Archive for Eugenics

Planned Parenthood joins left-wing groups, some linked to George Soros, to spend $30 million on elections

Posted in George Soros, Planned Parenthood Election Fraud, Planned Parenthood PAC, Planned Parenthood Votes with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2018 by saynsumthn

Group seeking to ‘win justice’ for people of color joins with group aborting them

By  |  Via LiveActionNews.org

people of color protesting

Planned Parenthood, with its deep ties to the eugenics movement, is behind yet another attempt to reach people of color. According to an April 2018 USA Today article, “Planned Parenthood Votes, Center for Community Change Action, Color Of Change PAC and the Service Employees International Union are behind the ‘Win Justice’ program….” What USA Today doesn’t say is that pro-abortion billionaire George Soros is the one funding “Win Justice” — which the IRS shows was set up in March — to the tune of $3 million dollars. A March 2018 search at the FEC website revealed Soros was the only contributor at that time. What’s more, as of the writing of this article, reports show funds have not been spent on specific campaigns. Rather, the money received by “Win Justice” is going to Planned Parenthood.

 

Image: Win Justice Planned Parenthood Soros MoneyThe “Win Justice” effort was announced in April and includes a $30 million investment in a joint political campaign. According to CNN, Planned Parenthood’s share of those dollars is $20 million.

Since April, additional donations trickled in — some from Soros family members and $1 million from the SEIU. The July 2018 report shows “Win Justice” disbursed $301,000 to Planned Parenthood Votes.

Image: Planned Parenthood Votes letter to FEC 2010

Planned Parenthood Votes letter to FEC 2010

 

Image: Win Justice gives contributions to Planned Parenthood PAC July 2018 FEC

Win Justice gives contributions to Planned Parenthood PAC July 2018 FEC

Image: Win Justice gives contributions to Planned Parenthood PAC July 2018 FEC

Win Justice gives contributions to Planned Parenthood PAC July 2018 FEC

SEIU’s involvement is no mystery. The SEIU is a major funder of left-wing organizations and is well-known for promoting abortion. Former Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards’ husband, Kirk Adams, has held several leadership positions at this powerful union.

But it certainly seems counterintuitive for groups supposedly concerned with minorities to join ranks with an organization steeped in eugenics — an ideology that manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. From the documentary Maafa21:

Planned Parenthood’s roots in eugenics date back to their founder Margaret Sanger, who was a member of the American Eugenics Society, and who was an invited speaker to members of the Ku Klux Klan. As Live Action News previously reported, many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion might be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit.”

Image: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK from Maafa21

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Color of Change (COC), launched in 2005, exists, according to its website, to build “a new, effective strategy for changing the rules society lives by, and ending the injustices Black people face.” Likewise, the Center for Community Change (CCC), founded during the civil rights struggles of the 1960’s, says on its website that it works “to build the power and capacity of low-income people, especially low-income people of color, to change their communities and public policies for the better.”

In 2017, Dorian Warren, CCC’s incoming president, attended Planned Parenthood‘s national conference.

Image: Dorian Warren leader of Center for Community Change attends 2017 Planned Parenthood conference

Dorian Warren leader of Center for Community Change attends 2017 Planned Parenthood conference

On the surface, CCC cloaks its abortion/Planned Parenthood agenda. Its 2018 “Path to Power” document says nothing about these issues, until you scroll near the end where they quote Cecile Richards (recently honored by CCC) for Planned Parenthood’s shared goals… to recruit people of color.

Image: Center for Community Change works with Planned Parenthood

Center for Community Change works with Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood and Margaret Sanger are well known for their recruitment of members of the Black community to promote a eugenics agenda. Sanger recruited Black ministers to her infamous “Negro Project,” while Planned Parenthood added Black leaders to its organization to counter suspicions of “Black genocide” in the 1960s and 70s.

Image: Former Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards honored by Center for Community Change

Former Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards honored by Center for Community Change

According to CCC’s 2017 annual report, money is flowing to CCC from a variety of left-wing organizations, many which have bankrolled the abortion industry for years, including Soros’ Open Society Foundation:

Image: Center for Community Change 2017 Annual Report collaborates with eugenics organizations

Center for Community Change 2017 Annual Report collaborates with eugenics organizations

 

Center for Community Change 2017 Annual Report collaborates with eugenics organizations

Color of Change was sought after by Open Society for its U.S. Programs Opportunities Fund (USP) because COC had “younger, social-media savvy African Americans.”

According to Open Society Board notes, “USP staff members have played active roles in providing consultative support and referrals to technical assistance, fostering connections to funding leads… organizing briefings, and engaging in conversations with grantees about how we can use our positioning and access to be a thoughtful and constructive partner, not just a funder.”

Open Society assisted COC to “aggressively help it raise resources, within USP and with other funders, so that it may stay on track with rapid expansion that now includes more than 900,000 online members and a 16 person staff.”

CCC was also funded by Open Society, as detailed in documents from 2013 and 2014.

Image: Center for Community Change and Planned Parenthood funded by Soros Open Society 2014

Center for Community Change and Planned Parenthood funded by Soros Open Society 2014

Tragically, instead of fighting for the civil rights of all people, including preborn persons in the womb, these Black community organizers are aiding Planned Parenthood, the largest abortion provider in the nation, in its unjust killing of minority children in the womb.

While change can be necessary, it should not come on the backs of innocent babies.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Alan Guttmacher (a man) pushed Planned Parenthood to perform abortions

Posted in Abortion History, Guttmacher, Illegal abortion, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood uses blacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2018 by saynsumthn

Past Planned Parenthood president instrumental in pushing to decriminalize abortion

This article is part of a series on the history of Planned Parenthood. Read parts one and two and four.

In reviewing the genesis of Planned Parenthood’s obsession with abortion, their founder Margaret Sanger’s views on forced sterilization and birth control, we’ve learned that it was actually under Alan F. Guttmacher’s presidency that abortion became part of Planned Parenthood’s mission. In the second part of this series, we gave some context to just how long Guttmacher had been pushing abortion prior to becoming a leader of Planned Parenthood. In part three, we will detail when Planned Parenthood publicly began to call for the legalization of abortion and began referring for the procedure.

In 1962, Guttmacher became president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) and shortly thereafter, he told a friend, “I have not had the fortitude” to present to PPFA the idea of promoting abortion. “I think I would have a tough time in getting them to take a stand” he said. Any open support for legal change, he said, according to author David J. Garrow, “is going to take a long time.”

In reality, it did not take long at all.

Image: Alan F Guttmacher

Alan F Guttmacher

Pushing the “health exceptions” and redefining “life of the mother”

Guttmacher had been an outspoken advocate of decriminalizing abortion for years, but he became especially obsessed with abortion while in New York, eventually serving (in 1968) on Governor Rockefeller’s commission to examine the abortion statute in the state and make recommendations for change. In comparing the abortion rate of New York hospitals, Guttmacher observed that more whites than minorities were having abortions, writing, “the ratio of therapeutic abortions per 1000 live births was 2.6 for whites, 0.5 for Negroes, and 0.1 for Puerto Ricans…. [D]iscrimination between ward and private patients and between ethnic groups served to aggravate my dissatisfaction with the status quo and led to my desire for the enactment of a new law.”

Image: Alan Guttmacher, 1973 (Image credit: WGBH)

Alan Guttmacher, 1973 (Image credit: WGBH)

Guttmacher was a Humanist who did not view the life of the child as equal to the woman. He can be credited with pushing the so-called “health exceptions” for abortion. “By defining ‘life’ to include mental well being… Guttmacher claimed that there were instances in which it was appropriate to protect a woman’s ‘life’ by taking the life of her fetus,” writes abortion historian Daniel K Williams:

“I don’t like killing,” Guttmacher stated in a public lecture in 1961.

“I don’t like to do abortions but as many of you probably fought in World War II and killed because you wanted to preserve something more important, I think a mother’s life is more important than a fetus.”

Guttmacher’s focus on abortion for health purposes might be attributed to his twin brother, Dr. Manfred Guttmacher, a psychiatrist who happened to be a member of the American Law Institute (A.L.I.). The two Guttmacher brothers were both activists in the first birth control clinic in Baltimore.

“I have great respect for the American Law Institute. My twin brother Manfred, also a physician, an authority on forensic psychiatry, is a member of this group. Because of our twinship, I was privileged to attend a closed meeting two years ago,”Guttmacher wrote in Babies by Choice or Chance, in 1961.

Image: Manfred Guttmacher US National Library of Medicine

Manfred Guttmacher (Image: US National Library of Medicine)

According to the University of Pennsylvania Law School, the ALI was founded in 1923 and was made up of a group of  judges, lawyers, and law professors, “to promote the clarification and simplification of the law and its better adaptation to social needs, to secure the better administration of justice and to encourage and carry on scholarly and scientific legal work.” It was the ALI’s Model Penal Code on abortion that was used in the infamous Roe v. Wade Supreme Court ruling that forced abortion on every state in the nation.

Guttmacher later described that closed meeting further in 1972:

 [O]n a Sunday afternoon in December, 1959 when Mr. Herbert Wechsler (Professor of Law at Columbia) unveiled his model abortion statute now called the A.L.I. bill. The recommended statute provided that a doctor would be permitted to perform an abortion:

(1) if continuation of pregnancy “would gravely impair the physical or mental health of the mother”;

(2) if the doctor believed “that the child would be born with grave physical or mental defects”; or

(3) if the pregnancy resulted from rape or incest.”

Image: article American Law Institute Model Penal Code on Abortion 1959

American Law Institute Model Penal Code on Abortion 1959

“The Wechsler abortion bill was passed by the Institute as part of the total revised penal code revealed to the public in 1962. Many, including myself, hailed it as the answer to the legal problems surrounding abortion, which had always been the doctors’ dilemma,”Guttmacher recounted, adding, “In 1967, Colorado, California, and North Carolina… and in 1968, Maryland and Georgia… all modified their respective statutes using the A.L.I. bill as the prototype.”

“Even though the A.L.I. Code had not yet been adopted by any state, its mere promulgation opened the medical profession’s eyes to the preservation of health as being a justification for abortion,” Guttmacher wrote.

The real reason for the abortion push: population control and eugenics

Guttmacher’s and Sanger’s views were very similar, as they were both vocal members of the eugenics community. Sanger once advocated that a woman should obtain a license to breed in order to have a child, while Guttmacher pushed the idea that “feeble-minded” and “unfit” persons should have abortions. He was, however, clever enough to say that these were to be voluntary measures, despite a history of force within the population control movement.

As author Donald T. Critchlow explained in his book, “Intended Consequences,” “Within Planned Parenthood… population control advocates found a prominent place. Thus, Planned Parenthood maintained its position of promoting birth control as a woman’s right, but it joined other groups in lobbying for family planning as a means of controlling the rate of population growth.”

Image: Babies by Choice or By Chance, by Alan F Guttmcher

Babies by Choice or By Chance, by Alan F Guttmcher

In his 1959 book, “Babies by Choice or by Chance,” Guttmacher writes:

It is my belief that it should be permissible to abort any pregnancy in which there is high likelihood of injury to the health of the mother, or one in which there is a strong probability of an abnormal or malformed infant. In addition, the quality of the parents must be taken into account. Feeble-mindedness, in the mother in particularly, and her ability to care for a child should be evaluated. Pregnancy occurring from proved rape, and pregnancy in a child less than sixteen serves no useful purpose. Further, chronic moral turpitude which unfits humans as parents, such as drug addiction or chronic alcoholism, if declared incurable, should furnish ground for pregnancy interruption.

On December 4, 1967, Guttmacher appeared on a panel at Harvard Law School to discuss which types of people Hospitals should approve for abortions. He admitted:

“… I would abort mothers already carrying three or more children…. I would abort women who desire abortion who are drug addicts or severe alcoholics…. I would abort women with sub-normal mentality incapable of providing satisfactory parental care…”(Source; “Abortion: The Issues”, Dr. Alan Guttmacher – President, Planned Parenthood, December 4, 1967, Harvard Law School Forum)

Lying about motives… and about illegal abortion deaths

Abortion was strategically pushed on the nation, as Live Action News has previously reported, through lies and deceptions on the numbers of women who died from illegal abortions. And yet, a 1967 article in the Harvard Crimson quoted Alan Guttmacher speaking at the Harvard Law School Forum, admitting that most abortions prior to legalization were performed by “reputable physicians” – something that was downplayed as advocates pushed legal abortion as being safer than illegal abortion:

Seventy per cent of the illegal abortions in the country are performed by reputable physicians, each thinking himself a knight in white armor.

At the same event, Guttmacher asked for liberalization of abortion laws, but according to a report published by the Harvard Crimson, not for outright repeal. He said, “To allow abortion on demand would relegate man to the status of the bull.”

The next year, in 1968, Guttmacher founded the Center for Family Planning Program Development, a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood, later renamed The Alan Guttmacher Institute. The organization, according to their website, was “originally housed within the corporate structure of Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA).” In a speech he made in July of 1969, Guttmacher acknowledged that funding for his Institute came from grants “from the Kellogg, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations as well as several other lesser  foundations.” Some of these same organizations had been funding eugenics for years.

Image: article headline on Guttmacher

Alan Guttmacher sees abortion as necessary 1968

In April 1969, Guttmacher suggested adding a clause to permit abortion in New York for any woman over 40 years of age, but it was voted down. He also believed that “abortion statutes should be entirely removed from the criminal code.”

“Family planning” not welcomed by minorities

Guttmacher called abortion “family planning,” and, in that same July 1969 speech, he pushed the decriminalization of abortion, saying, “It is time that we come to grips with two methods of family planning which we have a tendency to skip over in this country. One is abortion. I doubt that any of you is satisfied with the archaic, punitive, medieval law which now exists in your state and in mine which permits abortion to be done only to preserve the life of the mother. Almost all realize that liberalization of the abortion law is absolutely essential to permit the practice of good, honest medicine, not hypocritical medicine, but honest medicine. The question is how extensively should we liberalize the law.”

Image: article

Guttmacher calls abortion family planning 1969

The problem they had was that the very people which Sanger and her eugenics boards (and Guttmacher with his abortion advocacy push) targeted, the Black community, viewed birth control and abortion to be genocidal efforts to limit the growth of the Black race. And Planned Parenthood had noticed that their own minority patients had been on the decline. “Figures for ethnicity only go back to 1964 when 47% of the total patients were nonwhite. This dropped to 39% five years later in 1968,” Guttmacher stated.

Image: article Guttmacher speaks about Blacks in 1969

Guttmacher speaks about Blacks in 1969

Guttmacher acknowledged this in his speech:

“In addition, we must take full cognizance of the fact that our work among some militant minority groups is considered genocidal. They charge that what we are doing is not really trying to give a better family life to the less privileged segments of the community but trying to retard the numerical growth of ethnic minorities. This was first brought to my attention five or six years ago when I was lecturing at the University of California. For the first time in a long life I was picketed, and this fascinated me. I was picketed by a group called EROS, so I went down and chatted with the pickets who were very intelligent-looking black men. EROS means Endeavor to Raise Our Size…. They protested the work of PPWP as a form of genocide.”

Image: article Racism seen as denting Birth Control 1966

Racism seen as denting Birth Control 1966

Black suspicions ran even higher, when during a 1969 White House conference on food, nutrition and health, Guttmacher again unashamedly pushed for the decriminalization of abortion.

Fannie Lou Hamer

His statements, along with comments by others at the conference, were supposed to be aimed at helping the poor with food, but, instead, he was pushing population control. This alarmed Black activists like Fannie Lou Hamer, who, the night before the conference ended, issued a scathing attack on Guttmacher and others of like mind, according to a report filed on December 20, 1969, by the The Free Lance-Star. The paper quoted the noted civil rights activist as denouncing voluntary abortion, calling it “legalized murder,” making it clear that “she regards it as a part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the Black population of the United States.”

The paper then went on to defend Guttmacher’s eugenic motives as “humanitarian.”

Image: article

Media spins Black concerns about Guttmacher push for abortion

A January 28, 1966, internal memo from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe acknowledged that Planned Parenthood was aware of how the Black community viewed abortion. The memo outlined the plan for winning over the Black community, calling for a “Community Relations Program” to “form a liaison between Planned Parenthood and minority organizations.” The plan, according to Planned Parenthood, would emphasize that “all people have the opportunity to make their own choices,” rather than, as the memo states, exhortation telling them how many children they should have.”

Image: article Black community charges genocide from abortion

Black community charges genocide from abortion

One way to get the message out, according to the memo, is to “get assistance from black organizations like The Urban League and the AME church,” and to employ “more Negro staff members on PP-WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] and Affiliate’s staff, as well as recruit more Negro members for the National Board – at least 5.”

Planned Parenthood approves abortion advocacy

A few short years later, in 1968, Planned Parenthood did just that. Coincidentally, the move to add more Black board members came at the same time that the organization unanimously approved a policy recognizing abortion and sterilization as proper medical procedures.

According to the New York Times, “It called for liberalizing the criminal laws that prohibit them.”

Image: article Planned Parenthood uses Black man to push abortion (Image: New York Times 1968)

Planned Parenthood uses Black man to push abortion (Image: New York Times 1968)

At that same meeting, Planned Parenthood elected the first Black board chairman as the face to push this new abortion agenda — Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to the NYT, “pledged his support for the group’s program saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Guttmacher expressed pleasure that “the group had taken a positive stand on ‘the necessity to liberalize abortion and sterilization statutes,’” adding that abortion should never be used as birth control. The recommendation affirmed by the 100-member board had originated from Planned Parenthood’s medical advisory committee, which Guttmacher had been part of. That committee had held:

“[I]t was the right and responsibility if every woman to decide whether and when to have a child…

“The committee recommended the abolition of existing laws and criminal laws regarding abortion and the recognition that advice, counseling and referral constituted an integral part of medical care…It recommended also that Planned Parenthood centers offer appropriate information and referral,” the NYTs reported.

The board then took Guttmacher’s advice to stress “voluntarism” with regard to legalizing abortion as the best way to reduce population.

Image: Planned Parenthood first calls for legalizing abortion 1968 (Image: New York Times)

Planned Parenthood first calls for legalizing abortion 1968 (Image: New York Times)

Planned Parenthood first calls for legalizing abortion 1968 (Image: New York Times)

“After this plank was approved in 1969,” writes Larry Lader in “Abortion II,” “PP chapters soon started abortion referrals, and even clinics, as ‘an integral part of medical care.’”

Planned Parenthood refers for abortions 

In fact, by 1970, Planned Parenthood of New York had announced according to the New York Times, “a citywide abortion information and referral service would be in operation on July 1, when the state’s new abortion law takes effect. The service will advise women on abortions and refer them to doctors and hospitals willing and able to perform the operations.”

Image: Planned Parenthood announces they will be referring for abortion June 1970

Planned Parenthood announces they will be referring for abortion June 1970

That same year, Guttmacher added, “We look forward to the time when our clinics can be closed, when the government can fund enough money to serve the poor and research new birth control methods.”

In our next article in this series, we will discuss Planned Parenthood’s first abortion facility, which did not open until 1970, and will detail Alan Guttmacher’s role in the idea of stand-alone abortion facilities, revealing how abortion came to be seen as the ultimate method of population control.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Abortion survivor and Gospel singer Fred Hammond says ‘God had a plan’

Posted in Black Babies, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black pro-life leaders with tags , , , , on March 29, 2018 by saynsumthn
abortion survivor

In 2011, Grammy award-winning Gospel singer Fred Hammond shared his story as an abortion survivor on the Donnie McClurkin radio show. On her deathbed, Hammond’s mother revealed to him the truth of how she had attempted to have him aborted, not once, but twice.

Hammond was 47 years old when his mother finally told him the story and it has affected Hammond greatly.

“Here’s why I don’t have time to ‘play church’,” he said. “At the end of the day, when I was supposed to be discarded, and the tools came in to kill me, to crush my head or whatever you’re supposed to do, the Lord took His hand, pushed in there, and pushed me back out of the way. And they thought they got me. But at the end of the day, God had a plan for a broken situation.”

Hammond, who has sold over eight million albums, recalled how his mother told him through tears and with regret, that she had gone to the abortion facility to have an abortion.

“She said, ‘Fred, Fred was aborted.’ […] She said, ‘I went to the clinic and it was illegal to do it in the 50s and 60s, and I had you aborted. And I was supposed to go home and have a miscarriage and bring you back in a bag.’ […] She said, ‘I had it done, there was blood. I got up, I went home. Two days nothing, three days nothing.’ She decided to go back and said, ‘I don’t think it worked.’ And as she said, ‘I don’t think it worked’ they looked and said, ‘No, it’s still there, we’ll get it this time.’ And she says as she laid there, and they got the tools, she says she felt like God was going to kill her. She got up and ran out, putting her clothes on.”

READ: Meet four abortion survivors whose names you may not know

Hammond says that God saved him that day, and continues to save him when life gets rough. He says he will continue to do what God has chosen him to do and will do it to the best of his ability.

“This is not just another artist who has another gift,” said McClurkin. “This is literally someone whom God has safeguarded from his inception. A lot of things that people think are a mistake wind out to be used by God in great ways.”

The video of Hammond’s testimony as an abortion survivor has been viewed over 250,000 times and proves that all lives are a gift even when the pregnancy is unplanned.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Abortion biz Planned Parenthood: Everyone has right to lead life free from violence

Posted in Planned Parenthood Gun Violence with tags , , , , , , , , on March 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Ironic: Planned Parenthood, the nation’s largest killer of children, denounces gun violence

planned parenthood tweet

On Saturday, during the March for Our Lives, sponsored by many activist organizations including Planned Parenthood, the nation’s most profitable killer of children tweeted out some terribly ironic statements about the value of life. While the organization has done things like this in the past, the group’s tweet under the #MarchForOurLives hashtag is astonishingly blind:

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Everyone has the right to lead a life that is healthy & free from violence. We fight for interconnected issues that affect our patients & communities, including repro health, gun violence prevention, immigration, & racial justice. We’re proud to join today’s .

 

Live Action president and founder Lila Rose responded:

Your abortionists violently tore apart 900 children today, some of them old enough to survive outside the womb. All were helpless.

You took money from parents who were scared and struggling and sold violence and death as a solution to their struggles. https://twitter.com/ppfa/status/977553171307487236  

“96 lives”… vs. almost 900

“Everyone has the right to lead a life that is healthy & free from violence,” the Planned Parenthood tweet reads. And the graphic accompanying the tweet reads in part, “I fight to #EndGunViolence because gun violence claims 96 lives every day in the U.S.” Why, one would almost think that Planned Parenthood actually fought for the right of human beings to live!

But it doesn’t.

In fact, Planned Parenthood’s own statistics show that it kills nearly ten times as many human beings on a daily basis as this tweet says are claimed by gun violence in the same span of time. Live Action News previously noted, “in 2016, Planned Parenthood reported ending the lives of 321,384 preborn children (down from more than 328,000 the previous year), maintaining the organization’s nearly 35 percent nationwide market share of abortions.” That means Planned Parenthood killed around 881 human beings every day, on average.

881 versus 96.

While the death of any human being is tragic, Planned Parenthood’s hypocrisy is showing here. An organization killing ten times the amount of people every day — violently, I might add — really has no right to lament such a loss of life. And yes, these children in the womb are people. They’re human. Scientifically, they can be nothing other than human. Not “almost human.” Not “subhuman.” They’re 100 percent humanfrom the moment of conception. Anyone who argues differently is peddling pro-abortion philosophy, not science.

“Black lives matter”?

“Because Black lives matter,” Planned Parenthood said in the graphic displayed with its tweet. Are we supposed to believe this statement, coming from such an organization?

“Black lives matter” to an organization that was founded by a eugenicist who spoke to the Ku Klux Klan by invitation, who recruited the most racisteugenically-minded board members she could find, whose philosophies actually led to the compulsory sterilization of Black women? (The organization still gives out awards in their eugenicist founder’s name, by the way.)

“Black lives matter” to an organization who was caught on tape happily accepting money to abort Black babies, specifically?

“Black lives matter” to an organization which pushed birth control so heavily to the Black population that multiple Black leaders rose up against it with cries of Black genocide — and in response, the organization recruited Black board members to quell suspicions?

“Black lives matter” to an organization which appears to target the Black community for abortion? Live Action News previously reported:

Planned Parenthood’s targeting of minorities isn’t just happening in New York City. Protecting Black Life has a map showing that, nationwide, Planned Parenthood facilities are in minority-concentrated areas, affecting communities as far removed from New York City as Wichita, Kansas, where last year, as Live Action News reported, Planned Parenthood raised its abortion prices.

Students for Life of America president Kristan Hawkins also noted, “79% of [Planned Parenthood’s] surgical abortion facilities are located within walking distance of African American or Hispanic/Latino neighborhoods.”

No, actions speak louder than words. And Planned Parenthood has killed too many Black babies to pretend that their lives matter.

“50 women are shot to death by intimate partners,” but what about women dying from abortion?

For those of us who know that Planned Parenthood is an organization which routinely returns women to their abusers after their abortions, and which ignores women who die from legal abortion, and which seems to ignore the fact that pregnant women are more at risk for death by homicide than any other cause, sharing this statistic seems like an exercise in selective outrage. Even WebMD acknowledges the disturbing trend of the homicide of pregnant women, writing:

… [W]omen actually are more likely to be murdered than to die from any complications of pregnancy — or from any other cause for that matter.

“We found that homicide was the leading cause of death among women who were pregnant … and accounted for 20% of deaths among that group, compared with 6% of deaths among nonpregnant women of reproductive age,” says author Isabelle Horon, DrPH, from the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, who conducted a study that looked at pregnancy-associated deaths from 1993 to 1998.

And again, why doesn’t Planned Parenthood ever point out how many women die from legal abortion, including at their hands? Why ignore the fact that abortion kills women, too? Or maybe those women just aren’t as important — or at least, not important to the organization’s narrative.

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fliveaction%2Fvideos%2F10156061246558728%2F&show_text=0&width=560

If Planned Parenthood were truly concerned about violence against women, and against “everyone,” as it claims in its head-scratcher of a tweet, then it would stop perpetuating it against women and their babies.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News

More from PP on gun violence March for our Lives in DC here.

Black women never demanded right to abortion says woman who decried it as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks protest abortionn with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 27, 2018 by saynsumthn

Remembering Dr. Dolores Grier, pro-life activist who decried abortion as Black genocide

Image: Dr. Delores Grier

The Catholic and pro-life communities are mourning the death of Dr. Dolores Bernadette Grier, an advocate for life and a gracious Black leader in the New York archdiocese, who passed away on February 22, 2018 — her birthday. As a Black pro-life activist, Dr. Grier founded the Association of Black Catholics Against Abortion and served on the board of the African American Society Against Abortion. She was outspoken about abortion’s impact on the Black community.

Dr. Grier’s voice in defense of life will be missed, but we in the pro-life community are grateful for the legacy she has left behind. A Funeral Mass will be offered at Dr. Grier’s parish church, St. Charles Borromeo in Harlem, on Wednesday, March 7 at 11 a.m.

Image: Delores Grier

Delores Grier

In 1989, Dr. Grier joined a group of pro-life women, including, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and the first woman employed as a general surgeon at Boston University Medical Center, for a press conference picked up by C-SPAN. Dr. Grier began her speech by calling abortion racism:

We do believe that more than anything else, abortion is racism. It is a way of pruning, if you will, the Black population…. In 1973, shortly after civil rights struggles – when there were more benefits for the Black people, all of a sudden we were given this free, free thing from the society of America: abortion. 78 percent of your free abortion clinics were placed in Black and Urban areas, for the purpose of [inaudible] free of charge from a racist society. To put it in words of one pro-abortionist, “We don’t need so many Negroes anymore – there’s no more cotton to pick.”

… Black women, let it be stated, Black women never demonstrated, demanded or even requested the right to an abortion. We’ve been asking for the right to decent housing, the right to education, in fact, the right to health car, and all we’ve been given free of charge is the right to kill our unborn child…

It is demeaning to the Black woman, because, when you wanted us (in other words) when we were on the plantation, you snatched the newborn baby from our arms and sold it into slavery. Today, you cut it out of the womb and throw it in the garbage or use it for human experimentation.

Dr. Grier later told those attending that conference that a majority of Blacks oppose abortion and she said she was hopeful that the attitudes of Americans are changing. “I believe that as more and more of the education and the true fact, that there is a life in the womb, that people will begin to say, ‘I do not want to kill,’” she said.

In a prepared statement (page 173) before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee during its May 1990 hearing on the “Freedom of Choice Act,” Grier wrote:

After many years of the civil rights struggle for equal opportunity in housing, education and employment, Black women have only been granted the right to kill their children in the womb. Free health care only includes abortion…. The White master is still telling Black people what is best for us – death instead of life.

Image: Delores Grier statement abortion and racism

Delores Grier written statement before Congress abortion and Black Genocide

Grier went on to say (page 170) in part:

I believe that one of the reasons that so many women, especially poor women, minority women, Black women in particular and young women, have abortions is because they really do not know what an abortion does, how it is performed and the effects after they have an abortion and the complications…. Abortion is the termination of a pregnancy which results in the death of a developing human. This is how it is defined in Webster’s medical dictionary 1986. Abortion, as many people may believe, is not a medical procedure; it is invasive surgery where the surgeon uses steel instruments to terminate the life of the unborn child in the mother’s womb….

Image: Dr. Grier testimony on abortion

Delores Grier statement before Congress abortion and racism

Advances in science have opened the womb that was once hidden, so we can now observe the growth and the movement of the unborn child through ultrasound…. Yet, the child terminators endeavor to hide the humanity of the unborn by describing the child as a “fetus….”

I would like to now say that I am speaking as a [B]lack women…sad to say that…many of the [Bl]ack men and women in Congress will be recorded in history as having contributed to the demise of the African American race in this country. They are rejecting their own African heritage, which regards the unborn as those waiting to be born. As they say in the African villages, no one knows whose womb will bear the chief. I would also like to say that 97 percent of the abortionists who kill unborn [B]lack babies in the inner city are white American males, and they are paid, directly or indirectly, by funding from the United States Government…

In 1992, Dr. Grier again agreed with other Black leaders within her community that abortion was a tool of genocide. “What do you see here? Unless you are white, unless you are wealthy… you really shouldn’t come into the world,” she stated.

She then questioned why abortion was being used to solve the problems of poor women, and referred to abortion as “pruning the Black race,” a concept Dr. Grier said began with Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s “Negro Project”:

We were not equal to white people and she [Margaret Sanger] didn’t think that we should populate the earth and she wanted to eliminate anybody who had color.

Why are you taking that woman, because of her situation, and resolving her problem by murder? What are you doing to her and what are you doing to yourself as a society by saying that this is the only way you can solve it? She is a human being, she can be talked to?

pro-life

Dr. Dolores Grier saw Planned Parenthood and abortion as Black Genocide and the pruning of the Black race

In that same article, Dr. Grier said that as a woman of color, she was influenced to speak out about abortion after hearing a moving speech in 1977 by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson, who was once an outspoken advocate for life, at that time. She said, “After the talk, I went up and said, ‘Rev. Jackson, I’m going to join the pro-life movement. You said the pro-life movement needed youth and color, and I am the color.’”

Sadly Jesse Jackson soon changed his position on abortion when he ran for president. Read Jackson’s pro-life statements before his flip here.

In 1995, after President Bill Clinton nominated Henry W. Foster, a Black abortionist who had served on the board of Planned Parenthood, to be the Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. Grier spoke out, saying,”The man is not Black. The man is not white. He is an abortionist who terminates life in the womb and that’s what he should be judged by.”

Dr. Grier recently told the Catholic Program, The Journey Home, that we need to pray and fast more for life:

We must bear witness to true life. I say true-life because we have too many of those who say pro-choice. Pro-choice is the comfort zone for our legislators who’d rather say pro-choice – the right to choose. Choose what? Whether or not to kill the child in the womb, that’s what she’s choosing.

According to Catholic New York (CNY), Grier was named vice chancellor by Cardinal John O’Connor, then Archbishop of New York, in 1985. An announcement about Grier’s death published by in CNY says that the Grier was “believed to have been the first black woman appointed to such a position nationwide.” The publication then expounded on Grier’s pro-life stance:

Miss Grier spoke with conviction and authority against the “black genocide” of abortion that continues to grip the black and Hispanic communities in New York City, a message that was unpopular in some circles. In a 1994 CNY article about the first Central Harlem Vicariate Respect Life Conference, Miss Grier strongly criticized Planned Parenthood’s abortion practices. “What are they bringing to us, people of color?” she asked. “They’re not bringing jobs, they’re not bringing food, they’re not bringing skills. They’re bringing death.”

In 1993, Miss Grier refused an honor from the New York City branch of the NAACP because of the organization’s pro-abortion stance.

That 1993 NAACP “honor” was for Grier to be the recipient of the Women’s History Month award. She refused, stating, “As president of the Association of Black Catholics, I believe abortion to be a racist weapon of genocide against black people.”

Today, abortion disproportionately targets Blacks in the womb more than any other race, and the number one provider of abortions in the nation is Planned Parenthood. The abortion lobby would like to convince Americans that our society — and specifically the Black population of America — is okay with abortion, but this is simply false. Black activists like Dolores Grier have been warning America for years and years that abortion would decimate the Black community and become a tool of eugenic genocide against Black people.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Did Planned Parenthood appoint Black leaders to quell suspicion of Black genocide?

Posted in Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood and Black Leaders, Planned Parenthood and Black Women, Planned Parenthood Black president, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood CEO, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 27, 2018 by saynsumthn
Image: Faye Wattleton

Faye Wattleton first Black president Planned Parenthood

Despite the fact that Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger promoted eugenics, it was actually under another eugenicist leader, Alan F. Guttmacher, that Planned Parenthood began referring for and eventually committing abortions. At the exact same time that abortion was being pushed publicly, the organization elected a Black chairman to roll out this agenda. All of this transpired in the late 1960s, a time when America was in conflict over the struggle for the civil rights of Black Americans.

During this time frame, many of the organization’s leaders were concerned about overpopulation. The organization’s history is steeped in eugenics, and this ideology manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As laws about these eugenics courts began to be challenged, a new tool of eugenics was making its way across the land: abortion.

Even though many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion would be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit,” Guttmacher, by now a Planned Parenthood president, was able to convince his friends that abortion, at first in perhaps a voluntary way, would be a better solution. However, there was a slight problem, because Black citizens and other minority groups were already suspicious of birth control efforts aimed at them. How would they feel about abortion?

Image: News article Blacks Charge Genocide from abortion

Blacks Charge Genocide from abortion

The solution for Planned Parenthood was to bring Black leaders to the organization’s board, in an effort to convince Black Americans that Planned Parenthood’s efforts were not genocidal. This strategy was not a new one; Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger — who gave a talk for the Ku Klux Klan — had already implemented the so-called “Negro Project” to accomplish the exact same thing. Memos between Planned Parenthood staffers and leadership indicated a great concern over how the Black community viewed their efforts. In response, Planned Parenthood’s public relations machine also reached out to Black publications, as they had already done with push for birth control.

Image: Alan Guttmacher

Alan Guttmacher Birth Control Article (Image: Ebony Mag April 1962)

In 1967,  the Pittsburgh Branch of the NAACP had criticized the swarming of Planned Parenthood facilities into minority neighborhoods. Other leaders like H. Rap Brown and Fannie Lou Hamer had called abortion “Black genocide.” And, as late as 1973, a study published by the American Journal of Public Health,”Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans as Related to Age, Sex, and Region,” found that Black men and women had a level of unease about “family planning.” Researchers Castellano Turner, Ph.D., and William A. Darity, Ph.D., concluded that Blacks were more suspicious when “family planning” was under the control of Whites. “It is noteworthy that the greatest degree of agreement is found where the issue of black control of family planning (as against white control) is at issue,” they said.

Image: table on fears of genocide

Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans 1973 study Castellano Turner, Ph.D. and William A. Darity, Ph.D.

After dialoguing internally about the unease of the Black community, the suggestion was made to add Black members to Planned Parenthood’s board; this took place at the same time that Planned Parenthood was calling for the decriminalization of abortion. According to a New York Times article from November 14, 1968, the first time that Planned Parenthood went on record calling for abortion, they also elected their very first Black board chairman to roll out the new agenda — Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: Jerome Holland article

First Black Chairman of Board elected by Planned Parenthood 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate.
Image: Jerome H Holland

Jerome H Holland, First Black PPFA BOD 1968

Holland was also added as chairman of the Board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood.

But Holland’s post as chairman of the board of Planned Parenthood was short lived.

In 1970, Holland was named ambassador to Sweden by President Richard Nixon; however, the headlines of the first Black chairman of Planned Parenthood had seemingly done their job. Holland was openly endorsing abortion as a “health matter” between the woman and her doctor.

Image: Jerome Holland lauds Planned Parenthood

Jerome Holland lauds Planned Parenthood

The same year Planned Parenthood elected its first Black chairman of the board, Frederick Osborn, a founding Eugenics Society officer connected to Planned Parenthood, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

A few years later, a new Black leader would emerge to reinforce the push for abortion within Planned Parenthood: Faye Wattleton.

After 62 years as an organization, why did Planned Parenthood wait until 1978 to elect the very first Black female as president? Like Holland,  Wattleton was not a novice where abortion was concerned. She had been with Planned Parenthood for a while, serving as a volunteer in the early 1970s and eventually serving as director of the Dayton affiliate.

Image: Faye Wattleton elected to Planned Parenthood board

Faye Wattleton elected to Planned Parenthood board

At a press conference held in February of 1978, then president-elect of Planned Parenthood Wattleton told the media that she was “putting the world on notice” that the organization was going to be much more aggressive on abortion rights. “What has happened is that we have allowed them [right-to-lifers] to have center stage,” Wattelton said, “I’d like to say those days are over.”

Wattleton then vowed to restore — “to the poor” — access of abortion under Medicaid.

Wattleton was asked if her leadership of Planned Parenthood as a Black woman would alleviate suspicions within the Black community linking abortion and her organization to Black genocide. Wattleton responded, “I don’t think a lot of people are yelling genocide anymore, because I’m Black. I’m in a watchdog position on these issues and no one should assume I’ve been co-opted. What better way is there to guard against those types of abuses?”

Wattleton then said that the Black community should be more concerned about quality of life than “increasing our numbers.”
Image: Faye Wattleton

Faye Wattleton first Black president Planned Parenthood

Wattleton served as president of the abortion corporation for 14 years, where, among other radical abortion advances, she helped to legalize the sale of the RU-486 abortion pill in the United States. Under Wattleton’s leadership, Planned Parenthood’s budget grew from $90 million in 1978 to $384 million in 1990. For her service and dedication to the eugenics-minded organization, in 1992, Wattleton received Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award. Despite Sanger’s known eugenics and Klan connections, Wattleton once referred to her as “[t]he great heroine of our time,” telling Hubbard News in 1979 that Sanger would be proud of Planned Parenthood’s progress.

But the idea that Blacks would no longer be targeted for eugenics because a Black woman was at the helm of a eugenics organization was short-lived. During Wattleton’s tenure at Planned Parenthood, she stated that supporters of Planned Parenthood contributed to the abortion giant to “keep the Black population down.” On CNN, in a debate with Bob Dornan, an outspoken pro-life member of the US House of Representatives, at that time, Wattleton, admitted, “As a matter of fact… we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all Black women to stop having children.”

And also clipped in the documentary film, Maafa21, below:

Wattleton went on to help form the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, she has been described by some in the media as “a pioneer, a crusader, a media star and a rebel of sorts.”

Today, many within the Black community still see abortion as a tool of eugenics, and the abortion statistics show that it has become a leading cause of death of Blacks in the nation. Margaret Sanger’s vision of limiting births among certain races may not have begun with abortion, but it appears to have led to abortion.

Tragically, today, as a result of Guttmacher continuing Sanger’s eugenics agenda by introducing abortion to Planned Parenthood, over 800 preborn children of all races die there every day from abortion.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Jesse Jackson, NAACP, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Samuel Yette with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action screened the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Image: Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

Image: article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Omage: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

 

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

 

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

 

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

Article on abortion (Pamela Carr and Faye Wattleton) published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

 

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.