Archive for right to privacy

MSNBC plays Stump Trump on abortion and privacy, shows Trump does not understand Roe V. Wade

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on April 20, 2011 by saynsumthn

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Used To Be Pro-Choice Donald Trump Clueless Abo…, posted with vodpod

4/20/2011 CNN Reporting:

Donald Trump appeared to stumble into a contradiction in an interview Tuesday – a misstep that could haunt the potential GOP presidential candidate amongst social conservatives.

In an interview with MSNBC, Trump was asked if he believed there was a right to privacy in the Constitution – a right that, while not explicitly stated in the Constitution, the Supreme Court has said can be inferred from the text.

He responded, “I guess there is, I guess there is.”

Then his tone of voice changed and he followed up with, “And why, just out of curiosity, why do you ask that question?”

When NBC’s Savannah Guthrie wondered how that line of legal theory “squares” with his pro-life stance, Trump said, “Well, that’s a pretty strange way of getting to pro-life. I mean, it’s a very unique way of asking about pro-life. What does that have to do with privacy? How are you equating pro-life with privacy?”

To answer Trump’s question, the United States Supreme Court equated the right to privacy as grounds to legalize abortion in its controversial 1973 Roe v. Wade decision.

Glenn Beck on Revolutionary Agitators

Posted in Communist, Glenn Beck with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2010 by saynsumthn

June 20, 2010


Weather Underground Organization (Weatherman)

420 pages

In 1976, the FBI’s Chicago Field Office prepared a summary which described the activities of the Weather Underground Organization, also known as Weathermen. This organization described itself as a revolutionary organization of communist men and women. The FBI’s analysis of its motivations, beliefs, and international travels are outlined in this summary.

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FROM the FBI:

BYTE OUT OF HISTORY
1975 Terrorism Flashback: State Department Bombing

01/29/04

Twenty-nine years ago Thursday, an explosion rocked the headquarters of the U.S. State Department in Washington, D.C. No one was hurt, but the damage was extensive, impacting twenty offices on three separate floors. Hours later, another bomb was found at a military induction center in Oakland, California, and safely detonated. A domestic terrorist group called the Weather Underground claimed responsibility. Remember them?

Who were these extremists? The Weather Underground — originally called the Weathermen, taken from a line in a Bob Dylan song — was a small, violent offshoot of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), created in the turbulent ‘60s to promote social change.

When the SDS collapsed in 1969, the Weather Underground stepped forward, inspired by communist ideologies and embracing violence and crime as a way to protest the Vietnam War, racism, and other left-wing aims. “Our intention is to disrupt the empire … to incapacitate it, to put pressure on the cracks,” claimed the group’s 1974 manifesto, Prairie Fire. By the next year, the group had claimed credit for 25 bombings and would be involved in many more over the next several years.

The Chase. The FBI doggedly pursued these terrorists as their attacks mounted. Many members were soon identified, but their small numbers and guerilla tactics helped them hide under assumed identities. In 1978, however, the Bureau arrested five members who were plotting to bomb a politician’s office. More were arrested when an accident destroyed the group’s bomb factory in Hoboken, New Jersey. Others were identified after two policemen and a Brinks’ driver were murdered in a botched armored car robbery in Nanuet, New York.

Success for the FBI/NYPD Task Force. Key to disrupting the group for good was the newly created FBI-New York City Police Anti Terrorist Task Force. It brought together the strengths of both organizations and focused them on these domestic terrorists. The task force and others like it paved the way for today’s Joint Terrorism Task Forces — created by the Bureau in each of its field offices to fuse federal, state, and local law enforcement and intelligence resources to combat today’s terrorist threats.

By the mid-’80s, the Weather Underground was essentially history. Still, several of these fugitives were able to successfully hide themselves for decades, emerging only in recent years to answer for their crimes. Once again, it shows that grit and partnerships can and will defeat shadowy, resilient terrorist groups.

Related links: The Weather Underground Organization | FBI History