Archive for the Eugenics Category

Former Planned Parenthood president: forced birth control would be ‘desirable’

Posted in American Eugenics Society, Eugenics, Guttmacher, Population Control with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2017 by saynsumthn

A former Planned Parenthood president and vice president of the American Eugenics Society once advocated that if families did not limit births to just two children, then compulsory methods of population control could be necessary.  The idea, proposed by Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, a well-known eugenicist and one-time president of Planned Parenthood who established the Guttmacher Institute, came on the heels of radical proposals by Planned Parenthood board members and others that immediate compulsory means should be used to curtail population growth.

In 1970, Guttmacher addressed a group concerned about the so-called “population explosion.” Lee McCall, a reporter for the Sarasota Herald Tribune, attended the conference and noted that Guttmacher, as president of Planned Parenthood World Population “for the past eight years,” was invited to speak under the sponsorship of Planned Parenthood of Sarasota County, Inc.

McCall spoke with Guttmacher about “discussions” that had been floating around to limit children within families to “2 or 3.”

McCall wrote:

There has been discussion of limiting families to 2.2 children.

Dr. Guttmacher feels it inadvisable for Planned Parenthood to boldly vocalize such a plan.

‘It would be difficult,’ he said, ‘In the first place it would probably split the organization. Also we would have trouble with minority groups accepting this.’

Despite his apparent hesitancy towards coercion, McCall goes on to quote Guttmacher as admitting that such a “plan” of compulsory population control would be “desirable.”

“So even though the plan may be desirable and would make us a stronger nation, a less polluted nation, I feel it would be strategically unwise at this time,” the former Planned Parenthood president told the reporter.

Keep in mind, this is the very organization which allegedly claims it was founded on freedom of choice. And Guttmacher was attempting to dispel the theory that abortion and birth control were racist efforts of genocide aimed to limit the birth rate of the Black community.

Racism seen as denting Birth Control 1966

This admission was profound and came shortly after the New York Times attempted to paint Guttmacher as a wanting “volunteer” birth control measures only.

In its 1969 article entitled, “Dr. Guttmacher is the Evangelist of Birth Control,” the New York Times was forced to acknowledge that many leaders sitting on Planned Parenthood’s board were in favor of coercive measures of population control. While painting the picture of an agency which was pushing birth control on the “ghetto” rather than the “middle-class” who were having more than the optimal amount of children, the paper noted that a “sizable” number of Planned Parenthood’s board was made up of “preponderantly white and well-to-do” people. They then quoted a Planned Parenthood board member who admitted the racist attitude of the organization, when he stated:

What it all comes down to is that we want the poor to stop breeding while we retain our freedom to have large families. It’s strictly a class point of view.

However, despite the majority of Planned Parenthood’s board holding a “class” point of view regarding who should be “encouraged” to use contraception, if Guttmacher was for “voluntary measures” of population control, compulsory measures were never ruled out.  Because, as the Planned Parenthood president saw it, if “voluntary measures” did not work, then force would be necessary.

This point of view can clearly be seen in a 1969 article from Medical World News Reports, in which Guttmacher floated the possibility that coercion could be used. His shocking statement was published by the Sarasota Herald Tribune where it quoted Guttmacher as suggesting that, “Each country will have to decide its own form of coercion, and determine when and how it should be employed.”

Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

The following year (1970) Guttmacher told an audience at New Mexico State University that, “[…] if by 1990, the population is still growing at a rate of 2% then we must go to some kind of compulsory birth control.” (emphasis added).

Earlier in 1966, Guttmacher compared the world population with the threat of nuclear war and told the Washington Post that governments may have to act officially to limit families saying, “It may be taken out of the voluntary category.”

In his 1959 book, “Babies by Choice or By Chance”, Guttmacher described the atomic bomb as “more merciless to our generation” and “more kinder to future generations” than “the explosion of the population bomb.” He bemoaned the fact that death rates were lowering, while birth rates were on the rise, writing, “Therefore if we want to decelerate the rate of population growth, it must be done by conception control.”

Babies by Choice or By Chance, by Alan F Guttmacher

This idea of temporary volunteerism was also noted by author Angela Franks, who wrote in her book, “Margaret Sanger’s Eugenic Legacy: The Control of Female Fertility”, that, “in the late 1960’s, Guttmacher put a limit on volunteerism: if we don’t see a population decline by 1980, he said, ‘we’ll have to get tough.’”

The fact is that Guttmacher’s ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. After all, they were both members of the very racist American Eugenics Society, with Guttmacher serving as the group’s vice-president. As Live Action News has documented in the past, Sanger made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics.

But, rarely reported by contemporary media is the fact that Sanger once suggested that parents should be required to have a “license” to even be allowed to have children at all.

License to Breed Margaret Sanger

In her “A License for Mothers to Have Babies” with the subtitle, “A code to stop the overproduction of children.” Sanger outlined her plan article by article, which read in part (emphasis mine):

A marriage license shall in itself give husband and wife only the right to a common household and not the right to parenthood.

Article 4. No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood.

Article 5. Permits for parenthood shall be issued upon application by city, county, or State authorities to married couples , providing the parents are financially able to support the expected child, have the qualifications needed for proper rearing of the child, have no transmissible diseases, and on the woman’s part, no medical indication that maternity is likely to result in death or permanent injury to health.

Article 6No permit for parenthood shall be valid for more than one birth.

While Sanger’s plan may have been viewed as extreme in her day, and the idea of coercion may have been chided as evoking a potential backlash against Planned Parenthood, my colleague, Kelli wisely observed that the “two-child idea” advocated by Guttmacher was just as eugenic. In a recent Live Action News report, Kelli noted that the, “[…] view of ‘two children and no more’ has its roots in the eugenics movement, and at the heart of the eugenics movement lies Planned Parenthood. Margaret Sanger and her friends advocated population control for the ‘unfit’, while today’s eugenicists tend to couch their beliefs about family size in terms of environmental concerns.

Despite that fact that Guttmacher and Sanger were both (as eugenicists) concerned that the world population was a threat, it was under Guttmacher’s leadership that Planned Parenthood first vocalized abortion as part of the answer to “over-population.”

He noted this approval in the 1970 interview where he stated:

If we could get the abortion law liberalized, most of the 750,000 unwanted pregnancies would not lead to babies – rejected children, battered baby syndrome and illegal abortions.

And, in that same year, Guttmacher admitted to a 1970 Cornell Symposium, (according to an April 7, 1970 article published by the Cedar Rapids Gazette), that although he did not know when life began, he believed that “unlimited abortion” was the only way to reduce population growth saying:

There is no question that the most effective way of reducing population growth is by unlimited abortion.

Today, Alan Guttmacher is painted by some as a hero of “reproductive rights” despite his promotion of coerced population control and abortion.  And, Guttmacher was correct about one thing, and that is that abortion has been an effective tool in the limitation of births. This was recently acknowledged by pro-abortion Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who said, “I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”

It is no surprise that Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.  After all, on their website, his Institute describes Guttmacher by saying, “No one was better able to unite the Planned Parenthood organization or summon it to carry out its historic mission.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

The foundation that just gave Planned Parenthood an award also funded its eugenics projects

Posted in American Birth Control League, Clarence Gamble, Eugenics, Lasker Award, Margaret Sanger, Negro Project, Planned Parenthood funded by rich elites with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

Since 1945, the Lasker Awards have been granted by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation to recognize “the contributions of scientists, physicians, and public servants who have made major advances in the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of human disease.” In a previous Live Action News report, Danny David detailed the reasons why the Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award to Planned Parenthood was based in anything but science.

But another piece of interesting information is this: Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s most infamous “Negro Project,” motivated by her belief in eugenics, was funded in part by none other than Albert Lasker.

In 1939, Sanger penned a letter to Clarence Gamble regarding her desire to use Black ministers in furthering her organization’s agenda, because, she said, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,” and if it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” This is the project that The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation chose to fund.

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Sanger not only founded Planned Parenthood, but met with members of the Ku Klux Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.”

In 1937, Mary Lasker, known then as Mary Woodward Reinhardt, was secretary of Sanger’s newly formed Birth Control Federation of America (BCFA).  According to Lasker’s website, Mary “made a donation to the American Birth Control League and subsequently joined its board.”

In 1939, Mary connected Sanger to her soon-to-be husband, Albert Lasker, to seek funding for Sanger’s “Negro Project.” He eventually gave Sanger $20,000.

To obtain the funds, Sanger, Reinhardt and Sanger’s secretary, Florence Rose, drafted a report on “Birth Control and the Negro,” skillfully using language that appealed both to eugenicists fearful of unchecked black fertility and to progressives committed to shepherding Black Americans into middle-class culture, according to New York University’s website for the Margaret Sanger Papers:

The report stated that “[N]egroes present the great problem of the South,” as they are the group with “the greatest economic, health and social problems,” and outlined a practical birth control program geared toward a population characterized as largely illiterate and that “still breed carelessly and disastrously,” a line borrowed from a June 1932 Birth Control Review article by W.E.B. DuBois. Armed with this paper, Reinhardt initiated contact between Sanger and Albert Lasker (soon to be Reinhardt’s husband), who pledged $20,000 starting in Nov. 1939. (“Birth Control and the Negro,” July 1939, Lasker Papers)

Then, in November of 1939, Sanger wrote to Albert Lasker requesting the funds, to “help” the Black community in the South “obtain birth control information.” Sanger also wrote, “If we can get the Negro universities and the Negro medical groups behind this project I think it will go over, I think, really big….”

LASKERS ACTIVE IN PLANNED PARENTHOOD 

Mary and Albert later married and their participation in Sanger’s organization continued after the initial “Negro Project” donation. By 1940, a committee to extend and develop the movement of “planned parenthood” was formed and consisted of nearly 1000 members, including Albert Lasker.

A New York Times article revealed that in February of that same year,  Albert donated $10,000 to the Planned Parenthood Committee.

Albert Lasker gives Planned Parenthood committee $10K

The following year (1941), the Laskers gave the Planned Parenthood Committee a total of $50,000 ($25,000 each from Mary and Albert), the largest donation the committee had received.

Interestingly, the Laskers established their foundation in 1942 — the same year that Sanger’s American Birth Control League changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

The Lasker Foundation website has even credited Albert Lasker as the one responsible for Planned Parenthood’s name:

Albert Lasker supported Sanger’s work as well, and he proposed a new name for her operation—one that better reflected its positive mission and that might ease its public acceptance. In 1942, his suggestion was accepted, and the organization became the Planned Parenthood Federation of America….

In 1943, another $50,000 was donated to Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) by Albert Lasker, according to the New York Times.

1943 Albert Lasker gives PPFA 50K

Mary Lasker continued her involvement with PPFA, and in 1945 was listed as a PPFA board member:

Mary Lasker Board of PPFA

As late as 1962, Mary Lasker was listed as honorary vice-chairman of Planned Parenthood’s World Population Emergency Campaign.

MARGARET SANGER AWARDED BY LASKER 

In 1950, the Lasker Award given by Planned Parenthood – World Population was granted to Margaret Sanger, one of the first women to receive a Lasker award. According to an October New York Times report, the award read:

“To Margaret Sanger foremost in teaching families wise planning in birth control: Leader in influencing nations towards balanced population; living to see her beginnings in city slums grow into plans for a planet.”

Sanger was unable to receive the award in person because she was speaking to delegates at a luncheon of PPFA’s 13th annual meeting. The New York Times reported that at that PPFA meeting, their founder was advocating “a national Government-sponsored program of sterilization of the feeble-minded and victims of transmissible, congenital diseases.”

Margaret Sanger Lasker sterility for feeble minded (image credit New York Times Oct 1950)

The “plan,” according to Sanger, was to “save innocent children from the cruelty of being born to such parents.”

Elaine Riddick was the victim of an identical eugenics project, funded by Clarence Gamble, and was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. In the video below, Riddick stands next to her son, Tony, speaking as a witness to this flawed ideology:

Many believe that Sanger’s “Negro Project,” along with her eugenics advocacy, were partly to blame for the attitude many had about Black births, and the Lasker Foundation was unquestionably a part of promoting this horrible and harmful view.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Merge ABCL with Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Ku Klux Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

The media seems to be doing an effective job of condemning many people who have an association with the Klu Klux Klan — but one exception to this seems to be Planned Parenthood’s “beloved” founder, Margaret Sanger. Margaret Sanger is usually described as a “birth control pioneer” who founded Planned Parenthood, but she also met with members of the Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.” Sanger wrote about her meeting with the Klan in her autobiography. Yet somehow this fact is made light of, glossed over, or completely ignored by the media.

On page 366 of her autobiography, Sanger described her meeting with the Klan, where she says she received additional invitations to speak with similar groups:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.

What about Sanger’s outspoken support for eugenics?

While some may not be entirely familiar with the meaning of “eugenics,” it’s likely that those same people have seen it in action in various ways. Coined in the mid 1800’s by Francis Galton, the cousin of Charles Darwin, eugenics was a popular movement to create a society in which those who were considered “superior” would reproduce… while those who were deemed “inferior” would be encouraged not to reproduce. Tragically, this movement was credited with forcefully sterilizing many men and women. The targets of these horrendous acts were disproportionately Black and poor, according to many reports.

Screenshot of PP honoring Sanger

Eugenics victim Elaine Riddick speaks in the video below about being “cut up like a hog,” thanks to the philosophy of eugenics. Riddick, like some other Black citizens, was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. Her tearful testimony encouraged state lawmakers to vote for reparations for those like her, who were eugenically sterilized.

So how does this relate to Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger? One of the prominent supporters of that horrific eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, and Gamble was a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

In Margaret Sanger’s “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” the Planned Parenthood founder links the goals of eugenics with her own goals of promoting birth control, writing (emphasis added):

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health. …While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfit… Eugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit….

Sanger called for unfit to be sent to farms (Image credit Maafa21)

Sanger was highly motivated to stop the procreation by those she deemed “unfit.” In a personal letter to Katharine Dexter McCormick in 1950, Sanger called for “a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people.”

But, Sanger added, “Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

In 1932, Sanger also called for those who were poor (and those she considered to be “morons and immoral”) to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called better “moral conduct.”  She specifically wanted to keep “immigration closed to the entrance of certain aliens whose condition is known to be detrimental to the stamina of the race.” (“A Plan for Peace,” by Margaret Sanger, published in Birth Control Review (BCR) April 1932, pp. 107-108)

Sanger was more than just a passive observer where eugenics was concerned; she was a member of the American Eugenics Society and even tried to unite her efforts and her publication with the eugenics movement.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

This image below captures a letter entitled, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” written by Sanger.  It was published in the June 1928 edition of her Birth Control Review and it details her meeting (page 188) with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney was the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society (AES) and Sanger published his writings in the Birth Control Review (BCR).

Of interest is that fact that, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him a letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization.

Margaret Sanger to Merge ABCL with Eugenics

Sanger merge w eugenics

The New York Times recorded Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement as well, in an April 1, 1925, article:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League [ABCL], said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis, rather than a eugenic ideal.

Another example where Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement can be seen is in this ABCL publication from 1935 (below), calling for a resolution that Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later became Planned Parenthood), “unite with the American Eugenics Society.”

Sanger resolution to merge BCR with Eugenics

Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization, as Live Action News has previously documented. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

PP’s Margaret Sanger Award

Since the 1960’s, Planned Parenthood has granted its infamous Margaret Sanger Award (calling it their top award) to people who benefit the organization’s cause.

Probably the most well-known recipient of the Margaret Sanger award in more recent times is Hillary Clinton, who said during her acceptance of the award that she “admired Margaret Sanger.” Republicans called her out for her comments, and Clinton responded by making disparaging remarks about Thomas Jefferson instead of repudiating Sanger’s push to eradicate the “unfit.” In the video below, Clinton pays homage to Sanger:

In 2014, then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accepted the Margaret Sanger award, despite Sanger’s clear support for a hideous eugenic philosophy and associations with the Klan. Pelosi referred to the largest abortion corporation in the nation as an “outstanding organization,” suggesting that Sanger’s philosophy paved the ideology behind Planned Parenthood: “Out of this philosophy and outlook emerged the spirit and driving force of what would become known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.” Pelosi added, “To be associated with the great Margaret Sanger is a distinct privilege.”

Nancy Pelosi gets award named after Klan speaker, Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood

In 2004, the founder of CNN, Ted Turner, received the Margaret Sanger Award. The “honor” was mentioned in Planned Parenthood’s 2004 annual report:

2004 Margaret Sanger award to CNN Founder Ted Turner

Today, Planned Parenthood will defend their founder by pointing to civil rights giants like Martin Luther King, Jr., who also received the Margaret Sanger award. But the full picture and agenda of Sanger and her Planned Parenthood organization were not obvious to many in the Black community at that time, including MLK.

However, despite the suspicious timing of the award to MLK, many Black leaders have since spoken against the birth control and family planning agenda of Planned Parenthood, even calling abortion a form of “black genocide.”

Given this information and much more, when will the media demand recipients of this hideous award return it to Planned Parenthood? And, even more important, when will Congress cut ties with Planned Parenthood and stop sending them half a billion in tax dollars every year?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Yes, Planned Parenthood’s founder spoke to the Klan – but the photo is a fake

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in Arkansas, Hilda Cornish, Klan, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Maggie Awards, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

With the topic of America’s history in racism once again a focus in the news, a fake image of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger speaking to the Klu Klux Klan has been circulating online. While the image is not real, what is quite real is the fact that Sanger, a proponent of eugenics, spoke to a meeting of the women’s branch of KKK in 1926.

The event took place in Silver Lake, New Jersey, and Sanger described in it in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Sanger called that event “one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.”

That being said, the image below, which purports to show Sanger giving that speech before her adoring Klan supporters is not authentic. The image was part of a blogger’s photo contest.

Photo of Margaret Sanger W/ KKK is fake

Sanger and Klan image was part of blog photo contest in 2005 — it is not authentic.

The Sanger/Klan fake was published by the “Margaret Sanger Blog Spot” which held an annual photo contest because, in the blog’s words, “The Big Abortion Industry still holds Margaret Sanger out as an icon. Artwork is one more important ways to promote the truth about Margaret Sanger.”

The blog’s instructions for the contest were to “commemorate Sanger at the Klan rally in unique artistic ways,” including “modern interpretations of Sanger speaking to the Klan.”

But Sanger’s views were so outrageous in and of themselves that there is no need to circulate inaccurate depictions, which could lead to attempts to discredit her meeting with the Klan altogether.

Sanger has a very controversial history as an enthusiastic proponent of eugenics and a member of the American Eugenics Society. This philosophy not only fed her work within the Planned Parenthood movement, but her lesser known advocacy of euthanasia as well. The organizations Sanger founded, such as The American Birth Control League (ABCL) and later, Planned Parenthood, also have ties to many eugenics proponents.

Clarence Cook Little

Clarence C. Little

One of those connections was a man by the name of Clarence Cook Little.

According to a biographical memoir published by the National Academy of Sciences, Little held various distinguished positions. He was the president of the University of Maine and of the University of Michigan, and he was the managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

He was named the director of The Jackson Laboratory and later accepted a position as scientific director of the Tobacco Industrial Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sadly, Little was also president and founding member of The American Eugenics Society, as well as a board member of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. He was also the Birth Control Federation President, and sat on the previously mentioned American Euthanasia Society board.

Little was also listed on the 1938 Committee for Planned Parenthood.

CC Little ties to Eugenics and Sanger’s ABCL

Little has since been denounced by some in modern society who have called for his name to be removed from the University of Michigan’s science building for his belief in eugenics. An op-ed penned by the daughter of an interracial couple and a student at the University of Michigan published last year by MTV.com shows the disdain for Little:

There is a building (and a bus stop) on the University of Michigan campus named for Clarence Cook (C.C.) Little. He was the University’s president in 1925, and an outspoken “scientific” racist and eugenicist, who believed that “inferior” races should undergo involuntary sterilization. I often sat at the bus stop bearing his name while I waited to go to class. Little would have hated that.

Despite the merit of these denouncements, few have expressed concern over Little’s ties to Planned Parenthood’s history.

Hilda Cornish

Another interesting eugenics connection to both Sanger and Planned Parenthood is a woman by the name of Hilda Kahlert Cornish. Hilda Cornish chaired the Arkansas Eugenics Association. According to a 1986 article in an Arkansas newspaper, Cornish received much of her counsel directly from Margaret Sanger. In fact, the Blytheville Courier Press notes that the sons of the two leaders were roommates at Yale University.

The documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21 (clipped below) details disturbing connections the Arkansas Eugenics Association had to Planned Parenthood:

The film states:

From its beginning, Planned Parenthood always had powerful ties to the American Eugenics community. In fact, in many places they were often one in the same.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.

Later, the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Documents obtained by Live Action News confirm this fact.

A 1945 Planned Parenthood directory reveals that Mrs. Edward Cornish was the director of the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas. Cornish was active with the Democrat Party and married to banker Edward Cornish, according to Arkansas historians.

She is also listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

According to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas:

In the summer of 1930, [Cornish] met Margaret Sanger… The two developed a friendship maintained by correspondence and occasional meetings. During that summer, Cornish visited Sanger’s Clinical Research Bureau in New York, and she launched the Arkansas birth control movement later that same year.

At Cornish’s initiative, a group of physicians, business and religious leaders, and women active in civic work formed the Arkansas Eugenics Association (AEA)…. In early 1931, the association opened the Little Rock Birth Control Clinic in the basement of Baptist Hospital…. Cornish also worked with the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control.

The online historical site added that in 1942, The Arkansas Eugenics Association changed its name… to the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas.

Segregated Clinics

Authors of the bookHidden Histories of Women in the New South, noted that the “first report of the Arkansas Eugenics Association stated that the Little Rock clinic registered 161 White women during its first eleven months of service.”

The book concludes that Cornish was more aligned with promoting birth control than the national eugenics movement. (That being said, Sanger herself wanted to merge her publications with the national eugenics organization.)

The book‘s authors reveal that the clinic “directed its efforts towards poor women only,” yet they imply a prejudice against Blacks by writing that “African American women were not invited to the [Arkansas Eugenics] clinic from its start in 1931.”

www.AbortionProcedures.com click here for facts on abortion

The authors add that “until 1937, only white women actually had the opportunity to receive services” and the organization “held separate hours for white and African American women.” The book also notes that “most of [the American Birth Control League’s] clinics were segregated.” The ABCL later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s beloved founder Margaret Sanger reached out to many people who saw Blacks as less than equal, and this includes the Klan and the Eugenics movement.

Today, many believe that Sanger’s racist ideologies have penetrated much of her work. And even without an image to document Sanger’s speech before the Klan, Planned Parenthood knows her history, as revealed in her own autobiography.

Instead of repudiating Sanger, taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood honors her as a hero, naming their most prestigious award after her. It’s despicable.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go far beyond Margaret Sanger

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics Quarterly, Eugenics Review, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by saynsumthn

From Live Action News

One of the more frustrating things pro-lifers hear from abortion supporters is the claim that Planned Parenthood has never been about eugenics. It is simply intellectually dishonest as well as a total denial of history to make such a claim. Such was the case recently when MSNBC’s Joy Reid defended Planned Parenthood and cut off a guest who criticized Hillary Clinton because she once admitted that she admired Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger

According to author George Grant in his book Grand Illusions: The Legacy of Planned Parenthood:

[Sanger] began to build the work of the American Birth Control League, and ultimately, of Planned Parenthood. Margaret relied heavily on the men, women, ideas, and resources of the Eugenics movement. Virtually all of the organization’s board members were Eugenicists. Financing for the early projects from the opening of the birth control clinics to the publishing of the revolutionary literature – came from Eugenicists. The speakers at the conferences, the authors of the literature and the providers of the services were almost without exception avid Eugenicists. And the international work of Planned Parenthood were originally housed in the offices of the Eugenics Society while the organizations themselves were institutionally intertwined for years.

Sanger was an avowed eugenicist and a member of the American Eugenics Society, and she also proudly spoke to the Ku Klux Klan, something she described in her autobiography…

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger writes about her speech with the Klan

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger writes about her speech with the Klan

But, as abortion supporters who view Sanger as a heroine often do, they make the claim that Sanger is dead and therefore we are to simply ignore her Klan interactions, eugenics connections, rants about immigrants, push for forced sterilization and her failed goal of merging with the Eugenics Society.

Today, we are told that Sanger was a product of her day and that her attempt to have the “unfit” sterilized, the “feebleminded” shipped off, or her radical suggestion that couples be forced to get a permit from the state to have children (she wrote“No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood“) had no lasting impact on the organization she founded, namely, Planned Parenthood.

The fact is that despite the claims of their supporters, not only does Planned Parenthood have a connection to eugenics separate from their founder, but many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. The following is a very abbreviated list of examples:

Henry P. Fairchild was vice president of Planned Parenthood and (surprise!) he was also a past president of the American Eugenics Society. According to the American Sociological Association, “One of Fairchild’s most famous contributions was the development of the Planned Parenthood of America Federation, called the Birth Control Federation of America until 1942. There he served on the Board of Directors in 1932 and later the Vice President from 1939-1948.”

Samuel W. Anderson was a member of the American Eugenics Society and served on Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s Board of Directors.

CP Blacker was Secretary to the Eugenics Society and Vice Chairman of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).

Mrs. Dorothy Brush was involved with the American Eugenics Society as well as the International Planned Parenthood Federation. In 1948, The Brush Foundation provided seed money to help establish the International Committee on Planned Parenthood (ICPP). In 1952, the organization opened its headquarters in London, England.

C. Lalor Burdick was a member of the American Eugenics Society and served on the Board of Directors for Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) and PPFA’s World Population Emergency Campaign.

Arkansas Eugenics Assoc. becomes state Planned Parenthood affiliate. (Image screen from Maafa21)

Arkansas Eugenics Society becomes state Planned Parenthood affiliate. (Image screen from Maafa21)

Mrs. Edward (Hilda) Cornish was not only a member of the American Eugenics Society, she was also an officer of the Arkansas Eugenics Association (later the Arkansas Eugenics Association, which would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood). Despite her direct connection to eugenics organizations, Cornish was named Arkansas Planned Parenthood’s executive director.

Robert L. Dickinson was a Vice President of Planned Parenthood and served on their Board of Directors. However, his eugenics ties were as deep as Sanger’s. In fact, he was a member of the American Eugenics Society as well as a committee chairman for Eugenics Research Associationevent.

Dr. Haven Emerson was on the Board of Directors for the American Eugenics Society and served as a Chairman of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Emerson was also a member of their National Medical Council.

In addition to those who officially served as leaders of Planned Parenthood who had direct ties to eugenics (too many to name here), there were others who were accepted with open arms despite their eugenics history.

Professor Frank Lorimer was part of the Eugenics Research Association and served on the editorial board of the Eugenics Quartlerly. Despite his eugenics connections, he represented the Planned Parenthood Federation of America at various meetings.

Dr. Charles F. Dight was the president of the Minnesota Eugenics Society when he wrote a letter to Adolf Hitler in 1933, wishing him success in “stamping out mental inferiority among the German people,” noting the Nazi leader’s efforts would “advance the eugenics movement in other nations as well as in Germany.”

In the 1930s, Dight joined the Minnesota Birth Control League, the forerunner of Planned Parenthood of Minnesota.

Charles F Dight letter to Hitler ( Image from document provided by the Minnesota Historical Society)

Charles F Dight letter to Hitler ( Image from document provided by the Minnesota Historical Society)

Frederic Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

Planned Parenthood invites Eugenics officer to speak to their lunch

Planned Parenthood invites Eugenics officer to speak to their lunch

In 1958, Planned Parenthood was still cozy with eugenics leaders. In the article pictured right, we learn that the Director of the American Eugenics Society, Robert Carter Cook, was invited by Planned Parenthood to speak at their lunch in 1958.

In addition to Planned Parenthood leaders who had connections to eugenics, the International Committee on Planned Parenthood (ICPP) maintained by PPFA among others, received free rent from the Eugenics Society, according to the Eugenics Review. ICPP was replaced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) in 1952.

Does this sound like an organization that wanted to distance themselves from eugenics?

Wait… there’s more.

From their Review (and repeated here):

In conclusion, a unanimous vote of thanks was moved to the Eugenics Society, which has continued during the past year to make available, rent free, accommodation to the International Committee on Planned Parenthood.

This was confirmed by former Planned Parenthood chairman CP Blacker MD, who told an audience at the Fourth Conference at the International Planned Parenthood Federation in 1964, that while he was secretary of the Eugenics Society they gave Planned Parenthood office accommodations rent free.

Let’s stop and consider the intentional blindness to truth that Joy Reid and others would have to have to claim that Planned Parenthood is not a eugenic organization. The fact is that Planned Parenthood was so supportive of the evil eugenics ideology that they advertised in eugenics journals. For Reid and others who doubt this fact, I provide some examples below (notice that their goals and beliefs go far beyond “reproductive rights”):

1968:

1968 advertisement by Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

1968 advertisement by Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

The Eugenics Society’s honorary secretary even encouraged funding IPPF, saying, “The Society’s activities in crypto-eugenics should be pursued vigorously, and specifically that the Society should increase its monetary support of the FPA and the IPPF [International Planned Parenthood Federation]…”

1963:

1963 Advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review Quarterly

1963 Advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review Quarterly

1961:

1961 advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

1961 advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

In summary, it is evident that from its inception, Sanger founded and nurtured Planned Parenthood in eugenics — and denying what is plain to see will never change that fact.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Jonathan Gruber: abortion reduces welfare, crime, and black births

Posted in Abortion and Crime, Black Birth Rates, Eugenics, Gruber with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 26, 2015 by saynsumthn

ObamaCare architect, Jonathan Gruber has been removed from the Massachusetts Health Connector Board after calling the American people stupid.

The MIT economist professor was involved in the construction of ObamaCare visiting the White House on several occasions and has also made several controversial statements linking abortion to eugenics, the reduction of welfare, crime, and black births.

A look at the White House visitor logs reveals that Gruber was a regular at the Obama White House.

Jonathan Gruber WH Logs Large

Jonathan Gruber WH Logs

( Details on Subject Titles here)

Jonathan Gruber CSPAN Hearings Dec 9 2014

While apologizing for his insulting statements to the American people Gruber was also grilled on controversial eugenics like statements he made on abortion, referring to the poor as “marginal children” and calling for “positive selection.”

Grubers abortion paper creepy eugenics

In Gruber’s 1998 paper, “Abortion legalization and child living circumstances who was the marginal child,” he concludes that the legalization of abortion saved the government fourteen billion dollars in welfare payments.

Gruber ab saves billions

In 2006, Gruber authored another paper with Phillip B. Levine, Elizabeth Oltmans Ananat, and Douglas Staiger called, Abortion and Selection, where they again use terms like “marginal child” and “positive selection through abortion.”

Abortion and Selection Jonathan Gruber

Two earlier papers investigated the implications of such positive selection through abortion for the quality of cohorts born after abortion legalization. Gruber, Levine and Staiger (GLS, 1999) found that the legalization of abortion led to significant improvements in the circumstances of children born into cohorts where abortion was legal. Such cohorts of children lived in households with lower rates of single motherhood, welfare receipt and poverty, and experienced lower infant mortality than nearby cohorts of children. Donohue and Levitt (DL, 2001) focused on a relevant outcome for children at older ages and young adults, crime.1 They found that increased use of abortion in the 1970s resulted in lower crime rates among the cohorts born in that era when those cohorts were in their late teens and early 20s,” the paper reads.

Abortions decrease birth rates in Non-White women:

In a 1999 paper published by the American Journal of Public Health Phillip B. Levine, Douglas Staigei; (both co-authors with Gruber on his paper) along with Thomas J. Kane and David J. Zimnmerman, entitled, Roe v Wade and American Fertility, the group points out that when abortions are made legal, fertility rates drop with a reduction in births of teens and non-White women to be the largest.

Phillip B Levine Roe v Wade and American Fertility

Estimates show that births to non-White women in repeal states (vs states with no law change) fell by 12% just following repeal, more than 3 times the effect on White women’s fertility,” that paper states.

Effect of abortion on Black births

The group also concluded that there was an important connection between the fall of birth rates in states where abortion was accessible vs. states where it was not, “The results indicate that travel between states to obtain abortions was important. Births in repeal states fell by almost 11% relative to births in nonrepeal states more than 750 miles away but only by 4.5% relative to births in states less than 250 miles away and those in states between 250 and 750 miles away,” the authors write.

Effect of abortion birth rates distance

Interestingly, the paper thanks Jonathan Gruber for providing research assistance, “We thank Jonathan Gruber for comments and Eileen Aguila, David Autor, and Tara Gustafson for outstanding research assistance.”

Abortion decreases welfare

Back to his paper, Abortion and Selection, Gruber repeats the oft heard eugenics reason for abortion, that it reduces welfare.

Gruber and his fellow authors sandwiched their analysis this way, “We found consistent evidence that changes in cohort composition that occurred in the 1970s that can be attributed to greater abortion access led to improved cohort outcomes, particularly in the form of higher rates of college graduation, lower rates of single motherhood, and lower rates of welfare receipt.”

Abortion reduces crime

Gruber and the other authors also conclude among other things that the there is a link between increased abortion access and a reduction of crime.

That theory was perpetuated by John J. Donahue and and Steven D. Levitt in a paper they wrote entitled, “The impact of legalized abortion on crime.

According to Life News, in Harvard University’s Quarterly Journal of Economics, Donahue and Levitt concluded that “Legalized abortion contributed significantly to recent crime reductions. … Legalized abortion appears to account for as much as 50 percent of the recent drop in crime.” The authors noted, “Crime began to fall roughly 18 years after abortion legalization,” and that the social benefit of this decrease in crime is about $30 billion annually.

Donohue and Levitt wrote that, since 1991 ― 18 years after Roe v. Wade legalized abortion ― murder rates have fallen faster than at any time since the end of Prohibition in 1933. They added that the five states that legalized abortion earlier than 1973 [New York, California, Washington, Hawaii and Alaska] also experienced earlier declines in crime. Finally, they found that states with especially high abortion rates in the 1970s and 1980s had equally dramatic crime reductions in the 1990s, Life News reported.

Levitt went on to co-author the 2005 bestseller Freakonomics, in which he reiterated his thesis that the legalization of abortion is responsible for half of the recent drop in violent crime.

freakonomics

Gruber and the others acknowledged Levitt and Donahue’s findings, “Finally, we reconsidered the analysis of abortion and crime originally conducted by Donohue and Levitt to incorporate our updated methodological framework. The results of this analysis support the association between abortion and crime, but suggest that it is difficult to associate their finding with selection as opposed to the direct effect of cohort size.”

Unwanted children are disadvantaged

Gruber’s group finally concludes that “unwanted children” will grow up “disadvantaged” writing, “Most importantly, taken together with earlier results (Gruber, et al., 1999), our findings suggest that the improved living circumstances experienced by the average child born after the legalization of abortion had a lasting impact on the lifelong prospects of these children. Children who were “born unwanted” prior to the legalization of abortion not only grew up in more disadvantaged households, but they also grew up to be more disadvantaged as adults…Overall, our results provide further evidence that abortion is associated with differential selection and its impact is persistent.”

So, if Gruber and his friends can conclude that the fertility rates among “Non-White” women drop substantially when abortion is legal and then claim that a reduction in crime also follows legalized abortion- what subtle messages are they implying?

Since it’s inception, we know that abortion has been a tool for the eugenics movement and we also know clearly – just who- that movement seeks to target.

I may not be an MIT economist, but, I can do the math here – and so can you.

Texas abortion doctor says its great that 98% of babies he aborted were from Hispanic mothers

Posted in Abortionist, Eugenics, Eugenics by State, Hispanic, Hispanic Abortion Stats, Texas Abortion, Texas abortion clinics with tags , , , , , , , , on September 12, 2014 by saynsumthn

White doctor, Lester Minto who performs abortions in Texas has admitted that he aborts primarily Hispanic babies.

For 35 years I had a clinic where I saw women and took care of their reproductive needs, but mostly terminating pregnancies,” Dr. Lester Minto says.

Lester Minto

Ninety-eight percent were Hispanics,”Minto told NPR radio, “I would go days where I wouldn’t speak English because they were all Spanish speakers — which is great.

Minto, who says he averaged more than 4000 each year, admits that he has had emergencies related to his abortions. Two of his patients have had to go to the hospital, he says.

Reproductive Services Harlingen

According to the most recent stats, 64 percent of babies aborted in Texas were Black or Hispanic.

24.9% of babies aborted in Texas were Black.

38.7% of babies aborted in Texas were Hispanic.

TEXAS 2010 Abortion Stats REAL 2010

The stats, published by the CDC , reports that there were 76,778 total abortions performed in Texas in 2010.

23,548 (or 30.7 percent) were non-Hispanic white babies, 19,139 (or 24.9 percent) were non-Hispanic black babies, 29,771 (or 38.8 percent) were Hispanic babies, and 4,320 (or 5.6 percent) were babies of other races or ethnicity.

That is an increase from the CDC Abortion Surveillance report published on Nov. 23, 2012.

The CDC Abortion Surveillance Report dated November 29, 2013 also reveals that in 2010, 56.7% of abortions reported to the CDC nationwide were done on Hispanic and Black women.

CDC 2010 Black Hispanic Abortions TOTAL

According to the Report there were 415,479 abortions for known ethnicity reported for selected states in 2010. 153,045 (or 36.8 percent) were non-Hispanic white babies, 148,261 (or 35.7 percent) were non-Hispanic black babies, 87,240 (or 21.0 percent) were Hispanic babies, and 26,933 (or 6.5 percent) were babies of other races or ethnicity.

Abortion Eugenics Racism

The report reveals that a majority of Black or Hispanic babies were aborted in many states:

• 73.3% of babies aborted in Mississippi were Black or Hispanic

• 73.2 % of babies #aborted in Georgia were Black or Hispanic

• 64.8% of babies aborted in DC were Black or Hispanic

• 61.4% of babies aborted in Alabama were Black or Hispanic

• 55.9% of babies aborted in New Jersey were Black or Hispanic

• 55.6% of babies aborted in Virginia were Black or Hispanic

• 54.1% of babies aborted in Tennessee were Black or Hispanic

• 54.3% of babies aborted in Delaware were Black or Hispanic

• 45.7 % of babies aborted in South Carolina were Black or Hispanic

• 43.5% of babies aborted in Missouri were Black or Hispanic

• 42.6% of babies aborted in Ohio were Black or Hispanic

• 41.6% of babies aborted in Arkansas were Black or Hispanic

RacialTargeting

A Texas pro-life organization says that abortion clinics are strategically located in minority communities. The group, Life Dynamics, Inc. has published a report using zip code analysis to document their claims.

Mark Crutcher, president of Life Dynamics, who wrote the report, said that he believes abortion is about eugenics, and his research proves this claim, “This confirms what we have said all along, that abortion is not about woman’s rights or reproductive freedom it is simply about eugenics. We not only documented the eugenic targeting of minorities in our film, Maafa21 but also in a report we published in 2011. Research we produced for our report, Racial Profiling by Planned Parenthood and the American Abortion Lobby, clearly shows that a majority of family planning centers market abortion to minorities by locating their centers in minority communities.”

Maafa21 DVD NEW WEBSITE

Crutcher continues, “Maafa21 cites a study conducted by three American university researchers into the criteria used to decide the placement of U.S. population control facilities. Their finding was that the primary consideration in making this determination is not poverty but the percentage of blacks in the area. Historically, the population control movement’s eugenic efforts have been primarily focused on the African-American community and that was the underlying theme of Maafa 21. In our most recent research, however, we have seen unmistakable evidence that the family planning establishment is also ratcheting up its efforts to deal with the Hispanic population.

Life Dynamics identified 116 ZIP codes nationwide with more than one population control facility. Of those, 84 were disproportionately black and/or Hispanic.

Crutcher’s report revealed that in Texas alone, 94 zip codes showed either an abortion facility or a Planned Parenthood abortion-referral clinic located there and 72 percent of the zip codes have populations that are disproportionately black and/or Hispanic.

Racial-Targeting-tx-pp

Racial-Targeting-tx-nonpp(1)

You can read the entire report here.