Archive for Newark Black Power Conference

Were programs like Title X started to curb the population of certain people groups?

Posted in Black Genocide, Black Neighborhood, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Ehrlich, Eugenics, Every Child a Wanted Child, Fannie Lou Hamer, Ford, Lader, Malcolm X, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood Free Birth Control, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood Motto, Planned Parenthood Slogan, Planned Parenthood Tax Dollars, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Population Control, Population Council, Richard Nixon, Rockefeller, Samuel Yette, Saves Taxpayers, Tax Payer Funding of Abortion, Title X, Walt Disney with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2018 by saynsumthn

population, Black, abortion, Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Was there a sinister eugenics agenda behind so-called federally funded “population control” programs like Title X?  The program, which could be seen as a form of classism, is touted as a “family planning”program aimed at “helping” poor and low income Americans in limiting their families. But the question is, what motive was behind this push prior to Title X’s 1970 passage, and who were the key players? In this four part series, Live Action News hopes to answer those questions.

When the push to use government dollars to fund population control programs was introduced, there was heavy opposition from groups that saw the move as racist eugenics. The Population Council and Planned Parenthood, two of the main groups behind this move, were both founded with eugenic philosophies. Planned Parenthood even played a prominent role in recruiting an ideal Republican lawmaker — as readers will learn later in the series — whom they convinced to sponsor what has become known as the federal Title X Family Planning Program, which now funnels $60 million to the organization.

READ: Film documents Planned Parenthood’s history of Black genocide, eugenics

Leading up to this time, many within the Black community viewed government programs of population control as genocidal efforts aimed at limiting the births of Blacks and other minorities. This was not without justification, as detailed by Simone M. Caron’s research, “Birth Control and the Black Community in the 1960’s: Genocide or Power Politics?,” published by the Journal of Social History:

Certain segments of the black community mistrusted the underlying intention of both private and government efforts with respect to contraception. Some blacks in particular became skeptical of the increasing push for contraceptive dispersal in poor urban neighborhoods, accusing contraceptive proponents of promoting nothing less than “black genocide.”…

The incidence of increasing government involvement in contraception at the same time as the civil rights movement gained strength could be interpreted as a planned conspiracy to decrease the numbers of blacks and other racial minorities.

Leaders of the birth control movement even suggested that crime and health disparities within the Black community could be resolved by reducing the Black population. This kind of thinking aroused additional suspicion as calls for public health centers to disseminate birth control pills to the poor began to emerge.

Image: 1942 article urges family planning for Harlem (Image credit New York Times)

1942 article urges family planning for Harlem (Image credit New York Times)

In 1967, Black comedian Dick Gregory joined more than 1,100 Black delegates for the First National Conference on Black Power where he, along with others in the group, adopted a black power manifesto that called for the “refusal to accept birth control programs on the basis that they seek to exterminate Negroes,” among other demands, according to a July 24, 1967, New York Times report. Gregory and others viewed “government programs designed for poor Black folks” which emphasized birth control and abortion as, “designed to limit the black population.”

Image: 1967 First National Conference on Black Power

1967 First National Conference on Black Power

Image: 1967 First National Conference on Black Power refuse birth control

1967 First National Conference on Black Power refuse birth control

Journalist Samuel Yette, himself outspoken about the genocidal aspects of birth control, once wrote about noted civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….”

Image: Fannie Lou Hamer

Fannie Lou Hamer

In that same article, Yette, one of the first Black journalists to work for Newsweek, wrote, “Instead of seeking ways to feed the hungry, the back stage plan was to get the poor unwittingly to endorse a plan to eliminate from the society those who were hungry.”

Image: Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Maafa21)

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Maafa21)

Yette went on to publish a book, “The Choice,” which exposed high level attempts of Black genocide through birth control, abortion, and additional means. Shortly after the publication, Yette was fired by Newsweek and claimed that his superiors told him that the “Nixon White House” wanted him out of Washington.

“The book dealt with things they did not want people to know about at the time,” Yette told the Tennessee Tribune, which he joined as a columnist, in 1996. “There were those well-placed in our government who were determined to have a final solution for the race issue in this country — not unlike Hitler’s ‘Final Solution’ for Jews 50 years earlier in Germany. I wrote this and documented it. It caused the Nixon White House to say to Newsweek in effect, ‘Don’t come back until you are rid of him.’”

Blacks were highly suspicious of anything that had to do with “control,” radical Black Muslim leader Malcolm X suggested. In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” Memos from the meeting indicated that overpopulation discussions evoked questions on why major efforts to control population were directed toward “colored nations.” The Black Muslim leader asked if Planned Parenthood had anything to do with “birth control” and offered the suggestion that Planned Parenthood would probably be more successful if they used the term “family planning” instead of “birth control.”

His reason for this was simple. He stated that “people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled….”

Image of memo

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

While Caron concludes that the Black community eventually accepted contraception, a look at the organizations behind the push for government funded “family planning” programs reveal that their initial concerns may have been spot on. Behind the scenes, population control groups — some with long ties to the eugenics movement, such as the Population Council, Planned Parenthood, the Hugh Moore Fund, the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and others  — were seeding the ground and calling for large sums of government money to be spent on so-called “family planning.”

Author Donald T. Critchlow, in his book, “Intended Consequences, Birth Control, Abortion and the Federal Government in Modern America,” notes that the Population Council took the lead, and had an annual budget of over $3 million by 1964. Ford and Rockefeller Foundation money, along with dollars from other eugenics organizations, were flooding the Population Council coffers by the millions.

The Population Council was founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller III, as Live Action News has previously documented. The group’s second president, Frederic Osborn, was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society. Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” He also signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her Birth Control Review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan, “Every Child a Wanted Child,” may have originated with Osborn.

Image: Planned Parenthood Motto

Planned Parenthood Motto

These groups pushed the idea of a worldwide population crisis. The media joined in the fear mongering by publishing articles about the impending population crisis. Images of global starvation resulting in forced euthanasia and cannibalism were depicted in books such a Paul Ehrlich’s now discredited “The Population Bomb.”

Image: Population Bomb threatens world peace

Population Bomb threatens world peace

On-screen gloom and doom propaganda was also being disseminated.

One film, produced by Walt Disney Productions, has been detailed in a previous Live Action News article, and interestingly, the controversial 1967 film, “Family Planning,” was produced in association with the Population Council, a eugenics founded organization.

Larry Lader's book helped redefine Margaret Sanger from her eugenics roots

Walt Disney Production produces FP film with Population Council

The propaganda film featured Disney’s iconic animated character, Donald Duck, who introduces the alleged gloom of having a large family. Children in smaller sized families are “healthy and happy and go to school to gain an education,” the film states, as if children of large families are unhealthy, unhappy, and uneducated. The film indoctrinates its viewers that a “happy family” is one with a modest number of children while large families basically starve with “no money for modern conveniences. […]”

In the 1969 book about the founder of Planned Parenthood, “Margaret Sanger Pioneer of Birth Control,” authors Lawrence Lader, an advocate of population control with ties to the Population Council, and Milton Meltzer reinforced overpopulation fears.

Quoting the book from p. 160-161:

Today the world has caught up with the crucial necessity for population control. Many political leaders consider it second only to the threat of nuclear war as the key issue of our time. World population is now growing at a record speed of seventy million a year. The terrible prophecy is that at the current rate of increase the world may double in population by the year 2000. Yet less than 5 percent of the world’s six hundred-odd million women in the fertile years are using modern contraceptives. To Dr. Harrison Brown, one of the nation’s leading scientists, it means “catastrophe appears a near certainty.”

Latin America, whose growth is faster than any other continent’s, will almost triple its population in the next three decades. And less food is now produced and eaten there per capita than before World War II. India, kept from the edge of famine by wheat shipments from abroad, will add two hundred million more people by 1980.

With this tidal wave of population goes desperate hunger. One half of the world’s population and two thirds of its children go to bed hungry every night. General William H. Draper, head of a presidential study committee, has said that “the stark fact is that if the population continues to increase faster than food production, hundreds of millions will starve in the next decade.”

Image: Larry Lader’s book helped redefine Margaret Sanger from her eugenics roots

Larry Lader’s book helped redefine Margaret Sanger from her eugenics roots

The United States has already added fifty million between 1950 and 1968, and our population may almost double by the year 2000. We may not face famine because of our highly mechanized food production. But the terrible overcrowding in the cities has already brought us the destructive problems of air and water pollution, traffic chaos, shortage of schools and houses, lack of parks and recreation space. The whole quality of American life is being badly damaged.

The authors then summarize the solution:

Almost everyone now realizes that Margaret Sanger’s crusade for population control is the only way to enable living standards to improve substantially. International Planned Parenthood has already shown in many areas that populations can be kept in reasonable balance…. After the government approved legalized abortion in qualified hospitals, along with contraception, the country cut its birth rate more than in half between 1947 and 1961.

The need has become so staggering that IPPF has been joined by new allies. First came the private organizations. The Population Council, headed by John D. Rockefeller III, has spent over thirty-five million dollars since 1952, the Ford Foundation many millions more.

They end the book by making an argument for federal dollars to fund population control:

But the money needed to spread birth control around the world goes far beyond private means. Hugh Moore’s Campaign to Check the Population Explosion and the Population Crisis Committee in Washington soon realized that only vast help from the federal government could meet the crisis. With constant pressure on Congress, they were able to get the government to increase its population programs overseas to fifty million dollars in 1969. Family planning programs in the United States were given ten million dollars. Yet even these sums are only a tiny fraction of what it will take to meet the problem.

And thus, the push for taxpayer-funded population control programs took on a life of its own and consisted of a multitude of characters working behind the scenes, forming coalitions, meeting with political leaders, and spreading eugenics propaganda. By the 1960s the agenda was in full swing, but it would be continually met with opposition from religious leaders and Black leaders who recognized it as a means to control the Black population.

In part two of this series, Live Action News will detail further the population control advocates who pushed for these government funded programs. Additional articles on Title X’s history are included (parts onethree, and four), as well as Planned Parenthood’s Blueprint and George HW Bush’s relationship to Title X and Planned Parenthood.

Editor’s Note, 11/8/18: Links to related articles were added.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Civil rights activist Dick Gregory: Abortion is Black ‘genocide’

Posted in Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Neighborhood, Black pro-life leaders, Civil Rights, Dick Gregory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2017 by saynsumthn

|  (From Live Action News)

via flickr

Comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory died August 19, 2017, and although he is best known for his humor, the satirist once called out government-funded abortion and birth control as a genocide effort targeting the Black community.

Gregory was the father of eleven children but tragically, one of his children died as an infant. He often used his humor to touch on the social ills of the day, and as a result, many white people attended his comedy events. He became a strong voice in the Black community during the tumultuous times of the 1960’s and 70’s during the African American civil rights struggle.

In 1967, Gregory joined more than 1,100 Black delegates for the First National Conference on Black Power where he along with others in the group adopted a black power manifesto that called for the “refusal to accept birth control programs on the basis that they seek to exterminate Negroes,” among other demands, according to a July 24, 1967, New York Times report obtained by Live Action News.

In the Journal of Social History, researcher Simone M. Caron described the view just after that conference saying, “The following year, the Third Annual National Conference on Black Power in Philadelphia called on all blacks to ‘resist the increasing genocidal tendencies of American society.’ Resistance ranged from a small California group called Efforts to Increase Our Size (EROS) to groups in Pittsburgh and Cleveland that protested Planned Parenthood programs to the ultramilitant group in New York known as the Five Percenters. These organizations asked two main questions: ‘Is birth control just a “white man’s plot” to “contain” the black population?’ and ‘Is it just another scheme to cut back on welfare aid or still another method of “keeping the black man down”?’ An editorial in The Thrust questioned why blacks could not get a free aspirin for a headache ‘yet when you’re a Black woman old enough to look sexy you can get a truck loaded down with control pills free. . . . The whole plot makes Hitler look like a Boy Scout.’”

The following year (1968) Gregory ran for president of the United States on the “peace and freedom” ticket calling the two-party system “corrupt and immoral.”

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine: Abortion is Genocide

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion is Genocide

Then, in 1971, Gregory penned a controversial Op-ed piece entitled, My Answer to Genocide, which was published in Ebony Magazine.

Gregory, like many other Black leaders of his day, believed that large families were important to the Black power struggle of their time. And, the civil rights activist perceived that the government might be attempting to limit the Black population through their funding of abortion and birth control.

This idea that abortion and birth control were plots to exterminate African Americans was not new.

In fact, there were many prominent African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, Samuel Yette, Fannie Lou Hamer, Whitney Young and more who were suspicious of government programs that pushed “family planning”, especially those that were placed within Black communities.

That suspicion appears to have had merit.

Research shows that family planning centers and abortion facilities often set up their locations in or near minority communities. In addition, the largest provider of abortions, Planned Parenthood, was founded by a radical advocate of racist eugenics who spoke with the Klu Klux Klan. And, Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go well beyond their founder Margaret Sanger, as Live Action has reported previously.

Today, with Planned Parenthood receiving half a billion in government dollars every year to promote their agenda, not only is the abortion corporation’s market share of abortions increasing, but nationally Black abortions are at frighteningly high levels as well.

In the Ebony article, Gregory begins by criticizing “planned parenthood groups” that call for people to only have 2.5 children.

He dismissed the terminology that claimed a preborn person was merely a fraction of a human to the way Blacks were described during slavery as “three-fifths” human:

My answer to genocide, quite simply is eight Black kids – and a another baby on the way […]

Now planned parenthood groups are saying that a couple should have a maximum of 2 1/2 children. I’m still trying to figure out that half a kid. I know my American history well enough to know what ‘three-fifths’ of a man is, but half-a-kid?

 

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion Genocide article

Gregory, who was born into a poor family, denounces birth control as something that “goes against Nature,” writing:

Can you believe that human beings are the only creatures who would ever consider developing birth control pills? You mention contraception to a gorilla and he will tear your head off.

Although Gregory’s humor is weaved throughout his piece, he is clear about the seriousness of genocide or as he also called it “subtle forms of genocide.” He said:

Genocide has come to mean, acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group as such; by killing members of the group […] imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group […]

Like many Black leaders today, Gregory pointed to a host of ills facing the Black community including police brutality, segregation, the KKK, poverty, and war. But of genocidal measures to “prevent births” within a group, Gregory wrote in Ebony:

There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.

In November of 1971, following the birth of Gregory’s ninth child, Jet Magazine pointed again to the civil rights leaders opposition to planned parenthood groups:

Dick Gregory opposed planned parenthood. Jet Magazine November 1971

At the time, Gregory’s colleague Jesse Jackson shared his views and decried abortion.

In 1971, during public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, the Rev. Jesse Jackson warned that, “Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove ( and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives, will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation[…]”

(Source: Statements at public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future as quoted in: Genocide? Birth Control and the Black American by Robert G. Weisbord, Greenwoor Press, 1972; P. 165)

In 1973, Jesse Jackson stated, “Abortion is genocide,in a Jet Magazine interview.

In that Jet Magazine, Mar 22, 1973, article Jackson added:

“Anything growing is living…If you got the thrill to set the baby in motion and you don’t have the will to protect it, you’re dishonest…You try to avoid reproducing sickness. You try to avoid reproducing deformities. But you don’t try to stop reproducing and procreating human life at its best. For who knows the cure for cancer won’t come out of some mind of some Black child?”

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

Jesse Jackson Dick Gregory oppose abortion Winnipeg Free Press 1975

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

According to the media outlet, the Black activists told the group that, “that the nation’s pro-abortion mentality undermines the value and dignity of every human life and that ‘killing babies’ is symptomatic of a civilization
and culture which operates without sacred absolutes.”

Upon news of Gregory’s death, CNN described his first-hand experience with injustice:

In a 1963 protest in which Gregory participated in Birmingham, Alabama, he was arrested and beaten by the police for championing the right of blacks to vote. After that incident, Gregory wrote, ‘It was just body pain, though. The Negro has a callus growing on his soul, and it’s getting harder and harder to hurt him there.’

Like a majority of dishonest media which support abortion, CNN failed to mention Gregory’s opposition to the horrific taking of human life in the womb.

But, stats do not lie, and sadly, reported abortion numbers in the Black and minority communities ring of a certain confirmation about the concerns Gregory and Jackson had.

As a result, the numbers of abortions performed on minorities and specifically Black women remain disproportionately high. As Live Action News has previously documented, in 2011, the CDC revealed that almost 56% of all abortions reported for race were committed on minority women.

 

The CDC’s 2012 report (dated November 27, 2015) reveals that 55% of abortions reported for race/ethnicity were performed on Black or Hispanic women.

The latest numbers for 2013 (published in 2016) show those numbers remained relatively the same (54.6%).

While Dick Gregory is rightly remembered for his many accomplishments, it is doubtful the news media will discuss how his suspicions about birth control and abortion proved to be true.

After all, if government-funded abortion and birth control are, in fact, genocide against Black community, then why does the media remain supportive of forced taxpayer dollars to such agendas?

And, more importantly, why does Congress continue to fund Planned Parenthood?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

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Planned Parenthood shows Black woman celebrating free birth control from ObamaCare

Posted in Birth Control and Eugenics, Black Genocide, Black Population Demographics, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Planned Parenthood and Black Leaders, Planned Parenthood and Black Women, Planned Parenthood and NAACP, Planned Parenthood and ObamaCare, Planned Parenthood Clergy with tags , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2013 by saynsumthn

On the Planned Parenthood Tumblr page, the eugenics and racist founded organization shows a black woman dancer to the idea of free birth control under ObamaCare

PP Free BC Black Woman OCt 2013PP Black wioman dances free BC Oct 2013

For YEARS, Black Americans fought the idea of free birth control in minority communities , in fact many continue to speak out today.

In the 1940’s –50’ Certain segments of the black community mistrusted the underlying intention of both private and government efforts with respect to contraception. Some blacks in particular became skeptical of the increasing push for contraceptive dispersal in poor urban neighborhoods, accusing contraceptive proponents of promoting nothing less than “black genocide.”

In 1942, Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, a black member of Planned Parenthood herself, noted the fear when she stated, these objections by “Negroes” toward birth control: “The concept that when birth control is proposed to them, it is motivated by a clever bit of machination to persuade them to commit race suicide, the fact that birth control is confused with abortion, and the belief that it is inherently immoral.”

That same year (1942) An American Dilemma; the Negro problem and Modern Democracy by: Gunnar Myrdal, reported that the number of contraceptive clinics rose from 34 in 1930 to 803 in 1942. Later that year, Margaret Sangers American Birth Control League would change it’s name to Planned Parenthood. The reason may have been that blacks they surveyed said they did not like words like “Control”. “Plan” was a more acceptable term to the black community.

In 1958, 1958- State Representative of Mississippi David H Glass sponsored a sterilization bill because he was angered by black women who made it a business to give birth to illegitimate children and collected welfare assistance for them. Glass wanted to “ stop, or slow down, such traffic at its source.” According to Mississippi’s The Delta Democrat-Times, Glass said it was designed to limit the number if illegitimate Negro children. Four times more Black children than Whites were receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children in Mississippi in the early 60’s.

By the 1960’s the birth control pill was introduced at a time when scientists such as Arthur Jensen and William Shockley were promoting genetic explanations of racial differences in intelligence-test scores. During the 1960s and 1970s, thousands of poor black women were coercively sterilized under federally funded programs. Women were threatened with termination of welfare benefits or denial of medical care if they didn’t “consent” to the procedure. Southern blacks claimed that black women were routinely sterilized without their consent and for no valid medical reason—a practice so widespread it was called a “Mississippi appendectomy.” Teaching hospitals in the North also performed unnecessary hysterectomies on poor black women as practice for their medical residents. During this period, state legislators considered a rash of punitive sterilization bills aimed at the growing number of blacks receiving public assistance. .. Black concerns about family planning had arisen decades earlier during Margaret Sanger’s crusade for birth control. As Sanger allied herself with the burgeoning eugenics movement, the call for birth control veered away from its radical, feminist origins to include programs to regulate the poor, immigrants and blacks, based on theories of genetic inferiority and social degeneracy. Some blacks of the period, including the nationalist leader Marcus Garvey, opposed birth control as a form of “race suicide.”

In 1962, the National Urban League rescinded its support of contraception, and so did many local NAACP chapters. Twenty-eight percent of the Blacks surveyed in the late 1960’s agreed that “ encouraging blacks to use birth control is comparable to trying to eliminate this group from society” Whitney Young, leader of the Urban League, revoked his group’s support of contraception in 1962 Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception and argued that black women needed to produce large numbers of babies until the black population comprised 30-35 percent of Americans; only then would blacks be able to affect the power structure.

At a meeting of the Council of Philadelphia Anti-Poverty Action Committee in 1965, Cecil Moore, president of the local NAACP chapter, condemned a Planned Parenthood program for northern Philadelphia because 70 percent of the population was black. Labeling the plan “replete with everything to help the Negroes commit race suicide,” Moore convinced the committee to table the proposal. Around the same time, Donald A. Bogue, a Chicago activist, reported that the birthrate of blacks in Chicago had fallen from 39.4 per thousand births in 1960 to 29.1 per thousand births in 1965.

At the White House Conference on Civil Rights sponsored by Lyndon Johnson, Cecil Moore made this attack on population control, And I have noticed that every time that we talk about population and planned parenthood, the only country I find that wants to limit poverty by limiting the poor- they always want to do it in Africa and South America and Asia , but I never heard them talk about doing it in Paris or England. Then I hope I am not belaboring the point, but don’t take that away from Negroes because we don’t have much else.”

In September 1965 the NAACP opposed a $91,000 federal grant for the dissemination of birth control information in North Philadelphia. The NAACP charged Planned Parenthood, which had applied for the grant, with attempting to “help Negroes commit racial suicide.” Although many blacks believed the pill was a benevolent technological advance, black nationalists tended to regard it as a symbol of genocide. A Planned Parenthood official explained to Ebony magazine: “Many Negro women have told our workers, There are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us…and the one for us causes sterilization.” This kind of paranoia frustrated and angered birth control activists.

In a letter dated March 7, 1966, Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher wrote to Mr. William Searle, VP of Marketing of the CD Searle Company telling him that he had been picketed by a group of very attractive young men, and noted that this was “just one of several manifestations of increasing racist apprehension in regard to birth control by minority groups, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans.” Guttmacher had a solution, he continued, “I am seriously considering adding to my staff a minority relations man or women from one of the minority groups, and since the largest is the Negro, probably someone of the Negro race. It would be his task to work not only with the conventional groups like the NAACP, CORE, etc. but actively to confront three militant groups and see whether or not we couldn’t persuade them of the error of their ways.” Guttmacher then tells Searle that the “only thing holding me back is the lack of money.” Guttmacher than asks is Searle would be interested in supporting “such a unit”. Shortly after this, Planned Parenthood would begin to advance blacks to upper management of the organization.

In a memo from Naomi T. Gray, Elsie Jackson, Helen Stanford, and Wylda B. Cowles, Community Relations Program for Planned Parenthood-World Population, to Alan F. Guttmacher, PP President dated April 11, 1966 they write, “ there was a consensus at the staff retreat that the tax-savings approach as a rational for providing birth control services has generated mistrust of Planned Parenthood’s motives among some segments of minority group communities—especially the Negro. This approach coupled with the population control message has proved to be explosive. The question now is how to handle the situation in such a way as to improve Planned Parenthood’s image , and if possible, to prevent the generation of further mistrust.”

On January 11,1966, Lammont Du. P. Copeland sent a letter to Alan Guttmacher which contained the advice of Dupont’s Public Relations Representative, Mr. Glen Perry regarding the attitudes of the Black community toward Planned Parenthood. Perry sough counsels from a black man who had been active with Planned Parenthood, Mr. Joseph Baker, who Dupont retains as a public relations advisor in the field of race relations. Perry summaraized the suggestions in a memo dated: January 10,1966, “Baker told us that Dr. Guttmacher is correct in feeling that civil rights leaders are beginning to take a hostile position toward population planning on the ground that it is an attempt to halt the growth of the Negro population.” Baker strongly suggested to Perry that Planned Parenthood immediately open dialogue to the Black leaders, to “get their support and participation.” Baker chastised a speech that Guttmacher made where he admitted some on the Planned Parenthood Board may be there solely for a racist agenda, Perry writes, “[ Baker] was especially critical of Dr. Guttmacher’s admission that there might be some members of Planned Parenthood who had the political objective attributed to the organization by civil rights leaders. Such an admission could easily be taken out of context, and used to the detriment of the organization.”

Perry suggested that Guttmacher consider adding blacks to the Planned Parenthood board as well as the staff, he warns, “ If this isn’t done, I’m not sure any amount of talk can convince the Negro leaders that this isn’t something being done to them by the whites rather than being done for whites and blacks by whites and blacks working together.” Perry end by stressing that they need to “move quickly” to involve the black community.

During a workshop on family planning at the March 21-24th, 1966 Southern Christian Leadership Conference , Planned Parenthood’s field consultant, Mrs. Elsie Jackson reported to Alan Guttmacher that, “As I had suspected the two S.N.C.C. workers came into the room with homemade picket signs (sheets of papers on their chests and backs). WE OPPOSE BIRTH CONTROL FOR NEGROES.” Elsie Jackson described the response of other blacks who attended the conference as follows, “Immediately after the initial presentation and the short introductory film, the reactions were hostile and volatile:

“God is against abortion and family planning is abortion and killing.”
“ Let the government give us our rights…and we’ll take care of our children.”
“They brought us here to work when they needed us and used us even as studs to produce more and more when they needed us—now they say stop breeding—Hell, no—now we’ll do as we please—we are tired of being run and manipulated.”
“Birth Control is a plot just as segregation was a plot to keep the Negro down.”

She reported that two members of the group described birth control as the white man’s tool to weaken the race.

On February 23,1966 while in Berkley California, Wylda B. Cowles met with Walter Thompson, head of EROS an organization that opposed both Planned Parenthood and Birth Control. EROS stands for Endeavor to Raise our Size. On March 28, 1966, Cowles reported to Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher, MD that EROS “interprets the underlying motives [of Planned Parenthood] as a means of accomplishing racial genocide.” She described Thompson as a college graduate, articulate, and intelligent and said that she did not believe that Thompson was an “irrational, wild-eyed radical.” Cowles acknowledged that Thompson’s goals were to “destroy Planned Parenthood” because his wife was insulted at a Planned Parenthood center.

In 1966, Planned Parenthood president, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher praised the advice of Cecil Newman, the publisher of the Minnesota Spokesman and former board member of Planned Parenthood of Minneapolis, concerning Guttmacher’s concern that blacks viewed Planned Parenthood and birth control as genocide. In a letter dated February 18,1966, from a mutual friend, Daryl Feldmeir managing editor of the Minneapolis Tribune, Newman offered this suggestion, which Guttmacher wholeheartedly approved, “If I were Dr. Guttmacher, I would find some of the top Negro clergymen with large congregations to serve on my board. They really command respect.” On March 7th of the same year, Guttmacher thanks Newman, “Our mutual friend, Daryle M. Feldmeir, wrote me that he had discussed with you my concern about the racist reaction which seems to be springing up regarding Planned Parenthood. Actually the groups that seem the most vocal do not seem to be connected with the Black Muslim movement, to wit, the group of students at Berkley, calling themselves EROS and the NAACP in Philadelphia under the leadership of Cecil Moore.” Guttmacher goes on to acknowledge Newman’s suggestion of placing clergymen on the board and asks him to submit three names.

On September 10,1967, H. Rap Brown, National Chairman of the Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee urged an audience of 1000 that the Vietnam War and Birth Control programs are part of a genocide against Negroes.

Douglas Stewart, Director of Community Relations with Planned Parenthood World Population, noted in a memorandum to the Executive Directors, Planned Parenthood Affiliates, and Regional Directors that at the July 21-23 Newark Black Power Conference. The conference passed an anti-birth control resolution, ” I was in attendance at the Black Power Conference held in Newark, New Jersey as a representative of Planned Parenthood–World Population. It is interesting to note that even though the conference passed an anti-birth control resolution, I was personally well received…” Stewart did make this suggestion, “I would strongly recommend that all “outreach” personnel be instructed to minimize discussions of population control in the minority group…”

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This trend continued…….

In 1983– A study conducted in Waller County , Texas, which had a 52% Black population rate, The study found that a substantial percentage of the respondents indicated agreement with each of the following genocidal statements: 5> Birth control programs are a plot to eliminate Blacks; (45.3% agreed)

Ted Hayes, civil rights and homeless activist, tells people about the millions of black babies lost to abortion

1977 It is strange that they choose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.” Jesse Jackson, 1977

1976 Jesse Jackson: “I think it is a significant issue, it reflects at one level, the moral decay and ambiguity in society, I think that Whenever Human Life ceases to represent the highest value in the human sphere, the society is in trouble….at this point what the court have ruled in abortion, the legal , it almost takes away from the young man the responsibility, and from the young woman the responsibility, of the act they have engaged in. And when people begin to use the excuses like “this girl is not ready yet” it means that the law of convenience becomes the highest law, and that is a very dangerous precedent morally, even before it becomes political!” (Jesse Jackson, Press Conference USA, February 2,1976)

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1971 Contraceptives will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation.” Jesse Jackson, 1971

1971Dr. Andrew Billingsley, vice president for academic affairs at Howard University, said that many birth control programs are aimed at “stamping out black children before they get on welfare. . . others have decided the black population is getting out of c o n t r o l and must be curbed.” BirthCurbsCritisized

AndrewBillings

1971 A black educator and social scientist has sharply criticized the Planned Parenthood-World Population organization and called population control programs “overt racism with overtones of genocide.” Andrew Billingsley, Vice President for academic affairs of Howard University in Washington , D. C., told 700 delegates at the organization’s annual convention they should focus their attention on curbing the growth of this country’s white middle class. Although blacks constitute only 15 per cent of
this country’s population, Billingsley said “others have decided the black population’s getting out of control, and must be curbed.” He said birth control might not be bad if it were designed to enhance freedom of choice rather than “stamping out black children before they get on welfare.”

1971 Proponents…have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.Iowa State Rep. June Franklin, Democrat 1971.

1971 The abortion law, hides behind the guise of helping women, when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people.” Brenda Hyson, New York chapter, Black Panther Party, 1971

1970 A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.Detroit chapter, Black Panther Party, 1970

1969 A May 1969 issue of The Liberator , told readers, “ For us to speak in favor of birth control for Afro-Americans would be comparable to speaking in favor of genocide.” In articles and in cartoons in the Black press, the Pill was depicted as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. A poster circulated by the Berkley group: EROS, Endeavor to Raise Our Size- likened the Pill to lynching. Lynching represented “Birth Control Then…the crude way.” Under the image of a woman reaching for her oral contraceptives was the caption: ““Now, the Smooth Way.” (SOURCE: Devices and Desires, a History of Contraceptives in America, by By Andrea Tone Published 2002, Hill and Wang; PP.254-256, google books online)

1968The idea is to make less niggers so they won’t have to build houses for them.” , Dr. Charles E. Greenlee, a Negro physician and a chairman of the Health Committee of the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP. ( SOURCE: The Problem of Black Birth Control THE TITUSVILLE HERALD, TITUSVILLE, PENNA, PAGE SEVEN: OCTOBER 7,1968)

1968 Negro doctors Association with the Black Congress attacked some aspects of the government’s birth control program as being genocidal. In Intent for Black People, Walt Bremond, chairman of the Black Congress, said the highly diversified group felt that , “ if we don’t band together in our struggle, we’ll all perish as a people.” ( New York Times: Negroes see riots giving way to Black Activism and drive for Community Control: 10/21/1968)

1967 Newark, Black Power Conference resolution, “rejection of all birth control programs”
( Source; The cry of the ghetto, Saturday Evening Post : 8/26/1967, Vol. 240 Issue 17, P80-80, 1P, Editorial)

1967 On September 10,1967, H. Rap Brown, National Chairman of the Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee urged an audience of 1000 that the Vietnam War and Birth Control programs are part of a genocide against Negroes. ( SOURCE: The New York Times: Rap Brown Calls Nation on ‘Eve’ of a Negro Revolt: 9/11/1967)

1962 Whitney Young, leader of the Urban League, revoked his group’s support of contraception in 1962 Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception and argued that black women needed to produce large numbers of babies until the black population comprised 30-35 percent of Americans; only then would blacks be able to affect the power structure. (SOURCE: Journal of Social History, Birth control and the black community in the 1960s: genocide or power politics?, by Simone M. Caron, (Spring 1998)

Some of these quotes are from a new film on Eugenics and Population Control called: Maafa21. It is a MUST SEE film- the best ever made on this issue. The early civil rights leaders, Black Panthers and others saw through the Planned Parenthood mirage. They saw it for what it really was: BLACK GENOCIDE.

In fact, civil rights icon, Fannie Lou Hammer saw clearly that abortion and birth control were being used as Genocide first hand.
Below are exerts of an eye opening incident Ms. Hamer experienced in the realm of Black Genocide written by Black journalist Samuel Yette. Yette was the first Black Washington Correspondent for Newsweek who was later fired after he himself authored a book exposing how birth control and abortion would be used as black Genocide, more on that later. Here Yette writes about Hamar’s experience in the Afro-American:

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer was Tough Fighter The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977 By Samuel Yette

” It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…For these and other reasons the recent death of Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer …was noted here and across the nation not only with personal sadness, but also with stern political reflection.

When the charades of Richard Nixon included a White House Conference on hunger in 1969, Mrs. Hamer was among the hundreds of authentic grass-roots persons brought here to confir with the highly paid experts.

But the conference (whose name was changed from a conference on hunger to a conference on “Food and Nutrition”) was in reality, one great fraud against the poor.

Instead of seeking ways to feed the hungry, the back stage plan was to get the poor unwittingly to endorse a plan to eliminate from the society those who were hungry.

For example, a panel of medical experts pretended to be studying was to insure proper nourishment for babies and pregnant women. Instead it adopted-in the name of the poor at the conference- a resolution providing for:

– Birth Control devices for young girls, free, and with or without parental approval;

– Required abortions of unmarried girls discovered during the first three months of pregnancy; and

– Forced sterilization of any such girl giving birth out of wedlock a second time.

Only one black person-a nurse-was a member of that panel.

Yette continues, In my reportorial role, I found Mrs. Hamer for a reaction to the newly passed resolution.

She responded with shock and outrage at the deception, “I didn’t come to talk about birth control, ” she protested, ” I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people, Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

Hearing the location of the panel, she gamely pulled herself up on a cane, and made her way to the panel’s meeting room. Along the way she beckoned several black men, who followed seriously intent on doing her will.

She went straight to the front of the room and demanded to be heard.

With the power and conviction of personal tragedy, she told how she, herself, had once been sterilized under the guise of an unrelated surgical procedure. She told how such tools as their resolution in the hands of racist medical personnel would mean tragedy for the black and poor.

Finally, with several large black men at her side, Mrs. Hamer demanded that the resolution be reconsidered. It was, and voted down. But she could not stand and watch forever.

Though she saw the deception and illuminated the society’s most immoral contradictions , she, like the hope and moral vigor of he 1960’s ran out…

The author of the tribute above, Mr. Samuel Yette also suffered persecution for exposing the sinister plot to exterminate blacks with population control methods.

Samuel Yette authored a stunning book called: My Book, “The Choice” and it exposed high level eugenics efforts against the black community

Samuel Yette was also one of the first and very distinguished Black journalists to work for Newsweek. After he published his book, The Choice” which exposed high level attempts of Black Genocide through birth control , abortion, and additional means , he was fired by Newsweek. Yette claims his superiors told him that the “Nixon Whitehouse” wanted him out of Washington.

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In One chapter on Birth Control

Yette exposes President Nixon’s White House Conference on Food and Nutrition of December 2-4, 1969. In Mr. Yette’s words it, “was worse than a farce.” President Nixon opened the conference with 3 recommendations designed to reduce the number of hungry people! He suggested no measures for the relief of hunger in America.

1. He wanted everyone to have a guaranteed minimum income of $1,600 a year. (This is less than welfare was paying at that time.)
2. A supposed expansion of the food stamp program that would be tied into and compliment the welfare reform package in #1. (His plan would have actually reduced the amount of food stamps. Less money + less food =more hunger.)
3. Provide family planning services to at minimum 5 million women in low-income families.

This last proposal was part of a plan formulated by Dr. Charles Lowe of the National Institute of Health. The plan recommended Congress pass a law that:

1. Made birth control information and devices available to any and all girls over the age of 13 with or without parental consent.
2. Allowed mandatory abortions for unmarried girls within the 1st three months of pregnancy.
3. Mandatory sterilization for any unmarried girl giving birth out of wedlock for the 2nd time.

In that book, Yette describes how black activist, Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer was there for the Conference on hunger. When she heard about the birth control proposals she grabbed about a dozen young black men, walked into the room, and demanded to be heard. She spoke about ten minutes on the evil results of this plan and the conference dropped it from consideration.

Today 5 BLACK babies to every 1 White baby will die inside American Abortion Clinics. Is there a targeting going on? Find out: Maafa21:

MAAFA 21 DVD BLACK GENOCIDE IN 21ST CENTURY AMERICA

An incredible documentary that everyone must see.

Introduction:
They were stolen from their homes, locked in chains and brought across an ocean. And for more than 200 years, their blood and sweat would help build the richest and most powerful nation the world has ever known.

But when slavery ended, their welcome was over. America’s wealthy elite had decided it was time for them to disappear and they were not going to be particular about how it might be done.

What you are about to see is that the plan these people set in motion 150 years ago is still being carried out today. So don’t think that this is history. It is not. It is happening right here, right now.

If you think that slavery and racism is over, you will be shocked when you watch this well documented DVD exposing the racism that is still taking place within America. Maafa21 is a high quality documentary with incredible documentation – A MUST SEE for every African American !

MAAFA21 Purchase Here

Maafa21 DVD

Jesse Jackson and other Black Leaders used to speak against abortion- why have they been so silent?

Watch a powerful film called- Maafa21 to find out who has sold out the black race

Clip of Maafa21

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