Archive for son

Muslim son shoots Christian dad at Easter shouts, “The Will of Allah”

Posted in Islam with tags , , , , , , on April 1, 2013 by saynsumthn

Rashad Riddle, waited outside of the church until his family came out. He said a few words before shooting his father, Richard Riddle, who died at the scene. A witness only remembers hearing one shot.

The shooter didn’t leave the scene following the shooting. When police arrived, they told him to put down his gun, which he did. Police then took him into custody.

According to WYTV-TV, the suspected shooter, Rashad Riddle, yelled, “The will of Allah — this is the will of God,” either before or after the murder.

Gunner a military dog adopted by family whose Son died in Iraq

Posted in Animal Lovers with tags , , , , , , , , , on October 6, 2010 by saynsumthn

A Story of Loss and Love 10/5/2010 6:23:28 PM

In 2004 Deb and Dan Dunham lost their son Jason to an insurgent’s grenade in Iraq. Now the Scio, N.Y., couple is healing — and being healed by — another wounded Marine: Gunner, a bomb-sniffing dog traumatized by war.

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King son finds common ground with Beck

Posted in Glenn Beck, Racism with tags , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Washington Post

By Hamil R. Harris

Martin Luther King III thanked Glenn Beck and leaders of the “Restoring Honor” rally for honoring his father on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial Saturday and King hopes that there can be dialogue between civil rights leaders and Beck’s followers.

“I would like to see both communities working together to make America a better place because whether one is Republican or Democrat, Tea Party or independent,” King said in an interview after he closed out the March. “What is relevant is that together we can roll up our sleeves to make America better.”

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King III was the final speaker during the “Reclaim the Dream” march that ended with participants being greeted by those who participated in the Beck rally at the Lincoln Memorial. As the marchers filed past each other, greets, information and even bottles of water were exchanged.

“Bless y’all,” said Kathryn Travis as she watched the King marchers file past her as she left the memorial grounds. “I think that it is good that we can disagree but we can still love each other.”

While many of the speakers at the “Reclaim the Dream” rally condemned Beck for hosting an event on the 47th anniversary of his father’s speech, King III said nobody can hijack his father’s message.

“The way they paid tribute to my dad created a context for a dialogue,” King said, adding that he looks forward the day when “we will be close to no longer having to sing ‘We Shall Overcome,’ but we can stand and sing ‘we have overcome.’ ”

After the march, King III, said “I feel very proud and humbled that 47 years after my dad delivered the speech that people around the nation are mobilized around what Martin Luther King Jr. represented. It is an incredible feeling.”

Buried in rubble, Dad writes goodbye note to son, “I was in a big accident. Don’t be upset at God.” – Haiti

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 19, 2010 by saynsumthn

Trapped in Rubble- Rescued by God – Haiti

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Buried in Haiti rubble, U.S. dad wrote goodbyes

By Mike Celizic
TODAYshow.com contributor
updated 22 minutes ago

The words on the pages of the plain black notebook are written in a semi-scrawl, punctuated by smears of blood — stark evidence of the desperation in which they were written.

Sitting with his wife, Christina, in Miami’s Jackson Memorial Hospital, Dan Woolley showed the notebook to TODAY’s Meredith Vieira via satellite hookup Tuesday. Trapped for 65 hours under tons of wreckage in the lobby of his hotel by Haiti’s Jan. 12 earthquake and knowing he could die, Woolley had written notes to his two young boys and his wife.

I always wanted to survive, but I knew that was something that I couldn’t control. So I decided if I had to go, I wanted to leave some last notes for them,” Woolley said. Opening the book and fighting his emotions, he read an entry he addressed to his sons, Josh, 6, and Nathan, 3:

I was in a big accident. Don’t be upset at God. He always provides for his children, even in hard times. I’m still praying that God will get me out, but He may not. But He will always take care of you.

‘Boy, I cried’
Woolley had taken refuge in an elevator shaft, where he used an iPhone first-aid app to treat a compound fracture of his leg and a cut on his head. He had already used his digital SLR camera’s focusing light to illuminate his surroundings, and taken pictures of the wreckage to help find a safe place to wait to be rescued — or to die.

Writing the notes to his wife and children wasn’t easy, the deeply religious man said.

Boy, I cried,” he admitted. “Obviously, no one wants to come to that point. I also didn’t want to just get found after having some time — God gave me some time — to think and to pray and to come to grips with the reality. I wanted to use that time to do everything I could for my family. If that could be surviving, get out, then I would. If it could be just to leave some notes that would help them in life, I would do that.”

Woolley had been working for Compassion International, a mission organization, making a film about the impact of poverty on the people of Haiti. He and a colleague, David Hames, had just returned to the Hotel Montana in Port-au-Prince from a day of filming when the earthquake struck.

“I just saw the walls rippling and just explosive sounds all around me,” Woolley told Vieira. “It all happened incredibly fast. David yelled out, ‘It’s an earthquake,’ and we both lunged and everything turned dark.

Awaiting his fate

Woolley is nearsighted and lost his glasses in the quake. But by using the focusing light on his camera and taking pictures, he was able to figure out where he was and where to go. And thanks to the iPhone first-aid app he’d downloaded, he knew how to fashion a bandage and tourniquet for his leg and to stop the bleeding from his head wound. The app also warned him not to fall asleep if he felt he was going into shock, so he set his cell phone’s alarm clock to go off every 20 minutes.

And then for 65 hours, he waited for whatever fate had in store for him.

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