Archive for World Health Organization

Group that brought abortion pill to US has eugenics history

Posted in Abortion pill, American Eugenics Society, Bernard Berelson, Eugenics, Every Child a Wanted Child, Frank Notestein, Frederick OSborn, Guttmacher, Population Council, RU-486 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

The Population Council has a shocking 65-year history, and it’s nothing to celebrate

(From Live Action News)

John D Rockefeller-founded Population-Council

The Population Council, the eugenics organization credited with bringing the abortion pill RU-486 to the United States, turns 65 this month — but it is nothing to celebrate.

In 1952, John D. Rockefeller III founded the Population Council and served as the organization’s first president.  According to the Rockefeller Foundation, the Population Council, Inc., was incorporated following Rockefeller’s Conference on Population Problems, “…to stimulate, encourage, promote, conduct and support significant activities in the broad field of population.”

Like its founder, the Population Council’s other members were concerned about population issues — and, like other population organizations such as Planned Parenthood, high ranking Population Council leaders were well connected to the eugenics movement.

Frederick Osborn

 

Frederic Osborn followed Rockefeller as Population Council president in 1957. Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in April of 1938. Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan, “Every Child a Wanted Child,” may have originated with Osborn. It is no wonder that Osborn also said that “Birth Control and abortion are turning out to be the great eugenic advances of our time.”

Frank W Notestein

Frank W. Notestein followed Osborn as president in 1959. Like Osborn, he was member of the American Eugenics Society and as the American Philosophical Society, according to a biography published by Princeton University. He was also one of the organization’s original four trustees, according to the Population Council’s 1957 Annual Report.

In 1939, Notestein and Osborn served together on the Medical Advisory Board for Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Federation. By 1967, under Notestein’s leadership, the Population Council released a controversial film, entitled “Family Planning,” which featured Disney’s iconic cartoon figure Donald Duck. It was one of many efforts in the 1960s and ’70s to indoctrinate the culture on the use of birth control.

By 1970, Notestein was serving on the Board of Directors of Planned Parenthood-World Population.

Bernard Berelson

Bernard Berelson took the helm of Population Council in 1968, as its fourth president. A year later, in 1969, Berelson published an article which suggested that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods. The article was published in the journal, “Studies in Family Planning,” published by the Population Council. Berelson was also featured in the Population Council’s first issue of “Population and Development Review.”

 

Alan F. Guttmacher, M.D. sat on the Population Council’s first Medical Advisory Board. Guttmacher, a former Planned Parenthood president, was also vice president of the American Eugenics Society. His ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger, who made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics. Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute, would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.

Alan Guttmacher, president of past Planned Parenthood (screenshot: CBS news)

Thomas Parran, Jr. was on the original Population Council’s board of trustees. On paper, he has a very distinguished career, having been named the nation’s sixth U.S. Surgeon General, building support for the passage of Social Security as well as the establishment of the World Health Organization. His name even appeared on the public health building of the University of Pittsburgh as “one of the giants of 20th-century medicine.”

Thomas Parran (Photo: NIH/NLM)

But according to USA Today, “Parran’s legacy was tainted in 2010, when the U.S. government apologized to Guatemala for the syphilis experiments that exposed 1,308 men, women and children to syphilis without consent from 1946 to 1948. Parran approved of the experiments, conducted by U.S. Public Health Service physician John Cutler.” (Cutler and his wife Eleise contributed to the Population Council and Cutler’s wife admitted that she served on the board of Planned Parenthood.)

Earlier this year, Philly.com reported that Parran was suspected of being the “intellectual inspiration of the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Study”:

Regrettably, Parran’s great work, impressive resume, and proud legacy are besmirched by his ethical violations. The truth of his association with horrendous experiments using impoverished Alabama sharecroppers, federal prison inmates, and an array of vulnerable subjects in Guatemala who were purposefully infected with syphilis were already known. But newly discovered evidence disclosing his role as the architect of the Tuskegee study may have caused his already troubling case to reach the tipping point…

Pitt trustees now must confront evidence showing Parran was more than a distant bureaucrat during the Tuskegee study. New documents disclose that Parran believed the African American population of Macon County, Ala., was perfect for a nontreatment exercise. “If one wished to study the natural history of syphilis in the Negro race uninfluenced by treatment,” Parran wrote in January 1932, “this county would be an ideal location for such a study.”

Eugenics founded Guttmacher praises Eugenics founded Population Council which turned 65

The Rockefeller family has long been connected to eugenics. According to author Rebecca Messall, “Rockefeller money funded eugenic scientists decades before Hitler put eugenic theories into practice.”

Rockefeller eugenics (image: New York Times)

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

Black added, “In May 1926, Rockefeller awarded $250,000 to the German Psychiatric Institute of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, later to become the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Psychiatry. Among the leading psychiatrists at the German Psychiatric Institute was Ernst Rüdin, who became director and eventually an architect of Hitler’s systematic medical repression.” (NOTE: In 1933, Rüdin’s call for racial purity was published in Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Review. According to the documentary film, Maafa21, Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws.)

Rockefeller III once claimed that birth control was “directly related to the matter of meaningful peace.”

In her review of the book, “Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population,” written by Columbia University historian Matthew Connelly, C-Fam author Susan Yoshihara, Ph.D, discovered what led up to Rockefeller’s founding of the Population Council:

John D Rockefeller III (Image: Rockefeller Foundation)

In 1952, at a secret, invitation-only gathering in Colonial Williamsburg, John D. Rockefeller III brought together what would become the modern population control establishment. Setting the agenda for the following decades were the heads of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, National Academy of Sciences, and top scientists “from embryology to economics,” including past and present Nobel Prize winners.

From verbatim transcripts of the “Conference on Population Problems,” just one of the countless number of such meetings the book exposes, Connelly found that what drove them were the questions of how many people the world could hold along with “whether ‘industrial development should be withheld’ from poor, agrarian countries like India.” By decreasing mortality and encouraging “breeding,” development would increase inferior populations and further degrade “the genetic quality of the human race.” They decided radical measures to reduce birthrates were justified in order to save “Western Civilization” from being dragged down by the growing humanitarian demands of Third World countries.

Thus was born the Population Council, which would in turn become the nexus of the entire population control movement, going on to coordinate the work of the United Nations, the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) – founded three weeks later – as well as major pharmaceutical firms.

In 1994, with the encouragement of the Clinton administration, french pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf assigned the US rights of marketing and distribution of abortion pill RU-486 to the Population Council. The right to distribute the harmful drugs were later handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.

In 2015, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report found that from fiscal year 2010 through 2012, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) reported sending about $236 million to six organizations and their affiliates and member associations: Advocates for Youth, Guttmacher Institute, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA), the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), and the Population Council.

Today, abortion remains among the Population Council’s strategic priorities, according to its latest annual report.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Bill Gates Enters Ebola Fight

Posted in Bill Gates, Ebola with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 22, 2014 by saynsumthn

I recently blogged about how population control group, International Planned Parenthood Federation or IPPF is getting involved in the fight against Ebola.

Bill Gates Ebola Spet 2014

Now…another population control organization, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has stepped into the Ebola fight. The Gates are huge doors of eugenic abortion which leaves many suspicious of their supposed charitable efforts worldwide and especially in African nations.

According to news from the University of Washington, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is working to avert future emergencies and decrease the spread of the current outbreak. The foundation is working with various organizations to provide funding for Ebola interventions, increase support in the three affected countries, and increase emergency response systems in unaffected countries throughout West Africa.

“There are ways we can get ahead of future disasters by making these core investments,” said Amanda Lanzarone, part of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation’s Emergency Response team. “We work on long term programming to improve capacity of local responders so they are not completely overwhelmed when response of this magnitude hit.”

In September, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation announced that it will commit $50 million to support the scale up of emergency efforts to contain the Ebola outbreak in West Africa and interrupt transmission of the virus.

The foundation stated that they would immediately release flexible funds to United Nations agencies and international organizations involved in the response to enable them and national governments to purchase badly needed supplies and scale up emergency operations in affected countries. In addition, the foundation will work with public and private sector partners to accelerate the development of therapies, vaccines, and diagnostics that could be effective in treating patients and preventing further transmission of the disease.

Gates Susan Desmond-Hellmann Ebola

According to their website, the Gates Foundation has committed more than $10 million of the $50 million to fight the Ebola outbreak, including $5 million to World Health Organization (WHO)for emergency operations and R&D assessments and $5 million to the U.S. Fund for UNICEF to support efforts in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea to purchase essential medical supplies, coordinate response activities, and provide at-risk communities with life-saving health information. An additional $2 million will also be committed immediately to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to support incident management, treatment, and health care system strengthening.

Bill Gates Politico Ebola

The end of September 2014, Bill Gates told Politico that Ebola is a great example of where the world needs to come together. “I’m sure we will be able to get this under control,” he said.

After Ebola broke out in Dallas, Texas, Bill Gates spoke to Bloomberg about their efforts:

Perhaps this news is just indicative of a charitable and philanthropic agenda on behalf of Bill Gates and his Foundation.

Or…perhaps the organization, known for their population control and abortion agenda, has something more up their sleeve.

What that is- we may not know for years to come….but…stay tuned.

If you do not know about the Gates/ Abortion connection read: Gates says they don’t fund abortion so why do they fund abortion providers ?

Global Call for Mercury-free Vaccines Issued

Posted in Mercury, Vaccinations with tags , , , on March 16, 2012 by saynsumthn

Global Call for Mercury-free Vaccines Issued

SILVER SPRING, Md., March 15, 2012 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ — In a historic open letter to the World Health Organization and other public health agencies, the Coalition for Mercury-Free Drugs (CoMeD), and the United Methodist Women are seeking to stop the use of mercury in human drugs, especially vaccines. Currently, the mercury-based preservative Thimerosal, which is 49% mercury by weight, remains in vaccines for the United States and much of the world, despite the fact that it is a known neurotoxin. While other safer and less toxic alternatives are being utilized, industry has been slow to eliminate Thimerosal from many vaccines, including the flu shot given to those most vulnerable to this toxin, children and pregnant women.

The goal of the United Methodist Women and CoMeD is to protect the global immunization program and to safeguard public confidence in vaccines by seeing that the addition of mercury to human pharmaceuticals ceases. Through the ongoing diplomatic work of the Intergovernmental Negotiation Committee of the United Nations Environment Programme, these organizations hope to impact the formulation of a global, legally binding treaty on mercury scheduled to be completed in 2013.

In these negotiations, the World Health Organization and other global distributors of vaccines have defended the continuing use of mercury, especially in vaccines. They maintain that there is no evidence of harm from Thimerosal. Dr. Mark R. Geier, a CoMeD director, cautions, “Recent statements by those holding national and global responsibility for vaccine safety are difficult to reconcile with the known and published toxicity of Thimerosal.” Eight decades of scientific literature have shown that Thimerosal poses a significant health risk and its manufacturers acknowledge it can cause mild to severe mental retardation in children.

The United Methodist Church passed the first global resolution “Protecting Children from Mercury-containing Drugs,” and the United Methodist Women have actively advocated for a ban of mercury in medicine on moral and ethical grounds. As the Rev. Lisa K. Sykes, the author of the original draft of the United Methodist global resolution, asserts, “The United Methodist Women have historically advocated in the areas of education and health, both in this country and around the world. Undertaking the issue of mercury in vaccines and other drugs is just one expression of that commitment.”

The United Methodist Women and CoMeD support every effort to make safer vaccines, those without added mercury, equally available to all persons around the globe.

SOURCE Coalition for Mercury-Free Drugs (CoMeD)

Copyright (C) 2012 PR Newswire. All rights reserved

Global treaty on mercury could affect vaccines

Posted in Mercury, Vaccinations with tags , , , on October 21, 2011 by saynsumthn

As countries negotiate mercury treaty, scientists say suggested ban could threaten vaccines

MARIA CHENG AP Medical Writer
7:53 a.m. CDT, October 21, 2011
LONDON (AP) — Scientists are warning officials negotiating a global treaty on mercury that banning the deadly chemical completely would be dangerous for public health because of the chemical’s use in vaccines.

The ban option is one of several proposals on the table for a meeting later this month in Nairobi, but a final treaty isn’t expected until 2013.

According to the World Health Organization, mercury is one of the top 10 chemicals of public health concern and is highly toxic. Most of the worry is centered on mercury emissions from burning coal, gold mining and people eating mercury-tainted fish.

Mercury in small amounts is also found in many products including light bulbs, batteries and thermometers. WHO advises such products to be phased out, suggesting for example, that health systems switch to digital thermometers instead.

The problem is that a proposed ban might include thiomersal, a mercury compound used to prevent contamination and extend the shelf life of vaccines, many scientists say. It is used in about 300 million shots worldwide, against diseases including flu, tetanus, hepatitis B, diptheria and meningitis.

“Not being able to use mercury is not a viable option,” said David Wood, a WHO vaccines expert.

Wood said there isn’t a viable alternative to thiomersal at the moment. If banned, pharmaceuticals would likely have to switch to preservative-free vaccines, which would complicate the supply chain and vaccination campaigns in poor countries, since the injections would have a much shorter shelf life. Costs would also spike since manufacturers would need to reconfigure their factories.

In 2009, the United Nations Environment Programme, or UNEP, began working on a legally binding global treaty on mercury. At the end of October, the third of five meetings to hammer out a treaty will take place in Nairobi.

“The document is a draft at the moment, so some of these proposals have to be taken with a grain of salt,” said Tim Kasten, head of the chemicals branch at UNEP. Kasten said the amount of mercury in vaccines is so minute it doesn’t threaten the environment. He said there could be provisions to allow mercury for certain uses, such as in dental fillings and vaccines.

But according to an annex in the draft document, there is currently no “allowable use exemption” for mercury products in pharmaceutical products, putting vaccines in the same category as banned mercury-containing paints and pesticides.

“That would be a terrible idea,” said Paul Offit, an infectious diseases expert at the University of Pennsylvania. “It would be another tragic example of us not being able to explain to the public where the real risk lies.”

Thiomersal has mostly been removed from childhood vaccines in the U.S. and Canada. In some European countries, including Norway and Sweden, manufacturers have been encouraged to make thiomersal-free vaccines — and no other uses of mercury as a medical preservative are allowed.

Fears about thiomersal in vaccines were first raised after a flawed medical study in 1998 linked a common childhood injection to autism. But numerous studies since have found no sign the mercury compound is risky.

Experts hope countries won’t go overboard in their attempts to control the substance.

“Provided you know the risks and it’s handled properly, there isn’t a problem,” said Andrew Nelson, a toxicology expert at the University of Leeds. “The health of so many millions of children benefit from vaccines containing mercury that an absolute ban is ridiculous.”

Eliese Cutler wife to John C. Cutler of Guatemala syphilis study was a former Planned Parenthood board member founded in eugenics

Posted in American Eugenics Society, Eugenics, free speech, Guatemala, Hispanic, John C. Cutler, Maafa21, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Hispanics, Population Control, Population Council, pro-choice, Racism, Rockefeller, Sterilization, Sterilizing agents in Drinking Water with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2010 by saynsumthn


John C. Cutler, the author of the controversial Guatemala syphilis study spent much of his life as a physician largely in service to global public health. Prior to joining the University of Pittsburgh’s Graduate School of Public Health for his “second career”, he served as both assistant surgeon general of the U.S. Public Health Service and deputy director of the Pan American Health Organization.

Cutler’s wife Eleise, a graduate of Wellesley College in Massachusetts, told the University that Cutler’s early work was in the field of venereal disease. He was a part of the group of physicians who developed VDRL, the venereal diseases research laboratory test, which has become the accepted test for the diagnosis of syphilis. We traveled all over the world together when he was doing research work in syphilis and gonorrhea,” Eleise explains. “He worked in a federal prison in Terre Haute, Indiana, in New York and also in Guatemala. And, I was with him every step of the way.” Dr. Cutler’s research also took the two of them to India where, while working for the World Health Organization, he organized a venereal disease laboratory for South East Asia.

Eliese Cutler 2007 Planned Parenthood Board of Western Pennsylvania Board Member

Eliese Cutler 2007 Planned Parenthood Board of Western Pennsylvania Board Member

But the recent news that U.S. government medical researchers intentionally infected hundreds of people in Guatemala, including institutionalized mental patients, with gonorrhea and syphilis without their knowledge or permission more than 60 years ago, during those studies has promoted the United States to issue an apology to Guatemala.



** The image above has been removed from the website of the University of Pittsburgh, I grabbed it prior to them taking it down

Cutler’s wife , Eliese S. Cutler, told the University of Pittsburgh that John understood the importance of population control – which she called, one of her husband’s passions. John C. Cutler’s wife admitted that she has served on several boards, including Planned Parenthood, an organization whose founders (Margaret Sanger) , past presidents, and many board members were seeped in eugenics ideals which are very racist.. Eliese and her husband John both contributed to the Population Council and NOTE: Frederic Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society and co-founder of the Population Council along with John D. Rockefeller. In 1969, the Population Council’s President, Bernard Berelson, published an article suggesting that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods.

From the powerful documentary on Eugenics- Maafa21

The 1940’s was known as an era where many scientists endorsed the idea of eugenics. Eugenics was often used to promote the idea of population control for people which the Elites thought should not procreate. Many victims were sterilized against their will- such as these people in North Carolina.

Planned Parenthood was founded in 1942 by Margaret Sanger who was a member in good standing with the racist American Eugenics Society. Sanger had board members who were known for their racist writing and Sanger published many of those in her publications. Sanger called for parents to have a QUOTE: LICENSE TO BREED controlled by people who believed in her eugenic philosophy. She wanted all would be parents to go before her eugenic boards to request a “PERMIT TO BREED“.

Margaret Sanger once said, “More children from the fit, less from the unfit — that is the chief aim of birth control.” Birth Control Review, May 1919, p. 12

In Margaret Sanger’s, “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” Feb 1919. Birth Control Review , Library of Congress Microfilm 131:0099B .
Sanger states, “Before eugenists and others who are laboring for racial betterment can succeed, they must first clear the way for Birth Control. Like the advocates of Birth Control, the eugenists, for instance, are seeking to assist the race toward the elimination of the unfit. Both are seeking a single end but they lay emphasis upon different methods.

Eugenists emphasize the mating of healthy couples for the conscious purpose of producing healthy children, the sterilization of the unfit to prevent their populating the world with their kind and they may, perhaps, agree with us that contraception is a necessary measure among the masses of the workers, where wages do not keep pace with the growth of the family and its necessities in the way of food, clothing, housing, medical attention, education and the like.

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health.While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfitEugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit…

Sanger also called for those who were poor and what she considered to be “morons and immoral‘ , to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called, “Better moral conduct”.

I consider that the world and almost our civilization for the next twenty-five years, is going to depend upon a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people. Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.
Planned Parenthood Founder, Margaret Sanger, 1950

In addition, Planned Parenthood’s top award is called the Margaret Sanger Award, despite the fact that Sanger was an admitted Klan speaker. This is what Sanger wrote in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

When Dr. John C. Cutler arrived at the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, he became the head of the population division of the Graduate School of Public Health where he helped establish and coordinate major international health projects in West Africa and several third world countries. He was also instrumental in the development of a joint program with the University’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

Interesting to note is that John Cutler’s wife Eleise, served on the board of PLANNED PARENTHOOD, a group which was founded by , Margaret Sanger, as we proved above was a Klan speaker who was a long time member of the American Eugenics Society. Susan Reverby says that Cutler’s wife, Eliese Cutler, the former Planned Parenthood board member, assisted her husband in the administration of the experiment. According to Reverby , “She ‘got to know the patients and helped keep things straight,’ while also photographing them and the inoculations for the record.”

Eleise Cutler and her husband John supported population control and Eleisealsocontributed to Planned Parenthood’s research arm the Alan Guttmacher Institute, whose founder was a Vice President of both Planned Parenthood and the American Eugenics Society.

*****Here you see an article documenting that John C. Cutler’s wife Eleise, served on the board of the eugenic founded Planned Parenthood:
The Pittsburgh Press – Feb 1, 1970 Planned Parenthood Official here fears famine in 5 years

Here – John C. Cutler promotes population control and small families along with Planned Parenthood.The Pittsburgh Press – Sep 10, 1970

And here Dr Cutler is a guest at a Planned Parenthood luncheon Here Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – Jan 15, 1969

Here, John C. Cutler promotes Birth Control with Planned Parenthood,The Pittsburgh Press – Jan 20, 1970

As you watch the video and read the information below about the Guatemala syphilis study, keep in mind that John C. Cutler promoted Planned Parenthood ideas, his wife sat on their board, and he advocated Population Control an idea that was pushed by Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. Also keep in mind the fact that Planned Parenthood was funded by members of the American Eugenics Society such as Clarence Gamble, who also funded the North Carolina Eugenics Society which later eugenically sterilized several black women. Below is a testimony from such one of his victim’s Elaine Riddick from the documentary: Maafa21.

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Now for the information about – John C. Cutler:

Vodpod videos no longer available.

U.S. to Apologize for Shock STD Experiments , posted with vodpod

U.S. to apologize for STD experiments in Guatemala
Government researchers infected patients with syphilis, gonorrhea without their consent in the 1940s

U.S. government medical researchers intentionally infected hundreds of people in Guatemala, including institutionalized mental patients, with gonorrhea and syphilis without their knowledge or permission more than 60 years ago.

Many of those infected were encouraged to pass the infection onto others as part of the study.

About one third of those who were infected never got adequate treatment.

On Friday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius offered extensive apologies for actions taken by the U.S. Public Health Service.
The sexually transmitted disease inoculation study conducted from 1946-1948 in Guatemala was clearly unethical,” according to the joint statement from Clinton and Sebelius. “Although these events occurred more than 64 years ago, we are outraged that such reprehensible research could have occurred under the guise of public health. We deeply regret that it happened, and we apologize to all the individuals who were affected by such abhorrent research practices.”

The apology was directed to Guatemala and to Hispanic residents of the United States, according to officials.

“The people of Guatemala are our close friends and neighbors in the Americas,” the statement says. “As we move forward to better understand this appalling event, we reaffirm the importance of our relationship with Guatemala, and our respect for the Guatemalan people, as well as our commitment to the highest standards of ethics in medical research.”

In addition to the apology, the U.S. is setting up commissions to ensure that human medical research conducted around the globe meets “rigorous ethical standards,” according to the government statement.

A telebriefing with Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health and Arturo Valenzuela, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Affairs is expected Friday morning.

The episode raises inevitable comparisons to the infamous Tuskegee experiment, the Alabama study where hundreds of African-American men were told they were being treated for syphilis, but in fact were denied treatment. That U.S. government study lasted from 1932 until press reports revealed it in 1972.

The Guatemala experiments, which were conducted between 1946 and 1948, never provided any useful information and the records were hidden.

They were discovered by Susan Reverby, a professor of women’s studies at Wellesley College, and were posted on her website.

“In 1946-48, Dr. John C. Cutler, a Public Health Service physician who would later be part of the Syphilis Study in Alabama in the 1960s and continue to defend it two decades after it ended in the 1990s, was running a syphilis inoculation project in Guatemala, co-sponsored by the PHS, the National Institutes of Health, the Pan American Health Sanitary Bureau (now the Pan American Health Organization), and the Guatemalan government,” she wrote.

“It was the early days of penicillin and the PHS was deeply interested in whether penicillin could be used to prevent, not just cure, early syphilis infection, whether better blood tests for the disease could be established, what dosages of penicillin actually cured infection, and to understand the process of reinfection after cures.”

The prison inmates were deliberately infected by prostitutes, but were treated with penicillin afterwards.

According to Reverby’s report, the Guatemalan project was co-sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, the NIH, the Pan-American Health Sanitary Bureau (now the Pan American Health Organization) and the Guatemalan government. The experiments involved 696 subjects — male prisoners and female patients in the National Mental Health Hospital.

The researchers were trying to determine whether the antibiotic penicillin could prevent early syphilis infection, not just cure it, Reverby writes. After the subjects were infected with the syphilis bacteria — through visits with prostitutes who had the disease and direct inoculations — Reverby notes that it is unclear whether they were later cured or given proper treatment.

Reverby, who has written extensively about the Tuskegee experiments, found the evidence while conducting further research on the Alabama syphilis study.

CBS News reports that Cutler seemed to recognize the delicate ethical quandaries their experiments posed, particularly in the wake of the Nuremberg “Doctors’ Trials,” and was concerned about secrecy. “As you can imagine,” Cutler reported to his PHS overseer, “we are holding our breaths, and we are explaining to the patients and others concerned with but a few key exceptions, that the treatment is a new one utilizing serum followed by penicillin. This double talk keeps me hopping at time.”

Cutler also wrote that he feared “a few words to the wrong person here, or even at home, might wreck it or parts of it …

PHS physician R.C. Arnold, who supervised Cutler, was more troubled, confiding to Cutler, “I am a bit, in fact more than a bit, leery of the experiment with the insane people. They can not give consent, do not know what is going on, and if some goody organization got wind of the work, they would raise a lot of smoke. I think the soldiers would be best or the prisoners for they can give consent.”

Apparently difficulties in transmission, as well as in replicating results, added to concerns over the study, and it was dropped after two years.

Cutler went on to participate in another Syphilis Study at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, N.Y. (although in that case the subjects were informed about the nature of the inoculations administered to them).

John C. Cutler is one of the founders of the Family Health Council of Western Pennsylvania in 1971, where Planned Parenthood operated as a member.
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The Tuskegee syphilis experiment (also known as the Tuskegee syphilis study or Public Health Service syphilis study) was a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 in Tuskegee, Alabama, by the U.S. Public Health Service. Investigators recruited 399 impoverished African-American sharecroppers with syphilis for research related to the natural progression of the untreated disease.

The Public Health Service, working with the Tuskegee Institute, began the study in 1932. Nearly 400 poor black men with syphilis from Macon County, Ala., were enrolled in the study. They were never told they had syphilis, nor were they ever treated for it. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the men were told they were being treated for “bad blood,” a local term used to describe several illnesses, including syphilis, anemia and fatigue.

For participating in the study, the men were given free medical exams, free meals and free burial insurance.

Here the US issues an apology:

And never forget the way we targeted Blacks for sterilization under the term: Eugenics.

In fact, since records have been made public in many states- they show over 60,000 people were sterilized against their will – most of them black.

Find out more about how the US has and continues to promote Eugenic Experiments on an entire class of people Watch the documentary Maafa21 (Clip Below)

Read apology: joint statement issued by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebeliushere

RU 486 companion drug blamed in 2001 death

Posted in Abortion, Abortion death, RU-486 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by saynsumthn

By Ed Langlois Jan 12,2001

Of the Sentinel

A just-settled Portland lawsuit has called into question the safety of a drug being used in concert with the abortion compound RU 486.

The 1997 death of 34-year-old Margaret O’Connor is being blamed on a dose of misoprostol, an ulcer medication that doctors have for several years used to induce labor in expectant mothers.

The undisclosed settlement, achieved last month after a two-year trial in Multnomah County Circuit Court, went to Michael O’Connor of Portland. On Jan. 28, 1997, O’Connor lost his wife an hour after she gave birth to their third child at Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland.

The Food and Drug Administration in September approved the use of RU 486, and doctors have been using Cytotec as a companion drug to complete the chemical abortion process.

But FDA figures show 30 cases of rupture of the uterus related to the use of misoprostol, known by its brand name Cytotec. In eight cases, the child died even though abortion was not the intent.

In the Portland case, the mother died.

Peggy O’Connor was admitted to Emanuel for what Dr. Barry Davis says appeared to be an ‘uneventful’ labor. But Dr. Davis did note that O’Connor was anxious to have the baby and had consulted with another physician, Dr. Joseph Weick, about using Cytotec to hurry the birth and avert complications. The drug had been used in Legacy delivery rooms for less than a year. Dr. Weick said he saw no problem and Dr. Davis ordered the dose.

Powerful contractions set in and O’Connor delivered the child. About 20 minutes later, the placenta came. O’Connor, who had had a child previously via cesarean section, then began bleeding profusely. She went into shock, and surgical measures to save her life failed.

An autopsy revealed that the placenta had broken off too abruptly and that amniotic fluid entered Peggy O’Connor’s bloodstream.

‘The pro-life community has always warned that RU 486 abortions are deadly not only to the unborn but to the women,’ says Gayle Atteberry, executive director of Oregon Right to Life. ‘This tragically proves us right.’

Oregon was one of the states where doctors tested RU 486 and developed protocol for its use.

In a pre-trial deposition, the O’Connors’ attorney Keith Tichenor asked Dr. Davis if he had warned his patient of the risks involved with Cytotec before he administered it.

Tichenor: ‘Did you tell her anything about whether it was used as an abortifacient?’

Davis: ‘No.’

Tichenor: ‘Did you tell her anything about warnings on the package inserts about not using it if you were pregnant because of the abortifacient property?’

Davis: ‘No.’

Attorneys for Dr. Davis, Legacy Health System and Monsanto argued that the harm to Margaret O’Connor was ‘not foreseeable.’

Cytotec is manufactured by G.D. Searle, a drug company owned by chemical giant Monsanto. The FDA approved Cytotec as an ulcer medication in 1988.

The drug literature from the late 1980s warns, in bold type, against the use of Cytotec by pregnant women.

But medical experts are split on the use of the drug during labor.

The O’Connor case showed that some strong proponents of its use are at Portland’s Oregon Health Sciences University. It was there, at a 1995 continuing education seminar, that Dr. Davis was told that the ulcer drug Cytotec was a good labor quickener.

But doctors elsewhere argue strongly against the drug, citing its tendency to cause the strong contractions and even kill the child in the process of being born.

Dr. Marsden Wagner, a Washington, D.C., physician who once worked with the World Health Organization, relays reports from Medford that obstetricians there are using Cytotec to try to fit deliveries into a daytime schedule.

‘We can’t just throw drugs at people in an uncontrolled way,’ Dr. Wagner writes in a recent article in the magazine Midwifery Today.

‘These women and babies paid a very big price because their practitioners were willing to use a very powerful drug before it has been approved by the FDA for this purpose and before it was adequately evaluated by prospective, controlled research.’

Dr. Charles Lockwood, chairman of obstetrical practices for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, says that Cytotec is the ‘agent of choice’ for inducing labor in the United States.

During the 12-year debate that resulted in the approval of protocol for RU 486, many physicians argued that women should be able to take Cytotec at home to make the abortion process cheaper and quicker.

‘Not being able to use misoprostol at home is a barrier to entry to providing medical abortion services,’ Dr. Suzanne Poppema, Seattle-based president of the National Abortion Federation, said in March 1999.

So far, the FDA has approved Cytotec only for use in treating peptic ulcers, but did recommend it to cause miscarriage after use of RU 486. When doctors use the drug to induce labor they are engaging in a common, legal but risky practice called ‘off-label use.’

In August 2000, Searle sent an update letter from its Skokie, Ill., office to doctors warning that Cytotec was approved only for treating ulcers and posed dangers to women if used to induce labor or abortions.

‘Serious adverse events reported following off-label use of Cytotec in pregnant women include maternal or fetal death,’ the Searle letter reported.

Just last week, two doctors from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists chided Searle for the attempted dissuasion.

The editorial, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, charged Searle with letting a fear of abortion politics and potential boycotts override science.

‘It is a sad state of affairs when a pharmaceutical company attempts to restrict the use of a drug although a large body of scientific evidence indicates that the drug has unique benefits and is safe for a large group of patients,’ wrote Drs. Ralph Hale and Stanley Zinberg. ‘Women in the United States should not be deprived of access to misoprostol.’

Other labor-induction drugs are more dangerous and more expensive, the doctors argued.

Though 30 cases may not seem like an epidemic, observers say Cytotec could pose a greater risk now that RU 486 is approved.

Doses for causing abortion will be higher than those used to speed labor.

Even in smaller doses, the drug causes overwhelmingly powerful contractions in some women and can bring on the kind of rupture and bleeding that killed Margaret O’Connor.
‘I’m not sure this kind of thing is isolated, or if it is, whether it will stay isolated,’ says the O’Connors’ Portland attorney Keith Tichenor.

H1N1 WHO exaggerated threat? Influenced by drug makers ?

Posted in Flu Chip, Flu Shot, H1N1, Vaccinations with tags , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2010 by saynsumthn

Reports accuse WHO of exaggerating H1N1 threat, possible ties to drug makers
By Rob Stein
Washington Post Staff Writer

Friday, June 4, 2010; 3:52 PM

European criticism of the World Health Organization‘s handling of the H1N1 pandemic intensified Friday with the release of two reports that accused the agency of exaggerating the threat posed by the virus and failing to disclose possible influence by the pharmaceutical industry on its recommendations for how countries should respond.

The WHO’s response caused widespread, unnecessary fear and prompted countries around the world to waste millions of dollars, according to one report. At the same time, the Geneva-based arm of the United Nations relied on advice from experts with ties to drug makers in developing the guidelines it used to encourage countries to stockpile millions of doses of antiviral medications, according to the second report.

The reports outlined the drumbeat of criticism that has arisen, primarily in Europe, of how the world’s leading health organization responded to the first influenza pandemic in more than four decades.

“For WHO, its credibility has been badly damaged,” wrote Fiona Godlee, the editor of the BMJ, a prominent British medical journal, that published one of the reports. “WHO must act now to restore its credibility.”

A spokesman for the WHO, along with several independent experts, however, strongly disputed the reports, saying they misrepresented the seriousness of the pandemic and the WHO’s response, which was carefully formulated and necessary given the potential threat.

“The idea that we declared a pandemic when there wasn’t a pandemic is both historically inaccurate and downright irresponsible,” said WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl in a telephone interview. “There is no doubt that this was a pandemic. To insinuate that this was not a pandemic is very disrespectful to the people who died from it.”

The first report, released in Paris, came from the Social, Health and Family Affairs Committee of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, which launched an investigation in response to allegations that the WHO’s response to the pandemic was influenced by drug companies that make antiviral drugs and vaccines.

“The parliamentary assembly is alarmed about the way in which the H1N1 influenza pandemic has been handled, not only by the World Health Organization (WHO), but also by the competent health authorities at the level of the European Union and at national level,” the 18-page draft report states.

“It is particularly troubled by some of the consequences of decisions taken and advice given leading to distortion of priorities of public health services across Europe, waste of large sums of public money, and also unjustified scares and fears about health risks faced by the European public at large,” according to the report.

The second report, a joint investigation by the BMJ and the Bureau of Investigative Journalism, which is based in London, criticized 2004 guidelines the WHO developed based in part on the advice of three experts who received consulting fees from the two leading manufacturers of antiviral drugs used against the virus, Roche and GlaxoSmithKline.

“We are left wondering whether major public health organizations are able to effectively manage the conflicts of interest that are inherent in medical science,” the report states.

Hartl dismissed those charges.

“WHO would say categorically that it believes that it has not been subject to undue conflict-of-interest. We know that some experts that come to our committees have contact with industry. It would be surprising if they didn’t because the best experts are sought by all organizations,” Hartl said. “We feel that the guidelines produced were certainly not subject to undue influence.”

Several other experts also defended the agency.

“Twenty-twenty hindsight can always second guess the decisions of public health officials,” said Jeffrey Levi, executive director of the Trust for America’s Health, a private nonprofit group. “But this kind of condemnation of public health officials who made the most prudent decisions based on available knowledge could well backfire in future emergencies: I fear that public health officials will draw the lesson that they should wait for greater scientific certainty before responding in the future — and we could pay for that overcaution with many lives lost.”

In response to the criticism, the WHO has launched two investigations, including one by an independent panel of experts led by Harvey Fineberg, who heads the Institute of Medicine at the U.S. National Academy of Sciences.

These reports raise questions about potential, inappropriate influences on WHO decision-making in the assessment and response to the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and, more generally, question practices employed by WHO to guard against conflict of interest among its expert advisers,” Fineberg said in an e-mail. “These topics are among those that will be fully considered by our review committee.”