Archive for Margaret Sanger

NARAL condemns the racist actions of J. Marion Sims, but not those of Margaret Sanger

Posted in NARAL, Racist Statute with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 21, 2017 by saynsumthn

NARAL Pro-Choice America is condemning the racist actions of James Marion Sims, the so-called “father of modern gynecology”, who experimented on slaves. For years, Sims was hailed a hero despite the fact that he performed medical experiments on Black slaves without anesthesia or their consent. Sound familiar? That’s because Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, who once admitted that she believed “in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic“, was also part of a movement that performed medical procedures on Blacks without their consent. However, when it comes to Planned Parenthood, NARAL tolerates the racism linked to it.

Margaret Sanger (Image Credit Milwaukee Sentinel)

Sanger was part of the eugenics movement which forcefully sterilized Black men and women. Not only did Sanger have a strong belief in eugenics, she made certain eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization.

One of those people was Clarence Gamble, a director of Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.  Gamble was a supporter of a horrific North Carolina forced sterilization eugenics program and he helped fund Sanger’s infamous “Negro Project,” along with Albert Lasker, whose”prestigious” foundation recently granted Planned Parenthood a top award.

Many believe that Sanger’s “Negro Project,” along with her eugenics advocacy, contributed to the racist attitude society had about Black births. Yet despite this history, Sanger’s bust is currently displayed at the Smithsonian next to Dr. Martin Luther King’s.

Demands by Black leaders calling for Sanger’s statue to be removed have been largely ignored. 

James Marion Sims (image credit: National Library of Medicine)

Sims’ experiments on Blacks differed slightly from the eugenics movement in that his victims were slaves, but like the eugenics movement, Sims did not receive consent.

And if his experiments, which led to a medical breakthrough in treating vesicovaginal fistula, were not bad enough, the New York City Park website, where one of his statues is located, reports that, “He [Sims] operated on these subjects, in some cases repeatedly, without the use of anesthesia.”

The sad truth is that the medical establishment ignored Sims’ past and collaborated to pay tribute to Sims by erecting statues in his honor. A literature review of medical, sociological, and periodical sources on Sims dating back to 1851, and conducted by Sara Spettel and Mark Donald White, found that:

J Marion Sims Statute NYC (image credit: City of New York)

“While historians, ethicists and the popular press have debated Dr. Sims’ legacy, medical sources have continued to portray him unquestionably as a great figure in medical history.”

Today, despite praises of Sims from the medical community for his discoveries (some which also include instruments now used in surgical abortions), the public is speaking out and demanding that his statues be removed. And, although silent about eugenicist Sanger’s bust at the Smithsonian, abortion advocates are hypocritically joining the call to remove statues of Sims.

NARAL on J Marion Sims statute (image credit Twitter)

In one example, an e-mail sent out by the abortion lobby group, NARAL demanded the removal of a Charleston statue of Sims on grounds that the “monuments commemorate a history that willfully ignores the suffering of black women, and we cannot continue to honor that history by keeping these statues up.”

While it may sound noble to speak out against a Sims’ statue, the fact is that NARAL is silent where Planned Parenthood is concerned even though Planned Parenthood continues to “honor” their founder Sanger whose eugenics beliefs targeted “black women.”

And, just as with Sims, the media remains silent on the fact that Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go well beyond Sanger.

In fact, although Sanger’s organization did not morph into Planned Parenthood until 1942, Live Action News has published documentation that proves that Planned Parenthood followed their founder’s ideology and collaborated with the eugenics movement.

The truth is that Planned Parenthood was so supportive of eugenics ideology that they advertised in eugenics journals. And, as late as 1968, the Eugenics Society encouraged funding Planned Parenthood:

The Society’s activities in crypto-eugenics should be pursued vigorously, and specifically that the Society should increase its monetary support of the FPA and the IPPF [International Planned Parenthood Federation]…

Eugenics Society to fund IPPF 1968

In addition, both Sanger and Planned Parenthood invited eugenics leaders to speak at conferences, tried to merge publications with them, and Planned Parenthood was even granted free rent from the Eugenics organization.

Eugenics S Rent Free to IPPFThis image to the left taken from a eugenics document shows Planned Parenthood received rental space from the Eugenics Society. This is reinforced by former Planned Parenthood chairman, CP Blacker, who told an audience at a Planned Parenthood event in 1964 that while he was secretary of the Eugenics Society they gave Planned Parenthood accommodations “rent free.”

The fact is that Planned Parenthood evolved out of eugenics, and Sanger, who once pushed eugenic propaganda in a speech before the Klu Klux Klan, openly advocated sterilizing those she deemed “unfit.”

So, while NARAL’s outrage in denouncing Sims’ racist past appears honorable, no one is fooled by the faux rhetoric as long as NARAL remains eerily silent about Planned Parenthood. Because, as NARAL themselves stated, society can no longer “commemorate a history that willfully ignores the suffering of black women.”

And, that includes Planned Parenthood’s.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Population control film produced by Walt Disney: children in large families ‘sickly and unhappy’

Posted in Bernard Berelson, Disney, Frederick OSborn, John D Rockefeller, Population Control, Population Council with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 25, 2017 by saynsumthn
screen shot from film

A newly discovered 1960’s video produced by Walt Disney Productions promotes “family planning” propaganda as a way to solve overpopulation and enter into the utopia that can only be attained by having smaller families.  The company known for animated cartoons was started in 1923 by Walt Disney and his brother Roy O. Disney.  In 1966, a year prior to the film’s release, Walt Disney died, leaving his brother Roy in charge.  The controversial film, entitled Family Planning was released in December of 1967 and produced in association with the Population Council, which advocates abortion.

Walt Disney Production produces FP film with Population Council

The Population Council is credited with bringing the abortion pill RU486 to the United States. The organization was founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller 3rd.

News Disney Family Planning film

Frederic Osborn, a founding member of the American Eugenics Society became the group’s second president in 1957. Osborn, who once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics,” signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood” published in her Birth Control Review in April of 1938, as Live Action News has previously documented.

Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

In 1969, Population Council’s president, Bernard Berelson, published an article suggesting that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods.

The Population Council brags about their Disney collaboration on their website’s timeline noting the film has been translated into 25 languages.

Disney film Family Planning with Population Council

The propaganda film features Disney’s iconic animated character, Donald Duck who introduces the alleged gloom of having a large family. Children, in smaller sized families are “healthy and happy and go to school to gain an education,” the film states, as if, children of large families are unhealthy, unhappy, and uneducated.

The mother of a smaller sized family doesn’t “have to work too hard and stays healthy and happy,” producers of the film go on to claim.

The propaganda film begins by referring to the “Common Man” who “by nature” is “one of the animals.” It states:

But he has something the rest do not have, human intelligence and the ability to reason and plan ahead. Other animals are at the mercy of the world around them. But by his ability to reason man has learned to improve his life.

Donald Duck narrates Family Planning film

In what they call an “upward rise” of man, the film’s narrator claims that man is being held back by increased numbers:

But this upward rise is being slowed by the sheer weight of numbers. The family of man is increasing at an astonishing rate. Almost doubling every generation. Ironically, this too comes about through man’s intelligence.

The film takes a slight Malthusian look at population growth blaming the increase in population on medical advances.

“The number of people in the community remained about the same for many generations,” it says. “There was almost a balance. A balance between the large number of babies born each year and the large number of people who died.”

The film credits, disease, epidemics, and famine with the death of earlier generations, until,  “[…] in the space of a single generation, man began to change these conditions. There was great progress in medical science.”

Donald Duck family planning film

Adding, that now (in 1967):

There are still about the same number of babies being born each year but, today, deaths are cut in half, or better especially among children. The old balance is upset. Those who live now, instead of dying, are added each year to the number of people in the community.

The film indoctrinates its viewers that a “happy family” is one with a modest number of children while large families basically starve with “no money for modern conveniences. […] The mother will have too much to do. She’ll be tired and cross and her health will suffer. The children will be sickly and unhappy with little hope for the future.”

This was the attitude Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger once advocated when she suggested that parents get a license to parent.

License to Breed Margaret Sanger

In Sanger’s“A License for Mothers to Have Babies” with the subtitle, “A code to stop the overproduction of children,” she writes:

Permits for parenthood shall be issued upon application by city, county, or State authorities to married couples, providing the parents are financially able to support the expected child, have the qualifications needed for proper rearing of the child, have no transmissible diseases, and on the woman’s part, no medical indication that maternity is likely to result in death or permanent injury to health.

Sanger later told journalist Mike Wallace, “I think the greatest sin in the world is bringing children into the world — that have disease from their parents.”

In their January 1968 edition of the publication Studies in Family Planning, Population Council explained why they produced the film:

Throughout the world there is great need for more energetic programs of information and education on family planning. As we have deliberated about the problem, we have considered that one of the most familiar, most popular, and most effective materials for mass exposure is the animated cartoon; and certainly among the leading producers of this form is the Walt Disney organization. Accordingly, the Council authorized the Disney studios to prepare a short color cartoon, featuring Donald Duck, that deals with the desirability of family planning. In addition to the talent and reputation of the Disney studio in this field, the Disney style is familiar throughout the world and its identification with wholesome family life is well-known.

The film is called “Family Planning.” […] The film is designed primarily for men and women of reproductive age in the developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and we have reason to believe that it will be utilized in the United States as well.

The goal of the film is then laid out in the article:

The film will, we hope, help to develop attitudes favorable to the small family norm; […] stimulate discussion of the matter; and, importantly, help to legitimate the very concept and practice of family planning throughout the developing world.

PP Children by Choice Not Chance

To no one’s surprise, Disney’s film captured a version of Planned Parenthood’s oft repeated “every child a wanted child” slogan, mentioned previously as attributed to Osborn.

“This picture can be true for complex families if the number of children born is left to chance! ” the film says.

And the solution?

Today things have changed,” the film explains, “modern science has given us a key that makes possible a new kind of personal freedom – family planning!”

“Family Planning” is key according to Disney film

It’s pure bliss in Disney’s family planning world and there is no mention in the film about the complications of birth control, the unpredictability of pregnancy or the effectiveness of each family planning method.

Nor is there any mention of whether some “family planning” methods could be abortive.

Nope.

Just rainbows and unicorns and of course, Donald Duck and the promise of miraculous results because allegedly “[family planning] improves the health of mother and children” and, as the propaganda film claims, “both are better off if children are not born too close together.”

And, as a reward, for limiting your children you will have room for “modern conveniences.”

Disney Family Planning for Modern conveniences

The film ends with the concept that family planning will somehow usher in a utopia world which benefits all of society:

[…] if enough couples choose family planning the balance will be restored. But, this time in a better way. Thus, every couple has the opportunity to help build a better life not just for themselves but for people everywhere. And, all of us have a responsibility toward the family of man, including you.

The film is one of many efforts in the 1960’s and 70’s to indoctrinate the culture on the use of birth control. It was sold by Planned Parenthood in certain areas, but went out of production in 1988 because of decreasing demand, according to a report by the Population Research Institute.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Merge ABCL with Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Ku Klux Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

The media seems to be doing an effective job of condemning many people who have an association with the Klu Klux Klan — but one exception to this seems to be Planned Parenthood’s “beloved” founder, Margaret Sanger. Margaret Sanger is usually described as a “birth control pioneer” who founded Planned Parenthood, but she also met with members of the Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.” Sanger wrote about her meeting with the Klan in her autobiography. Yet somehow this fact is made light of, glossed over, or completely ignored by the media.

On page 366 of her autobiography, Sanger described her meeting with the Klan, where she says she received additional invitations to speak with similar groups:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.

What about Sanger’s outspoken support for eugenics?

While some may not be entirely familiar with the meaning of “eugenics,” it’s likely that those same people have seen it in action in various ways. Coined in the mid 1800’s by Francis Galton, the cousin of Charles Darwin, eugenics was a popular movement to create a society in which those who were considered “superior” would reproduce… while those who were deemed “inferior” would be encouraged not to reproduce. Tragically, this movement was credited with forcefully sterilizing many men and women. The targets of these horrendous acts were disproportionately Black and poor, according to many reports.

Screenshot of PP honoring Sanger

Eugenics victim Elaine Riddick speaks in the video below about being “cut up like a hog,” thanks to the philosophy of eugenics. Riddick, like some other Black citizens, was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. Her tearful testimony encouraged state lawmakers to vote for reparations for those like her, who were eugenically sterilized.

So how does this relate to Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger? One of the prominent supporters of that horrific eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, and Gamble was a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

In Margaret Sanger’s “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” the Planned Parenthood founder links the goals of eugenics with her own goals of promoting birth control, writing (emphasis added):

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health. …While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfit… Eugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit….

Sanger called for unfit to be sent to farms (Image credit Maafa21)

Sanger was highly motivated to stop the procreation by those she deemed “unfit.” In a personal letter to Katharine Dexter McCormick in 1950, Sanger called for “a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people.”

But, Sanger added, “Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

In 1932, Sanger also called for those who were poor (and those she considered to be “morons and immoral”) to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called better “moral conduct.”  She specifically wanted to keep “immigration closed to the entrance of certain aliens whose condition is known to be detrimental to the stamina of the race.” (“A Plan for Peace,” by Margaret Sanger, published in Birth Control Review (BCR) April 1932, pp. 107-108)

Sanger was more than just a passive observer where eugenics was concerned; she was a member of the American Eugenics Society and even tried to unite her efforts and her publication with the eugenics movement.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

This image below captures a letter entitled, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” written by Sanger.  It was published in the June 1928 edition of her Birth Control Review and it details her meeting (page 188) with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney was the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society (AES) and Sanger published his writings in the Birth Control Review (BCR).

Of interest is that fact that, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him a letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization.

Margaret Sanger to Merge ABCL with Eugenics

Sanger merge w eugenics

The New York Times recorded Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement as well, in an April 1, 1925, article:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League [ABCL], said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis, rather than a eugenic ideal.

Another example where Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement can be seen is in this ABCL publication from 1935 (below), calling for a resolution that Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later became Planned Parenthood), “unite with the American Eugenics Society.”

Sanger resolution to merge BCR with Eugenics

Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization, as Live Action News has previously documented. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

PP’s Margaret Sanger Award

Since the 1960’s, Planned Parenthood has granted its infamous Margaret Sanger Award (calling it their top award) to people who benefit the organization’s cause.

Probably the most well-known recipient of the Margaret Sanger award in more recent times is Hillary Clinton, who said during her acceptance of the award that she “admired Margaret Sanger.” Republicans called her out for her comments, and Clinton responded by making disparaging remarks about Thomas Jefferson instead of repudiating Sanger’s push to eradicate the “unfit.” In the video below, Clinton pays homage to Sanger:

In 2014, then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accepted the Margaret Sanger award, despite Sanger’s clear support for a hideous eugenic philosophy and associations with the Klan. Pelosi referred to the largest abortion corporation in the nation as an “outstanding organization,” suggesting that Sanger’s philosophy paved the ideology behind Planned Parenthood: “Out of this philosophy and outlook emerged the spirit and driving force of what would become known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.” Pelosi added, “To be associated with the great Margaret Sanger is a distinct privilege.”

Nancy Pelosi gets award named after Klan speaker, Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood

In 2004, the founder of CNN, Ted Turner, received the Margaret Sanger Award. The “honor” was mentioned in Planned Parenthood’s 2004 annual report:

2004 Margaret Sanger award to CNN Founder Ted Turner

Today, Planned Parenthood will defend their founder by pointing to civil rights giants like Martin Luther King, Jr., who also received the Margaret Sanger award. But the full picture and agenda of Sanger and her Planned Parenthood organization were not obvious to many in the Black community at that time, including MLK.

However, despite the suspicious timing of the award to MLK, many Black leaders have since spoken against the birth control and family planning agenda of Planned Parenthood, even calling abortion a form of “black genocide.”

Given this information and much more, when will the media demand recipients of this hideous award return it to Planned Parenthood? And, even more important, when will Congress cut ties with Planned Parenthood and stop sending them half a billion in tax dollars every year?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Yes, Planned Parenthood’s founder spoke to the Klan – but the photo is a fake

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in Arkansas, Hilda Cornish, Klan, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Maggie Awards, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

With the topic of America’s history in racism once again a focus in the news, a fake image of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger speaking to the Klu Klux Klan has been circulating online. While the image is not real, what is quite real is the fact that Sanger, a proponent of eugenics, spoke to a meeting of the women’s branch of KKK in 1926.

The event took place in Silver Lake, New Jersey, and Sanger described in it in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Sanger called that event “one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.”

That being said, the image below, which purports to show Sanger giving that speech before her adoring Klan supporters is not authentic. The image was part of a blogger’s photo contest.

Photo of Margaret Sanger W/ KKK is fake

Sanger and Klan image was part of blog photo contest in 2005 — it is not authentic.

The Sanger/Klan fake was published by the “Margaret Sanger Blog Spot” which held an annual photo contest because, in the blog’s words, “The Big Abortion Industry still holds Margaret Sanger out as an icon. Artwork is one more important ways to promote the truth about Margaret Sanger.”

The blog’s instructions for the contest were to “commemorate Sanger at the Klan rally in unique artistic ways,” including “modern interpretations of Sanger speaking to the Klan.”

But Sanger’s views were so outrageous in and of themselves that there is no need to circulate inaccurate depictions, which could lead to attempts to discredit her meeting with the Klan altogether.

Sanger has a very controversial history as an enthusiastic proponent of eugenics and a member of the American Eugenics Society. This philosophy not only fed her work within the Planned Parenthood movement, but her lesser known advocacy of euthanasia as well. The organizations Sanger founded, such as The American Birth Control League (ABCL) and later, Planned Parenthood, also have ties to many eugenics proponents.

Clarence Cook Little

Clarence C. Little

One of those connections was a man by the name of Clarence Cook Little.

According to a biographical memoir published by the National Academy of Sciences, Little held various distinguished positions. He was the president of the University of Maine and of the University of Michigan, and he was the managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

He was named the director of The Jackson Laboratory and later accepted a position as scientific director of the Tobacco Industrial Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sadly, Little was also president and founding member of The American Eugenics Society, as well as a board member of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. He was also the Birth Control Federation President, and sat on the previously mentioned American Euthanasia Society board.

Little was also listed on the 1938 Committee for Planned Parenthood.

CC Little ties to Eugenics and Sanger’s ABCL

Little has since been denounced by some in modern society who have called for his name to be removed from the University of Michigan’s science building for his belief in eugenics. An op-ed penned by the daughter of an interracial couple and a student at the University of Michigan published last year by MTV.com shows the disdain for Little:

There is a building (and a bus stop) on the University of Michigan campus named for Clarence Cook (C.C.) Little. He was the University’s president in 1925, and an outspoken “scientific” racist and eugenicist, who believed that “inferior” races should undergo involuntary sterilization. I often sat at the bus stop bearing his name while I waited to go to class. Little would have hated that.

Despite the merit of these denouncements, few have expressed concern over Little’s ties to Planned Parenthood’s history.

Hilda Cornish

Another interesting eugenics connection to both Sanger and Planned Parenthood is a woman by the name of Hilda Kahlert Cornish. Hilda Cornish chaired the Arkansas Eugenics Association. According to a 1986 article in an Arkansas newspaper, Cornish received much of her counsel directly from Margaret Sanger. In fact, the Blytheville Courier Press notes that the sons of the two leaders were roommates at Yale University.

The documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21 (clipped below) details disturbing connections the Arkansas Eugenics Association had to Planned Parenthood:

The film states:

From its beginning, Planned Parenthood always had powerful ties to the American Eugenics community. In fact, in many places they were often one in the same.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.

Later, the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Documents obtained by Live Action News confirm this fact.

A 1945 Planned Parenthood directory reveals that Mrs. Edward Cornish was the director of the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas. Cornish was active with the Democrat Party and married to banker Edward Cornish, according to Arkansas historians.

She is also listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

According to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas:

In the summer of 1930, [Cornish] met Margaret Sanger… The two developed a friendship maintained by correspondence and occasional meetings. During that summer, Cornish visited Sanger’s Clinical Research Bureau in New York, and she launched the Arkansas birth control movement later that same year.

At Cornish’s initiative, a group of physicians, business and religious leaders, and women active in civic work formed the Arkansas Eugenics Association (AEA)…. In early 1931, the association opened the Little Rock Birth Control Clinic in the basement of Baptist Hospital…. Cornish also worked with the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control.

The online historical site added that in 1942, The Arkansas Eugenics Association changed its name… to the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas.

Segregated Clinics

Authors of the bookHidden Histories of Women in the New South, noted that the “first report of the Arkansas Eugenics Association stated that the Little Rock clinic registered 161 White women during its first eleven months of service.”

The book concludes that Cornish was more aligned with promoting birth control than the national eugenics movement. (That being said, Sanger herself wanted to merge her publications with the national eugenics organization.)

The book‘s authors reveal that the clinic “directed its efforts towards poor women only,” yet they imply a prejudice against Blacks by writing that “African American women were not invited to the [Arkansas Eugenics] clinic from its start in 1931.”

www.AbortionProcedures.com click here for facts on abortion

The authors add that “until 1937, only white women actually had the opportunity to receive services” and the organization “held separate hours for white and African American women.” The book also notes that “most of [the American Birth Control League’s] clinics were segregated.” The ABCL later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s beloved founder Margaret Sanger reached out to many people who saw Blacks as less than equal, and this includes the Klan and the Eugenics movement.

Today, many believe that Sanger’s racist ideologies have penetrated much of her work. And even without an image to document Sanger’s speech before the Klan, Planned Parenthood knows her history, as revealed in her own autobiography.

Instead of repudiating Sanger, taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood honors her as a hero, naming their most prestigious award after her. It’s despicable.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Are Sanger’s eugenic efforts still a hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission?

Posted in Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by saynsumthn

From Live Action News |

In celebrating their 100th birthday, Planned Parenthood supporters continue to praise their founder Margaret Sanger (even featuring her on their 100 year website) while simultaneously attempting to distance the organization from her eugenicist beliefs. The problem is that they continue to hold Sanger up as an icon, despite her support of one of the most demeaning ideologies of recent centuries.

planned-parenthood-100-years-features-margaret-sanger

In celebrating their 100 year anniversary, Planned Parenthood says (as pictured above) the organization “was founded on the revolutionary idea that women should have the information and care they need to live strong, healthy lives and fulfill their dreams.” But is this true? Was Planned Parenthood really founded on those ideas? Not quite.

Alexander Sanger (image credit IPPF)

Alexander Sanger (image credit IPPF)

In an interview with Vox, Margaret Sanger’s grandson Alexander Sanger, who is the current Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Council and a former president of Planned Parenthood New York City, tried to gloss over his grandmother’s beliefs by claiming that she only “dabbled in eugenics”:

Now, she also dabbled in eugenics. She was not a full believer in all of eugenics, and disagreed with some of the things eugenicists believe in. But at various points in her life, she was opposed to women who she felt were incapable of being mothers from becoming mothers.

How does being “opposed to women who she felt were incapable of being mothers from becoming mothers” square with the idea that women should have “information” and be able to “fulfill their dreams,” as is advertised on the website graphic above? What if those women dreamed of motherhood? And we are supposed to believe that Sanger was some sort of feminist icon?

If Margaret Sanger was “not a full believer in eugenics” as her grandson suggests, it wasn’t where the so-called “unfit” were concerned. The founder of Planned Parenthood clearly advocated eugenic solutions for that “class of people” she deemed unworthy to have children, even calling for a “license to breed” and the permanent sterilization of those she deemed “feebleminded.” If Sanger differed from rank and file eugenicists, it was that she also supported those she called “fit” to voluntarily limit their children. In her autobiography, Sanger wrote:

Eugenics, which had started long before my time, had once been defined as including free love and prevention of conception. Moses Harman of Chicago, one of its chief early adherents, had run a magazine and gone to jail for it under the Comstock regime. Recently it had cropped up again in the form of selective breeding, and biologists and geneticists such as Clarence C. Little, President of the University of Maine, and C. B. Davenport, Director of the Cold Spring Harbor Station for Experimental Evolution, had popularized their findings under this heading…. I accepted one branch of this philosophy, but eugenics without birth control seemed to me a house built upon sands.

The fact is that despite the claims of Planned Parenthood’s supporters, not only did Sanger have a strong belief in eugenics, she made certain eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders or members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

And here is Margaret Sanger herself, listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society. Hardly a “dabble,” as her grandson has suggested:

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

Margaret was such a strong believer in eugenics that she even attempted to merge her publication with the Eugenics Society (which again doesn’t sound like “dabbling” to me). An April 1, 1925, article in the New York Times documented Sanger’s intentions:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger founder of the American Birth Control League, said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis rather than a eugenic ideal.

nyt1925merge-abcl-eugenics1

mergeabclwitheugenicsThis letter, written by Sanger in June of 1928 and published in her Birth Control Review under the heading, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” Sanger details her meeting with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society in order to “reach[] a wider audience and cover[] a more extended field.” Whitney was the former executive secretary of the American Eugenics Society and Sanger willingly published his writings in her Birth Control Review.

woman-and-the-new-race-eugenics-publishing-company-margaret-sanger2Some of Sanger’s writings, listed below, were even published by the eugenics movement (Source: Margaret Sanger, Pioneer of Birth Control, by Lawrence Lader and Milton Meltzer):

• What Every Mother Should Know, originally published by the Eugenics Publishing Co. in 1916
• What Every Girl Should Know, originally published by the Eugenics Publishing Co. in 1922

Planned Parenthood promoters try to convince the public that Sanger — a member of the American Eugenics Society who, by the way, also advocated for euthanasia — was simply a product of her day. But the facts paint a much different picture. Despite the evidence, Planned Parenthood’s supporters are working overtime to gloss over their founder’s beliefs.

Planned Parenthood Board Member Max Michael

Planned Parenthood Board Member Max Michael

In an op-ed praising abortion giant Planned Parenthood’s work as “health care equity,” Max Michael, MD, a member of the Planned Parenthood Southeast Board of Director, recently wrote:

Like many great organizations, Planned Parenthood is not without its flaws. While Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, was a woman of tremendous achievement, she was also a flawed and imperfect leader. She devoted her life to enabling women to have control over when and whether to have children, yet she also had beliefs, practices, and associations that Planned Parenthood acknowledges, denounces and works to redress.

Michael’s words coincidentally seem to mirror Planned Parenthood’s published talking points.

Planned Parenthood proudly calls Sanger a “reproductive rights trailblazer,” “woman of heroic accomplishments,” and “a true visionary,” while at the same time claiming to denounce her views, even giving Sanger a pass for speaking to the Klu Klux Klan, writing:

However, it is true that Margaret Sanger made a speech on birth control to a women’s auxiliary branch of the Ku Klux Klan in Silver Lake, New Jersey, in 1926. Sanger’s passion to spread and mainstream birth control led her to speak to any group interested in learning how to plan their reproduction. Planned Parenthood strongly disagrees with Sanger’s decision to address an organization that spreads hatred (Sanger, 1938, 366).

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger, 2008

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger, 2008

Planned Parenthood leaves out the fact that Sanger was encouraged by the results of her speech to the Klan, saying, “In the end, through simple illustrations I believe I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.”

As the public learns the truth about Sanger’s beliefs, they tend to become less supportive of Planned Parenthood’s mission. It is this reality that likely prompted an unusual response from a Planned Parenthood spokesperson in 2011, after a member of the Humanist Community Forum in California asked her how she would respond to statements that Margaret Sanger was “such a racist.”

Guadalupe Rodriguez, Director of Public Affairs for Planned Parenthood Mar Monte in Silicon Valley, Alameda and San Mateo Counties, answered (watch the exchange at 37:44):

What we say is that she did make these statements – they were wrong then and they’re wrong now. We’re not standing by anything that she said–we’re not standing by her beliefs. We are a vastly different organization now than we were when she first started the group. We’ve evolved…. What we say is her statements and her beliefs were wrong then and they’re wrong now and we don’t stand with her – we are a different organization.

Planned Parenthood has a strange way of “denouncing” and “disagreeing” and not “standing by” Sanger’s beliefs — they named their most prestigious award after her. Sadly, even though Sanger’s beliefs were despicable, many journalists and politicians alike have accepted the infamous Margaret Sanger Award without hesitation.

Planned Parenthood’s doublespeak regarding Sanger is troubling, to say the least. The organization has called her one of the “greatest heroines,” while simultaneously denouncing her eugenic efforts. Privately, they acknowledge that Sanger’s vision was the foundation of Planned Parenthood’s mission. A 2008 Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains annual report says of Sanger, “Sanger’s early efforts remain the hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission.”

 

Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go far beyond Margaret Sanger

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics Quarterly, Eugenics Review, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by saynsumthn

From Live Action News

One of the more frustrating things pro-lifers hear from abortion supporters is the claim that Planned Parenthood has never been about eugenics. It is simply intellectually dishonest as well as a total denial of history to make such a claim. Such was the case recently when MSNBC’s Joy Reid defended Planned Parenthood and cut off a guest who criticized Hillary Clinton because she once admitted that she admired Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger

According to author George Grant in his book Grand Illusions: The Legacy of Planned Parenthood:

[Sanger] began to build the work of the American Birth Control League, and ultimately, of Planned Parenthood. Margaret relied heavily on the men, women, ideas, and resources of the Eugenics movement. Virtually all of the organization’s board members were Eugenicists. Financing for the early projects from the opening of the birth control clinics to the publishing of the revolutionary literature – came from Eugenicists. The speakers at the conferences, the authors of the literature and the providers of the services were almost without exception avid Eugenicists. And the international work of Planned Parenthood were originally housed in the offices of the Eugenics Society while the organizations themselves were institutionally intertwined for years.

Sanger was an avowed eugenicist and a member of the American Eugenics Society, and she also proudly spoke to the Ku Klux Klan, something she described in her autobiography…

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger writes about her speech with the Klan

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger writes about her speech with the Klan

But, as abortion supporters who view Sanger as a heroine often do, they make the claim that Sanger is dead and therefore we are to simply ignore her Klan interactions, eugenics connections, rants about immigrants, push for forced sterilization and her failed goal of merging with the Eugenics Society.

Today, we are told that Sanger was a product of her day and that her attempt to have the “unfit” sterilized, the “feebleminded” shipped off, or her radical suggestion that couples be forced to get a permit from the state to have children (she wrote“No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood“) had no lasting impact on the organization she founded, namely, Planned Parenthood.

The fact is that despite the claims of their supporters, not only does Planned Parenthood have a connection to eugenics separate from their founder, but many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. The following is a very abbreviated list of examples:

Henry P. Fairchild was vice president of Planned Parenthood and (surprise!) he was also a past president of the American Eugenics Society. According to the American Sociological Association, “One of Fairchild’s most famous contributions was the development of the Planned Parenthood of America Federation, called the Birth Control Federation of America until 1942. There he served on the Board of Directors in 1932 and later the Vice President from 1939-1948.”

Samuel W. Anderson was a member of the American Eugenics Society and served on Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s Board of Directors.

CP Blacker was Secretary to the Eugenics Society and Vice Chairman of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).

Mrs. Dorothy Brush was involved with the American Eugenics Society as well as the International Planned Parenthood Federation. In 1948, The Brush Foundation provided seed money to help establish the International Committee on Planned Parenthood (ICPP). In 1952, the organization opened its headquarters in London, England.

C. Lalor Burdick was a member of the American Eugenics Society and served on the Board of Directors for Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) and PPFA’s World Population Emergency Campaign.

Arkansas Eugenics Assoc. becomes state Planned Parenthood affiliate. (Image screen from Maafa21)

Arkansas Eugenics Society becomes state Planned Parenthood affiliate. (Image screen from Maafa21)

Mrs. Edward (Hilda) Cornish was not only a member of the American Eugenics Society, she was also an officer of the Arkansas Eugenics Association (later the Arkansas Eugenics Association, which would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood). Despite her direct connection to eugenics organizations, Cornish was named Arkansas Planned Parenthood’s executive director.

Robert L. Dickinson was a Vice President of Planned Parenthood and served on their Board of Directors. However, his eugenics ties were as deep as Sanger’s. In fact, he was a member of the American Eugenics Society as well as a committee chairman for Eugenics Research Associationevent.

Dr. Haven Emerson was on the Board of Directors for the American Eugenics Society and served as a Chairman of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Emerson was also a member of their National Medical Council.

In addition to those who officially served as leaders of Planned Parenthood who had direct ties to eugenics (too many to name here), there were others who were accepted with open arms despite their eugenics history.

Professor Frank Lorimer was part of the Eugenics Research Association and served on the editorial board of the Eugenics Quartlerly. Despite his eugenics connections, he represented the Planned Parenthood Federation of America at various meetings.

Dr. Charles F. Dight was the president of the Minnesota Eugenics Society when he wrote a letter to Adolf Hitler in 1933, wishing him success in “stamping out mental inferiority among the German people,” noting the Nazi leader’s efforts would “advance the eugenics movement in other nations as well as in Germany.”

In the 1930s, Dight joined the Minnesota Birth Control League, the forerunner of Planned Parenthood of Minnesota.

Charles F Dight letter to Hitler ( Image from document provided by the Minnesota Historical Society)

Charles F Dight letter to Hitler ( Image from document provided by the Minnesota Historical Society)

Frederic Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

Planned Parenthood invites Eugenics officer to speak to their lunch

Planned Parenthood invites Eugenics officer to speak to their lunch

In 1958, Planned Parenthood was still cozy with eugenics leaders. In the article pictured right, we learn that the Director of the American Eugenics Society, Robert Carter Cook, was invited by Planned Parenthood to speak at their lunch in 1958.

In addition to Planned Parenthood leaders who had connections to eugenics, the International Committee on Planned Parenthood (ICPP) maintained by PPFA among others, received free rent from the Eugenics Society, according to the Eugenics Review. ICPP was replaced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) in 1952.

Does this sound like an organization that wanted to distance themselves from eugenics?

Wait… there’s more.

From their Review (and repeated here):

In conclusion, a unanimous vote of thanks was moved to the Eugenics Society, which has continued during the past year to make available, rent free, accommodation to the International Committee on Planned Parenthood.

This was confirmed by former Planned Parenthood chairman CP Blacker MD, who told an audience at the Fourth Conference at the International Planned Parenthood Federation in 1964, that while he was secretary of the Eugenics Society they gave Planned Parenthood office accommodations rent free.

Let’s stop and consider the intentional blindness to truth that Joy Reid and others would have to have to claim that Planned Parenthood is not a eugenic organization. The fact is that Planned Parenthood was so supportive of the evil eugenics ideology that they advertised in eugenics journals. For Reid and others who doubt this fact, I provide some examples below (notice that their goals and beliefs go far beyond “reproductive rights”):

1968:

1968 advertisement by Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

1968 advertisement by Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

The Eugenics Society’s honorary secretary even encouraged funding IPPF, saying, “The Society’s activities in crypto-eugenics should be pursued vigorously, and specifically that the Society should increase its monetary support of the FPA and the IPPF [International Planned Parenthood Federation]…”

1963:

1963 Advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review Quarterly

1963 Advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review Quarterly

1961:

1961 advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

1961 advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

In summary, it is evident that from its inception, Sanger founded and nurtured Planned Parenthood in eugenics — and denying what is plain to see will never change that fact.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Black woman: Planned Parenthood has never denounced Negro Project

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Women with tags , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2016 by saynsumthn

More on what the Black Community says about Planned Parenthood here.