Archive for Elaine Riddick

Children and consent: How eugenics is parallel in James Younger case

Posted in Parental Rights, Transgender Issues with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 24, 2019 by saynsumthn

Written by: Carole Novielli

What happens when a state or a judge for that matter orders the bodies of young children to be forever altered under the guise of medicine? Well, I think we already know because history is a great teacher. After all, under eugenics programs targeted at poor whites and a majority of minorities we witnessed the abuse of state eugenics courts who ordered the surgical sterilization of men, women and children (too young to consent) in the name of public health. And, while some were complicit in this monstrous part of our history, many others said and did nothing to stop it. Today, the James Younger case out of Texas parallels this tragic time in history and reveals how the state can potentially yank children from a parent and pump them full of hormones to force them to become another gender.

Jamers Younger (Image: SaveJames.com)

Past is reflection of the Present:

“Unnamed patient records from the 1920s document hundreds of individuals in their late teens and early 20s sterilized for…feeblemindedness, or mental deficiency. A notable percentage of these young patients were typed as masturbators or incest perpetrators if male and as promiscuous—even nymphomaniacal—or having borne a child out of wedlock if female,” noted a report on coercive sterilizations, ironically titled, Sterilized in the Name of Public Health.

This targeting of vulnerable children continued for years. Wallace Kuralt who influenced the opening of a Planned Parenthood facility in North Carolina, headed a coercive eugenic sterilization program in the state when he served as Mecklenburg County’s welfare director from 1945 to 1972. Eugenics has been a cornerstone of Planned Parenthood’s history, and its ugly roots continue to be revealed. According to a report by the Charlotte Observer:

Kuralt retired almost 40 years ago and died in 1994. His key aides also have died, and memories have faded of the decisions that changed hundreds of lives. Some women came forward willingly. Some patients were little more than children who didn’t understand what was to take place. Today, it is impossible to tease out the exact mix of good intentions and overzealous execution, prejudice and paternalism that let such a crusade run unchecked.

A coercive program put in place by the German Nazi Party also targeted children-unable to consent.

Nazis plan to sterilize children under eugenics program (Image: NYTs Jan 5, 1934)

In the 1970’s, a lawsuit was filed to petition federal agencies to draw up guidelines which would prevent the economic coercion of poor women seeking medical care under Medicaid and other programs. A 1973 report by the Aiken Standard report on the case states that,  “The action amends a suit seeking to prevent the forced sterilizations of minors and mental incompetents, stemming from three minors, two of whom were allegedly sterilized without their consent and one who received experimental birth control shots in Alabama.

Aiken lawsuit to stop forced sterilization of children

In referring to the aforementioned Mecklenburg County case, the Charlotte Observer also discussed the issue of “consent,” writing, “Records show patients signed consent for 317 of the 430 sterilizations brought by the Welfare Department. Those without consent were often the youngest patients. All told, the department got sterilization orders for 54 children 16 and younger. The youngest was a 10-year-old girl with a mental age of 4 who had begun menstruating the year before. The parents, who signed the consent for surgery, “appear to give her good supervision but she frequently eludes her parents and wanders away,” the summary says.”

What about today?

On Thursday, October 24, 2019 a judge will make the final determination on whether the mother of a young seven year-old boy, James Younger, can begin the process of chemically altering his gender to “transition” him into being a girl. You heard correctly- 7 years-old – a child that can hardly consent nor understand the consequences that could change his life and his body forever. The case has garnered a ton of attention over the last year but exploded on social media this week after the boy’s father, Jeff Younger, lost his battle in court to protect his son from this experimental procedure.

James Younger with his father Jeff Younger (Image: SaveJames.com)

According to the Daily Caller, “Jeff Younger said his son is happy being a boy and does not desire to be a girl, according to The Texan. James Younger’s pediatrician mother, Anne Georgulas, as well as counselors and therapists who testified on her behalf, told the court that the 7-year-old is transgender and had expressed to each of them that he wished he were a girl.”

LifeSite News, has been following the case and reported that, “Dr. Georgulas [the boy’s mother] has been telling James he’s a girl since he was three. She enrolled him in kindergarten as a girl named “Luna.” He uses the girls’ restroom and all of this classmates believe he is a girl. Dr. Georgulas wants to subject James to puberty blockers and cross-sex hormones as well as legally force his father to treat him as a girl. ”

“Multiple character witnesses for Mr. Younger testified that James presents as a boy when he is with his father and that they have never seen reason to believe James wants to be a girl,” LifeSite News also reported.

On Monday, a consensus of 11 of the 12 jurors in a Dallas court ruled against granting Younger [the father] sole managing conservatorship over James and his twin brother Jude, reported the Daily Wire, adding:

According to the LifeSiteNews, Georgulas has been granted authority to move forward with puberty blockers, which can cause chemical castration, and, potentially, hormones, if she so chooses.

The case is raising questions about the ability for young children to “consent” to permanent and often surgical changes to their bodies.

History has shown us that courts and the medical community have made troubling decisions for others in the past. It wasn’t that long ago when the State was forcefully sterilizing men, women and children under eugenics programs that continue to haunt society to this day. In many cases, children who were forcefully castrated or sterilized with “permission” of their parents have since decried the ghoulish experiments.

 

In the summer of 1923, 16 year-old Carrie Buck was raped and became pregnant. She was unmarried and the daughter of an inmate at the Lynchburg Colony for Epileptics and Feebleminded. After her foster parents dubbed her she  “peculiar” since birth, Carrie was classified as “feebleminded.” According to Facinghistory.org:

On March 28, 1924, Carrie Buck gave birth to a daughter, whom she named Vivian. A few months later, Carrie was admitted to the Lynchburg Colony. Not long after her arrival, Virginia passed a law allowing involuntary sterilization of those labeled as “feebleminded.” Officials at the Lynchburg Colony decided to sterilize Carrie Buck under the new law with the approval of Albert Priddy, the superintendent of the colony. But first, he and his colleagues arranged for her to appeal the decision in the Virginia courts. Although the appeal was in her name, Carrie Buck had no voice in the process. Priddy and other eugenicists were in charge. They hired an attorney for her as well as one for themselves. The two lawyers were in constant contact with one another and with Priddy before and during trial proceedings even though such collaborations are unethical.

The case, later known as Buck v. Bell, was first heard in the Circuit Court for Amherst County on November 18, 1924.

At the trial Aubrey Strode, the lawyer for Priddy and the Lynchburg Colony, offered “scientific evidence” that Carrie Buck ought to be sterilized. The evidence came from the Eugenics Record Office and was prepared by Harry Laughlin.

Laughlin, who never met the young girl, was published by Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger in her Birth Control Review. He also signed the Citizen’s Committee on Planned Parenthood and in 1936, according to researcher Paul A. Lombardo, “Laughlin received an honorary degree from the Nazi-controlled University of Heidelberg as “a pioneer in the science of race cleansing.”

 

Laughlin’s “evidence” claimed that Carrie came, “from a shiftless, ignorant, and worthless class of people…”

After watching her seven-month-old daughter for a short time, a nurse decided that the baby was “not quite normal.” Based on this testimony, the judge decided that Carrie’s mother, Carrie herself, and her infant daughter were all “socially inadequate.”

Irving Whitehead, Buck’s lawyer, did little on her behalf. He called no witnesses to dispute Laughlin or other “experts” who favored sterilization. Not surprisingly, a judge upheld the decision to sterilize Carrie Buck. Whitehead promptly filed an appeal on her behalf in the Virginia Court of Appeals. It was just eight pages long, compared with the 44-page document the colony’s lawyers prepared. In November 1925, the appeals court also ruled against Buck.

In April of 1927, the case reached the U.S. Supreme Court. By then, Albert Priddy was dead. The new superintendent of the Lynchburg Colony was his former assistant, a Dr. Bell. So the case that began as Buck v. Priddy went to the Supreme Court as Buck v. Bell. The justices saw only the records from the original trial and the appeals court. Based solely on what they read in the court transcripts, they voted 8-1 to uphold the sterilization of Carrie Buck.

Oliver Wendall Holmes

Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. who delivered the opinion of the Supreme Court, stated in part, “We have seen more than once that the public welfare may call upon the best citizens for their lives. It would be strange if it could not call upon those who already sap the strength of the State for these lesser sacrifices, often not felt to be such by those concerned, in order to prevent our being swamped with incompetence. It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind. . . . Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”

Carrie Buck was sterilized in October 1927.

In 1928, Virginia officials also sterilized Carrie Buck’s sister. She was told that the operation was to remove her appendix. Only in 1980 did she learn why she was never able to have a child. “I broke down and cried,” she said. “My husband and me wanted children desperately. We were crazy about them. I never knew what they’d done to me.”

The ruling encouraged other states to enact sterilization laws. By 1930, 24 states had passed similar measures and about 60,000 people were sterilized under these statutes. Virginia alone sterilized more than 7,500 people between the Supreme Court ruling in 1927 and 1972 when the law was finally replaced.

As recent as the 1960’s state decisions which forever altered children reached deep into the heart of North Carolina and impacted a young Black teen by the name of Elaine Riddick.

Riddick’s tragic story also included a horrific rape as a young girl where she became pregnant.

NC state social worker Sue L. Casebolt discovered her pregnancy and referred Elaine’s case to the state’s Eugenics Board. One of the prominent supporters of the NC eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood. Casebolt had been installed as the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Eugenics Board in 1961 and was on the board in 1968 when it approved the sterilization of Riddick.

According to ABC News, “Riddick’s illiterate grandmother, was told that they were doing a “procedure” that was necessary to help the young girl and signed the sterilization papers with an “X”. The state authorized and paid for the procedure, and without her consent or even her knowledge, Riddick was sterilized shortly after giving birth. She was 14 years old.”

In an interview in the documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21, Riddick stated:

“I asked the State of North Carolina why they did this to me…They sterilized kids, my understanding…-as young as eight years of age. I don’t know what an eight year-old can do that could cause them to do this to them? The only reason I can give myself is that [it’s] because they’re Black.”

According to Maafa21:

At a board meeting held three weeks later, she stated that she intended to keep a file on every child whose name reached her desk so that they could be picked up as soon as they reached childbearing age.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Sue Casebolt on eugenics board that sterilized Elaine Riddick (Image credit: Maafa21)

“I did not find out that they had sterilized me until I was nineteen years old,” Riddick states in the documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21.

“They cut me open like I was a hog,” Riddick emotionally told lawmakers in a hearing on reparations for eugenics victims.

Lillie Ann Buelin was also a victim of the terrible NC Eugenics Program, she told DigTriad.com that welfare workers told her that if she didn’t go to school they would operate on her and have her sterilized.  She says they also tested her and labeled her retarded.

“I was just 13 years old,” she emphasized.

In 2005, NBC News reported how, “Government-funded researchers tested AIDS drugs on hundreds of foster children over the past two decades, often without providing them a basic protection afforded in federal law and required by some states, an Associated Press review has found.”

The research funded by the National Institutes of Health spanned the country. It was most widespread in the 1990s as foster care agencies sought treatments for their HIV-infected children that weren’t yet available in the marketplace.

The practice ensured that foster children — mostly poor or minority — received care from world-class researchers at government expense, slowing their rate of death and extending their lives. But it also exposed a vulnerable population to the risks of medical research and drugs that were known to have serious side effects in adults and for which the safety for children was unknown.

According to a report from the Catholic News Agency (CNA), “Pediatric endocrinologists are warning that despite a lack of medical tests to determine its safety, U.S. doctors are increasingly injecting children who have gender dysphoria with a powerful hormonal suppressant normally used to treat prostate cancer.” And, a recent NBC News report highlighted a study that, “found that transgender women, who are assigned the male sex at birth, were twice as likely as cisgender men or women to have the blood clot condition venous thromboembolism. Transgender women on hormone therapy were also found to be 80 to 90 percent more likely to have stroke or a heart attack than cisgender women.”

A review of several studies, by the BMJ, concluded, that “There are significant problems with how the evidence for Gender-affirming cross-sex hormone has been collected and analysed that prevents definitive conclusions to be drawn…The development of these interventions should, therefore, occur in the context of research, and treatments for under 18 gender dysphoric children and adolescents remain largely experimental. There are a large number of unanswered questions that include the age at start, reversibility; adverse events, long term effects on mental health, quality of life, bone mineral density, osteoporosis in later life and cognition…”

On Thursday, Daily Wire writer Matt Walsh tweeted, “And yes puberty blockers are chemical castration. It’s the same drug they use to chemically castrate sex offenders. Yes this is shocking and hard to believe but it’s also true. This is the world we live in now. Wake up and start paying attention.”

Matt Walsh tweet over James Younger (Image: Twitter)

Public outrage over the ruling in the Jeff Younger case prompted Texas Governor Greg Abbott to tweet on Wednesday that, “FYI the matter of 7 year old James Younger is being looked into by the Texas Attorney General’s Office and the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services.” But, according to the Washington Examiner, “There are no laws currently preventing a legal guardian from giving a minor puberty blockers or hormones.”

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott tweets about the James Younger transgender case (Image: Twitter)

It also prompted Texas Representative Rep. Chip Roy to draft a letter to to the US Attorney General over his concern for the “lack of research studying the long-term impacts of the experimental use of medical treatments for so called gender dysphoria on young children, including hormones on children as young as 8 and double mastectomies on girls as young as 13…”

 

 

Rep. Roy then tweeted, “A 7-year-old shouldn’t be subjected to barbaric medical procedures because of an irresponsible adult.”

Rep Chip Roy sends letter to US Justice Department over transgender issue (Image: Twitter)

That sentiment was repeated by Washington Examiner columnist Brad Polumbo who wrote, “A 7-year-old boy cannot be transgender. At least, not with anywhere near the certainty necessary to justify life-altering, potentially irreversible physical changes such as hormone therapy or puberty blockers.”

This is insane and has understandably led to conservative backlash and widespread denunciation. As Kaylee McGhee observes, “[T]his is the logical conclusion of the transgender movement: Affirm our agenda or lose your rights to freedom of speech, association, conscience, and even your parental rights.”

McGhee is exactly right, which is why gay people should denounce transgender radicalism and separate ourselves from a movement that would strip away parental rights and force confused children into radical, life-altering decisions, all in the name of adults’ ability to show off how “woke” they are.

Polumbo continued, “First, let’s dispense with the narrative that a 7-year-old can even be transgender at all. Such a young child cannot even truly understand what sex and gender are, let alone sexuality or gender identity. Of course, a child can experience gender confusion: Many children do, and if James wanted to go by the name Luna, wear dresses, or so on, his parents would be wrong to shame him or otherwise stifle him. But that’s a very far cry from making radical, permanent physical changes based on the whims of a young child who, as McGhee notes, doesn’t even meet the medical criteria for a gender dysphoria diagnosis. Moreover, numerous studies show “that a substantial majority [of gender-confused kids] — anywhere from 65% to 94% — eventually ceased to identify as transgender.”

But, those stats did not dissuade the boy’s mother who, according to the Washington Examiner, secured a letter of recommendation for transition for James from a woman associated with a gay children’s therapy center, the Examiner reported.

“This is a letter of recommendation that my client, James Younger, aka Luna, begin the process of becoming a patient of the GENECIS clinic so that she can receive a full psychological assessment for gender dysphoria and potentially take hormone blockers,” said a letter from Rebekka Ouer from Dallas Rainbow Therapy.

A judge is set to rule on the matter Thursday October 24, 2019.

(NOTE: Reprint permission granted if article published in full with credit to the blog/author)

Government ‘family planning’ push once rightly raised suspicion of Black genocide

Posted in Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black Population Demographics, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Eugenics, Eugenics in North Carolina, Forced Population Control, Forced Sterilization, Guttmacher, Marco Rubio, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood in Black Neighborhoods, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2018 by saynsumthn

family planning, abortion, pro-life

Alan

In a previous article in this series on the eugenics and class warfare agenda behind federally funded population programs like Title X and others, I detailed how minority leaders quickly became suspicious of the government’s push for “family planning.” This article will document the beginning of this agenda and how suspicions of these programs targeted at “low-income,” impoverished Americans continued.

In 1919, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger made an astonishing admission.Quoting from Sanger’s “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” published in the February 1919 edition of her Birth Control Review, Sanger says, “Birth Control will clear the way for eugenics and the elimination of the unfit.” She went on:

Before eugenists and others who are laboring for racial betterment can succeed, they must first clear the way for Birth Control. Like the advocates of Birth Control, the eugenists, for instance, are seeking to assist the race toward the elimination of the unfit. Both are seeking a single end but they lay emphasis upon different methods….

Eugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit.

Sanger’s statement could almost be described as prophetic. Fears of the overpopulation of certain people groups were and are common in eugenics circles. By the 1960s, as discussed in part one of this series, fears of overpopulation were again being driven by organizations with ties to eugenics, pushing for federal dollars to reduce the births of the poor.

This was met with resistance in the United States, where there was a growing concern that the push for federally funded population control was motivated by a sinister plot to limit the births of Blacks and other minorities. After all, years of eugenic programs, had already been aimed at sterilizing Black Americans, so why wouldn’t federally funded “family planning” programs also target those populations?

Image: Graffiti says Birth Control is a Plan to Kill Negro (Image credit: Jet Magazine, August 1951)

Graffiti says Birth Control is a Plan to Kill Negro (Image credit: Jet Magazine, August 1951)

As Live Action News has previously documented, North Carolina’s eugenics program was funded in part by Clarence Gamble, a member of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s Boards of Directors for both the American Birth Control League (ABCL) as well as Planned Parenthood. He was a close friend of the Planned Parenthood Federation and was also a financier of Sanger’s birth control crusade. That eugenics board was responsible for the sterilization of Elaine Riddick, as seen in the video clip below from the film, Maafa21

In Margaret Sanger’s “Plan for Peace,” published in the April 1932 edition of her Birth Control Review, the Planned Parenthood founder laid out her eugenic ideas for using government resources to reduce populations of those she deemed “unfit.” It reads in part:

…Second, have Congress set up a special department for the study of population problems and appoint a Parliament of Population, the directors representing the various branches of science this body to direct and control the population through birth rates and immigration, and to direct its distribution over the country according to national needs consistent with taste, fitness and interest of the individuals.

The main objects of the Population Congress would be:

a. to raise the level and increase the general  intelligence of population
b. to increase the population slowly by keeping the birth rate at its present level of fifteen per thousand…

…The second step would be to take an inventory of the secondary group such as illiterates, paupers, unemployables, criminals, prostitutes, dope-fiends, classify them in special departments under government medical protection, and segregate them on farms and open spaces as long as necessary for the strengthening and development of moral conduct.

Having corralled this enormous part of our population and placed it on a basis of health instead of punishment, it is safe to say that fifteen or twenty millions of our population would then be organized into soldiers of defense-defending the unborn against their own disabilities.

Image: Margaret Sanger’s Plan for Peace (edited)

Margaret Sanger’s Plan for Peace (edited)

In 2017, data from the Centers for Disease Control showed that overall, the U.S. birth rate had reached the lowest recorded number of births in 30 years. According to a May 2018 article in Forbes:

… [A]s described… at the Institute for Family Studies, 2017 fertility rates have been published, and show a 40 year low at 1.76 lifetime births per woman, with the most dramatic declines expressed in “missing births” over the past decade, occurring among Hispanic and African-American women, whose fertility rates are now, while still higher, much closer to the already-low rates of white non-Hispanic women. Specifically, the fertility rate for black women dropped from 2.15 to 1.89, and that of Hispanic women dropped from 2.85 to 2.1 in the time period of 2008 – 2016, compared to a decline from 1.95 to 1.72 births per non-Hispanic woman.

Recently, an Urban Institute report which looked at the birth rates for women in their 20s, found that from 2007 to 2012, according to CNBC, “Hispanic women in the age group saw the biggest declines in birth rates—a 26 percent plunge. That was followed by a 14 percent decrease among African-American women and an 11 percent fall for white women.”

Data on users of Title X clinics by race/ethnicity reveal that poor minorities are growing in their usage of the so-called free “family planning” services. In 1991 the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), reported the following:

  • 14.9% Hispanic
  • 61.9% White
  • 17.3% Black
  • .5% Native American
  • 1.2% Asian/Pacific Islander
Image: Title X family planning users by race ethnicity 1991 (Image credit: CDC)

Title X family planning users by race ethnicity 1991 (Image credit: CDC)

Today, according to figures published in the 2016 Family Planning Annual report, those numbers are on the rise. A report published by the blog American Progress states:

  • Out of the 4 million family planning clients who Title X serves, more than half are women of color: 30 percent identify as either black or African American, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, or American Indian or Alaska Native, and another 32 percent of clients identify as Hispanic or Latino.
  • 21 percent of all Title X clients identify as black or African American, and 30 percent identify as Hispanic or Latinowhile African American people and Hispanic and Latino people make up 13 percent and 17 percent of the U.S. population, respectively.

The figures show an alarming increase in users among the Black and Hispanic communities, specifically. This means that poor, minority women are likely more highly targeted for population control services through federally funded “family planning” programs than in the past.

In 1951, Dr. Charles V. Willie, Professor of Sociology at Syracuse University in New York, noted that Black Americans opposed any government effort to limit their numbers. Professor Willie studied the Black community’s attitudes on this topic and concluded that they viewed these efforts as Black genocide. “The genocidal charge of Black people is anchored in good data,” the professor told Jet Magazine. “Blacks point out that a leading government spokesperson has declared that an increase in Black people of 1 to 2 percent points of the total population is ‘extra-ordinary.’ Blacks also point out that whites were not concerned about their family form and size during the age of slavery.”

Simone M. Caron’s research published by the Journal of Social History, entitled, Birth Control and the Black Community in the 1960’s: Genocide or Power Politics?, gave several examples, including the attitudes of the Black Panther party, writing:

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race.

Author Donald T. Critchlow, in his book, “Intended Consequences, Birth Control, Abortion and the Federal Government in Modern America,” also noted the opposition, writing, “The Black Muslim newspaper, Muhammad Speaks, kept up a steady attack on federal family planning programs as a white plot against the black community.”

By 1962, Urban League and NAACP chapters would join the list of “family planning” critics, according to Caron:

Whitney Young, leader of the Urban League, revoked his group’s support of contraception in 1962. Several local NAACP chapters followed suit. Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception and argued that black women needed to produce large numbers of babies until the black population comprised 30-35 percent of Americans; only then would blacks be able to affect the power structure.

In September of 1965, according to author David Allyn in his book, “Make Love, not War,” “the NAACP opposed a $91,000 federal grant for the dissemination of birth control information in North Philadelphia. The NAACP charged Planned Parenthood, which had applied for the grant, with attempting to ‘help Negroes commit racial suicide.’ ”

Many of these fears were confirmed when, in 1964, the platform of the American Eugenics Party included the following:

  • The United States is already over-populated. We must stop all immigration and impose birth controls.
  • Those genetic types within each race and stock having better traits will be encouraged to produce more offspring and those having the lesser qualities will be restricted in the number of their offspring.
Image: American Eugenics Party platform 1964

American Eugenics Party platform 1964 (Image credit: DNA Learning Center at Cold Springs Harbor)

But advocacy of “family planning” programs was strong and the push was coming from top leaders, including the President of the United States.

In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) lent his support to taxpayer funded “family planning” efforts within the U.S. and abroad, claiming in a speech that for every five dollars spent on population control, more than a hundred would be invested in economic growth. For implementation of an “affirmative and effective population policy at home and abroad,” President Johnson was bestowed Planned Parenthood’s highest award (the Margaret Sanger Award).

Image: Lyndon B Johnson receives Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award

Lyndon B Johnson receives Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award

Planned Parenthood had its roots in eugenics; founder Margaret Sanger was a member of the American Eugenics Society, who stacked her board with leaders of the eugenics movement and even willingly spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan. Simply changing the organization’s name from the American Birth Control League (under Sanger’s leadership) to Planned Parenthood did not erase Planned Parenthood’s eugenics ties. You can trace the organization’s deep ties in eugenics well beyond their name change in 1942, and that philosophy has been carried on throughout its history.

Image: Margaret Sanger meets with Klan from film Maafa21

Margaret Sanger writes about Klan meeting in Autobiography (Image credit: Maafa21)

Planned Parenthood‘s medical director during this time (1962) was a doctor by the name of Alan Guttmacher, a former VP for the American Eugenics Society and founder of Planned Parenthood’s research arm and “special affiliate,” the Guttmacher Institute, who later went on to become president of Planned Parenthood.

Image: PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

Guttmacher was also a eugenicist, joining others of his day in voicing a concern about rising population growth. Guttmacher did not discount the idea of coercion.

Image: Compulsory Birth Control article

Compulsory Birth Control article

In 1966, Guttmacher compared the world population with the threat of nuclear war, telling the Washington Post that governments may have to act officially to limit families. “It may be taken out of the voluntary category,” Guttmacher said.

Image: Guttmacher abortion coercion possible

Guttmacher abortion coercion possible

Although Guttmacher can be credited as the mastermind behind the push for abortion at Planned Parenthood, he also helped craft the push for taxpayer funded family planning.

As Live Action News previously documented, in 1966, Guttmacher proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to pay for birth control access for the poor. By this time, Guttmacher had become more crafty in his messaging, promoting the concept as empowering others to make “choices,” when the real motivation was population control. This eugenics agenda was clear in his statement published by the New York Times: “The main goal of our program is not just to limit population, but to give everyone the same opportunity for quality medical care.”

Image: 1963 article urges family planning for Blacks (Image credit New York Times)

1963 article urges family planning for Blacks (Image credit New York Times)

The “plan” — described by a 1966 New York Times article as a “partnership of public and private agencies” — was to make birth control services “freely available to every American by 1970” in an effort to prevent about 250,000 pregnancies every year. It was presented at Planned Parenthood’s New York headquarters by the organization’s then-president, George N. Lindsay, who called it the “best bargain in health services that money could buy.”

Interestingly, a short time later, in 1967, according to HHS’ Administration for Children and Families website, funds for “family planning” were introduced:

The 1967 Social Security Amendments earmarked 6 percent of maternal and child health funds for family planning, officially sanctioning the Children’s Bureau’s involvement in these services for the first time. By 1968, nearly all States were providing some form of family planning through this program (up from 20 States just 4 years earlier), bringing assistance to more than 420,000 women.

Image: 1967 Child Health Program funds Family Planning

1967 Child Health Program funds Family Planning

According to a Brookings Paper on Economic Activity report:

In addition, the Maternity and Infant Care projects under the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (DHEW) supplemented the EOA [1964 Economic Opportunity Act (EOA)] effort by funding family planning services through city health departments. From fiscal 1967 to fiscal 1970, federal funds allocated to family planning increased to roughly $600 million (in 2010 dollars), over 10 times their level in 1967.

Author Donald T. Critchlow noted in the aforementioned book that by 1967, the “Children’s Bureau budget was increased to $50 million… but the bureau was hamstrung by restrictions that limited matching grants to state and local agencies. This policy deliberately excluded voluntary agencies such as Planned Parenthood from receiving federal funds administered through state and local agencies.”

However, Critchlow also observed that by the time Lyndon B. Johnson left office in 1968, “a policy revolution in federal family planning had occurred, setting the stage for the further expansion of family planning programs under Richard Nixon.”

In part three of this series, Live Action News will detail how the population control movement recruited a Republican president to push this agenda. Additional articles on Title X’s history are included (Parts onetwo, and four), as well as Planned Parenthood’s  Blueprint and George HW Bush’s relationship to TitleX and Planned Parenthood.

Editor’s Note, 11/8/18: Links to related articles were added.

Media enables Planned Parenthood prez to ignore organization’s eugenics past

Posted in Leana Wen, Media Bias, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Self Abortion with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2018 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood prez says nation’s #1 abortion provider ‘promotes life’

Planned Parenthood, abortion corporation

In November 2018, the New York Times (NYT) interviewed recently appointed Planned Parenthood president Dr. Leana Wen, who replaced political organizer Cecile Richards — the woman who presided over declining patient services and an aborted baby parts scandal. In her interview, Wen dodged topics such as eugenics — a largely racist philosophy — and self-managed abortions, all while claiming she has never done anything in her medical career but save lives. If this is the case, and Dr. Wen values human lives and desires to save lives, she’s working for the wrong organization.

Image: Leana Wen Planned Parenthood President

Leana Wen Planned Parenthood President

QUESTION #1: Eugenics

The NYT asked Wen, “How do you consider the misinformation — such as, say, that Planned Parenthood furthers eugenics — that can proliferate about the organization?” The paper’s use of the term “misinformation” is intellectually dishonest and a denial of history, which granted Wen the ability to pretend the organization’s known eugenics roots were just part of some vast, pro-life conspiracy.

Wen’s only mention of eugenics was to claim, “The same individuals who are making these eugenics claims are often the ones who want to deprive our communities of evidence-based education like teen-pregnancy prevention programs….”

Now that Dr. Wen is president, does the NYT intend for the public to believe it is “misinformation” that Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, had strong eugenics connections, Klan interactions, rants about immigrants, and promoted the idea of forced sterilization? Are we to diminish the horrific effects all those victimized by eugenics as we scrub Planned Parenthood’s well-documented history of it from the public sphere?

Image: New York Times asks Leana Wen about eugenics and Planned Parenthood (Image NYT Dr. Leana Wen Dislikes the Politicization of Health Care 11/6/2018)

New York Times asks Leana Wen about eugenics and Planned Parenthood (Image NYT Dr. Leana Wen Dislikes the Politicization of Health Care 11/6/2018)

Apparently, this liberal press outlet would prefer to rewrite history.

The philosophy of eugenics negatively affected many Black Americans, such as Elaine Riddick, who was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. Her tearful testimony encouraged lawmakers to vote for reparations for those like her, who were eugenically sterilized. One of the prominent supporters of that horrific eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

But today’s abortion-friendly media appears to have become far more activist than investigative, and the New York Times refused to dig any deeper into Wen’s claims.

Live Action News has documented the following:

  • Planned Parenthood had direct ties to eugenics.
  • The organization was founded by Margaret Sanger, an enthusiastic member of the American Eugenics Society who metwith members of the Klan, writing in her autobiography: “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses….”
  • Planned Parenthood brought on officials who were leading eugenics proponents.
  • Planned Parenthood received free rent from the Eugenics Society, according to the Eugenics Review.
  • Eugenic boards were sometimes operated by Planned Parenthood associates and some boards referred to the organization (watch Maafa21 clip below):

Year after year, Planned Parenthood has presented its most prestigious Margaret Sanger Award, named after its eugenicist founder, to journalists, to politicians like Democrat Nancy Pelosi, and to members of the media. (Perhaps for its softball Wen interview, the NYT will receive one as well.)

Image: Margaret Sanger Award given out by Planned Parenthood (Screen Planned Parenthood website Nov 13, 2018)

Margaret Sanger Award given out by Planned Parenthood (Screen Planned Parenthood website Nov 13, 2018)

If Dr. Leana Wen truly wants to continue in her pattern of saving human lives, then why is she working for an organization established by people who promoted the idea of forced sterilizations for those arbitrarily deemed “less than”?

QUESTION #2: Self Abortion

The NYT asked Wen, “…[H]ow do you feel about self-induced abortions?” Despite claiming she treated a woman who died from an illegal “home abortion,” Wen passed up the opportunity to denounce the push for self-managed abortions.

Image: New York Times asks Planned Parenthood prez about self-managed abortion

New York Times asks Planned Parenthood prez about self-managed abortion

Wouldn’t more unsupervised, at-home abortions have the potential to lead to even more emergency room visits like the one she describes in her interview? But instead of defending lives like a medical doctor concerned about women’s safety, Wen answered like a pro-abortion activist: “What I have a problem with is when they — or the government — impose their will on women’s bodies and health.”

Image: Leana Wen , Planned Parenthood president on The View

Leana Wen , Planned Parenthood president on The View

 

Wen pivoted further by redirecting the topic to an attack on pro-lifers — who, by the way,  regularly document transports of women from Planned Parenthood facilities to emergency rooms by ambulance, after so-called “safe” abortions.

“It’s insulting when people describe their anti-choice stance as “pro-life…” said the new leader of the organization killing 320,000 human beings every year.

While the NYT erroneously titled this sad excuse of an interview, “Dr. Leana Wen Dislikes the Politicization of Health Care,” it is beyond clear that Wen is in lockstep with Planned Parenthood, the inventor of abortion politicization, which has enabled the organization to rake in half a billion annually taxpayer dollars that may very well help to pay Wen’s salary. 

After all, it was Planned Parenthood, not those pesky “anti-choice” pro-lifers, who recently unveiled a new plan to expand abortion on demand in 2019. How’s that for politicization?

But perhaps Dr. Wen missed that memo.

Image: Planned Parenthood plan to expand abortion 2019

Planned Parenthood plan to expand abortion 2019

As delusional as it sounds, Dr. Wen and the media present abortion as “healthcare” and claim that Wen’s job as the abortion provider’s president is to “promote life and the well-being of women and families and communities” because, she claims, “I’m a physician. I went to medical school. Everything I’ve ever done is to save lives.”

Not all physicians save lives, Dr. Wen — including the ones working for Planned Parenthood and the abortion industry as a whole. They’re physicians who went to medical school, too — and some of them fully admit that they’re taking lives for a living.

Dr. Wen would have the public believe that abortion, the deliberate taking of human life in the womb at any stage of pregnancy, for any reason imaginable, committed 900 times per day by her organization, is “promot[ing] life.”

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Black woman sterilized due to eugenic agenda of Planned Parenthood board member

Posted in Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Clarence Gamble, Eugenics by State, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

At the age of 14, after becoming pregnant from a violent rape, the eugenics board of the State of Nort

North Carolina decided Elaine Riddick should not have any more children and sterilized her without consent. Riddick claims the reason she was sterilized without her knowledge or approval was because the state of North Carolina had ruled her “feebleminded,” a degrading term commonly used in eugenics. She recently told her emotional story in the powerful documentary film, produced by Life Dynamics, Inc., called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America, which Live Action is screening on social media this month. North Carolina’s eugenics program was funded in part by a member of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s Board of Directors and close friend of the Federation — Clarence Gamble. Gamble sat on the boardof Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) as well asPlanned Parenthood, and was also a financier of Sanger’s birth control crusade. In addition, he helped to fund the North Carolina Eugenics program.

Sanger, an established member of the American Eugenics Society, stacked her organization with like-minded men and women. In 1942, the ABCL changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Image: ABCL Directors

Clarence Gamble, a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League

Elaine Riddick was kidnapped, molested, and became pregnant as a result of rape at 13 years of age. At the time, Riddick was living with her grandmother, Maggie Woodard, known as “Miss Peaches,” when a social worker with the State discovered her pregnancy. Her name was Sue L. Casebolt, and she referred Elaine’s case to the state’s Eugenics Board. Casebolt had been installed as the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Eugenics Board in 1961.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick speaks about eugenic sterilization in Maafa21

According to Maafa21:

At a board meeting held three weeks later, she stated that she intended to keep a file on every child whose name reached her desk so that they could be picked up as soon as they reached childbearing age. Casebolt was still on the board in 1968 when it approved the sterilization of Elaine Riddick.

Sue Casebolt board that sterilized Black woman funded by Planned Parenthood member/ Sue Casebolt on eugenics board that sterilized Elaine Riddick (Image credit: Maafa21)

Riddick said that her grandmother was illiterate and did not understand what she was signing. Knowing this, the social worker pressured her to sign with an “X,” threatening to send Elaine to an orphanage, and remove her grandmother’s government aid for food if she did not. Unfortunately, the document her grandmother was pressured to sign was not a medical consent form for the birth, but a consent to have Elaine sterilized after she gave birth to her son Tony, now a successful businessman.

“I did not find out that they had sterilized me until I was nineteen years old,” Riddick says in Maafa21, adding:

I asked the State of North Carolina why they did this to me and they said that [they did it] because I was feebleminded. That I would not be able to take care of myself…. That I was incompetent…. They were saying that feeblmindness is hereditary. So, they sterilized me so I would not produce my kind. Mind you, I am not illiterate nor am I feebleminded…. They sterilized kids, my understanding…-as young as eight years of age. I don’t know what an eight year-old can do that could cause them to do this to them? The only reason I can give myself is that [it’s] because they’re Black.”

Riddick’s powerful testimony and nearly 40-year battle for justice secured millions of dollars for surviving victims in North Carolina. As a result of Riddick’s willingness to tell her story, North Carolina also agreed to make its eugenics records public.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

North Carolina Eugenics Program document

North Carolina’s sterilization program began with the passage of the North Carolina Sterilization Act in 1929. In 1933, according to the North Carolina History Project online, the act was declared unconstitutional on the grounds that it “did not allow an appeals process. In the same year, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a law allowing an appeal process and created the Board of Eugenics to oversee sterilizations.”

“Between 1929 and 1974, more than 7,600 North Carolinians were sterilized,” reports the Winston-Salem Journal, which wrote extensively on this tragedy, “many of them against their will. Young girls who had gotten pregnant, some by rape or incest, were frequently the targets. Some were flagged because faulty intelligence tests labeled them “feeble-minded,” others simply because they were epileptic. Many were young, poor and black.”

“It’s a very paternalistic model,” author and researcher Johanna Schoen said. “(Women) certainly weren’t supposed to choose when to use birth control or when not to use birth control, or when to be sterilized or when not to be sterilized. The model was, the physician knows best.”

Schoen writes in his book, “Choice & Coercion: Birth Control, Sterilization, and Abortion in Public”:

[M]any philanthropists and health officials believed that African Americans lacked the intellectual  capacity to use any form of birth control. Elsie Wulkop, a social worker who collaborated with [Clarence] Gamble to establish small contraceptive field trials, commented on the attempt to educate African Americans on birth control, “It impresses me as being like trying to get sheer animals to conform.”

Schoen continues, “Sources indicate that some health officials might have found birth control programs appealing as a form of population control.”

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick

Riddick is also understandably outspoken against Planned Parenthood, as the abortion corporation’s founder was  financially supported by Clarence Gamble, the man who also helped fund the very eugenics program that sterilized Riddick. “Euphemisms and sterilization target code words, for example, “feebleminded”, were used to describe Black women like me,” Riddick wrote in an op-ed:

“I was forcibly sterilized at the age of 14 years under North Carolina’s inhumane forced sterilization policy. A policy that was derived from Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood population control handbook, which spread across the United States by her loyal band of eugenicists and lobbying our elected officials.”

Despite Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s ties to the horrors of eugenics, many laud her as a hero, including modern-day Planned Parenthood itself. But, as Mary Senander explains in the Star Tribune, Sanger was anything but a heroine:

Contemporary liberal social planners have elevated Sanger to sainthood, protesting that her birth control campaign was nothing more than a vehicle for economic betterment and health for the masses. But Sanger’s own well-documented words, publications and associations indicate a deeper and darker motivation. Sanger began publishing the Birth Control Review in 1917 and served as its editor until 1938. The May 1919 Review proclaimed, “More children for the fit, less for the unfit.” By unfit, Sanger meant the mentally retarded or physically handicapped; later her definition expanded.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Birth Control to Create a Race of Thoroughbreds, by Margaret Sanger (Image Birth Control Review)

In November 1921 the review issued a clarion call: “Birth control, to create a race of thoroughbreds.” Sanger suggested that parents should “apply for babies as immigrants have to apply for visas.” By 1925, she was a true convert to eugenics, setting up birth control clinics in poor neighborhoods populated by “Latins” and “Slavs” (both groups heavily Catholic) and “Hebrews” – groups she had targeted as threats because of their increasing numbers. She spoke of those who were “irresponsible and reckless,” among them those “whose religious scruples prevent their exercising control over their numbers”…

In the October 1926 Review, Sanger announced her idea for eugenic sterilization: “There is only one reply to a request for a higher birthrate among the intelligent, and that is to ask the government to first take off the burdens of the insane and the feeble-minded from your backs.” Eugenicists like Sanger concluded that the poor were both stupid and immoral, fueling campaigns for sterilization during the Depression. (By 1932, 27 states had compulsory sterilization laws.)

Sanger supporter Clarence Gamble was a graduate of Harvard Medical School graduate, the heir to the Procter & Gamble fortune, and a teacher at the University of Pennsylvania. He was also a medical consultant for the Human Betterment League of North Carolina, another organization with ties to eugenics.

                                                            Eugenics pamphlet from Human Betterment League Association

                                                        Eugenics pamphlet from Human Betterment League Association

According to the book, “Intended Consequences,” in 1933, Gamble was elected president of the Pennsylvania Birth Control Federation, an organization affiliated with Sanger. And, according to researcher James A. Miller:

In December 1937, Gamble was appointed ‘Medical Field Director’ of Sanger’s Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau and at the same time became a member of the editorial advisory board of the Bureau’s Journal of Contraception, a propaganda vehicle for Sanger’s birth control and eugenics agenda…When the North Carolina plan was launched, there were just three (private) birth control clinics in the state; by the end of 1938, with Gamble’s backing, the state had created 56. At that time, with less than 3 percent of the country’s population, North Carolina had 13 percent of the nation’s birth control clinics. By mid-1939 the number of birth control clinics in North Carolina had risen to 62, second only to New York.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Margaret Sanger letter to Clarence Gamble (image credit: Maafa21)

By 1939, Gamble joined others in funding Sanger’s Committee on Planned Parenthood. And, according to Senander’s article, “Eugenics part of Sanger legacy”:

 Dr. Clarence J. Gamble, previously a director of the ABCL, was elected the BCFA regional director in the South. Almost immediately, he drew up a memorandum for his plans for the “Negro Project.” Gamble’s plan included placing black leaders in positions where it would appear that they were in charge (in order to counter the perception by black leaders who might regard birth control as an extermination plot). Sanger agreed: “We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten that idea out if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Sanger’s 1939 letter to Gamble, about the infamous “Negro Project,” can be seen excerpted in the image below:

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Gamble referred to eugenic sterilization as “preventative medicine,” writing in the North Carolina Medical Journal in 1951:

One method of preventive medicine, the sterilization of the insane, the feeblemided and the epileptic, is supervised by the Eugenics Board of North Carolina…. Petitions for the sterilization of a mentally diseased, feebleminded, or epileptic person may be initiated by a county superintendent of welfare, or the head of a state institution. If the Board finds that the operation is for the best mental, moral or physical improvement of the patient, or for the public good, it may authorize the procedure…. Of those sterilized under the law, 23 per cent were Negro. That this figure is lower than the proportion of Negroes in the population of the state-approximately one-third-is due partly to the fact that the state hospital caring for the Negro insane and feebleminded has not had sufficient surgical services to perform many of these operations.

Then, by the early 1960’s, Gamble co-authored a booklet on family planning with Planned Parenthood’s president, Alan F. Guttmacher. It was published by Pathfinder Fund, an organization Gamble helped to found. The book was  entitled, “Family planning: a challenge to health workers of every nation.”

Guttmacher, a former vice-president of the American Eugenics Society, had been a longtime advocate of abortion and a strong proponent of government funded “family planning.” Author Angela Franks notes in her book on Sanger:

As both Sanger and Gamble had foreseen, once government got involved, Planned Parenthood [PPFA] and Gamble’s Pathfinder Fund would be able to spend great sums of money carrying out their original eugenic and population control mandates, and with people like Gamble and PPFA’s Alan Guttmacher directing the organizational bureaucracy, the continued influence of eugenics was inevitable.

Research from the Winston-Salem Journal discovered that “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

According to the film, Maafa21, “In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s State’s sterilization program saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.”

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Clarence Gamble calls for eugenics sterilizations (Image: Maafa21)

Gamble had been promoting birth control since the late 1930s…” writes the Winston-Salem Journal. In addition:

Gamble was sure that eugenic sterilization was a good idea, but after World War II few states were willing to consider the kind of aggressive program that he wanted. Gamble contributed time, money and a keen public-relations sense to the Human Betterment League. He also paid for most of the sterilizations in Orange County during one year, and he paid for the research that went into the book Sterilization in North Carolina, written by researcher Moya Woodside.

According to Maafa21, “North Carolina was not the only state whose eugenics programs were influenced by friends of Sanger or Planned Parenthood. In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.” You can watch Maafa21 on Live Action’s Facebook page.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick embraces her son (Image credit: Maafa21 blog)

In her quest to get justice for eugenics victims, Elaine Riddick testified tearfully:

I was a victim of rape…I was a victim of child abuse… I have to get out what the state of North Carolina did to me. I am not feeble minded. I’ve never been feeble minded. They slandered me. They ridiculed and harassed me….

They cut me open like I was a hog… at the same time they gave me a cesarean birth and took my child and when they did that – they sterilized me. What do you think I’m worth?

Riddick told the lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment.

Between 1929 and 1974, nearly 7,600 documented males and females were sterilized by choice, force or coercion under the authority the NC Eugenics Board program. The youngest victims were ten years of age.

  • 85% of victims were female.
  • 40% of victims were minorities, including African Americans and Native Americans.

In 2010, the Justice for Sterilization Victims Foundation was established as a Division of the NC Department of Administration to compensate victims who were forcibly sterilized by the State. The exact number of victims alive today is unknown. However, the State Center for Health Statistics estimates that 2,944 victims may have still been alive as of 2010. It is more realistically estimated by the State Center that 1,500 to 2,000 victims may still be alive.

In 2013, the NC state legislature included $10 million in the budget to be divvied among verified victims.

Eugenics is an evil ideology that tragically remains alive today. As Live Action News has previously documented, the philosophy of eugenics continues to morph under different terms such as abortion and euthanasia. Today, abortion disproportionately targets the African American community — and the main promoter of abortion is Planned Parenthood.

Although Planned Parenthood was founded by Margaret Sanger, an eugenics enthusiast, the organization has yet to denounce her. That is because Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics run just as deep as their founder’s — and that evil root, which claims to decide who is worthy to live or to die, exists to this day.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Film documents Planned Parenthood’s history of Black genocide, eugenics

Posted in Maafa21 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 21, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  Reprinted from Live Action News

Image: Maafa21

As the nation celebrates Black History Month, it is worthwhile to share a documentary revealing how the eugenics and population control agenda — aided and abetted by Planned Parenthood and other organizations — has systematically been used to reduce Black births. Produced by Life Dynamics, a pro-life organization in Denton, Texas, Maafa 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America, is eye-opening. Maafa is a Swahili word meaning “a terrible tragedy,” and referring to the time of the middle passage during the slave trade. The “21” in the title refers to the 21st century, because, in reality, the “Maafa” has not ended. It is still being carried out today.

The back cover of the film sets the stage:

They were stolen from their homes, locked in chains and taken across an ocean. And for more than 200 years, their blood and sweat would help to build the richest and most powerful nation the world has ever known…. The wealthy elite had decided it was time for them to disappear and they were not going to be particular about how it might be done. What you are about to see is that the secret plan these people set in motion 150 years ago is still being carried out today.

In this documentary, this hidden racial agenda is dragged out of the shadows and into the light. Before the next two hours is up, you will know things that America’s politicians and power brokers never intended for you to know and you will see things that the media was never going to show you.

According to Life Dynamics, Maafa 21 unmasks the ties between the Nazis, the American eugenics movement, and today’s “family planning” cartel, and is “about elitism, secret agendas, treachery and corruption at the highest levels of political and corporate America.”

The film begins with the horrors of slavery and reveals how eugenics was introduced as a solution for what some had deemed the “Negro problem” in America. Eugenics opened the flood gates of forced sterilizations, led by crusaders like American Eugenics Society member, Margaret Sanger, who later founded Planned Parenthood.

Mark Crutcher, President of Life Dynamics, points out in the film:

These ties between eugenics and Planned Parenthood’s founder were so well established that Sanger, who was a long standing member of the American Eugenics Society, once pursued a plan to merge the American Birth Control League, or Planned Parenthood as it was later called, with the American Eugenics Society.

Live Action News has documented that, despite the claims of Planned Parenthood’s supporters, not only did founder Margaret Sanger have a strong belief in eugenics, she made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization — and even spoke to the Ku Klux Klan. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, or members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations (chart from Maafa21):

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

And listed among American Eugenics Society members in the film is Sanger herself:

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

According to Crutcher, “The relationship between Sanger and these eugenics elitists was basically a marriage of convenience. In order to advance their common agenda, they needed a front man and she needed money. And the whole thing would be held together with this bizarre obsession with race and class. The result was that the American Birth Control League became the driving force behind the American eugenics movement. Eugenics would no longer be just a philosophy. Sanger, and others like her, were going the put it into practice.”

Maafa 21 not only documents the eugenics movement dating all the way back to the days of slavery, but also contains interviews with notable Black leaders such as Reverends Johnny Hunter and Cleaned Childress, along with Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Image: Black leaders interviewed in Maafa21

Black Leaders in Maafa21 film speak about eugenics and Planned Parenthood

Elaine Riddick, who was forcefully sterilized by the State of North Carolina, was also interviewed for the documentary. Tragically, Riddick’s story was not isolated. It is estimated that 60,000 men and women were eugenically sterilized against their will in the United States, many of whom were minorities. Today, Riddick is outspoken against population control, abortion, and Planned Parenthood, which she believes has a eugenics agenda.

Image of Elaine Riddick from Maafa21

Elaine Riddick speaks about eugenic sterilization in Maafa21

Maafa 21 unveils for viewers who was behind the evil eugenics ideology, who funded it, and who was targeted. It then points out that as the courts began to rule that forced eugenic sterilization was unconstitutional, a new approach was being devised by the purveyors of eugenics. That strategy was the legalization of abortion, led by the largest chain of abortion facilities in America — Planned Parenthood.

Crutcher states in the film:

 … [F]rom the beginning, this idea that man could reinvent the world through eugenics was an elitist philosophy espoused by those who considered themselves not only financially superior, but intellectually superior to everyone else. And Planned Parenthood became the golden child of these people because they are the ones who figured out how to make eugenics work. That is what birth control, and especially abortion, are all about. And the reason Planned Parenthood has been so successful is because, unlike other eugenics organizations, they have always been able to keep their agenda hidden from the public.

Image: Mark Crutcher from Maafa21

Mark Crutcher producer Maafa21 film about eugenics and abortion

In the days leading up to the legalization of abortion, there were many prominent Black civil rights leaders, including Jesse JacksonSamuel YetteFannie Lou HamerWhitney Young, and more who were suspicious of programs that pushed “family planning,” especially those that were placed within Black communities. In reality, Alan Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood’s own former president and also vice president of the American Eugenics Society, admitted that there might be some members of Planned Parenthood’s board who “had the political objective attributed to the organization by [Black] civil rights leaders.”

Believe it or not, Jesse Jackson believed that the Black community was being targeted with birth control, writing in 1971:

Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove (and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation. Those who we could not get rid of in the rice paddies of Viet-Nam we now propose to exterminate, if necessary, eliminate if possible, in the OB wards and gynecology clinics of our urban hospitals. The direct extension of the old “man-in-the-house” rule against public aid recipients can be detected in the drive for birth control….

Image: Rev. Jesse Jackson from Maafa21

Rev. Jesse Jackson opposed abortion and birth control as Black Genocide

In 1974, Roy Innis, National Director of The Congress of Racial Equality, told Ebony Magazine that he was alarmed by the high concentration of birth control centers and abortion facilities in black neighborhoods, “It was not until the mid ’60s that Blacks began to realize that what was called urban renewal was, in fact, what one city planner labeled, ‘Negro removal.’ … We are alarmed by the high concentration of birth control centers and abortion clinics in Black neighborhoods as well as more exotic proposals such as adding anti-fertility drugs to drinking water, as suggested by a famous Chicago economist.”

Image: Maafa21 Black Genocide and abortion

Blacks opposed abortion as Black Genocide Maafa21

As Live Action News has previously documented, in 1971, comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory penned a controversial op-ed entitled, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine. Gregory stated in part:

There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit Black population.

Ironically, within days after the release of Maafa 21’s first edition, U.S Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was being interviewed by a reporter for The New York Times and made this astounding admission when asked about Roe v. Wade – the decision that legalized abortion: “Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”

Shockingly, Maafa 21 viewers also hear undercover phone calls from a Live Action investigation in which Planned Parenthood expresses willingness to accept donations to fund abortions for Black women.

Today, Planned Parenthood receives half a billion in government dollars every year to promote their agenda. And, as Live Action News has documented already, not only is the Planned Parenthood’s market share of abortions increasing, but nationally, Black abortions are at frighteningly high levels as well.

According to Crutcher, Maafa 21 is changing hearts and minds about abortion. Since release of the film in 2009, Crutcher says a number of Black activists have joined the pro-life movement. One reviewer of the film wrote:

Maafa21 shows, without exception, how African-Americans are the targets of the social elite. In the film, you will learn that civil rights leaders in the 1960’s gave a clear warning that abortion and population control was a tool of Black Genocide. You will see the links between racism, eugenics, and Planned Parenthood’s effort to market abortion to the African American Community.

Maafa21 is loaded with historical references from slavery, the Nazi take over of Germany and the Civil Rights movement within the United States, and will educate young and old alike on the causes of Black Genocide in the modern age.

Maafa21 has been viewed online hundreds of thousands of times and for years, the film has been shown during Black History Month on college campuses, at community centers, theaters, churches, libraries, and more.

Image: Maafa21 award

Maafa21 Life Fest Award

Shortly after its release by Life Dynamics in 2009, Maafa21 was shown in the Capitol Visitor Center Theater in Washington on two occasions. In addition, it was selected as the featured film in the March 2010 Jubilee Film Festival in Selma, Alabama, to commemorate the right to vote and remember the historic “Bloody Sunday” anniversary of the Bridge Crossing Civil Rights march from Selma to Montgomery. Maafa21 was also featured in the 2010 Real Life Film Festival in Sudbury, Ontario, and the 2011 Life Fest Film Festival in Los Angeles, California.

To watch the film in full or order a copy of the DVD, go to www.maafa21.com.

This is reprinted with permission from Live Action News – the original article can be viewed here.

Being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Conservative, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Media Bias with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

These 15 women prove that being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Michael Harriot, commentator for The Root,recently claimed that being a Black pro-life woman and seeking the protection of innocent Black babies in the womb is “rare.” But is it?

Harriott was writing in response to an interaction between Rep. Steve Cohen (D – Tenn.) and Star Parker, a pro-life Black woman, in which Cohen called Parker “ignorant” after she pointed out the devastation that abortion has wrought in the Black community.

Dem Congressman calls Black women Star Parker “ignorant”

“Since Roe v. Wade was legalized 20 million humans have been killed inside the womb of Black women. And then, on Halloween, Planned Parenthood tweets out that Black women are safest if they abort their child rather than bring it to term,” Parker said during a hearing on the Heartbeat Bill.

Planned Parenthood tweet tells Black women abortion is safer than birth

Parker also exposed the eugenic beliefs of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known eugenicist who once gave a speech before the Ku Klux Klan. She also compared the Dred Scott decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court declared that Black slaves in America were not citizens, to that of Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in the entire country (essentially declaring that preborn humans are not persons and have no standing as such under the law).

Watch the interaction below:

Shockingly, Michael Harriot, who is also Black, chose to criticize Parker for her comments rather than research her claims about Planned Parenthood’s eugenicist beginnings. Instead, Harriot discounted Parker and other Black pro-life women, claiming that they are “rare”:

Star Parker, founder of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and a community activist, was asked to testify before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice.

Hold up, I think I made a mistake in that previous paragraph. What I meant to type was: Star Parker was asked to testify before the House subcommittee because she is one of the rare black female Republican anti-abortion-rights activists. (No, I will not use the GOP marketing phrase “pro-life.” Who’s not for people living?)

Harriot then echoed Rep. Cohen’s derogatory remarks, saying, “People were shocked to hear him go after a black woman publicly like this, but here is the thing: She is kinda ignorant, though.” (Side note: Imagine for one moment what would happen if Parker were pro-choice and… oh, I don’t know… a white Republican male had called her “ignorant.” Media and social media — and likely Harriot himself — would explode with outrage.)

But Harriot’s claim about the rarity of pro-life Black females is simply wrong. The following Black pro-life women (in both the past and the present) are worth noting (and they weren’t all Republicans, Mr. Harriot):

1) Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and was co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee. She once stated:

I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxefrRccsbI

2) Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964 she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne quoted Hamer as calling abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition… there she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means  of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. “I didn’t come to talk about birth control,” she protested. “I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she “regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as being vehemently against abortion. “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders,” Hamer said. “Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Elaine Riddick

3) Elaine Riddick is a staunch pro-life advocate and vocal critic of Planned Parenthood. She was a victim of eugenic sterilization who led a successful crusade in North Carolina to gain reparations for the men and women (mostly Black) who were forcefully sterilized.

That NC eugenics program was supported by Margaret Sanger’s financier, Clarence Gamble, a director of Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood).

In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s state sterilization program, saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.

Research from North Carolina’s Winston-Salem Journal reveals a long history of abuses in that state’s sterilization program — abuses that Gamble consistently glossed over. According to the Journal, “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

Riddick testified before the North Carolina State Legislature about her experience, tearfully saying, “They cut me open like I was a hog.” She told lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment. Riddick’s horrific story was recounted in the documentary Maafa21, which chronicles the history of eugenics and the founding of Planned Parenthood:

4) Dr. Alveda King is the niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., and Director of Civil Rights for the Unborn for Priests for Life:

5) LaVern Tolbert is a former Board member of Planned Parenthood who now opposes their agenda:

7) Day Gardner is president of the National Black Pro-Life Union:

8) Judge Cheryl Allen is a Superior Court judge for the state of Pennsylvania. She has said, “Most people tend to believe that Planned Parenthood is in the African American Community to help, but they are not there to help, they are there to make abortion more accessible to black people….” (Source: Interview on His Place TV)

Judge Cheryl Lynn Allen

9) Rep. Mia Love is the first Black Republican female elected to the U.S. Congress from the state of Utah:

10)Barbara Howard is the Florida State chairwoman for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). She has stated,.  “Recently, some black preachers finally came out not against abortion per se, but merely against the location of Planned Parenthood centers in black communities. It seems the murder of blacks is only a consideration for black preachers or other leaders when they are killed by white or Hispanic cops…. So who will stop the cold-blooded murder of millions of unborn black children?”

Barbara Howard

11) Rep. June Franklin (D-Iowa) is the only African American representative in the Iowa legislature, and said in 1971, “Proponents… have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

Rep. June Franklin (image Maafa21)

12) Dr Ashley Harrell of Black People Against Abortion:

13) Catherine Davis is a founding member of the National Black Prolife Coalition:

14) Dr. Freda M. Bush is an OBGYN and president of the Medical Institute for Sexual Health:

15) Obianuju Ekeocha, founder and president of Culture of Life Africa:

All the Black pro-life women from both political parties would make an exceedingly long list — and the truth is that the pro-abortion media makes little effort to highlight them.

Tragically, the real “ignorance” here is not found in those who denounce abortion’s impact on the Black community. It is found among members of the media who imply that Black pro-life women are “rare.” It just simply is not true.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

The foundation that just gave Planned Parenthood an award also funded its eugenics projects

Posted in American Birth Control League, Clarence Gamble, Eugenics, Lasker Award, Margaret Sanger, Negro Project, Planned Parenthood funded by rich elites with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

Since 1945, the Lasker Awards have been granted by the Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation to recognize “the contributions of scientists, physicians, and public servants who have made major advances in the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of human disease.” In a previous Live Action News report, Danny David detailed the reasons why the Lasker-Bloomberg Public Service Award to Planned Parenthood was based in anything but science.

But another piece of interesting information is this: Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s most infamous “Negro Project,” motivated by her belief in eugenics, was funded in part by none other than Albert Lasker.

In 1939, Sanger penned a letter to Clarence Gamble regarding her desire to use Black ministers in furthering her organization’s agenda, because, she said, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,” and if it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.” This is the project that The Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation chose to fund.

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Sanger not only founded Planned Parenthood, but met with members of the Ku Klux Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.”

In 1937, Mary Lasker, known then as Mary Woodward Reinhardt, was secretary of Sanger’s newly formed Birth Control Federation of America (BCFA).  According to Lasker’s website, Mary “made a donation to the American Birth Control League and subsequently joined its board.”

In 1939, Mary connected Sanger to her soon-to-be husband, Albert Lasker, to seek funding for Sanger’s “Negro Project.” He eventually gave Sanger $20,000.

To obtain the funds, Sanger, Reinhardt and Sanger’s secretary, Florence Rose, drafted a report on “Birth Control and the Negro,” skillfully using language that appealed both to eugenicists fearful of unchecked black fertility and to progressives committed to shepherding Black Americans into middle-class culture, according to New York University’s website for the Margaret Sanger Papers:

The report stated that “[N]egroes present the great problem of the South,” as they are the group with “the greatest economic, health and social problems,” and outlined a practical birth control program geared toward a population characterized as largely illiterate and that “still breed carelessly and disastrously,” a line borrowed from a June 1932 Birth Control Review article by W.E.B. DuBois. Armed with this paper, Reinhardt initiated contact between Sanger and Albert Lasker (soon to be Reinhardt’s husband), who pledged $20,000 starting in Nov. 1939. (“Birth Control and the Negro,” July 1939, Lasker Papers)

Then, in November of 1939, Sanger wrote to Albert Lasker requesting the funds, to “help” the Black community in the South “obtain birth control information.” Sanger also wrote, “If we can get the Negro universities and the Negro medical groups behind this project I think it will go over, I think, really big….”

LASKERS ACTIVE IN PLANNED PARENTHOOD 

Mary and Albert later married and their participation in Sanger’s organization continued after the initial “Negro Project” donation. By 1940, a committee to extend and develop the movement of “planned parenthood” was formed and consisted of nearly 1000 members, including Albert Lasker.

A New York Times article revealed that in February of that same year,  Albert donated $10,000 to the Planned Parenthood Committee.

Albert Lasker gives Planned Parenthood committee $10K

The following year (1941), the Laskers gave the Planned Parenthood Committee a total of $50,000 ($25,000 each from Mary and Albert), the largest donation the committee had received.

Interestingly, the Laskers established their foundation in 1942 — the same year that Sanger’s American Birth Control League changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

The Lasker Foundation website has even credited Albert Lasker as the one responsible for Planned Parenthood’s name:

Albert Lasker supported Sanger’s work as well, and he proposed a new name for her operation—one that better reflected its positive mission and that might ease its public acceptance. In 1942, his suggestion was accepted, and the organization became the Planned Parenthood Federation of America….

In 1943, another $50,000 was donated to Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) by Albert Lasker, according to the New York Times.

1943 Albert Lasker gives PPFA 50K

Mary Lasker continued her involvement with PPFA, and in 1945 was listed as a PPFA board member:

Mary Lasker Board of PPFA

As late as 1962, Mary Lasker was listed as honorary vice-chairman of Planned Parenthood’s World Population Emergency Campaign.

MARGARET SANGER AWARDED BY LASKER 

In 1950, the Lasker Award given by Planned Parenthood – World Population was granted to Margaret Sanger, one of the first women to receive a Lasker award. According to an October New York Times report, the award read:

“To Margaret Sanger foremost in teaching families wise planning in birth control: Leader in influencing nations towards balanced population; living to see her beginnings in city slums grow into plans for a planet.”

Sanger was unable to receive the award in person because she was speaking to delegates at a luncheon of PPFA’s 13th annual meeting. The New York Times reported that at that PPFA meeting, their founder was advocating “a national Government-sponsored program of sterilization of the feeble-minded and victims of transmissible, congenital diseases.”

Margaret Sanger Lasker sterility for feeble minded (image credit New York Times Oct 1950)

The “plan,” according to Sanger, was to “save innocent children from the cruelty of being born to such parents.”

Elaine Riddick was the victim of an identical eugenics project, funded by Clarence Gamble, and was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. In the video below, Riddick stands next to her son, Tony, speaking as a witness to this flawed ideology:

Many believe that Sanger’s “Negro Project,” along with her eugenics advocacy, were partly to blame for the attitude many had about Black births, and the Lasker Foundation was unquestionably a part of promoting this horrible and harmful view.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.