Archive for the Fetal Stem Cell Category

1970’s Commission looks into fetal experimentation and research

Posted in Abortion History, Fetal Development, fetal heartbeat, Fetal Homicide, Fetal Organs, Fetal Pain, fetal Remains, fetal research, Fetal Stem Cell, Fetal Surgery, Fetal Tissue, The Ryan Program with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2018 by saynsumthn

Some abortion survivors were kept alive almost a day for experimentation

Image: 10 week old Fetus kept alive via artificial womb (Image credit: Life Magazine Sep 10, 1965)

In part one of this series on fetal research, Live Action News detailed a number of experiments conducted on living abortion survivors. Due to the outrage over such experiments reported in the media in the 1970s, the National Research Act established the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. The commission was chaired by Kenneth John Ryan, MD, an abortionist who also taught others how to do abortions.

IMage: Dr. Kenneth Ryan chaired commission on fetal research (Image credit: Harvard Gazette)

Dr. Kenneth Ryan chaired commission on fetal research (Image credit: Harvard Gazette)

A report published by the Harvard Gazette at the time of Ryan’s death states:

 President Jimmy Carter appointed Ken to chair the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

…When he became the Chief of Staff at the Boston Hospital for Women in 1973, one year after the Roe vs Wade decision, he established the first abortion service in a university hospital and included training in the necessary skills as a routine part of residency education. In 1975 Ken credentialed and granted admitting privileges to Dr. Kenneth Edelin, an African-American, even as he was under indictment for manslaughter in a politically motivated prosecution for performing a legal abortion at Boston City Hospital.

The Ryan Program, which bears the doctor’s name and partners with Planned Parenthood, was established in 1999 to train OB-GYN residents in abortion.

Dr. Paul Ramsey, a Professor of Religion at Princeton University, also served on the commission. He wrote a lengthy opinion in the section entitled, “Moral Issues in Fetal Research,” criticizing NIH definitions of life and death regarding the preborn child, with good reason:

The answer seems clear enough: the difference between the life and death of a human fetus/abortus should be determined substantially in the same way physicians use in making other pronouncements of death… the 1973 NIH proposed guidelines studiously refuses to speak of the previable fetus as “living” or having “life.” By studiously refusing to speak of a previable fetus/abortus who may still be medically “alive” and by leaving the determination of viability entirely to the discretion of physician researchers (not even excluding abortuses with respiration from being deemed previable and entered into experimentation), the American guidelines can be faulted for lack of definitional clarity. Indeed, if and only if the previable fetus is human, unique for certain purposes, and alive in significant medical respects–i.e., if it is not dead–could claims be made that researchers need the knowledge uniquely to be gained by using the fetus/abortus while it is still living, growing and reacting as a tiny, whole fetal human being or entity.

This national commission was tasked to investigate and study research involving abortion survivors, and to recommend whether and under what circumstances such research should be conducted or supported by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW). Up to this time, the July 1974 “National Research Act” had ruled that the “Secretary may not conduct or support research in the United States or abroad on a living human fetus, before or after the induced abortion of such fetus, unless such research is done for the purpose of assuring the survival of such fetus.”

Report Research on the Fetus

At the time the commission began, a New York Times article detailed how members of the commission had reviewed existing research of human fetuses. Members told the paper that the amount of research already conducted using aborted fetuses was “so substantial as to seem surprising.”

Image: article Hundreds of aborted fetuses delivered outside womb, NYT 1975

Hundreds of aborted fetuses delivered outside womb, NYT 1975

The most controversial form of research the commission found was on the “fetus outside the womb,” involving “fetuses delivered by abortion.” The commission claimed hundreds of reports of such cases had been conducted. Experiments were also conducted on already expired fetuses from spontaneous or induced abortions. Below is a small sample of what the commission found:

  • Physiologic and Metabolic Studies: Fetal hearts, removed just after death of a fetus following hysterotomy abortion, have been studied to establish physiologic response data.
  • Studies of the Pregnant Mother: Women undergoing elective midtrimester abortion have been starved for 87 hours before abortion in an attempt to learn the effects of caloric deprivation on pregnancy and to gain some information as to whether the fetus could adapt to fuels other than glucose.
  • Research With the Previable Fetus Outside the Uterus: To learn whether the human fetal brain could metabolize ketone bodies, brain metabolism was isolated in 8 human fetuses (12-17 weeks’ gestation) after hysterotomy abortion by perfusing the isolated head (the head was separated from the rest of the body). The study demonstrated that, similar to other species, brain metabolism could be supported by ketone bodies during fetal life suggesting avenues of therapy in some fetal disease states.
  • Another technique for studying the ability of the midtrimester fetus to carry out endocrine reactions used 4 fetuses (16-20 weeks’ gestation) immediately after hysterotomy abortion. The fetuses were perfused through their umbilical veins while being housed in a perfusion tank. Fetal tissues were examined at the end of the study.
  • After studies with newborn and fetal mice, cutaneous respiration (breathing through the skin) was studied in 15 fetuses (9-24 weeks’ gestation) from induced abortions. The fetuses were immersed in a salt solution with oxygen at high pressure. The fetuses were judged to be aliveby a pulsating cord or visible heart beat; if necessary the chest was opened to observe the heart. Four fetuses were supported for 22 hours in this attempt at developing a fetal incubator.
  • Seven previable fetuses (200-375 grams) from spontaneous or induced abortions were immersed in a perfusion tank and perfused with oxygenated blood through their umbilical vessels. The fetuses survived and moved for 5-12 hours.

Interestingly, in addition to general experimentation, the commission noted that if the fetus could “feel pain” then experimenting on abortion survivors would not be permissible. Of course, that debate continues to linger despite evidence that they do feel pain.

Still, members were mixed:

The fetus in utero or in process of being aborted provides a more difficult ethical analysis than does the dead fetus or the living viable infant. There is a presumption of viability at any stage in gestation for the living fetus as long as it remains inside the uterus. Thus experimentation involving that fetus must have acceptably low risk of any harmful effect on viability or on the potential for meaningful, healthy life. If the process of abortion has begun, the life of the fetus will soon end. There is debate about whether different standards apply in that situation and we disagree in our own analysis.

One view holds that no risks can be imposed that would not be acceptable for the fetus which was continuing life. Another view will accept an increase in risks if the information is important and alternate ways of obtaining the information are not practical, if the methods of the experiment are acceptable in themselves (i.e., would be used in other classes of human subjects), and if the process of dying for the fetus were not altered in an unacceptable way.

In any event, expected benefits from the experimentation still must be clear and must require the use of the human fetus to gain the desired information. Ethical considerations as to sensory perception by the fetus also must be addressed. We know of no evidence to suggest or support a contention that the fetus at midgestation or earlier, when abortions are performed, is aware of pain or has a psychologic fear of death.

Image: Ban on experimenting on live aborted fetuses (Image credit NYT, April 1975)

Ban on experimenting on live aborted fetuses (Image credit NYT, April 1975)

The commission ultimately drafted several recommendations, including a restriction on experimenting on living abortion survivors. But their report also recommended that research resulting in “no harm to the fetus” be permitted, so long as that research might benefit other fetuses.

Unfortunately, this did not stop the push for the research nor the push to obtain federal funding. According to a historical timeline of fetal research regulations published in a report by the Institute of Medicine:

After the National Commission issued its report (Report and Recommendations: Research on the Fetus), fetal research following abortion was permitted under subsequent [Department of Health Education and Welfare] DHEW regulations for therapeutic reasons, but otherwise held to the standard of “minimal risk.” Minimal risk means that no more potential harm is tolerated than would be encountered in daily life. In the case of a fetus, almost all interventions exceed minimal risk, and the regulations did not distinguish between fetuses that were carried to term and those intended for abortion. The DHEW regulations, however, contained the possibility of waiver of the minimal risk standard on a project-by-project basis by a complicated procedure to be decided ultimately by an Ethics Advisory Board.

Image: article 1975 Ban funding fetal research (Image credit Corpus Christi Times)

1975 Ban funding fetal research (Image credit Corpus Christi Times)

The first Ethics Advisory Board (EAB) was convened in 1978. The sole waiver issued by this body was to test the efficacy of using fetal blood samples for prenatal diagnosis of sickle cell anemia. The charter for the EAB expired in 1980, and despite publication of a draft charter in 1988, it has not been reactivated.

According to CQ Researcher, in 1988, an NIH commission “voted 18–3 to pronounce fetal tissue transplant research ‘acceptable public policy’—a position then unanimously endorsed by the standing advisory committee to the director of the NIH. That advice, however, was rejected in November 1989 by Louis W. Sullivan, the Bush administration’s secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), NIH’s parent department. Sullivan decided instead to extend, indefinitely, the moratorium on NIH funding of fetal tissue research first ordered by the Reagan administration in March 1988. The moratorium barred NIH funding of clinical transplantation studies using tissue from induced abortions.”

However, “The NIH moratorium did not affect privately funded research in the United States.”

Co-chairman on that 1988 NIH panel was none other than Kenneth Ryan, the same abortionist/trainer who chaired the 1970’s commission. When the push for federally funded research failed, Ryan began calling for private funding to experiment on aborted children.

In part three of this series, Live Action News will detail who eventually lifted the ban on federal funding of fetal tissue research and how much taxpayers spend on this research every year.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

New research: harvest organs from aborted fetuses to implant in animals

Posted in Aborted Babies, Aborted Baby Body Parts, Alex Jones, Fetal Organs, Fetal Stem Cell, Fetal Tissue, Humanized mice, stem Express with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 6, 2015 by saynsumthn

UPDATE NOTE: This blog was posted before The Center for Medical Progress (CMP) released videos showing Planned Parenthood’s operation of harvesting aborted baby parts. As I note in this post, Stem Express, which procured fetal parts from Planned Parenthood is listed as a source for these babies implanted into animals. The Washington Examiner writes of Gu, that, through his start-up research company, Ganogen, Gu has obtained fetal organs from StemExpress, which is being investigated by the House of Representatives Select Investigative Panel on Infants’ Lives. It is noteworthy that Gu and Stem Express owner Cate Dyer have authored a response together to the Select Panel investigating the use of fetal tissue.

It is now feasible to remove a kidney from an aborted human fetus and implant the organ into a rat, where the kidney can grow to a larger size. That was a statement written in an article published by The Genetic Literacy Project.

It’s possible that further work could find a way to grow kidneys large enough that they could be transplanted into a person, the researchers said, although much more research is needed to determine whether this could be done, the article states.

The new findings are published in the American Journal of Transplantation.

eugene-gu

The research, co-authored by Eugene Gu (Guhe) founder and CEO of Ganogen, Inc., a biotech company in Redwood City, California, raises a number of ethical questions, including whether it is acceptable to use human fetal organs in research, or to transplant human organs into animals. If the research moves forward, it must be determined that the organs were obtained with proper consent, and that the research was conducted with adequate oversight, experts told CBS News.

cuff-kidney-renal-anastomosed-abdominal-aorta

On their website, Ganogen, Inc., says that they have found a way to successfully transplant human fetal kidneys, livers, hearts, lungs, and other organs into animal hosts using advanced microsurgery.

Human fetal heart transplant rat abortion Ganogen

We also use our patented medical device, the arterial flow regulator, to make the fetal organ compatible for transplantation into the adult animal host.

kidney-growth-620w

“After transplantation, the fetal organ continues to grow and mature. It even demonstrates function, and in the case of the kidney, can keep the host animal alive all on its own,” they explain.

According to CBS, Gu and his colleagues obtained human fetal kidneys from Stem Express, a Placerville, California-based company that supplies researchers with tissue from deceased adults and fetuses.

On their website, Stem Express writes that their “human tissue products range from fetal to adult and healthy to diseased, and we also collect bone marrow and leukapheresis for isolation.”

They go on to say that, “Working with hospitals and clinics across the United States, all human tissue and blood procurement is performed in accordance with IRB-approved protocols and consents. Protecting the privacy of our researchers and donors is always the highest priority at StemExpress.

The company, which operates in more than 30 procurement sites across the United States and delivers product to hundreds of researchers worldwide has an online market of fetal cells that be purchased:

Stem Express Fetal LIver cost 2

According to Gu, people who donated the fetal tissues gave consent for the kidneys to be used in research.

The researchers transplanted the fetal kidneys into adult rats that lacked an immune system (so as to avoid tissue rejection), and connected the animals’ blood vessels to the organs using a challenging procedure that involved tiny stitches, about three to four times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Kidney Transplant fetal Ganogen abortion

We did this study in rats as proof-of-concept to show that human fetal organs can indeed survive in an animal host, can function to keep the animal alive, and can grow larger over time,” Gu told Medical Daily. The rats survived roughly four months after the transplant, and one even lived for 10 months.

Cate Dyer, CEO and founder of Stem Express, claimed that all “donors”, that is the pregnant women seeking the abortion and not the unborn child whose kidney’s were taken, are, “properly consented through an Institutional Review Board (IRB) consent, and donors are made aware of the potential use of any sample that we collect.”

IRB Fetal Research

The IRB defines a Fetus as, “the product of conception from the time of implantation until delivery. If the delivered or expelled fetus is viable, it is designated an infant. (Hereafter, the term “fetus” will refer to a living fetus unless otherwise specified.) The term “fetus” generally refers to later phases of development; the term “embryo” is usually used for earlier phases of development.

Research involving the human fetus raises special concerns for IRB reviewers, the review boards states on the HHS website, “The fetus has a unique and inextricable relationship to the mother. It cannot consent to be a research subject. These circumstances have aroused lengthy public debate on the ethics of fetal research, and led to special federal regulations that guide IRB deliberations about fetal research. The fetus may also be an indirect subject of research when women who may be pregnant participate. Research involving pregnant women is also regulated.”

IRB Research abortion fetus

Under the section: CONSIDERATIONS, the IRB address abortion, “If abortion is involved, the investigators may have no part in either the decision to abort or decisions about the timing or the method to be used; no change in the abortion procedure that would present more than minimal risk to the fetus or its mother can be introduced for research purposes. No monetary or other inducements (e.g., free care) may be offered to a woman to induce her to terminate her pregnancy for research purposes, IRB states.

In another section the IRB addresses research on non-viable fetuses, “A fetus is judged nonviable if it cannot possibly survive to the point of sustaining life independently, even with the support of available medical therapy, and will therefore die. Research involving a nonviable fetus that would either artificially maintain vital functions or hasten their failure is forbidden. Ethical considerations call upon investigators to maintain the dignity of this dying human subject and to avoid unseemly intrusions in the process of dying for research purposes.

However, in detailing how to obtain aborted fetal tissue, the IRB says the following should be followed:

    The decision to terminate a pregnancy and procedures of abortion should be kept independent from the retrieval and use of fetal tissue.
    The timing and method of abortion should not be influenced by the potential uses of fetal tissue for transplantation or medical research.
    Payments and other forms of remuneration and compensation associated with the procurement of fetal tissue should be prohibited, except payment for reasonable expenses occasioned by the actual retrieval, storage, preparation, and transportation of the tissues.

Addressing the possibility of research on a live fetus where the mother has already decided to have an abortion, The IRB says that, “The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects wrestled with this problem and concluded that there is no difference between the moral status of a fetus destined for abortion and that of a fetus to be carried to term. Therefore, only those research procedures that would be acceptable for a fetus going to term may be performed in anticipation of abortion.”

In all research in which human fetuses are the subjects of research, the consent of the mother on behalf of the fetus is required. As a general rule, the consent of the father on behalf of the fetus is also required before a fetus may be enrolled in research. Exceptions to the requirement that the father provide consent are permitted if: (1) the father’s identity or whereabouts cannot reasonably be ascertained; (2) the father is not reasonably available; or (3) the pregnancy resulted from rape,” IRB states.

Rats Human Kidney abortion fetus

In addition to kidneys, the researchers have also transplanted human fetal hearts into rats, Gu told CBS, which details the process.

Ultimately, the researchers plan to transplant the kidneys into larger animals, such as pigs, where the organs could grow large enough to be transplanted back into people, Gu said.

Hank Greely, an ethical and legal expert on biomedical science at Stanford Law School outlined his concerns, “The key issues are the existence of the pregnant woman’s consent and the total separation of the decision to abort from the decision to let the fetal remains be used in research,” Greely told Live Science.

In other words, a woman must have already decided to have an abortion before she can be asked whether she is willing to donate the fetus for research.

We feel that our research is more palatable than all the other researchers who use taxpayer money to fund their research involving aborted human fetal tissues, which is the vast majority of major biomedical research labs,” Gu said to Medical Daily.

Addressing his use of harvested organs from aborted fetuses, Gu says he and his colleagues “do not want to encourage abortions in any way, shape, or form. … If the organs are available, it is better to use them to save somebody’s life rather than throw them into the trash bin.”

Undoubtedly, writes Medical Daily, Gu’s argument is probably echoed in many research labs around the world. That said, most people would still find the details of his work unsavory… unless of course they needed a kidney, they say.

But, they fail to mention, religious, pro-life people, and many others find the use of aborted fetal tissue or organs for research morally objectionable.

___________________

Below InfoWars discusses harvesting aborted baby body parts and printing organs

SECOND UPDATE: CMP’s 5th video transcript implies Planned Parenthood is using the aborted babies for “mice” studies and “Humanized mice”.

The Center for Medical Progress released a 5th video showing the nation’s largest Planned Parenthood abortion facility offering intact fetal cadavers which they refer to as “specimens.”

Center for Medical Progress, posing as buyers for a Biotech company sat with the Director of Research for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, Melissa Farrell, at the abortion-clinic headquarters of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast in Houston, Texas.

Humanized Mice 2 Farrell Planned Parenthood Houston

Humanized Mice Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood implant aborted baby mice

Read more here: Planned Parenthood uses aborted baby parts for humanized mice research

Pro-lifers take part in Ice Bucket Challenge to support unborn babies

Posted in Fetal Stem Cell, Pro-Life with tags , , , , , , , , on August 20, 2014 by saynsumthn

After discovering that the ALS Association which has raised millions in their popular Ice Bucket challenge, gives money to an organization which uses stem cells that originated from electively aborted fetuses, pro-lifers have created their version of the Ice Bucket challenge to save unborn babies:

Screenshot 1

ALS Neals fetal Tissue

A statement on the ALS Consortium website states, “Previous research has shown that on autopsy, ALS patients are found to have increased levels of the amino acid glutamate accumulated in the brain and spinal cord. This increase is thought to be caused by a decrease in the glutamate transporter which normally “cleans up” glutamate from the cells. Human spinal cord-derived neural stem cells (HSSC) are known to express amino acid transporters and it is hoped that this action will reduce the toxicity of accumulated glutamate and benefit ALS patients. A second hypothesized benefit of HSSC is their ability to secrete neurotrophic support factors. Neurotrophic factors support the health of nerves.

These stem cells have been engineered from the spinal cord of a single fetus electively aborted after eight weeks of gestation. The tissue was obtained with the mother’s consent. The cells are transplanted into the ALS subject’s spinal cord after laminectomy, an operation that removes bone surrounding the spine. After the spinal cord is exposed, a device manufactured for this purpose will be mounted onto the subject and will hold a syringe filled with the cells. The syringe will have a needle attached and the needle will enter the spinal cord at 5-10 locations injecting the cells. The device will minimize trauma to the spinal cord caused by the needle by making the punctures precise and steady, and by injecting the material at a slow and steady speed.”

According to an article in Patheos ALSA.org states:

“Adult stem cell research is important and should be done alongside embryonic stem cell research as both will provide valuable insights. Only through exploration of all types of stem cell research will scientists find the most efficient and effective ways to treat diseases.”

Carrie Munk, a representative for the ALS Association, confirmed to TheBlaze that the organization is currently funding one study that involves embryonic stem cells. In a subsequent statement, the organization said that it is committed to “leaving no stone unturned in the quest to discover effective treatments and a cure for Lou Gehrig’s Disease.

Pro-lifers object to the use of aborted children and are now posting videos which expose the ALS connection to abortion as well as raising support for pro-life causes:

Screenshot 2

In this video, a Catholic Priest calls out ALS and asks others to challenge ALS to stop funding the fetal stem cell research.

Priest

Screenshot 3

A message posted under this YouTube vid below reads, “My daughter Rachel was nominated for the Ice Bucket Challenge. ~~ Because ALS is supportive of embryonic stem cell research, we decided that donating to The John Paul II Medical Research Institute was a much better alternative! ( http://www.jp2mri.org ) They are 100% Pro-life ! Please consider donating to JP2MRI

According to Mark Harrington of the pro-life group, Created Equal which uses abortion victim images to educate the public about abortion, David Kopechek, a former pro-life student leader,is trying to raise awareness for the thousands of unborn that are killed every day, and has uploaded a vid to Facebook. You can watch that vid here.