Archive for STD

Your child has an STD no worries Planned Parenthood won’t tell you anyway !

Posted in Planned Parenthood Teens with tags , , , , on November 3, 2014 by saynsumthn

Another inner city school given FREE condoms

Posted in Schools and abortion, Sex Ed with tags , , , , on December 27, 2012 by saynsumthn

Students at 22 public high schools in Philadelphia will return from their winter break to find condoms available for the taking at the school nurse’s office, the Philadelphia Inquirer reported.

The pilot project is intended to address what one deputy mayor described as an epidemic of sexually transmitted disease in Philadelphia adolescents.

Philadelphia School District officials sent an email to school nurses, notifying them that the clear-plastic condom dispensers would be installed “just inside the doorway near the entrance to your office.”

Students will return to 22 schools following the holiday break to see new clear plastic condom dispensers installed inside the nurse’s office, WTXF reports. While 12 schools in the city already offer condom in health resource centers, the new move aims to increase contraceptive access to students in a city where teens comprise 25 percent of new HIV infections.

The initiative has sparked outrage among a number of Philadelphia parents, who say free condoms will only serve to encourage teens to engage in sexual activity. But school officials point out that parents are able to sign a waiver to opt their child out of the program, and teens will have sex regardless of whether condoms are made easily available to them.

Across the U.S., at least 418 public schools make condoms available to students, according to Advocates for Youth, a group dedicated to educate and assist young people in sexual health. Of those schools, more than half distribute condoms via school nurses or teachers, while just 3 percent use “vending machines.”

The dispenser program in Philadelphia comes after a new initiative in Springfield, Mass. made waves this year for making condoms available to both high school and middle school students, giving students as young as 12 free access to contraceptives at school.

New York City school officials also sparked controversy in September, when the Department of Education announced a plan to make Plan B emergency contraception available to high school girls at 13 schools across the city. Under the program, an effort to curb the city’s teen pregnancy and abortion rate, girls as young as 14 are able to get the morning after pill without parental consent.

More on schools here and here and here and here ad here and here

Pregnancy Test Vending Machine in bar to protect the Unborn

Posted in Pre-Natal Screening with tags , , , , , , , on July 23, 2012 by saynsumthn

Minnesota bar installs pregnancy test vending machine
July 20th, 2012 by Stella Martin

One of the first pregnancy test vending machines to be installed in a bar will be Pub 500 in Mankato, Minn.. Screen shot via CBS News.

A pub in Mankato, Minnesota called Pub 500 has voluntarily allowed a non-profit organization to install vending machines dispensing pregnancy tests. One of the organizations founders, Jody Allen Crowe, suggested the idea to the owner in effort to help women make better choices about alcohol consumption if they think they might be pregnant.

The organization behind the vending machine is Healthy Brains for Children which promotes refraining from alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Crowe has written a book suggesting that prenatal alcohol exposure may lead to aggressive behavior later in life and possibly cause brain damage. The organization seeks to reduce, if not eliminate, fetal alcohol syndrome.

The bar’s owner, Tom Fredrik, said it didn’t take much convincing to get him on board.

Crowe further told CBS News, “How many times have you heard people say, ‘Oh, I didn’t realize I was pregnant’,” when speaking to unintentional alcohol consumption during the early stages of pregnancy.

The vending machine will be installed in the women’s bathroom and will take credit cards and debit cards. The cost of a vending pregnancy test will be $3.
:

Gonorrhea growing resistant to drugs, WHO warns

Posted in STD with tags , , , , on June 7, 2012 by saynsumthn

Gonorrhea growing resistant to drugs, WHO warns
Posted: Jun 06, 2012 2:14 AM CDTUpdated: Jun 06, 2012 11:05 AM CDT
By FRANK JORDANS
Associated Press

GENEVA (AP) – A sexually transmitted disease that infects millions of people each year is growing resistant to drugs and could soon become untreatable, the World Health Organization said Wednesday.

The U.N. health agency is urging governments and doctors to step up surveillance of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, a bacterial infection that can cause inflammation, infertility, pregnancy complications and, in extreme cases, lead to maternal death. Babies born to mothers with gonorrhea have a 50 percent chance of developing eye infections that can result in blindness.

“This organism has basically been developing resistance against every medication we’ve thrown at it,” said Dr. Manjula Lusti-Narasimhan, a scientist in the agency’s department of sexually transmitted diseases. This includes a group of antibiotics called cephalosporins currently considered the last line of treatment.

“In a couple of years it will have become resistant to every treatment option we have available now,” she told The Associated Press in an interview ahead of WHO’s public announcement on its ‘global action plan’ to combat the disease.

Lusti-Narasimhan said the new guidance is aimed at ending complacency about gonorrhea and encouraging researchers to speed up their hunt for a new cure.

Once considered a scourge of sailors and soldiers, gonorrhea – known colloquially as the clap – became easily treatable with the discovery of penicillin. Now, it is the second most common sexually transmitted infection after chlamydia. The global health body estimates that gonorrhea is responsible for some 106 million infections annually. It also increases the chances of infection with other diseases, such as HIV.

“It’s not a European problem or an African problem, it’s really a worldwide problem,” said Lusti-Narasimhan.

Scientists believe overuse or incorrect use of antibiotics, coupled with the gonorrhea bacteria’s astonishing ability to adapt, means the disease is now close to becoming a super bug.

Bacteria that survive antibiotic treatment due to a mutation that makes them resistant then quickly spread their genes in an accelerated process of natural selection. This is a general problem affecting all antibiotics, but gonorrhea is particularly quick to adapt because it is good at picking up snippets of DNA from other bacteria, said Lusti-Narasimhan.

“If it didn’t do so much damage it would actually be a fun organism to study,” she said.

Resistance to cephalosporins was first reported in Japan, but more recently has also been detected in Britain, Australia, France, Sweden and Norway. As these are all countries with well-developed health systems, it is likely that cephalosporin-resistant strains are also circulating undetected elsewhere.

“I think this is probably only the tip of the iceberg,” said Prof. Catherine Ison, who oversees the national surveillance program for treatment of resistant gonorrhea in England and Wales.

The over-the-counter availability of low potency antibiotics in some Asian countries is one of the reasons why resistance is increasing, she said.

Doctors in Britain are now switching to using a combination of antibiotics over a longer period of time to combat resistant gonorrhea, said Ison, who is based at the UK’s Health Protection Agency.

The Geneva-based WHO wants countries not just to tighten their rules for antibiotic use but also to improve their surveillance systems so that the full extent of the problem can be determined.

Better sex education is also needed, as proper condom use is an effective means of stopping transmission, said Lusti-Narasimhan.

“We’re not going to be able to get rid of it completely,” she said. “But we can limit the spread.”

“Reproductive Rights” to once again trump “Parental Rights”?

Posted in Gardasil, HPV with tags , , , , on October 3, 2011 by saynsumthn

Vaccine bill overrides parents on child health, By Rebecca Hagelin

The Washington Times

Culture Challenge of the Week: Government and Sex-pushers Versus Parents

Democratic California Gov. Jerry Brown has a ticking time bomb on his desk: He must sign a recently passed bill by Sunday for it to become law. His signature, however, would set an explosive precedent: The bill would allow children as young as 12 years old to give valid consent – without their parent’s knowledge or permission – to receive vaccines that aim to prevent sexually transmitted diseases.

The groups pushing the governor to sign the bill include the usual “reproductive rights” suspects: the ACLU, NARAL Pro-Choice California and Planned Parenthood, to name a few. Their justification for cutting parents out of the decision-making process is the usual tripe: When it comes to sex, parents cannot be trusted to act in their children’s best interests.

The bill meets an urgent need, says its sponsor, Assemblymember Toni Atkins (a lesbian, community organizer and longtime advocate for LGBT special privileges). She argues that letting individual parents decide whether their child should receive, for example, the HPV vaccine amounts to “playing Russian roulette with kids’ lives.” Why? Because random clinic workers, school nurses or pharmaceutical representatives surely stand in a better position than the child’s parents to judge whether – for that particular child – the benefits of receiving the vaccine outweigh the risks.

Excuse me? Read rest here

Emily Tarsell’s 21 year old daughter suddenly died from unknown causes. After a personal crusade, the devastated mother found the death could be traced to a common vaccination, Gardasil.

U.S. to Apologize for Eugenic STD Experiments

Posted in Elaine Riddick, Eugenics, John C. Cutler, Planned Parenthood, Sterilization, Tuskegee with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 1, 2010 by saynsumthn

Vodpod videos no longer available.

U.S. to Apologize for Shock STD Experiments , posted with vodpod

U.S. to apologize for STD experiments in Guatemala
Government researchers infected patients with syphilis, gonorrhea without their consent in the 1940s

U.S. government medical researchers intentionally infected hundreds of people in Guatemala, including institutionalized mental patients, with gonorrhea and syphilis without their knowledge or permission more than 60 years ago.

Many of those infected were encouraged to pass the infection onto others as part of the study.

About one third of those who were infected never got adequate treatment.

On Friday, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius offered extensive apologies for actions taken by the U.S. Public Health Service.
The sexually transmitted disease inoculation study conducted from 1946-1948 in Guatemala was clearly unethical,” according to the joint statement from Clinton and Sebelius. “Although these events occurred more than 64 years ago, we are outraged that such reprehensible research could have occurred under the guise of public health. We deeply regret that it happened, and we apologize to all the individuals who were affected by such abhorrent research practices.”

The apology was directed to Guatemala and to Hispanic residents of the United States, according to officials.

“The people of Guatemala are our close friends and neighbors in the Americas,” the statement says. “As we move forward to better understand this appalling event, we reaffirm the importance of our relationship with Guatemala, and our respect for the Guatemalan people, as well as our commitment to the highest standards of ethics in medical research.”

In addition to the apology, the U.S. is setting up commissions to ensure that human medical research conducted around the globe meets “rigorous ethical standards,” according to the government statement.

A telebriefing with Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health and Arturo Valenzuela, Assistant Secretary of State for Western Affairs is expected Friday morning.

The episode raises inevitable comparisons to the infamous Tuskegee experiment, the Alabama study where hundreds of African-American men were told they were being treated for syphilis, but in fact were denied treatment. That U.S. government study lasted from 1932 until press reports revealed it in 1972.

The Guatemala experiments, which were conducted between 1946 and 1948, never provided any useful information and the records were hidden.

They were discovered by Susan Reverby, a professor of women’s studies at Wellesley College, and were posted on her website.

“In 1946-48, Dr. John C. Cutler, a Public Health Service physician who would later be part of the Syphilis Study in Alabama in the 1960s and continue to defend it two decades after it ended in the 1990s, was running a syphilis inoculation project in Guatemala, co-sponsored by the PHS, the National Institutes of Health, the Pan American Health Sanitary Bureau (now the Pan American Health Organization), and the Guatemalan government,” she wrote.

“It was the early days of penicillin and the PHS was deeply interested in whether penicillin could be used to prevent, not just cure, early syphilis infection, whether better blood tests for the disease could be established, what dosages of penicillin actually cured infection, and to understand the process of reinfection after cures.”

The prison inmates were deliberately infected by prostitutes, but were treated with penicillin afterwards.

According to Reverby’s report, the Guatemalan project was co-sponsored by the U.S. Public Health Service, the NIH, the Pan-American Health Sanitary Bureau (now the Pan American Health Organization) and the Guatemalan government. The experiments involved 696 subjects — male prisoners and female patients in the National Mental Health Hospital.

The researchers were trying to determine whether the antibiotic penicillin could prevent early syphilis infection, not just cure it, Reverby writes. After the subjects were infected with the syphilis bacteria — through visits with prostitutes who had the disease and direct inoculations — Reverby notes that it is unclear whether they were later cured or given proper treatment.

Reverby, who has written extensively about the Tuskegee experiments, found the evidence while conducting further research on the Alabama syphilis study.

CBS News reports that Cutler seemed to recognize the delicate ethical quandaries their experiments posed, particularly in the wake of the Nuremberg “Doctors’ Trials,” and was concerned about secrecy. “As you can imagine,” Cutler reported to his PHS overseer, “we are holding our breaths, and we are explaining to the patients and others concerned with but a few key exceptions, that the treatment is a new one utilizing serum followed by penicillin. This double talk keeps me hopping at time.”

Cutler also wrote that he feared “a few words to the wrong person here, or even at home, might wreck it or parts of it …

PHS physician R.C. Arnold, who supervised Cutler, was more troubled, confiding to Cutler, “I am a bit, in fact more than a bit, leery of the experiment with the insane people. They can not give consent, do not know what is going on, and if some goody organization got wind of the work, they would raise a lot of smoke. I think the soldiers would be best or the prisoners for they can give consent.”

Apparently difficulties in transmission, as well as in replicating results, added to concerns over the study, and it was dropped after two years.

Cutler went on to participate in another Syphilis Study at Sing Sing Prison in Ossining, N.Y. (although in that case the subjects were informed about the nature of the inoculations administered to them).

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Tuskegee syphilis experiment (also known as the Tuskegee syphilis study or Public Health Service syphilis study) was a clinical study conducted between 1932 and 1972 in Tuskegee, Alabama, by the U.S. Public Health Service. Investigators recruited 399 impoverished African-American sharecroppers with syphilis for research related to the natural progression of the untreated disease.

The Public Health Service, working with the Tuskegee Institute, began the study in 1932. Nearly 400 poor black men with syphilis from Macon County, Ala., were enrolled in the study. They were never told they had syphilis, nor were they ever treated for it. According to the Centers for Disease Control, the men were told they were being treated for “bad blood,” a local term used to describe several illnesses, including syphilis, anemia and fatigue.

For participating in the study, the men were given free medical exams, free meals and free burial insurance.

And never forget the way we targeted Blacks for sterilization under the term: Eugenics.

In fact, since records have been made public in many states- they show over 60,000 people were sterilized against their will – most of them black.

Find out more about how the US has and continues to promote Eugenic Experiments on an entire class of people- including an interview with one of the victims of the US Eugenics Movement: Watch the documentary Maafa21 (Clip Below)

FROM Maafa21

NOTE: The author of the Guatemala eugenics experiment referenced above is John C. Cutler who also worked on the Tuskegee experiment.

Interesting to note is that John Cutler’s wife Eleise, served on the board of PLANNED PARENTHOOD, a group which was founded by , Margaret Sanger, a Klan speaker who was a long time member of the American Eugenics Society. Eleise Cutler and her husband John supported population control and Eleisealsocontributed to Planned Parenthood’s research arm the Alan Guttmacher Institute, whose founder was a Vice President of both Planned Parenthood and the American Eugenics Society.

When Dr. John C. Cutler arrived at the University of Pittsburgh in 1967, he became the head of the population division of the Graduate School of Public Health where he helped establish and coordinate major international health projects in West Africa and several third world countries. He was also instrumental in the development of a joint program with the University’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

Eleise, a graduate of Wellesley College in Massachusetts, also understood the importance of population control – one of her husband’s passions. She has served on several boards, including Planned Parenthood.

And this article: The Pittsburgh Press – Feb 1, 1970 Planned Parenthood Official here fears famine in 5 years

Here – The Pittsburgh Press – Sep 10, 1970 John C. Cutler promotes population control and small families along with Planned Parenthood.

Here Pittsburgh Post-Gazette – Jan 15, 1969Dr Cutler is a guest at a Planned Parenthood luncheon

Here The Pittsburgh Press – Jan 20, 1970John C. Cutler promotes Birth Control with Planned Parenthood

Read apology: joint statement issued by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebeliushere

Sex virus blamed for rise in head and neck cancers – may bring more forced HPV vaccinations

Posted in Gardasil, HPV, Population Control, Vaccinations with tags , , , , , , , , , on April 1, 2010 by saynsumthn

(Reuters) – The number of head and neck cancers linked to a virus spread by oral sex is rising rapidly and suggests boys as well as girls should be offered protection through vaccination, doctors said Friday.

4/1/2010

Despite an overall slight decline in head and neck cancers in recent years, cases of a particular form called oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have increased sharply, particularly in the developed world.

This growth seems to be linked to cancers caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), scientists said in a report in the British Medical Journal.

Two vaccines — Cervarix, made by GlaxoSmithKline, and Gardasil, made by Merck & Co — can prevent HPV, which causes virtually all cases of cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide.

Many rich nations have launched HPV immunisation programs for girls to try to protect them from the common sexually transmitted virus before they become sexually active.

The scientists, led by Hisham Mehanna of the Institute of Head and Neck Studies at University Hospital Coventry, said while including boys in immunisation plans has been seen as too expensive, it may be time to look again.

“We need to look at the evidence again to re-evaluate the cost-effectiveness of male children in light of this new and rapidly rising incidence,” he said in an interview.

Analyst Savvas Neophytou at Panmure Gordon in London said such studies would dispel worries about sales prospects for HPV vaccines, and repeated his ‘buy’ recommendation for Glaxo stock.

“The emergence of new data such as this may increase motivation amongst national vaccination authorities worldwide to re-double efforts to vaccinate children before they become sexually active,” he said in an equity research note.

Glaxo shares were slightly lower, in line with a weaker European pharmaceutical sector and down 0.4 percent by 0905 GMT.

More than 500,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed annually in women and it kills around 200,000 a year. Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer among men and women, with about 640,000 new cases each year worldwide.

A recent study found the risk of developing oropharyngeal carcinoma was linked to a history of six or more lifetime sexual partners, four or more lifetime oral sex partners, and, for men, an earlier age at first sexual intercourse.

“Sexual transmission of HPV — primarily through orogenital intercourse — might be the reason for the increase in incidence of HPV related oropharyngeal carcinoma,” wrote Mehanna.

The scientists pointed to recent studies which showed a 70 percent increase in the detection of HPV in biopsies taken to diagnose oropharyngeal carcinoma in Stockholm since the 1970s.

HPV-related cancer was also reported in 60-80 percent of recent biopsy samples in studies in the United States, compared with 40 percent in the previous decade, they wrote.

Mehanna said the findings had other important health implications. Patients with HPV-related head and neck cancers were typically younger and employed, he said, and because their tumors appeared to be less deadly than those caused by factors like smoking and drinking, patients may also live longer with the physical and psychological effects of treatment.

“This means they would need prolonged support from health, social, and other services, and may require help in returning to work,” he said.