Archive for political correctness

NPR Fires Juan Williams Over Remarks on Muslims

Posted in Censorship, free speech, Islam, Media Bias, Sharia Law with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 21, 2010 by saynsumthn

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NPR has terminated the contract of long-time contributor Juan Williams over remarks he made on the O’Reilly Factor last night. On Monday night’s O’Reilly Factor Williams weighed in on Bill O’Reilly’s now infamous View appearance .

Juan Told Bill (video below) , “Well, actually, I hate to say this to you because I don’t want to get your ego going. But I think you’re right. I think, look, political correctness can lead to some kind of paralysis where you don’t address reality...”more below

I mean, look, Bill, I’m not a bigot. You know the kind of books I’ve written about the civil rights movement in this country. But when I get on the plane, I got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they are identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous.

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A Brief History of NPR’s Intolerance and Imbalance
Fox News/ Published October 21, 2010

From calling Tea Party members “Tea Baggers,” to saying that “the evaporation of 4 million” Christians would leave the world a better place, to suggesting that God could give former Sen. Jesse Helms or his family AIDS from a blood transfusion, NPR’s personalities have said some pretty un-PC things in the past. A look at the record reveals no shortage of intolerant statements and unbalanced segments on the publicly sponsored network’s airwaves.

Here’s an incomplete list of questionable and controversial content that has aired on NPR or has been uttered by its employees:

— In June, the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America (CAMERA) said it was easy to see why some refer to NPR as “National Palestine Radio” following a June 2 segment hosted by Tom Ashbrook on the Gaza flotilla incident. The segment featured five guests — none of whom defended Israel’s actions.

Among the five guests, Janine Zacharia, a Middle East correspondent for The Washington Post, was the only one who did not overtly criticize Israel. She also did not defend its actions, CAMERA officials said.

“So there you have it — five perspectives and not one voice to present the mainstream Israeli perspective,” they said in a June 17 press release. “That’s Ashbrook’s and NPR’s version of a balanced discussion on Israel.”

— Last week, Newsbusters, a conservative media watchdog group, claimed that NPR’s “Fresh Air” spent most of its hour insinuating that the Republican Party was dangerously infested with extremists.

NPR’s Terry Gross hosted Princeton professor Sean Wilentz, who has written that President George W. Bush practiced “a radicalized version of Reaganism,” Newsbusters’ Tom Graham wrote.

“Can you think of another time in American history when there have been as many people running for Congress who seem to be on the extreme?” Gross asked, according to Graham.
“Not running for Congress, no,” Wilentz replied. “I mean even back in the ’50s.”

NPR issued an apology in 2005 for a commentator’s remark on the return of Christ following a complaint by the Christian Coalition that the comment was anti-Christian.
On “All Things Considered,” the network’s afternoon drive-time program, humorist Andrei Codrescu said that the “evaporation of 4 million [people] who believe” in the doctrine of Rapture “would leave the world a better place.”

Codrescu, who was on contract with NPR but not a full-time employee, later told The Associated Press he was sorry for the language, but “not for what [he] said.”
NPR apologized for the comment, saying, it “crossed a line of taste and tolerance” and was an inappropriate attempt at humor.

— Also in 2005, NPR apologized to Mark Levin, author of “Men in Black: How the Supreme Court is Destroying America,” after a broadcast of its program “Day to Day” falsely accused him of advocating violence against judges. Levin accepted the apology, but said the broadcast was “illustrative of a smear campaign launched by the Left to try and silence” his criticisms of judicial activism.

— In 2002, the head of NPR issued an apology six months after a report linking anthrax-laced letters to a Christian conservative organization.

— Also in 2002, during an interview with the Philadelphia City Paper, NPR host Tavis Smiley said he strived to do a show that is “authentically black,” but not “too black.”

In 1995, Nina Totenberg, NPR’s award-winning legal affairs correspondent, was allowed to keep her job after telling the host of PBS’ “Inside Washington” that if there was “retributive justice” in the world, former North Carolina Sen. Jesse Helms would “get AIDS from a transfusion, or one of his grandchildren will get it.”

House Passes DISCLOSE Act: Pro-Life/Grassroots Muzzle Bill Goes to Senate

Posted in free speech, Politics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 25, 2010 by saynsumthn

Critics on both left and right say act will disable grassroots political voices, including Tea Party movement

By Peter J. Smith
WASHINGTON, D.C., June 24, 2010 (LifeSiteNews.com) – With a political audacity that has become characteristic since the caustic health care debates, the Democrat-controlled House of Representatives voted Thursday to approve a campaign finance disclosure bill that critics on both the left and the right say will disable grassroots political voices – including the nascent “Tea Party” movement that has been looking to sweep away liberal incumbents in November.

At approximately 4:30 p.m., the House voted 219-206 to approve H.R. 5175, the “Democracy is Strengthened by Casting Light on Spending in Elections (DISCLOSE) Act,” which the National Right to Life Committee, other pro-life, pro-family groups, and even the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) have condemned as a threat to free speech and free participation in the political process. (See how your representative voted here.)

The Act would force grassroots organizations to release the names of donors and members into a publicly searchable database maintained by the Federal Elections Commission (FEC). Opponents of the bill say it would frustrate the ability of grassroots entities to communicate effectively with the public about public policy.
“This is a blatant attack on our organizations, members, and donors,” said Douglas Johnson, NRLC’s Legislative Director. “National Right to Life will do everything possible to keep this bill from coming out of the Senate.”

Johnson said that stopping the Senate from approving its version (S 3295) of the DISCLOSE Act is “a jump ball.”

“I think we have to take it very seriously. There are already 50 cosponsors of the bill in the Senate. But as you know, the Senate has different rules, and we will certainly do our best to persuade any Senator who will listen that this bill is unconstitutional, unprincipled, and nakedly partisan.”

Should the Senate approve the DISCLOSE Act, and should it be signed into law by President Barack Obama, the act would take effect in 30 days, even if the Federal Elections Commission has not yet crafted new guidelines – just in time for the mid-term elections in November.

During the one-hour debate on the bill, Rep. Dan Lungren expressed outrage that unlike every other campaign finance bill passed by the House, this bill has no provision for expedited judicial review. He said the lack of such a provision makes it clear the DISCLOSE Act is meant to influence the outcome of the 2010 midterm elections.
He also expressed frustration that so little time was given the House to debate a matter impacting Americans’ First Amendment rights.

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“We have spent 40 hours in this Congress naming post offices. Can’t we spend a little time protecting the Constitution of the United States?” Lungren exclaimed.
“We’re talking about political speech: the essence of the First Amendment.”

Under the bill, all groups subject to the law’s requirements – including most 501(c)4, 501(c)5, 501(c)6, and 527 groups – would have to list all donors of $600 or more with the Federal Election Commission (FEC). Groups must also post a hyperlink on their website to the FEC, where a list of the names of their donors can be accessed.
But the DISCLOSE Act exempts large 501(c)4 groups – like the 4 million strong NRA and 750,000 member Sierra Club – from having to report their donors if they have at least 500,000 members, over 10 years of existence, chapters in all 50 states, and receive no more than 15% of total contributions from corporations.

Unions also have significant exemptions. Most union dues are under $600 dollars, and so do not have to be reported. Union to union money transfers also do not have to be disclosed.

In a letter to Congress, the ACLU noted the irony that a bill ostensibly dedicated to uprooting corruption in the political process would exempt entrenched “mainstream” political interests from its reporting requirements, while “smaller organizations and those just starting out would have to disclose their donors in order to engage in political speech.”

“Those groups not challenging the status quo would be protected; those challenging the status quo would be suppressed,” they concluded.

House members had virtually no time to read the final version of the bill approved yesterday behind closed doors by the House Rules Committee. Instead of waiting for Congressmen and their staff to analyze the final bill, the Democrat leadership forced through today’s vote today by invoking a “Martial Law Rule.”

The Martial Law Rule dispenses with a longstanding House rule (Rule XIII(6)(a)) intended to give U.S. Representatives and the public enough time to understand significant legislation. The rule requires that there be at least one day between a bill’s unveiling and the House floor vote, and can only be suspended if two-thirds of the House agrees – but the Martial Law Rule dispenses with that process entirely.

Critics on both the left and the right have denounced the tactic, saying it empowers a party’s leadership to act in an authoritarian manner and endangers democratic self-government by forcing members to vote blindly on measures demanded by their leaders.

The bill requires that every time an organization runs a campaign ad, its CEO must appear in the ad and twice state his name and the organization’s name. The top five funders of the organization behind the ad – even if they had nothing to do with the ad’s funding – must also have their names listed in the ad.

In addition, the most “significant” donor to the organization must list his name, rank, and organization three times in the ad.

Critics of the bill say that the disclaimers effectively devour valuable airtime bought by these groups that would otherwise be used to inform voters about a candidate’s record.

“We’re getting a little silly here. We’re talking about making disclaimers that are going to take the entire time of a commercial,” stated Rep. Lungren during debate.
He also expressed grave concern that individuals – with names and addresses publicly available – would be subject to reprisals for making a political statement. He pointed to the situation in California, where supporters of Proposition 8 have been victims of reprisals by homosexualist activists.

“We are chilling speech already, and now we are getting into direct intimidation by requiring the residence of people living there,” he said.

Other affected entities under the bill will likely include vocal liberal and conservative groups that communicate through the internet. While traditional media organizations like newspapers and television stations are exempt from the bill, bloggers, the vanguard of the “new media,” are not.

How representatives voted – click here.
Contact information for the U.S. House of Representatives – click here.
Contact information for the U.S. Senate – click here.

See related coverage by LifeSiteNews.com:
Breaking: House Dems Preparing Thursday DISCLOSE Act Vote to Muzzle Pro-life, Pro-family Groups
http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2010/jun/10062313.html
Congress to Vote on DISCLOSE Act – Condemned by Pro-Life, Pro-Family Groups
http://www.lifesitenews.com/ldn/2010/jun/10061707.html

Evangelist Predicts Challenges for Christians in 2010

Posted in Abortion, Anti-Christ, Church, Civil Rights, Constitution, homosexuality, persecution, Politics, Pro-Life, Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 11, 2010 by saynsumthn

Evangelist Franklin Graham says Christians who share their faith in 2010 will face greater obstacles than in years past.

“I believe that a time is fast approaching – I think it will be in my lifetime – when the preaching of the Gospel is referred to as hate speech,” Graham wrote in a commentary posted on the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association website.

He said biblical statements about homosexuality, abortion, and other moral issues will be banned by “political correct cultures.”

Graham said preachers could even face jail time for teaching the Bible — and it is already happening in some countries.

His declaration of his commitment to preaching the Gospel was partly triggered by the recent climate change conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.

He said while there is “legitimate concern” for how the world manages its resources, he finds it “frightening” that those concerns have shifted to “a radical, godless world view that elevates the creation to idolatrous status.”

Source: The Christian Post

Evangelist Predicts Challenges for Christians in 2010

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