Archive for Supreme Court

Planned Parenthood leaders saw abortion for eugenics reasons according to Justice Clarence Thomas

Posted in Eugenics, Guttmacher, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections, Supreme Court with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2019 by saynsumthn

 

Part Two of Two.

Abortion for eugenics reasons was advocated by Planned Parenthood leaders such as Alan F Guttmacher according to a multi-page summary written by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in the case Box v. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky Inc. In part one, we detailed how Justice Thomas linked eugenics ideology to Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. Here we will include additional statements from the Justice.

In his opinion, Thomas wrote a lengthy history of eugenics and touched upon one of Margaret Sanger’s notorious directors, Lothrop Stoddard. Thomas wrote, “[…E]ugenicist Lothrop Stoddard argued that the “prodigious birth-rate” of the nonwhite races was bringing the world to a racial tipping point…Stoddard feared that without “artificial barriers,” the races “will increasingly mingle, and the inevitable result will be the supplanting or absorption of the higher by the lower types….Eugenic arguments like these helped precipitate the Immigration Act of 1924, which significantly reduced immigration from outside of Western and Northern Europe….”

Read more about Stoddard’s views at Live Action News (here).

Thomas also implicated former PP president and eugenics VP, Alan F Guttmacher, writing, “Many eugenicists therefore supported legalizing abortion” adding how “abortion advocates—including future Planned Parenthood President Alan Guttmacher— endorsed the use of abortion for eugenic reasons…Even after World War II, future Planned Parenthood President Alan Guttmacher and other abortion advocates endorsed abortion for eugenic reasons and promoted it as a means of controlling the population and improving its quality…”

Image: Alan Guttmacher 1973

Alan Guttmacher 1973 (Image credit: WGBH)

Thomas went on to address PP leaders on eugenics, “One journal declared that “abortion is the one mode of population limitation which has demonstrated the speedy impact which it can make upon a national problem.” …Planned Parenthood’s leaders echoed these themes. When exulting over “‘fantastic . . . progress’” in expanding abortion, for example, Guttmacher stated that “‘the realization of the population problem has been responsible’ for the change in attitudes. ‘We’re now concerned more with the quality of population than the quantity.’”

Live Action News has documented how Guttmacher was instrumental in the decriminalization of abortion and then pushed PP into committing abortions.  The fact is that Guttmacher’s ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. After all, they were both members of the very racist American Eugenics Society, with Guttmacher serving as the group’s vice-president. As Live Action News has documented in the past, Sanger made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics.

Image: Planned Parenthood president Alan F Guttmacher VP of eugenics society

Planned Parenthood president Alan F Guttmacher VP of eugenics society

The Justice, a Black man himself, spoke about the suspicion that Blacks had about “family planning” and abortion becoming a tool of Black genocide, mirroring examples pointed out previously by Live Action News:

“Avoiding the word “eugenics” did not assuage everyone’s fears. Some black groups saw “‘family planning’ as a euphemism for race genocide” and believed that “black people [were] taking the brunt of the ‘planning’” under Planned Parenthood’s “ghetto approach” to distributing its services,” the Justice wrote.

Image: Article Blacks Charge Genocide from abortion

Blacks Charge Genocide from abortion

Thomas pointed out how eugenicsts were cited in the Roe v. Wade case, writing, “Similarly, legal scholar Glanville Williams wrote that he was open to the possibility of eugenic infanticide, at least in some situations, explaining that “an eugenic killing by a mother, exactly paralleled by the bitch that kills her misshapen puppies, cannot confidently be pronounced immoral.” …The Court cited Williams’ book for a different proposition in Roe v. Wade.”

Live Action President, Lila Rose pointed out that Live Action has seen first hand how the abortion industry targets vulnerable and minority demographics as evidence in the undercover call below:

 

“I applaud Clarence Thomas’ assertion that ‘Given the potential for abortion to become a tool of eugenic manipulation, the [c]ourt will soon need to confront the constitutionality of laws like Indiana’s…. Enshrining the constitutional right to an abortion based solely on the race, sex, or disability of an unborn child, as Planned Parenthood advocates, would constitutionalize the views of the 20th Century eugenics movement.’ Rose stated.

Although Thomas concurred with the Court’s decision to not rule on the discrimination portion of the case at this time, he recognized that this issue of eugenics must be addressed by the Court, writing, “Given the potential for abortion to become a tool of eugenic manipulation, the Court will soon need to confront the constitutionality of laws like Indiana’s…Although the Court declines to wade into these issues today, we cannot avoid them forever. Having created the constitutional right to an abortion, this Court is dutybound to address its scope.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is a longer – edited- version of one also published by Live Action News. 

Justice Clarence Thomas: Abortion is tool of modern-day eugenics

Posted in Black Genocide, Eugenics, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger Legacy Society, Supreme Court with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2019 by saynsumthn

 

Part One of Two.

In deciding the recent case Box v. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky Inc., United States Supreme Court Justice sent a warning to the Court, suggesting that states have a “compelling interest in preventing abortion from becoming a tool of modern-day eugenics,” even going as far as to implicate Planned Parenthood’s founder and leaders. In the decision, the Court allowed one provision of an Indiana law requiring the humane burial of aborted children to stand, while denying another provision to bar abortions on the basis of sex, race or disability.

Justice Thomas penned a multi-page response to address the Court’s decision, which began (emphasis added):

I write separately to address the other aspect of Indiana law at issue here—the “Sex Selective and Disability Abortion Ban.”… Each of the immutable characteristics protected by this law can be known relatively early in a pregnancy, and the [Indiana] law prevents them from becoming the sole criterion for deciding whether the child will live or die. Put differently, this law and other laws like it promote a State’s compelling interest in preventing abortion from becoming a tool of modern-day eugenics.

He then pulled no punches, making it plain that Planned Parenthood — the defendant in the case — was founded in eugenics:

The use of abortion to achieve eugenic goals is not merely hypothetical. The foundations for legalizing abortion in America were laid during the early 20th-century birth control movement. That movement developed alongside the American eugenics movement. And significantly, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger recognized the eugenic potential of her cause.

Sanger was a known member of the American Eugenics Society. In addition to speaking at a Ku Klux Klan meeting by invitation, about which she wrote in her autobiography, the Planned Parenthood founder also advocated forced sterilization to rid the planet of those she deemed “unfit.” Despite this involvement, as Live Action News previously documented, Sanger’s namesake is listed on two current Planned Parenthood awards as well as Planned Parenthood facilities and Legacy Societies, with no condemnations from the abortion-friendly media.

Justice Thomas went into great detail, recording for posterity and for the public the truth about Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger. While we will not list all of the comments in detail here, some are more notable:

  • Sanger viewed birth control as a way to reduce the “ever increasing, unceasingly spawning class of human beings who never should have been born at all.”
  • Sanger argued that “Birth Control . . . is really the greatest and most truly eugenic method” of “human generation.”
  • In her view, birth control had been “accepted… as the most constructive and necessary of the means to racial health.”
  • Sanger accepted that eugenics was the best way toward a “solution of racial, political and social problems.”
  • Sanger believed that the imbalance between birth rates of the “fit” and “unfit” was “the greatest present menace to civilization.”
  • Sanger believed in “stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health.”
  • In Sanger’s view, frequent reproduction among “the majority of wage workers” would lead to “the contributing of morons, feeble-minded, insane and various criminal types to the already tremendous social burden constituted by these unfit.”
  • [I]n 1939, Sanger initiated the “Negro Project,” an effort to promote birth control in poor, Southern Black communities.
  • In a report titled “Birth Control and the Negro,” Sanger and her coauthors identified Blacks as “the great problem of the South.”
  • She recruited Black clergy to reassure the Black community on the benefits of controlling their birth rates and to keep them from the idea that Sanger “want[ed] to exterminate the Negro population.”

Justice Thomas correctly points out that Sanger herself did not advocate abortion but regarded “the hundreds of thousands of abortions performed in America each year [as] a disgrace to civilization.” He made it clear that “[…]Sanger’s arguments about the eugenic value of birth control in securing ‘the elimination of the unfit’ apply with even greater force to abortion, making it significantly more effective as a tool of eugenics.”

“Whereas Sanger believed that birth control could prevent “unfit” people from reproducing, abortion can prevent them from being born in the first place,” he said, noting that abortion is a mere extension of Sanger’s eugenic mindset.

For further reading, Live Action News has detailed Planned Parenthood’s eugenic history in articles below:

“This case highlights the fact that abortion is an act rife with the potential for eugenic manipulation,” Thomas wrote.

In part two – we will review the Justice’s view of PP’s former doctor and president, Alan F Guttmacher.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is a longer – edited- version of one also published by Live Action News. 

Pro-abortion leader hoped abortion would end ‘morality’ and ‘the nuclear family’

Posted in Black Babies, Black Genocide, Eugenics, Garret Hardin, Garrett Hardin, Human Betterment, Lader, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, Roe V Wade History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 23, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion, abortion rates, Roe v. Wade

The “father of the abortion movement,” Larry Lader, was heavily influenced by Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, about whom he wrote a biography. Planned Parenthood was also steeped in eugenics from its beginning, and boasted a list of eugenics proponents as its board members. Although the two shared a eugenics ideology, Lader would eventually part ways with Sanger over abortion. But it was perhaps Sanger’s warped eugenic ideology that motivated Lader to manipulate the 1960s women’s movement to push for abortion legalization.

 

Lader wasn’t interested in equal rights… just ‘abortion rights’

“Larry never seemed to be interested in the rest of the women’s movement, the equal rights amendment, child care and so forth,” Sey Chassler, a consulting editor at Parade magazine, recalled to the LA Times in 1995. But on abortion, “he is absolutely single-minded. He just keeps going forward on it.”

Image: Lawrence Lader abortion crusader

Lawrence Lader abortion crusader

READ: Did a eugenics proponent coin Planned Parenthood’s iconic slogan?

In 1966, Lader authored the book “Abortion” on the heels of the Supreme Court’s 1965 decision in Griswold vs. Connecticut, granting a so-called right to privacy. “If I had written it five years earlier, it would have sunk like a stone,” he admitted.

Lader stressed in the book, “We will only defeat ourselves by producing an endless cycle of unwanted children. Those born in slums, for example, denied even the smallest share of education and economic opportunity, have little chance of realizing their full potential as citizens.” He goes on to quote Garrett Hardin, a leading eugenic ecologist, whose views influenced debates on abortion, immigration, foreign aid, overpopulation, and other provocative issues.

Hardin, a member of the American Eugenics Society, who was given Planned Parenthood’s highest national award in 1980, once called it insanity to rely on voluntarism to control population. He advocated coercive birth control, stating that citizens should be willing to give up their right to breed for the betterment of society.

“When unwanted children become parents,” Lader quotes Hardin in “Abortion,” “they are more likely than others to be poor parents themselves and breed another generation of unwanted children. This is a vicious cycle if there ever was one. It is ruinous to the social system.”

Image: Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

“Above all, society must grasp the grim relationship between unwanted children and the violent rebellion of minority groups,” Lader went on to state, then using Planned Parenthood’s iconic slogan, “every child a wanted child,” coined by eugenicist Frederick Henry Osborn, a founding member and president of the American Eugenics Society (AES) who also signed Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April 1938.

Frederick Osborn

READ: Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go far beyond Margaret Sanger

“As long as a reasonable chance of contraceptive failure persists, however, abortion must be included as part of birth control to insure every child’s becoming a wanted child,” Lader wrote. He then turned from a eugenics emphasis to couching abortion as liberating for women, calling it, “the final freedom,” and quoting Sanger as saying, “No woman can call herself free until she can choose consciously whether she will or will not be a mother.”

“The complete legalization of abortion is the one just and inevitable answer to the quest for feminine freedom,” Lader stated. “All other solutions are compromises.”

Lader sought “a complete restructuring of sexual morality”

Lader saw abortion as liberating for women, sexually. But in reality, abortion was a man’s dream and the last barrier keeping him from free sex without consequences… and has shifted the responsibility of pregnancy to the woman alone.

“The rapid advance of legalized abortion in turn gave the feminist movement an explosive boost,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II,” adding, “Abortion provided the prime weapon against sexism and the ‘biological imperative’ – the prison of unwanted childbearing that had chained most women to the role of housekeepers, nurses, and cooks under male dominance. Once sex had been detached from pregnancy, Women’s Liberation could construct its own ethics on the ash-heap of puritan morality.”

Lader then suggested that the “feminist revolt” was the “rebirth of sex… an explosion of sexuality” while also pointing out that a recent study had shown that “nearly half of all unmarried women have had sexual intercourse by the age of nineteen.” Of course, Lader also observed from that Commission on Population Growth study that, “more Blacks than Whites had intercourse in each age group.”

Lader described the feminist demands as “a complete restructuring of sexual morality,” claiming that the “most radical feminist wants an even more sweeping revolt – the end of the nuclear family itself.” He claimed the feminist had replaced the security of a “husband’s salary” for the “biological security of abortion.”

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

 

____________________

 

  • ( Part one) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • (Part Two) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger
  • (Part Three) ‘Father of abortion rights’: Minorities need abortion to prevent future ‘drug addicts’
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Posted in Abortion Funding, Abortion History, Abortion legalization by state, Abortion prior to Roe, Abortion Racism, abortion used as birth control, Abortion Welfare, American Eugenics Society, American Law Institute, Bernard Nathanson, Bush, Bush Family, Cosmo Magazine, Faye Wattleton, Feminism, Guttmacher, Lader, Men and Abortion, Men For Choice, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood President, Population Control, Population Council, Roe V Wade History, Subverted, Supreme Court, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion

The media seems to always equate abortion with “women’s rights” — but many people may be unaware that legalizing abortion in America was actually an idea originally pushed by pro-abortion men, many of whom were concerned about the growth of certain people groups. But beyond this, predatory men have benefited significantly from legalized abortion, which has removed male responsibility from unplanned pregnancy situations, and which is used to cover up sexual abuse. And male abortionists continue to be protected by the abortion industry even when they rapeinjure or kill female patients.

Below are eight things everyone should know about the large role certain men played in liberalizing abortion laws in the U.S.:

1. Pro-eugenics men were the primary people discouraging reproduction among “undesirable” groups

Image: Image: American Eugenics Society document

Image: American Eugenics Society document

2. A pro-population control man led the push for abortion at Planned Parenthood 

Image: PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

Image: Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

3. A misogynistic man influenced the sexual revolution, which primarily benefited predatory males 

  • The sexual revolution of the 1960s pushed by Cosmopolitan Magazine (under direction of Helen Gurley Brown) was inspired by Hugh Hefner, creator of Playboy.
  • Hefner told Hollywood Reporter that Brown approached him for job before joining Cosmo: “She wanted to do a female version of Playboy.
  • The theme of free sex without consequences and no kids, with abortion as a safety net, benefited men.

Cosmo Magazine 1967

Cosmo Magazine 1967

4. Two pro-abortion men hijacked the 1960’s “women’s movement” to legalize abortion 

Image: Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

  • Most outspoken abortion enthusiasts in the 1960s were men, like Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson.
  • Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” dubbed “mother of the women’s movement,” called Lader “the father of the abortion rights movement.”
  • Friedan founded the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966 and in 1967, Lader and Nathanson convinced her to add abortion to NOW’s plank, causing a loss in female NOW membership.
  • Lader admitted in his book that “Abortion never became a feminist plank in the United States among the suffragettes or depression radicals. It was ignored, even boycotted by Planned Parenthood women in those days.”
  • 1969: NARAL was established by Lader, Nathanson, and Friedan, who admitted few women attended. (Nathanson later renounced his pro-abortion stance and worked to expose the lies they told.)
  • 1989: Friedan acknowledged it was certain men who pushed to legalize abortion: “I remember that there were some men… that had been trying to reform these criminal abortion laws. And they got a sense somehow that the women’s movement might make everything different…. They kept nagging at me… to try and do something…. ‘We need some organization to take up… abortion rights.’”
Image: Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

5. Pro-eugenics men founded the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s former research arm 

  • Alan Guttmacher, former Planned Parenthood president and Eugenics Society VP, founded the Center for Family Planning Program Development in 1968, which became the Guttmacher Institute, a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.
  • In 1969, Guttmacher acknowledged funding came from “Kellogg, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations.”

6. Men in favor of population control pushed for taxpayer-funded “family planning,” which aids America’s largest abortion business

  • The Title X federal family planning program allocates tens of millions of tax dollars to Planned Parenthood.
  • 1965: President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) supported taxpayer funded “family planning” and was awarded Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award the following year.
  • 1966: Alan Guttmacher proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to fund birth control for poor.
  • 1968: George N. Lindsay, chairman of Planned Parenthood-World Population, urged President Richard Nixon to federally fund poor people’s “family planning.”
  • 1969: Nixon spoke in favor of “family planning” and the same year, the Senate approved tax funding for it, with the help of Democrat Senator Joseph D. Tydings, a Planned Parenthood supporter granted PPFA’s Margaret Sanger award.
Image: Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

  • 1970: The U.S. House of Representatives authorized federal dollars to pay for family planning services.
  • The chief co-sponsor of the Title X statute was Rep. George H.W. Bush, who later became president. Bush was recruited because his grandfather, Prescott Bush, once sat on a Planned Parenthood board.
  • 1972: Nixon recommended Congress create the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future to study abortion. It was chaired by John D. Rockefeller III, a longtime advocate of population control. The Executive Director was Charles Westoff, a member of the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood’s National Advisory Council.

7. An all-male Supreme Court legalized abortion

  • 1973: U.S. Supreme Court justices, all men, ruled 7 to 2 to vote in the Roe v. Wade case in favor of legalizing abortion on demand.
Image: Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

8. Men pushing eugenics and population control brought the abortion pill to the U.S.

  • The Population Council, founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller III, was led by men concerned about population issues and is credited with bringing abortion pill RU-486 to the U.S.
  • Population Council leaders were connected to the eugenics movement (read more here).
Image: RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

  • 1994: President Bill Clinton’s administration encouraged French pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf to assign US rights of marketing and distribution of RU-486 to the Population Council.
  • Right to distribute handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.
  • 2000: Larry Lader bragged in a press conference he “plotted” to break the law and smuggle the pills into the U.S.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Texas lawmaker files bill to abolish abortion and ignore Roe

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 20, 2019 by saynsumthn

On January 17, 2019 Texas State Representative Tony Tinderholt filed a bill to abolish abortion in the state. HB896 is an, “Act relating to prohibiting abortion and protecting the rights of an unborn child,” and it in essence tells authorities to ignore federal mandates and to protect the preborn child with the force of law as a born child.

Image: State Representative Tony Tinderholt

State Representative Tony Tinderholt

Texas is where the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision which forced unrestricted abortion on demand began.

Roe was a pseudonym for Jane Roe a/k/a/ Norma McCorvey and Wade was Henry Wade, a Dallas district attorney who defended the Texas law, leading, eventually, to the Supreme Court ruling: Roe v. Wade. The Roe V. Wade case and a companion case, Doe v. Bolton were heard by the Supreme Court at the same time. Plaintiffs in both cases, Norman McCorvey (Jane Roe) and Sandra Cano (Mary Doe) claim they were lied to, manipulated and deceived.

In 1969, Norma McCorvey became pregnant and after meeting pro-abortion attorney Sarah Weddington, on March 17, 1970 she signed the affidavit which catapulted Roe into being. The case was first filed in Dallas on behalf of plaintiff Jane Roe and all other women “who were or might become pregnant and want to consider all options.”

Image: Texas abortion law challenge 1970

Texas abortion law challenge 1970

At the time, in Texas, abortions were prohibited except to save the pregnant woman’s life. But, on June 17, 1970 the three-judge federal panel struck down the Texas abortion statute.

1970-Henry-Wade-Abortion-article-2

 

The case was brought to the Supreme Court on the basis that Norma McCorvey, the Roe in the case was raped and needed an abortion. The fact is that she was never raped and never wanted an abortion. In fact, Norma later became pro-life and sought to overturn the infamous decision.

Doe v. Bolton, the companion case to Roe, opened the door for abortion on demand by allowing the “health of the mother” exception” to be defined however the doctor chose.

Image: Sandra Cano was Doe in the Doe v Bolton Supreme Court abortion case

Sandra Cano was Doe in the Doe v Bolton Supreme Court abortion case

Testimony from Sandra Cano the Former Doe of Doe v. Bolton, before the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Senate Judiciary Committee June 23, 2005 showed that, like the Roe case, she never wanted an abortion.

Roe v Wade was argued for the first time before the Supreme Court on December 13, 1971 but because of new appointments to the Court, the case was reargued a second time on October 11, 1972 before the full nine-man court in, conjunction with Doe v. Bolton.

Image: Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

The cases were decided January 22, 1973.

In 1998, McCorvey told marchers at the March for Life, “I lied and I’m sorry, I’ve repented, I’ve asked Jesus into my heart…”

Image: Norma McCorvey who was Jane Roe of Roe v Wade becomes pro-life

Norma McCorvey who was Jane Roe of Roe v Wade becomes pro-life

Neither McCorvey nor Cano lived to see abortion end.

ABOLISHING ABORTION IN TEXAS:

Image: State Representative Tony Tinderholt

State Representative Tony Tinderholt

Texas state Representative Tony Tinderholt’s measure would amend the Texas penal code for the “Rights of a Living Child” to read, “A living human child, from the moment of fertilization on fusion of a human spermatozoon with a human ovum. The proposal states that the preborn child, “[I]s entitled to the same rights, powers, and privileges as are secured or granted by the laws of this state to any other human child.”

The proposed law would add to the Government code the following abortion enforcement, “The attorney general shall monitor this state’s enforcement of Chapters 19 and 22, Penal Code, in relation to abortion. The attorney general shall direct a state agency to enforce those laws, regardless of any contrary federal law, executive order, or court decision.”

The state’s local code would be amended to read that, “The governing body of a political subdivision of this state shall ensure that the political subdivision enforces Chapters 19 and 22, Penal Code, in relation to abortion, regardless of any contrary federal law, executive order, or court decision.”

It amends the penal code to apply even if the conduct [ the abortion] is “committed by the mother of the unborn child, the procedure performed by a physician or other licensed health care provider, including a procedure performed as part of an assisted reproduction as defined by 160.102, Family Code; or the dispensation of a drug.”

IGNORING ROE:

Rep. Tinderholt’s measure clarifies that all changes apply only to acts committed on or after the measure takes effect and it requires that the State Constitution would override the Supreme Court decision in Roe as well as any other federal mandate:

Any federal law, executive order, or court decision that purports to supersede, stay, or overrule this Act is in violation of the Texas Constitution and the United States Constitution and is therefore void. The State of Texas, a political subdivision of this state, and any agent of this state or a political subdivision of this state may, but is not required to, enter an appearance, special or otherwise, in any federal suit challenging this Act.

To monitor the bill’s status, go here.

The measure follows calls for Texas Governor Greg Abbott to keep his promise to abolish abortion in the state. That promise was made to sixteen year old Jeremiah Thomas who passed away last year from cancer. Thomas’s dying wish that Texas abolish abortion made headlines and Governor Abbott told the dying teen, “Your wish is on the Republican Party platform positions, and it’s what we’re going to be pursuing this next legislative session.  And that is to outlaw abortion altogether in the State of Texas. And, so your wish is granted.”

 

 

Jeremiah’s parents, published an online petition to invite others to join Jeremiah’s wish by urging Governor Abbott to keep his promise by making abolishing abortion an emergency item for the State legislature.

Rep. Tinderholt was placed under protection following a 2017 attempt to criminalize abortions in the state, which resulted in several threats.

 

 

Measures to abolish abortion have also been proposed in Oklahoma. Senator Joseph Silk claims he was a “Typical pro-lifer,” until he “bumped into these crazy Abolitionists.”

Abolitionist and pro-life groups differ in whether incremental legislation is the correct strategy for abolishing abortion.

Senate Bill 13 (SB13), known as the Abolition of Abortion in Oklahoma Act, would equate abortion with homicide in Oklahoma, Sen. Silk claimed in the video below.

Shortly after the 1973 Supreme Court ruling on abortion, pro-lifers attempted to pass a complete ban on abortion via a Human Life Amendment. Those efforts were sadly defeated. Since that time, pro-life groups have worked to pass incremental legislation to protect the child in the womb. Those measures include the Heartbeat Bill, 20-week bans, parental consent requirements, an many others.

Abolitionists via their Free the States campaign are seeking to convince local governing authorities to “Ignore Roe” and protect the child in the womb.

Complete abolishment of abortion efforts come as pro-life measures like the Heartbeat bill which would outlaw abortion as early as six weeks, when the fetal heartbeat can be detected, are being proposed in several states. As the public demands tighter restrictions on abortion, pro-abortion forces are growing desperate and working to open the flood gates for home or mail order abortion pills. At the same time, new appointments to the Supreme Court are causing both sides to ask whether Roe will stand in coming months.

The humanity of the preborn child in the womb is impossible to deny. Today, ultrasound images, fetal monitors, sonograms and abortion victim imagery testify to the fact that the baby in the womb is a developing person which should be protected under the US Constitution as any other person. The analogy to other past dark times in history, such as slavery, when humans were not granted their God-given rights motivate pro-lifers and abolitionists alike.

Both want abortion abolished, both say their strategy is best, hanging in the balance is the preborn child.

Powerful interview w/ Janet Porter about pro-life Heartbeat Bill in Ohio

Posted in Heartbeat Bill, Janet Porter with tags , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2018 by saynsumthn

Janet Folger Porter was on Life Talk TV discussing the effort to pass the pro-life Heartbeat Bill in Ohio.

Read more about these historic votes here.

Take Action – here.

 

History of legal abortion prior to Roe

Posted in Abortion death, Abortion Death Prior to Roe, Abortion History, Abortion Numbers, Abortion prior to Roe, Abortion stats, American Law Institute, Guttmacher, Home Use Abortion, Illegal abortion, State Abortion Stats, States prior to Roe with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 5, 2018 by saynsumthn

Legal abortion equals more abortion, and America’s history is proof of this

abortion

Prior to the 1973 Roe v. Wade court decision, each state had its own abortion laws. Many had laws on the books banning it completely, but others legalized it in some form well before 1973. Roe didn’t become Roe overnight. We can trace its roots back more than a decade prior. And as is usually the case with abortion, once an inch is given, so to speak, those in favor of it tend take a mile. Here’s where it began:

1959: American Law Institute passes model penal code to liberalize abortion, the basis for Roe v. Wade

In 1959, the American Law Institute (A.L.I.), an organization of American lawyers and other elite members of the judiciary, whose mission was the reform of American law, proposed that therapeutic abortions should be legal. Although the first draft of the Model Penal Code to liberalize abortion was released on May 21, 1959, the final version was issued in 1962.

Image: American Law Institute-ALI model penal code on abortion (Image: CDC)

American Law Institute-ALI model penal code on abortion (Image: CDC)

The law proposed that “[a] licensed physician is justified in terminating a pregnancy if he believes there is a substantial risk:

(1) When continuation of pregnancy would gravely impair the physical and mental health of the mother; or

(2) When the child might be born with grave physical or mental defect; or

(3) When the pregnancy resulted from rape, incest, or other felonious intercourse.”

American Law Institute, Model Penal Code on Abortion (Image: Chicago Tribune, 1966)

The ALI’s Model Penal Code was the premise of the 1973 Supreme Court decision, Roe v. Wade. At that time a large percentage of states allowed abortion only when the woman’s life was endangered. By 1967, three states had liberalized it; according to Time.com, by 1968, four of five states—Colorado, North Carolina, Georgia and Maryland, had authorized it “if the child is likely to be born defective,” but “California did not sanction this ground because Governor Ronald Reagan threatened to veto any bill that included it.”

READ: Not just Nazis: The grisly history of research on abortion survivors

According to the Washington Post, “Through the mid-1960s, 44 states outlawed abortion in nearly all situations that did not threaten the life or health of the mother.”

In 1966, abortion was still illegal in all fifty states, according to Dr. and Mrs. John C. Willke. However, in 1966, Mississippi altered its existing law by adding rape as an indication for a hospital abortion, according to the CDC’s first abortion surveillance report in 1969. And, according to National Right To Life’s timeline, in 1954, Alabama permitted abortions for the mother’s physical health.

According to Dr. Willke, “The Bureau of Vital Statistics reported only 160 mothers had died from abortion in 1966 in the entire USA.”

1973: Abortion legalized nationwide by Supreme Court, with more than 600,000 abortions 

In 1969, the CDC estimates that there were 22,670 abortions. As more states began to legalize it, the numbers climbed dramatically. By 1970, the CDC reported 193,491, and the list went on:

1971: 485,816
1972: 586,760
1973: 615,831

After the U.S. Supreme Court decided to legalize abortion nationwide by a 7 to 2 decision in Roe v. Wade, the CDC Abortion Surveillance report from 1973 indicates that a total of 615,831 legal procedures were reported from 50 states and the District of Columbia and New York City.

Image: Abortions reported to CDC prior to 1973

Abortions reported to CDC prior to 1973

 

Alan F. Guttmacher, MD, who served as Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s president from 1962–1974, responded to the ruling by stating, “I think that to raise the dignity of woman and give her freedom of choice in this area is an extraordinary event. I think that Jan 22, 1973, will be a historic day.”

According to the CDC, in ten states, abortions outnumbered live births among teens 15 years and younger.

By race, the numbers broke down as follows:

  • 67.7% were white
  • 25.7% were Black or other races
  • 6.6% reported race was unknown

At the time the initial report was filed, the CDC reported that 51 deaths related to legal, illegal, and spontaneous abortions had been reported in 1973, and 71 in 1972. However, those reports were eventually updated.

READ: These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

In this table from the CDC report (shown below), 39 women died from illegal abortion in 1972, and 19 in 1973 while 24 died from legal abortion in 1972 and 25 died in 1973.

CDC Abortion deaths 1972 to 1990

Live Action News has previously documented how the abortion lobby falsely claimed that hundreds of thousands of women died annually from illegal terminations, in a deliberate effort to push abortion on the nation. Standing in stark contrast to this is the breakdown of the estimated numbers going back to 1930. Clearly, the claims that hundreds of thousands of women were dying was a complete falsehood — and Dr. Bernard Nathanson, founder of NARAL, later admitted as much:

Image: Illegal Abortion Deaths according to various sources, 1930 to 1979 – updated (Graph credit: Live Action News)

Illegal Abortion Deaths according to various sources, 1930 to 1979 – updated (Graph credit: Live Action News)

Roe v. Wade was filed by Norma McCorvey, known as ‘Roe,’ and was argued by Sarah Weddington. McCorvey would later admit that the claim that she had become pregnant through rape was fabricated. In fact, McCorvey’s child was never aborted. Her baby was born while the case was still being argued and she ultimately placed her child for adoption.

McCorvey became a staunch pro-life advocate and later expressed sorrow for her participation in the infamous court decision, working to overturn the case up until her passing in February of 2017 at the age of 69.

Click here for more details on state legalization prior to Roe.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.