Archive for Racism

Being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Conservative, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Media Bias with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

These 15 women prove that being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Michael Harriot, commentator for The Root,recently claimed that being a Black pro-life woman and seeking the protection of innocent Black babies in the womb is “rare.” But is it?

Harriott was writing in response to an interaction between Rep. Steve Cohen (D – Tenn.) and Star Parker, a pro-life Black woman, in which Cohen called Parker “ignorant” after she pointed out the devastation that abortion has wrought in the Black community.

Dem Congressman calls Black women Star Parker “ignorant”

“Since Roe v. Wade was legalized 20 million humans have been killed inside the womb of Black women. And then, on Halloween, Planned Parenthood tweets out that Black women are safest if they abort their child rather than bring it to term,” Parker said during a hearing on the Heartbeat Bill.

Planned Parenthood tweet tells Black women abortion is safer than birth

Parker also exposed the eugenic beliefs of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known eugenicist who once gave a speech before the Ku Klux Klan. She also compared the Dred Scott decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court declared that Black slaves in America were not citizens, to that of Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in the entire country (essentially declaring that preborn humans are not persons and have no standing as such under the law).

Watch the interaction below:

Shockingly, Michael Harriot, who is also Black, chose to criticize Parker for her comments rather than research her claims about Planned Parenthood’s eugenicist beginnings. Instead, Harriot discounted Parker and other Black pro-life women, claiming that they are “rare”:

Star Parker, founder of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and a community activist, was asked to testify before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice.

Hold up, I think I made a mistake in that previous paragraph. What I meant to type was: Star Parker was asked to testify before the House subcommittee because she is one of the rare black female Republican anti-abortion-rights activists. (No, I will not use the GOP marketing phrase “pro-life.” Who’s not for people living?)

Harriot then echoed Rep. Cohen’s derogatory remarks, saying, “People were shocked to hear him go after a black woman publicly like this, but here is the thing: She is kinda ignorant, though.” (Side note: Imagine for one moment what would happen if Parker were pro-choice and… oh, I don’t know… a white Republican male had called her “ignorant.” Media and social media — and likely Harriot himself — would explode with outrage.)

But Harriot’s claim about the rarity of pro-life Black females is simply wrong. The following Black pro-life women (in both the past and the present) are worth noting (and they weren’t all Republicans, Mr. Harriot):

1) Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and was co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee. She once stated:

I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxefrRccsbI

2) Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964 she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne quoted Hamer as calling abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition… there she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means  of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. “I didn’t come to talk about birth control,” she protested. “I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she “regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as being vehemently against abortion. “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders,” Hamer said. “Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Elaine Riddick

3) Elaine Riddick is a staunch pro-life advocate and vocal critic of Planned Parenthood. She was a victim of eugenic sterilization who led a successful crusade in North Carolina to gain reparations for the men and women (mostly Black) who were forcefully sterilized.

That NC eugenics program was supported by Margaret Sanger’s financier, Clarence Gamble, a director of Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood).

In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s state sterilization program, saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.

Research from North Carolina’s Winston-Salem Journal reveals a long history of abuses in that state’s sterilization program — abuses that Gamble consistently glossed over. According to the Journal, “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

Riddick testified before the North Carolina State Legislature about her experience, tearfully saying, “They cut me open like I was a hog.” She told lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment. Riddick’s horrific story was recounted in the documentary Maafa21, which chronicles the history of eugenics and the founding of Planned Parenthood:

4) Dr. Alveda King is the niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., and Director of Civil Rights for the Unborn for Priests for Life:

5) LaVern Tolbert is a former Board member of Planned Parenthood who now opposes their agenda:

7) Day Gardner is president of the National Black Pro-Life Union:

8) Judge Cheryl Allen is a Superior Court judge for the state of Pennsylvania. She has said, “Most people tend to believe that Planned Parenthood is in the African American Community to help, but they are not there to help, they are there to make abortion more accessible to black people….” (Source: Interview on His Place TV)

Judge Cheryl Lynn Allen

9) Rep. Mia Love is the first Black Republican female elected to the U.S. Congress from the state of Utah:

10)Barbara Howard is the Florida State chairwoman for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). She has stated,.  “Recently, some black preachers finally came out not against abortion per se, but merely against the location of Planned Parenthood centers in black communities. It seems the murder of blacks is only a consideration for black preachers or other leaders when they are killed by white or Hispanic cops…. So who will stop the cold-blooded murder of millions of unborn black children?”

Barbara Howard

11) Rep. June Franklin (D-Iowa) is the only African American representative in the Iowa legislature, and said in 1971, “Proponents… have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

Rep. June Franklin (image Maafa21)

12) Dr Ashley Harrell of Black People Against Abortion:

13) Catherine Davis is a founding member of the National Black Prolife Coalition:

14) Dr. Freda M. Bush is an OBGYN and president of the Medical Institute for Sexual Health:

15) Obianuju Ekeocha, founder and president of Culture of Life Africa:

All the Black pro-life women from both political parties would make an exceedingly long list — and the truth is that the pro-abortion media makes little effort to highlight them.

Tragically, the real “ignorance” here is not found in those who denounce abortion’s impact on the Black community. It is found among members of the media who imply that Black pro-life women are “rare.” It just simply is not true.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

GOP tax plan recognizes baby in the womb as a human being

Posted in Republican with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

| (From Live Action News)

The co-chair of the Congressional Pro-Choice Caucus has labeled a 529 college savings plan for an “unborn child” in the GOP tax plan a “back-door attempt to establish personhood from the moment of conception.” Congresswoman Diana DeGette (D-Colo.) criticized the wording in a November 2 press release, issued shortly after the plan was released by the House. The move follows a change by the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to define human life as ‘beginning at conception.’

According to Politico, the GOP tax bill “would allow expectant parents to start putting away money for college and private school tuition, wading into the battle over when human life begins.”

The proposal defines the ‘child in utero’ as, “a member of the species homo sapiens, at any stage of development” and reads:

UNBORN CHILDREN ALLOWED AS ACCOUNT BENEFICIARIES.—Section 529(e) is amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
‘‘(6) TREATMENT OF UNBORN CHILDREN.—
‘‘(A) IN GENERAL.—Nothing shall prevent an unborn child from being treated as a designated beneficiary or an individual under this section.
‘‘(B) UNBORN CHILD.—For purposes of this paragraph—
‘‘(i) IN GENERAL.—The term ‘unborn child’ means a child in utero.
‘‘(ii) CHILD IN UTERO.—The term ‘child in utero’ means a member of the species homo sapiens, at any stage of development, who is carried in the womb.’’

NBC pointed out that the bill’s terminology “mirrors a section of the 2004 Unborn Victims of Violence Act, which was enacted after the murder of Laci Peterson, who was pregnant.”

In response to the news, Paul McLeod, BuzzFeed reporter for Capitol Hill, tweeted, “I’m reading this as anti-abortion wedge. If an unborn child can be a beneficiary, that makes them a legal person, so how can they be killed?”

Paul McLeod Tweet on GOP Tax Bill Tweet

Following release of the bill, abortion advocates went ballistic.

Their fear is that if it can be established that the preborn child in the womb is a person, it could lead to overturning the infamous Roe v. Wade decision, which forced abortion on the nation.

NARAL on GOP Tax Bill Tweet

“On its own, I find it a despicable play to lay the groundwork for “personhood” bills and ending abortion rights,” Calla Hales, manager of A Preferred Woman abortion clinic in Charlotte, North Carolina told Bustle.

“Naturally, you’d expect me to say that as an abortion provider. As a tax paying citizen, I’ll frame it this way: Frankly, it’s fraud. A potential life cannot have assets. It cannot work, earn money, or open a bank account (or have one opened for it). … I find it logically impossible and incredibly unethical to fiscally account for a fetus,” Hales added.

Planned Parenthood, which gets over half a billion dollars a year from taxpayers, expressed its opposition to the move as well, telling CNN that defining a preborn child in the tax code would end up restricting access to abortion.

“It is absurd that House Republican leaders would use a tax bill to try to advance their agenda to undermine access to safe, legal abortion,” Dana Singiser, Vice President for Public Policy and Government Affairs at Planned Parenthood Action Fund told CNN.

Planned Parenthood, whose CEO was hired for her political organizing skills (not her health care experience, because she had none), has a record of Medicaid fraud, covering for child sexual predators, selling aborted baby parts, and chose Halloween to tweet an outrageous and eugenics-style message to the Black community that abortion is safer for women of color than childbirth. (Incidentally, Planned Parenthood’s founder was a known eugenicist who once gave a speech before the Ku Klux Klan.)

 

“Even in the tax reform debate, Republicans could not resist including offensive provisions to appease an extremist minority, ” Rep. DeGette wrote, “The tax code is no place to define what constitutes an ‘unborn child.’ What’s next, giving a Social Security number to a zygote?”

But Mallory Quigley, communications director for the pro-life Susan B. Anthony List, disagreed, telling NBC News that the measure is “a small increment in the momentum that we’re building to ensure that one day every child is welcomed and protected under the law. We hope that it stays in the House bill and that it stays in anything the Senate puts out.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Civil rights activist Dick Gregory: Abortion is Black ‘genocide’

Posted in Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Neighborhood, Black pro-life leaders, Civil Rights, Dick Gregory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2017 by saynsumthn

|  (From Live Action News)

via flickr

Comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory died August 19, 2017, and although he is best known for his humor, the satirist once called out government-funded abortion and birth control as a genocide effort targeting the Black community.

Gregory was the father of eleven children but tragically, one of his children died as an infant. He often used his humor to touch on the social ills of the day, and as a result, many white people attended his comedy events. He became a strong voice in the Black community during the tumultuous times of the 1960’s and 70’s during the African American civil rights struggle.

In 1967, Gregory joined more than 1,100 Black delegates for the First National Conference on Black Power where he along with others in the group adopted a black power manifesto that called for the “refusal to accept birth control programs on the basis that they seek to exterminate Negroes,” among other demands, according to a July 24, 1967, New York Times report obtained by Live Action News.

In the Journal of Social History, researcher Simone M. Caron described the view just after that conference saying, “The following year, the Third Annual National Conference on Black Power in Philadelphia called on all blacks to ‘resist the increasing genocidal tendencies of American society.’ Resistance ranged from a small California group called Efforts to Increase Our Size (EROS) to groups in Pittsburgh and Cleveland that protested Planned Parenthood programs to the ultramilitant group in New York known as the Five Percenters. These organizations asked two main questions: ‘Is birth control just a “white man’s plot” to “contain” the black population?’ and ‘Is it just another scheme to cut back on welfare aid or still another method of “keeping the black man down”?’ An editorial in The Thrust questioned why blacks could not get a free aspirin for a headache ‘yet when you’re a Black woman old enough to look sexy you can get a truck loaded down with control pills free. . . . The whole plot makes Hitler look like a Boy Scout.’”

The following year (1968) Gregory ran for president of the United States on the “peace and freedom” ticket calling the two-party system “corrupt and immoral.”

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine: Abortion is Genocide

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion is Genocide

Then, in 1971, Gregory penned a controversial Op-ed piece entitled, My Answer to Genocide, which was published in Ebony Magazine.

Gregory, like many other Black leaders of his day, believed that large families were important to the Black power struggle of their time. And, the civil rights activist perceived that the government might be attempting to limit the Black population through their funding of abortion and birth control.

This idea that abortion and birth control were plots to exterminate African Americans was not new.

In fact, there were many prominent African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, Samuel Yette, Fannie Lou Hamer, Whitney Young and more who were suspicious of government programs that pushed “family planning”, especially those that were placed within Black communities.

That suspicion appears to have had merit.

Research shows that family planning centers and abortion facilities often set up their locations in or near minority communities. In addition, the largest provider of abortions, Planned Parenthood, was founded by a radical advocate of racist eugenics who spoke with the Klu Klux Klan. And, Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go well beyond their founder Margaret Sanger, as Live Action has reported previously.

Today, with Planned Parenthood receiving half a billion in government dollars every year to promote their agenda, not only is the abortion corporation’s market share of abortions increasing, but nationally Black abortions are at frighteningly high levels as well.

In the Ebony article, Gregory begins by criticizing “planned parenthood groups” that call for people to only have 2.5 children.

He dismissed the terminology that claimed a preborn person was merely a fraction of a human to the way Blacks were described during slavery as “three-fifths” human:

My answer to genocide, quite simply is eight Black kids – and a another baby on the way […]

Now planned parenthood groups are saying that a couple should have a maximum of 2 1/2 children. I’m still trying to figure out that half a kid. I know my American history well enough to know what ‘three-fifths’ of a man is, but half-a-kid?

 

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion Genocide article

Gregory, who was born into a poor family, denounces birth control as something that “goes against Nature,” writing:

Can you believe that human beings are the only creatures who would ever consider developing birth control pills? You mention contraception to a gorilla and he will tear your head off.

Although Gregory’s humor is weaved throughout his piece, he is clear about the seriousness of genocide or as he also called it “subtle forms of genocide.” He said:

Genocide has come to mean, acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group as such; by killing members of the group […] imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group […]

Like many Black leaders today, Gregory pointed to a host of ills facing the Black community including police brutality, segregation, the KKK, poverty, and war. But of genocidal measures to “prevent births” within a group, Gregory wrote in Ebony:

There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.

In November of 1971, following the birth of Gregory’s ninth child, Jet Magazine pointed again to the civil rights leaders opposition to planned parenthood groups:

Dick Gregory opposed planned parenthood. Jet Magazine November 1971

At the time, Gregory’s colleague Jesse Jackson shared his views and decried abortion.

In 1971, during public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, the Rev. Jesse Jackson warned that, “Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove ( and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives, will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation[…]”

(Source: Statements at public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future as quoted in: Genocide? Birth Control and the Black American by Robert G. Weisbord, Greenwoor Press, 1972; P. 165)

In 1973, Jesse Jackson stated, “Abortion is genocide,in a Jet Magazine interview.

In that Jet Magazine, Mar 22, 1973, article Jackson added:

“Anything growing is living…If you got the thrill to set the baby in motion and you don’t have the will to protect it, you’re dishonest…You try to avoid reproducing sickness. You try to avoid reproducing deformities. But you don’t try to stop reproducing and procreating human life at its best. For who knows the cure for cancer won’t come out of some mind of some Black child?”

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

Jesse Jackson Dick Gregory oppose abortion Winnipeg Free Press 1975

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

According to the media outlet, the Black activists told the group that, “that the nation’s pro-abortion mentality undermines the value and dignity of every human life and that ‘killing babies’ is symptomatic of a civilization
and culture which operates without sacred absolutes.”

Upon news of Gregory’s death, CNN described his first-hand experience with injustice:

In a 1963 protest in which Gregory participated in Birmingham, Alabama, he was arrested and beaten by the police for championing the right of blacks to vote. After that incident, Gregory wrote, ‘It was just body pain, though. The Negro has a callus growing on his soul, and it’s getting harder and harder to hurt him there.’

Like a majority of dishonest media which support abortion, CNN failed to mention Gregory’s opposition to the horrific taking of human life in the womb.

But, stats do not lie, and sadly, reported abortion numbers in the Black and minority communities ring of a certain confirmation about the concerns Gregory and Jackson had.

As a result, the numbers of abortions performed on minorities and specifically Black women remain disproportionately high. As Live Action News has previously documented, in 2011, the CDC revealed that almost 56% of all abortions reported for race were committed on minority women.

 

The CDC’s 2012 report (dated November 27, 2015) reveals that 55% of abortions reported for race/ethnicity were performed on Black or Hispanic women.

The latest numbers for 2013 (published in 2016) show those numbers remained relatively the same (54.6%).

While Dick Gregory is rightly remembered for his many accomplishments, it is doubtful the news media will discuss how his suspicions about birth control and abortion proved to be true.

After all, if government-funded abortion and birth control are, in fact, genocide against Black community, then why does the media remain supportive of forced taxpayer dollars to such agendas?

And, more importantly, why does Congress continue to fund Planned Parenthood?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

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The foundation that just gave Planned Parenthood an award also funded its eugenics projects

Posted in American Birth Control League, Clarence Gamble, Eugenics, Lasker Award, Margaret Sanger, Negro Project, Planned Parenthood funded by rich elites with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

Since 1945, the Lasker Awards have been granted by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation to recognize “the contributions of scientists, physicians, and public servants who have made major advances in the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of human disease.” In a previous Live Action News report, Danny David detailed the reasons why the Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award to Planned Parenthood was based in anything but science.

But another piece of interesting information is this: Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s most infamous “Negro Project,” motivated by her belief in eugenics, was funded in part by none other than Albert Lasker.

In 1939, Sanger penned a letter to Clarence Gamble regarding her desire to use Black ministers in furthering her organization’s agenda, because, she said, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,” and if it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” This is the project that The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation chose to fund.

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Sanger not only founded Planned Parenthood, but met with members of the Ku Klux Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.”

In 1937, Mary Lasker, known then as Mary Woodward Reinhardt, was secretary of Sanger’s newly formed Birth Control Federation of America (BCFA).  According to Lasker’s website, Mary “made a donation to the American Birth Control League and subsequently joined its board.”

In 1939, Mary connected Sanger to her soon-to-be husband, Albert Lasker, to seek funding for Sanger’s “Negro Project.” He eventually gave Sanger $20,000.

To obtain the funds, Sanger, Reinhardt and Sanger’s secretary, Florence Rose, drafted a report on “Birth Control and the Negro,” skillfully using language that appealed both to eugenicists fearful of unchecked black fertility and to progressives committed to shepherding Black Americans into middle-class culture, according to New York University’s website for the Margaret Sanger Papers:

The report stated that “[N]egroes present the great problem of the South,” as they are the group with “the greatest economic, health and social problems,” and outlined a practical birth control program geared toward a population characterized as largely illiterate and that “still breed carelessly and disastrously,” a line borrowed from a June 1932 Birth Control Review article by W.E.B. DuBois. Armed with this paper, Reinhardt initiated contact between Sanger and Albert Lasker (soon to be Reinhardt’s husband), who pledged $20,000 starting in Nov. 1939. (“Birth Control and the Negro,” July 1939, Lasker Papers)

Then, in November of 1939, Sanger wrote to Albert Lasker requesting the funds, to “help” the Black community in the South “obtain birth control information.” Sanger also wrote, “If we can get the Negro universities and the Negro medical groups behind this project I think it will go over, I think, really big….”

LASKERS ACTIVE IN PLANNED PARENTHOOD 

Mary and Albert later married and their participation in Sanger’s organization continued after the initial “Negro Project” donation. By 1940, a committee to extend and develop the movement of “planned parenthood” was formed and consisted of nearly 1000 members, including Albert Lasker.

A New York Times article revealed that in February of that same year,  Albert donated $10,000 to the Planned Parenthood Committee.

Albert Lasker gives Planned Parenthood committee $10K

The following year (1941), the Laskers gave the Planned Parenthood Committee a total of $50,000 ($25,000 each from Mary and Albert), the largest donation the committee had received.

Interestingly, the Laskers established their foundation in 1942 — the same year that Sanger’s American Birth Control League changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

The Lasker Foundation website has even credited Albert Lasker as the one responsible for Planned Parenthood’s name:

Albert Lasker supported Sanger’s work as well, and he proposed a new name for her operation—one that better reflected its positive mission and that might ease its public acceptance. In 1942, his suggestion was accepted, and the organization became the Planned Parenthood Federation of America….

In 1943, another $50,000 was donated to Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) by Albert Lasker, according to the New York Times.

1943 Albert Lasker gives PPFA 50K

Mary Lasker continued her involvement with PPFA, and in 1945 was listed as a PPFA board member:

Mary Lasker Board of PPFA

As late as 1962, Mary Lasker was listed as honorary vice-chairman of Planned Parenthood’s World Population Emergency Campaign.

MARGARET SANGER AWARDED BY LASKER 

In 1950, the Lasker Award given by Planned Parenthood – World Population was granted to Margaret Sanger, one of the first women to receive a Lasker award. According to an October New York Times report, the award read:

“To Margaret Sanger foremost in teaching families wise planning in birth control: Leader in influencing nations towards balanced population; living to see her beginnings in city slums grow into plans for a planet.”

Sanger was unable to receive the award in person because she was speaking to delegates at a luncheon of PPFA’s 13th annual meeting. The New York Times reported that at that PPFA meeting, their founder was advocating “a national Government-sponsored program of sterilization of the feeble-minded and victims of transmissible, congenital diseases.”

Margaret Sanger Lasker sterility for feeble minded (image credit New York Times Oct 1950)

The “plan,” according to Sanger, was to “save innocent children from the cruelty of being born to such parents.”

Elaine Riddick was the victim of an identical eugenics project, funded by Clarence Gamble, and was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. In the video below, Riddick stands next to her son, Tony, speaking as a witness to this flawed ideology:

Many believe that Sanger’s “Negro Project,” along with her eugenics advocacy, were partly to blame for the attitude many had about Black births, and the Lasker Foundation was unquestionably a part of promoting this horrible and harmful view.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Merge ABCL with Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Ku Klux Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

The media seems to be doing an effective job of condemning many people who have an association with the Klu Klux Klan — but one exception to this seems to be Planned Parenthood’s “beloved” founder, Margaret Sanger. Margaret Sanger is usually described as a “birth control pioneer” who founded Planned Parenthood, but she also met with members of the Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.” Sanger wrote about her meeting with the Klan in her autobiography. Yet somehow this fact is made light of, glossed over, or completely ignored by the media.

On page 366 of her autobiography, Sanger described her meeting with the Klan, where she says she received additional invitations to speak with similar groups:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.

What about Sanger’s outspoken support for eugenics?

While some may not be entirely familiar with the meaning of “eugenics,” it’s likely that those same people have seen it in action in various ways. Coined in the mid 1800’s by Francis Galton, the cousin of Charles Darwin, eugenics was a popular movement to create a society in which those who were considered “superior” would reproduce… while those who were deemed “inferior” would be encouraged not to reproduce. Tragically, this movement was credited with forcefully sterilizing many men and women. The targets of these horrendous acts were disproportionately Black and poor, according to many reports.

Screenshot of PP honoring Sanger

Eugenics victim Elaine Riddick speaks in the video below about being “cut up like a hog,” thanks to the philosophy of eugenics. Riddick, like some other Black citizens, was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. Her tearful testimony encouraged state lawmakers to vote for reparations for those like her, who were eugenically sterilized.

So how does this relate to Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger? One of the prominent supporters of that horrific eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, and Gamble was a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

In Margaret Sanger’s “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” the Planned Parenthood founder links the goals of eugenics with her own goals of promoting birth control, writing (emphasis added):

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health. …While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfit… Eugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit….

Sanger called for unfit to be sent to farms (Image credit Maafa21)

Sanger was highly motivated to stop the procreation by those she deemed “unfit.” In a personal letter to Katharine Dexter McCormick in 1950, Sanger called for “a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people.”

But, Sanger added, “Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

In 1932, Sanger also called for those who were poor (and those she considered to be “morons and immoral”) to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called better “moral conduct.”  She specifically wanted to keep “immigration closed to the entrance of certain aliens whose condition is known to be detrimental to the stamina of the race.” (“A Plan for Peace,” by Margaret Sanger, published in Birth Control Review (BCR) April 1932, pp. 107-108)

Sanger was more than just a passive observer where eugenics was concerned; she was a member of the American Eugenics Society and even tried to unite her efforts and her publication with the eugenics movement.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

This image below captures a letter entitled, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” written by Sanger.  It was published in the June 1928 edition of her Birth Control Review and it details her meeting (page 188) with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney was the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society (AES) and Sanger published his writings in the Birth Control Review (BCR).

Of interest is that fact that, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him a letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization.

Margaret Sanger to Merge ABCL with Eugenics

Sanger merge w eugenics

The New York Times recorded Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement as well, in an April 1, 1925, article:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League [ABCL], said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis, rather than a eugenic ideal.

Another example where Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement can be seen is in this ABCL publication from 1935 (below), calling for a resolution that Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later became Planned Parenthood), “unite with the American Eugenics Society.”

Sanger resolution to merge BCR with Eugenics

Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization, as Live Action News has previously documented. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

PP’s Margaret Sanger Award

Since the 1960’s, Planned Parenthood has granted its infamous Margaret Sanger Award (calling it their top award) to people who benefit the organization’s cause.

Probably the most well-known recipient of the Margaret Sanger award in more recent times is Hillary Clinton, who said during her acceptance of the award that she “admired Margaret Sanger.” Republicans called her out for her comments, and Clinton responded by making disparaging remarks about Thomas Jefferson instead of repudiating Sanger’s push to eradicate the “unfit.” In the video below, Clinton pays homage to Sanger:

In 2014, then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accepted the Margaret Sanger award, despite Sanger’s clear support for a hideous eugenic philosophy and associations with the Klan. Pelosi referred to the largest abortion corporation in the nation as an “outstanding organization,” suggesting that Sanger’s philosophy paved the ideology behind Planned Parenthood: “Out of this philosophy and outlook emerged the spirit and driving force of what would become known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.” Pelosi added, “To be associated with the great Margaret Sanger is a distinct privilege.”

Nancy Pelosi gets award named after Klan speaker, Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood

In 2004, the founder of CNN, Ted Turner, received the Margaret Sanger Award. The “honor” was mentioned in Planned Parenthood’s 2004 annual report:

2004 Margaret Sanger award to CNN Founder Ted Turner

Today, Planned Parenthood will defend their founder by pointing to civil rights giants like Martin Luther King, Jr., who also received the Margaret Sanger award. But the full picture and agenda of Sanger and her Planned Parenthood organization were not obvious to many in the Black community at that time, including MLK.

However, despite the suspicious timing of the award to MLK, many Black leaders have since spoken against the birth control and family planning agenda of Planned Parenthood, even calling abortion a form of “black genocide.”

Given this information and much more, when will the media demand recipients of this hideous award return it to Planned Parenthood? And, even more important, when will Congress cut ties with Planned Parenthood and stop sending them half a billion in tax dollars every year?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Yes, Planned Parenthood’s founder spoke to the Klan – but the photo is a fake

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in Arkansas, Hilda Cornish, Klan, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Maggie Awards, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

With the topic of America’s history in racism once again a focus in the news, a fake image of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger speaking to the Klu Klux Klan has been circulating online. While the image is not real, what is quite real is the fact that Sanger, a proponent of eugenics, spoke to a meeting of the women’s branch of KKK in 1926.

The event took place in Silver Lake, New Jersey, and Sanger described in it in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Sanger called that event “one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.”

That being said, the image below, which purports to show Sanger giving that speech before her adoring Klan supporters is not authentic. The image was part of a blogger’s photo contest.

Photo of Margaret Sanger W/ KKK is fake

Sanger and Klan image was part of blog photo contest in 2005 — it is not authentic.

The Sanger/Klan fake was published by the “Margaret Sanger Blog Spot” which held an annual photo contest because, in the blog’s words, “The Big Abortion Industry still holds Margaret Sanger out as an icon. Artwork is one more important ways to promote the truth about Margaret Sanger.”

The blog’s instructions for the contest were to “commemorate Sanger at the Klan rally in unique artistic ways,” including “modern interpretations of Sanger speaking to the Klan.”

But Sanger’s views were so outrageous in and of themselves that there is no need to circulate inaccurate depictions, which could lead to attempts to discredit her meeting with the Klan altogether.

Sanger has a very controversial history as an enthusiastic proponent of eugenics and a member of the American Eugenics Society. This philosophy not only fed her work within the Planned Parenthood movement, but her lesser known advocacy of euthanasia as well. The organizations Sanger founded, such as The American Birth Control League (ABCL) and later, Planned Parenthood, also have ties to many eugenics proponents.

Clarence Cook Little

Clarence C. Little

One of those connections was a man by the name of Clarence Cook Little.

According to a biographical memoir published by the National Academy of Sciences, Little held various distinguished positions. He was the president of the University of Maine and of the University of Michigan, and he was the managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

He was named the director of The Jackson Laboratory and later accepted a position as scientific director of the Tobacco Industrial Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sadly, Little was also president and founding member of The American Eugenics Society, as well as a board member of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. He was also the Birth Control Federation President, and sat on the previously mentioned American Euthanasia Society board.

Little was also listed on the 1938 Committee for Planned Parenthood.

CC Little ties to Eugenics and Sanger’s ABCL

Little has since been denounced by some in modern society who have called for his name to be removed from the University of Michigan’s science building for his belief in eugenics. An op-ed penned by the daughter of an interracial couple and a student at the University of Michigan published last year by MTV.com shows the disdain for Little:

There is a building (and a bus stop) on the University of Michigan campus named for Clarence Cook (C.C.) Little. He was the University’s president in 1925, and an outspoken “scientific” racist and eugenicist, who believed that “inferior” races should undergo involuntary sterilization. I often sat at the bus stop bearing his name while I waited to go to class. Little would have hated that.

Despite the merit of these denouncements, few have expressed concern over Little’s ties to Planned Parenthood’s history.

Hilda Cornish

Another interesting eugenics connection to both Sanger and Planned Parenthood is a woman by the name of Hilda Kahlert Cornish. Hilda Cornish chaired the Arkansas Eugenics Association. According to a 1986 article in an Arkansas newspaper, Cornish received much of her counsel directly from Margaret Sanger. In fact, the Blytheville Courier Press notes that the sons of the two leaders were roommates at Yale University.

The documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21 (clipped below) details disturbing connections the Arkansas Eugenics Association had to Planned Parenthood:

The film states:

From its beginning, Planned Parenthood always had powerful ties to the American Eugenics community. In fact, in many places they were often one in the same.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.

Later, the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Documents obtained by Live Action News confirm this fact.

A 1945 Planned Parenthood directory reveals that Mrs. Edward Cornish was the director of the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas. Cornish was active with the Democrat Party and married to banker Edward Cornish, according to Arkansas historians.

She is also listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

According to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas:

In the summer of 1930, [Cornish] met Margaret Sanger… The two developed a friendship maintained by correspondence and occasional meetings. During that summer, Cornish visited Sanger’s Clinical Research Bureau in New York, and she launched the Arkansas birth control movement later that same year.

At Cornish’s initiative, a group of physicians, business and religious leaders, and women active in civic work formed the Arkansas Eugenics Association (AEA)…. In early 1931, the association opened the Little Rock Birth Control Clinic in the basement of Baptist Hospital…. Cornish also worked with the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control.

The online historical site added that in 1942, The Arkansas Eugenics Association changed its name… to the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas.

Segregated Clinics

Authors of the bookHidden Histories of Women in the New South, noted that the “first report of the Arkansas Eugenics Association stated that the Little Rock clinic registered 161 White women during its first eleven months of service.”

The book concludes that Cornish was more aligned with promoting birth control than the national eugenics movement. (That being said, Sanger herself wanted to merge her publications with the national eugenics organization.)

The book‘s authors reveal that the clinic “directed its efforts towards poor women only,” yet they imply a prejudice against Blacks by writing that “African American women were not invited to the [Arkansas Eugenics] clinic from its start in 1931.”

www.AbortionProcedures.com click here for facts on abortion

The authors add that “until 1937, only white women actually had the opportunity to receive services” and the organization “held separate hours for white and African American women.” The book also notes that “most of [the American Birth Control League’s] clinics were segregated.” The ABCL later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s beloved founder Margaret Sanger reached out to many people who saw Blacks as less than equal, and this includes the Klan and the Eugenics movement.

Today, many believe that Sanger’s racist ideologies have penetrated much of her work. And even without an image to document Sanger’s speech before the Klan, Planned Parenthood knows her history, as revealed in her own autobiography.

Instead of repudiating Sanger, taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood honors her as a hero, naming their most prestigious award after her. It’s despicable.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Racist Margaret Sanger praised by Planned Parenthood as Heroine

Posted in Hillary clinton, Margaret Sanger with tags , , , , , , on April 15, 2016 by saynsumthn

Racist Margaret Sanger praised by Planned Parenthood

Accolades to the racist founder of Planned Parenthood have been published by the organizations Colorado Affiliate. According to a Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains (PPRM) 2008 annual report, the organization wants you to think of them [Planned Parenthood] when you think of Sanger, writing “We Are Planned Parenthood” and calling Margaret Sanger a “Heroine.”

    Planned Parenthood is rooted in the courage and tenacity of American women and men willing to fight for women’s health, rights, and equality. Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood’s founder, is one of the movement’s great heroines. Sanger’s early efforts remain the hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission to:

    Provide contraception and other health services to women and men;

    Fund research on birth control and educate specialists and the public about the results;

    Advance access to family planning in the United States and around the world.

    Women’s progress in recent decades — in education, in the workplace, in political and economic power — can be directly linked to Sanger’s crusade for women’s reproductive freedom.

And again here.

Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Racist Heroine

Well…the largest chain of abortion clinics which targets minority communities for abortion left out a tiny detail about this alleged heroine:

SHE WAS A RACIST MEMBER OF THE EUGENICS MOVEMENT.

Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger, was a member in good standing with the racist American Eugenics Society. Sanger had board members who were known for their racist writings and Sanger published many of those in her publications.

EugenicsBoardSanger

Planned Parenthood was also steeped in eugenics and to this day their top award is called the Margaret Sanger Award, despite the fact that Sanger was an admitted Klan speaker.

Margaret Sanger and Autobiography

This is what Sanger wrote in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366 Read it here https://ia802607.us.archive.org/1/items/margaretsangerau1938sang/margaretsangerau1938sang.pdf)

Sanger Autobiography Klan Speech
This blog has documented those views many times, so I will not go over them one by one here. If you want more information, I recommend the film, Maafa21 for documentation on Sanger’s beliefs.

But, interestingly, Planned Parenthood is not alone.

Hillary Clinton admires Margaret Sanger

Hillary Clinton has also praised the racist founder – read about that here.

http://static.c-span.org/assets/swf/CSPANPlayer.1434395986.swf?clipid=4471554

http://www.c-span.org/video/standalone/?c4471554