Remembering abortion victims retrieved from trash dumpster

The number of abortions committed since it was legalized in 1973 is so astronomical that many people cannot begin to wrap their minds around it? As abortion tragically weaves its murderous roots deep into American society, it is easy to become calloused. That was apparent at another point in history when Rev. Gilbert Haven looked back on slavery and wrote, “We are so familiar with the word Slavery, that its real scope and character do not smite the eye with true horror.” These words ring true today in a society which tolerates the evil of abortion.

Those of us who have been in the pro-life battle for many years can sometimes get so overwhelmed at the numbers of abortions that we need to be reminded that every abortion takes the life of one, very precious baby. That reality was never more true to me, than the day I personally found aborted babies. Strange as it is, there are only a handful of pro-life people who have experienced this first hand. Interestingly, it was my interest in the Nazi Holocaust which motivated me to search for these precious children. As I would watch documentaries of the Holocaust, I remember asking myself, “Who took that picture?” As I contemplated the horror of that time in history, I knew that had those images never been released, the world would never have known the true evil that took place.

And, with that in mind, I prayed to the Lord that if aborted babies were being thrown in the trash, that He would lead me to where they were so I could have the honor to offer the babies the dignity of my tears along with a humane burial. So, a friend and I began to do what we called back then “Dumpster Diving” to see if we could find any babies that were being thrown away and we did. The process of uncovering these children was daunting. We pulled their broken bodies from the trash over a period of weeks and meticulously removed each identifiable human part from the mass of bloody gauze that held their tiny body inside each container.

ABorted babies in container

I will never forget the very first gauze sac I opened and what I saw. There inside the gauze sac was a fully formed arm. I wasn’t shocked because I knew what abortion did. I think I felt overwhelmed almost in denial that what I was documenting was part of the largest genocide in American history. I knew, that one day, people would look back on this and ask why we allowed this to take place on our shore.

Aborted baby arm 2

As you can imagine, we continued to uncover pieces of babies, victims of early, suction abortion. Those precious lives which began in the safety of their mother’s womb were brutally killed and then laid to rest inside a trash dumpster. The callousness of that kind of brutality haunted me for a long long time. I remember thinking to myself, “I wonder if each mom knows that their baby was thrown in the garbage by this abortion clinic.”


But, aborted victims from early abortions were not all we found. In the bottom of the bag were pieces of a baby we estimated to be in the second trimester. That child’s foot was one of only a few parts thrown away by the clinic in that garbage bag. We never found the rest of that child.

Aborted baby foot 2

It takes love to do what we do to rescue these kids and I admire each person who dedicates themselves to see them protected. It is easy to let the years discourage us to give up – and every time I feel that way, I take out these pictures of what I call, “my babies” and I recommit myself to never quit. Each and every little person we defend is a unique individual, not a statistic or an “issue” and we can never forget that God knows each one by name.

To encourage myself in this battle for life, I often look to others who faced injustice in their time and glean strength from their sacrifice. One such story of bravery took place in 1942 when Hans Scholl, a medical student at the University of Munich, along with his sister Sophie, and other brave young people founded the “White Rose” movement. This movement was one of the few German groups that spoke out against Nazi genocidal policies.

Sophie and her brother along with others in the “White Rose” movement committed themselves to speaking out about the evil of their day, writing this to their fellow students, “We will not be silent. We are your bad conscience. The White Rose will not leave you in peace!”

In an amazing amount of wisdom for such a young woman, Sophie described those she felt did the most damage in their response in their failure to stand against the Nazi Holocaust:

The real damage is done by those millions who want to ‘survive.’ The honest men who just want to be left in peace. Those who don’t want their little lives disturbed by anything bigger than themselves. Those with no sides and no causes.Those who won’t take measure of their own strength, for fear of antagonizing their own weakness. Those who don’t like to make waves—or enemies. Those for whom freedom, honour, truth, and principles are only literature.”

Does this sound like the average American where abortion is concerned? For their courage, Sophie and Hans Scholl and another member of their White Rose group, Christoph Probst, were executed on Feb. 22, 1943.


On the day we held a funeral for the aborted babies we retrieved from the trash dumpster, we encouraged every man, woman, and child to come forward and to lay a rose on top of the tiny baby casket which held their broken remains. It did not take long before my eyes filled with tears. In what I would describe as one of the most emotional events I have ever been part of, I began to weep uncontrollably like I have never cried before. It was at this time, that I felt the full impact of what I had witnessed and as long as we keep showing the truth of abortion, others will feel it as well.

Read more here.

One Response to “Remembering abortion victims retrieved from trash dumpster”

  1. plantaseed12 Says:

    I too, am bothered by the disregard for the remains.  It prompted me to write this:

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