Archive for Maafa21

These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Jesse Jackson, NAACP, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Samuel Yette with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action screened the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Image: Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

Image: article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Omage: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

 

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

 

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

 

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

Article on abortion (Pamela Carr and Faye Wattleton) published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

 

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Did Planned Parenthood appoint Black leaders to quell suspicion of Black genocide?

Posted in Black Genocide, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Planned Parenthood CEO, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood, Black genocide

Despite the fact that Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger promoted eugenics, it was actually under another eugenicist leader, Alan F. Guttmacher, that Planned Parenthood began referring for and eventually committing abortions. At the exact same time that abortion was being pushed publicly, the organization elected a Black chairman to roll out this agenda. All of this transpired in the late 1960s, a time when America was in conflict over the struggle for the civil rights of Black Americans.

During this time frame, many of the organization’s leaders were concerned about overpopulation. The organization’s history is steeped in eugenics, and this ideology manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As laws about these eugenics courts began to be challenged, a new tool of eugenics was making its way across the land: abortion.

Even though many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion would be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit,” Guttmacher, by now a Planned Parenthood president, was able to convince his friends that abortion, at first in perhaps a voluntary way, would be a better solution. However, there was a slight problem, because Black citizens and other minority groups were already suspicious of birth control efforts aimed at them. How would they feel about abortion?

Image: article Blacks Charge Black Genocide from Planned Parenthood

The solution for Planned Parenthood was to bring Black leaders to the organization’s board, in an effort to convince Black Americans that Planned Parenthood’s efforts were not genocidal. This strategy was not a new one; Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger — who gave a talk for the Ku Klux Klan — had already implemented the so-called “Negro Project” to accomplish the exact same thing. Memos between Planned Parenthood staffers and leadership indicated a great concern over how the Black community viewed their efforts. In response, Planned Parenthood’s public relations machine also reached out to Black publications, as they had already done with push for birth control.

Image: Guttmacher article on Birth Control

Alan Guttmacher Birth Control Article (Image: Ebony Mag April 1962)

In 1967,  the Pittsburgh Branch of the NAACP had criticized the swarming of Planned Parenthood facilities into minority neighborhoods. Other leaders like H. Rap Brown and Fannie Lou Hamer had called abortion “Black genocide.” And, as late as 1973, a study published by the American Journal of Public Health,”Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans as Related to Age, Sex, and Region,” found that Black men and women had a level of unease about “family planning.” Researchers Castellano Turner, Ph.D., and William A. Darity, Ph.D., concluded that Blacks were more suspicious when “family planning” was under the control of Whites. “It is noteworthy that the greatest degree of agreement is found where the issue of black control of family planning (as against white control) is at issue,” they said.

Graph: Black Genocide Fears

Study on how Blacks feared family planning – Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans 1973 study Castellano Turner, Ph.D. and William A. Darity, Ph.D.

After dialoguing internally about the unease of the Black community, the suggestion was made to add Black members to Planned Parenthood’s board; this took place at the same time that Planned Parenthood was calling for the decriminalization of abortion. According to a New York Times article from November 14, 1968, the first time that Planned Parenthood went on record calling for abortion, they also elected their very first Black board chairman to roll out the new agenda — Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: Jerome Holland of PPFA

Planned Parenthood names first Black Chairman to push abortion – First Black Chairman of Board elected by Planned Parenthood 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate.

Holland was also added as chairman of the Board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood.

But Holland’s post as chairman of the board of Planned Parenthood was short lived.

In 1970, Holland was named ambassador to Sweden by President Richard Nixon; however, the headlines of the first Black chairman of Planned Parenthood had seemingly done their job. Holland was openly endorsing abortion as a “health matter” between the woman and her doctor.

Image: PPFA article

Black chairman Jerome Holland lauds Planned Parenthood eugenics

The same year Planned Parenthood elected its first Black chairman of the board, Frederick Osborn, a founding Eugenics Society officer connected to Planned Parenthood, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

A few years later, a new Black leader would emerge to reinforce the push for abortion within Planned Parenthood: Faye Wattleton.

After 62 years as an organization, why did Planned Parenthood wait until 1978 to elect the very first Black female as president? Like Holland,  Wattleton was not a novice where abortion was concerned. She had been with Planned Parenthood for a while, serving as a volunteer in the early 1970s and eventually serving as director of the Dayton affiliate.

Article about Faye Wattleton elected to PPFA

Faye Wattleton elected first Black Planned Parenthood president

At a press conference held in February of 1978, then president-elect of Planned Parenthood Wattleton told the media that she was “putting the world on notice” that the organization was going to be much more aggressive on abortion rights. “What has happened is that we have allowed them [right-to-lifers] to have center stage,” Wattelton said, “I’d like to say those days are over.”

Wattleton then vowed to restore — “to the poor” — access of abortion under Medicaid.

Wattleton was asked if her leadership of Planned Parenthood as a Black woman would alleviate suspicions within the Black community linking abortion and her organization to Black genocide. Wattleton responded, “I don’t think a lot of people are yelling genocide anymore, because I’m Black. I’m in a watchdog position on these issues and no one should assume I’ve been co-opted. What better way is there to guard against those types of abuses?”

Wattleton then said that the Black community should be more concerned about quality of life than “increasing our numbers.”

Image: Faye Wattleton

Faye Wattleton first Black president Planned Parenthood

Wattleton served as president of the abortion corporation for 14 years, where, among other radical abortion advances, she helped to legalize the sale of the RU-486 abortion pill in the United States. Under Wattleton’s leadership, Planned Parenthood’s budget grew from $90 million in 1978 to $384 million in 1990. For her service and dedication to the eugenics-minded organization, in 1992, Wattleton received Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award. Despite Sanger’s known eugenics and Klan connections, Wattleton once referred to her as “[t]he great heroine of our time,” telling Hubbard News in 1979 that Sanger would be proud of Planned Parenthood’s progress.

But the idea that Blacks would no longer be targeted for eugenics because a Black woman was at the helm of a eugenics organization was short-lived. During Wattleton’s tenure at Planned Parenthood, she stated that supporters of Planned Parenthood contributed to the abortion giant to “keep the Black population down.” On CNN, in a debate with Bob Dornan, an outspoken pro-life member of the US House of Representatives, at that time, Wattleton, admitted, “As a matter of fact… we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all Black women to stop having children.”

And also clipped in the documentary film, Maafa21, below:

Wattleton went on to help form the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, she has been described by some in the media as “a pioneer, a crusader, a media star and a rebel of sorts.”

Today, many within the Black community still see abortion as a tool of eugenics, and the abortion statistics show that it has become a leading cause of death of Blacks in the nation. Margaret Sanger’s vision of limiting births among certain races may not have begun with abortion, but it appears to have led to abortion.

Tragically, today, as a result of Guttmacher continuing Sanger’s eugenics agenda by introducing abortion to Planned Parenthood, over 800 preborn children of all races die there every day from abortion.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Film documents Planned Parenthood’s history of Black genocide, eugenics

Posted in Maafa21 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 21, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  Reprinted from Live Action News

Image: Maafa21

As the nation celebrates Black History Month, it is worthwhile to share a documentary revealing how the eugenics and population control agenda — aided and abetted by Planned Parenthood and other organizations — has systematically been used to reduce Black births. Produced by Life Dynamics, a pro-life organization in Denton, Texas, Maafa 21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America, is eye-opening. Maafa is a Swahili word meaning “a terrible tragedy,” and referring to the time of the middle passage during the slave trade. The “21” in the title refers to the 21st century, because, in reality, the “Maafa” has not ended. It is still being carried out today.

The back cover of the film sets the stage:

They were stolen from their homes, locked in chains and taken across an ocean. And for more than 200 years, their blood and sweat would help to build the richest and most powerful nation the world has ever known…. The wealthy elite had decided it was time for them to disappear and they were not going to be particular about how it might be done. What you are about to see is that the secret plan these people set in motion 150 years ago is still being carried out today.

In this documentary, this hidden racial agenda is dragged out of the shadows and into the light. Before the next two hours is up, you will know things that America’s politicians and power brokers never intended for you to know and you will see things that the media was never going to show you.

According to Life Dynamics, Maafa 21 unmasks the ties between the Nazis, the American eugenics movement, and today’s “family planning” cartel, and is “about elitism, secret agendas, treachery and corruption at the highest levels of political and corporate America.”

The film begins with the horrors of slavery and reveals how eugenics was introduced as a solution for what some had deemed the “Negro problem” in America. Eugenics opened the flood gates of forced sterilizations, led by crusaders like American Eugenics Society member, Margaret Sanger, who later founded Planned Parenthood.

Mark Crutcher, President of Life Dynamics, points out in the film:

These ties between eugenics and Planned Parenthood’s founder were so well established that Sanger, who was a long standing member of the American Eugenics Society, once pursued a plan to merge the American Birth Control League, or Planned Parenthood as it was later called, with the American Eugenics Society.

Live Action News has documented that, despite the claims of Planned Parenthood’s supporters, not only did founder Margaret Sanger have a strong belief in eugenics, she made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization — and even spoke to the Ku Klux Klan. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, or members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations (chart from Maafa21):

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

And listed among American Eugenics Society members in the film is Sanger herself:

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

According to Crutcher, “The relationship between Sanger and these eugenics elitists was basically a marriage of convenience. In order to advance their common agenda, they needed a front man and she needed money. And the whole thing would be held together with this bizarre obsession with race and class. The result was that the American Birth Control League became the driving force behind the American eugenics movement. Eugenics would no longer be just a philosophy. Sanger, and others like her, were going the put it into practice.”

Maafa 21 not only documents the eugenics movement dating all the way back to the days of slavery, but also contains interviews with notable Black leaders such as Reverends Johnny Hunter and Cleaned Childress, along with Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Image: Black leaders interviewed in Maafa21

Black Leaders in Maafa21 film speak about eugenics and Planned Parenthood

Elaine Riddick, who was forcefully sterilized by the State of North Carolina, was also interviewed for the documentary. Tragically, Riddick’s story was not isolated. It is estimated that 60,000 men and women were eugenically sterilized against their will in the United States, many of whom were minorities. Today, Riddick is outspoken against population control, abortion, and Planned Parenthood, which she believes has a eugenics agenda.

Image of Elaine Riddick from Maafa21

Elaine Riddick speaks about eugenic sterilization in Maafa21

Maafa 21 unveils for viewers who was behind the evil eugenics ideology, who funded it, and who was targeted. It then points out that as the courts began to rule that forced eugenic sterilization was unconstitutional, a new approach was being devised by the purveyors of eugenics. That strategy was the legalization of abortion, led by the largest chain of abortion facilities in America — Planned Parenthood.

Crutcher states in the film:

 … [F]rom the beginning, this idea that man could reinvent the world through eugenics was an elitist philosophy espoused by those who considered themselves not only financially superior, but intellectually superior to everyone else. And Planned Parenthood became the golden child of these people because they are the ones who figured out how to make eugenics work. That is what birth control, and especially abortion, are all about. And the reason Planned Parenthood has been so successful is because, unlike other eugenics organizations, they have always been able to keep their agenda hidden from the public.

Image: Mark Crutcher from Maafa21

Mark Crutcher producer Maafa21 film about eugenics and abortion

In the days leading up to the legalization of abortion, there were many prominent Black civil rights leaders, including Jesse JacksonSamuel YetteFannie Lou HamerWhitney Young, and more who were suspicious of programs that pushed “family planning,” especially those that were placed within Black communities. In reality, Alan Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood’s own former president and also vice president of the American Eugenics Society, admitted that there might be some members of Planned Parenthood’s board who “had the political objective attributed to the organization by [Black] civil rights leaders.”

Believe it or not, Jesse Jackson believed that the Black community was being targeted with birth control, writing in 1971:

Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove (and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation. Those who we could not get rid of in the rice paddies of Viet-Nam we now propose to exterminate, if necessary, eliminate if possible, in the OB wards and gynecology clinics of our urban hospitals. The direct extension of the old “man-in-the-house” rule against public aid recipients can be detected in the drive for birth control….

Image: Rev. Jesse Jackson from Maafa21

Rev. Jesse Jackson opposed abortion and birth control as Black Genocide

In 1974, Roy Innis, National Director of The Congress of Racial Equality, told Ebony Magazine that he was alarmed by the high concentration of birth control centers and abortion facilities in black neighborhoods, “It was not until the mid ’60s that Blacks began to realize that what was called urban renewal was, in fact, what one city planner labeled, ‘Negro removal.’ … We are alarmed by the high concentration of birth control centers and abortion clinics in Black neighborhoods as well as more exotic proposals such as adding anti-fertility drugs to drinking water, as suggested by a famous Chicago economist.”

Image: Maafa21 Black Genocide and abortion

Blacks opposed abortion as Black Genocide Maafa21

As Live Action News has previously documented, in 1971, comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory penned a controversial op-ed entitled, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine. Gregory stated in part:

There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit Black population.

Ironically, within days after the release of Maafa 21’s first edition, U.S Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was being interviewed by a reporter for The New York Times and made this astounding admission when asked about Roe v. Wade – the decision that legalized abortion: “Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”

Shockingly, Maafa 21 viewers also hear undercover phone calls from a Live Action investigation in which Planned Parenthood expresses willingness to accept donations to fund abortions for Black women.

Today, Planned Parenthood receives half a billion in government dollars every year to promote their agenda. And, as Live Action News has documented already, not only is the Planned Parenthood’s market share of abortions increasing, but nationally, Black abortions are at frighteningly high levels as well.

According to Crutcher, Maafa 21 is changing hearts and minds about abortion. Since release of the film in 2009, Crutcher says a number of Black activists have joined the pro-life movement. One reviewer of the film wrote:

Maafa21 shows, without exception, how African-Americans are the targets of the social elite. In the film, you will learn that civil rights leaders in the 1960’s gave a clear warning that abortion and population control was a tool of Black Genocide. You will see the links between racism, eugenics, and Planned Parenthood’s effort to market abortion to the African American Community.

Maafa21 is loaded with historical references from slavery, the Nazi take over of Germany and the Civil Rights movement within the United States, and will educate young and old alike on the causes of Black Genocide in the modern age.

Maafa21 has been viewed online hundreds of thousands of times and for years, the film has been shown during Black History Month on college campuses, at community centers, theaters, churches, libraries, and more.

Image: Maafa21 award

Maafa21 Life Fest Award

Shortly after its release by Life Dynamics in 2009, Maafa21 was shown in the Capitol Visitor Center Theater in Washington on two occasions. In addition, it was selected as the featured film in the March 2010 Jubilee Film Festival in Selma, Alabama, to commemorate the right to vote and remember the historic “Bloody Sunday” anniversary of the Bridge Crossing Civil Rights march from Selma to Montgomery. Maafa21 was also featured in the 2010 Real Life Film Festival in Sudbury, Ontario, and the 2011 Life Fest Film Festival in Los Angeles, California.

To watch the film in full or order a copy of the DVD, go to www.maafa21.com.

This is reprinted with permission from Live Action News – the original article can be viewed here.

Four Black pro-life women who spoke against abortion as ‘Black genocide

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  Republished from Live Action News

Image: Mildred Jefferson pro-life leader

Black pro-life leader Mildred Jefferson

In the early 1960s and 70s, organizations seeking to liberalize abortion laws, like the National Organization for Women (NOW), attempted to convince the nation that women wanted legalized abortion on demand. Many women actually opposed liberalized abortion laws, and those women’s voices were silenced by NOW (who was influenced by men seeking to profit from abortion) and NOW’s friends in the (at that time, majority male-led) media.

During that time, many pro-life women spoke out against the liberalization of abortion laws, including many women in the Black community, who saw abortion as “Black genocide.” Four of them are listed below:

Fannie Lou Hamer 

Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped to found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964, she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer pro-life women

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne said Hamer called abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition…. There she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. ‘I didn’t come to talk about birth control,’ she protested. ‘I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?’”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she ‘regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.’”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as saying, “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders. Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Dr. Mildred F. Jefferson

Mildred Jefferson pro-life, women

Mildred Jefferson (Image: Schlesinger Library)

Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and the first woman employed as a general surgeon at Boston University Medical Center. She was ardently pro-life, and was the co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) and Massachusetts Citizens for Life. She served as NRLC president from 1975-1978.

Dr. Jefferson was committed to defending human life from, as she described it, “conception to natural death.”

She first became active in 1970 when, as she recalled to the New York Times, “the American Medical Association first considered bending its founding principles in such a way that a doctor would not be considered unethical” if he or she committed an abortion.

She once described why she became a physician, “I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.”

Dr. Jefferson also warned that abortion would target the Black community, and in 1977, she stated, “Blacks suffer more from abortion because what looks like help is actually striking against them. Blacks are fewer. They will disappear sooner….” She insisted that “[a]bortion is class war against the poor,” and told the Pittsburgh Press in 1977, “Abortionists argue, ‘Let the poor have abortions like the rich can.’ Then abortionists should make a list of the other things rich women have that they’re going to give to poor women.”

Mildred Jefferson abortion Black genocide pro-life women

Mildred Jefferson: Abortion is Black genocide

At a press conference in 1989, Dr. Jefferson noted how the abortion lobby uses the poor to maintain abortion access. At that press conference, Dr. Jefferson joined with other pro-life women to release a declaration supporting life, stating that abortion is “not only genocide” but “national suicide.”

“It implies a fascist solution that now they call ‘liberal,’ to keep down the costs of caring for the poor. They get rid of those who are going to run up the costs,” she stated, adding:

Every women’s organization in this country has got to deal with these issues a little more forthrightly than has been possible in the past.  Because, for most of the organizations, of the general women’s organizations that support that point of view [abortion] there has never been any kind of real in depth discussion of such issues…

We have an idea that N.O.W., the National Organization of Some Women, in alliance with the other alphabet organizations — ACLU, PP, NARAL — are in deadly collusion to obtain the private right to kill all having the direct objective of establishing a socialist order, to replace our Democratic Republic.”

In a 1976 article with the New York Times, Dr. Jefferson summarized efforts of the pro-life movement as “dedication.” She went on to say, “It’s a simple matter that our people believe if they fail, other people will die. Today the unborn, tomorrow the elderly.”

READ: Bishops and pastors gather at Missouri Planned Parenthood to condemn Black genocide

Iowa Rep. June Franklin

Rep. June Franklin was one of many Black women who opposed abortion.

Rep. June Franklin (Image: Maafa21)

In 1971, one of the most convincing arguments against legalizing abortion in Iowa came from a Black female representative in the State’s legislature: June Franklin. According to a report published by the Burlington Hawk Eye, Rep. A. June Franklin, a Democrat from Des Moines, was joined in her opposition to abortion by another female Congresswoman, Hallie Sargisson, (D-Salix).

Rep. Franklin was the only African-American representative in the Iowa legislature, and saw liberalized abortion as a way to target the Black community. “Proponents… have argued this bill is for Blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all,” Franklin said. “Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of Blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either Blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

In July of 1972, she defended her vote to the Des Moines Register, saying, “Most of the people I’ve heard from are strongly opposed to legalizing abortion, and most of these people are not Catholics.”

The Des Moines Register later quoted the female lawmaker as being proud that her vote overturned the measure. “It would have led to genocide and euthanasia. God gave us life and only God can take it away,” Franklin said.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Clardy Craven was one of several Black women who opposed abortion.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Craven served on the board of the National Right to Life Committee and NRLC’s state affiliate, Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life. She was also a social human rights activist and chairman of the Minnesota Human Rights Commission and African-Americans Against Abortion.

In 1972, just prior to the Roe v. Wade decision, Craven wrote a piece titled “Abortion, Poverty and Black Genocide– Gifts to the poor?” and called abortion Black genocide:

Throughout the course of American history, the quality of human life has always been improved at the expense of the weak and oppressed…. It takes little imagination to see that the unborn Black baby is the real object of many abortionists….

The quality of life for the poor, the Black and the oppressed will not be served by destroying their children….

[T]he womb of the poor Black woman is seen as the latest battleground for oppression. In times past the Blacks couldn’t grow kids fast enough for their “masters” to harvest; now that power is near, the “masters” want us to call a moratorium on having babies. When looked at in context, this whole mess adds up to blatant genocide….

Government family planning programs designed for poor Blacks will emphasize birth control and abortion with the intent of limiting the Black population is genocide. The deliberate killing of Black babies in abortion is genocide- perhaps the most overt form of all…. The prevalent Black attitude toward birth control and abortion is distinctly in opposition!

Craven pointed to two studies showing that Blacks — and specifically, Black women — opposed abortion:

In a study conducted by the Bowman Gray Medical School on poverty-level Blacks, 79% of 776 poverty-level Black females, 86% of 500 of their sex partners, and 70% of 215 low-middle-income Black females were found to be “not in favor of abortions under any circumstances.”  Similarly, when 990 urban Black females were studied, 77% were found to be opposed to abortion under any circumstances, and this opposition was found to be manifest in their actions of carrying their children to term…”

In 1975, Craven told a Pennsylvania federal panel that abortion amounted to a “wholesale marketing of human flesh.”

In 1985, Craven described why she opposed abortion. “Having served women on welfare, I feel that the pro-choice movement is a male cop out,” she said. “I vowed on my dear grandmother’s grave that as long as there is breath in my body I shall fight for the right of the Black child to exist.”

Hamer, Jefferson, Franklin, and Craven were adamant in their belief that abortion was being used by those in power to cull the Black population. Planned Parenthood’s own founder, Margaret Sanger, was a eugenicist whose “Negro Project” had the goal of reducing population growth in the Black community. Even today, Planned Parenthood has been caught in controversy, as an undercover Live Action investigation found the organization willing to accept donations to abort specifically Black babies:

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News

Civil Rights matter to everyone not just those who survive the womb

Posted in Civil Rights, Lyndon B Johnson, Maafa21 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 2, 2015 by saynsumthn

REPUBLISHING FROM LIFE DYNAMICS BLOG:

LBJ signs Civil Rights Act 1964

51 years ago today, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964 outlawing racial discrimination in public accommodations such as hotels, theaters, parks, restaurants, and other public places.

LBJ Civil Rights ACt 1964

The Act guaranteed full and equal enjoyment of goods and services and public accommodations without discriminating or segregating on the basis of race, color, religion, or national origin.

LBJ signed the document protecting the basic civil rights of minorities, stating that, “It’s purpose is not to divide but to end divisions,” he said.

Life Dynamics‘ president Mark Crutcher points out that this nation still has a long way to go in protecting the rights of all Black people.

What we learned in Maafa21 tells us we still have a long way top go,” Crutcher stated.

Maafa21 documents how the Black community has been targeted with eugenics trough abortion and birth control since the days of slavery and the plot is still being carried out to this day.

Sadly, Life Dynamics also uncovered that Johnson was not without his flaws.

As Life Dynamics points out in the film, during the 1960’s a growing number of civil-rights activists discovered that that “family planning” was a code word for abortion and birth control and that it was being pushed by the government as way to avoid putting money into the black community.

One of those who pushed this plan was the Democrat President, who, in June of 1965, stated that every five dollars the government spent on population control was worth more than a hundred dollars invested in economic growth.

Then, at the urging of Republican Congressman, George Bush, Johnson became the first U.S. president to endorse federal funding for birth control.

LBJ

In 1966, LBJ would also accept Planned Parenthood’s highest award, the Margaret Sanger Award, for his policies pushing family planning on foreign countries.

Sanger founded Planned Parenthood and in her autobiography she discussed a speech she gave at a Ku Klux Klan rally in Silver Lake New Jersey. She bragged about the fact that, afterward, she was invited by 12 other Klan chapters to speak at their events. Sanger wrote that she found the Klan to be an interesting group.

Sanger Klan Planned Parenthood Maafa21 In her Autobiography KKK

It was at about this same time that political leaders from both parties began to increase their demands that aid to the poor – whether abroad or within the United States – be tied to birth control.

In 1965, former Republican President, Dwight Eisenhower, complained that the United States was spending money to slow the population growth of responsible families while at the same time providing financial incentives for ignorant, feebleminded and lazy people to have more babies.

Eisenhower

He said that history would rightly condemn the United States if we didn’t link welfare to family-planning.

At that time, Eisenhower was the co-chairman of a Planned Parenthood fund-raising campaign along with former Democratic President, Harry S. Truman.

And Johnson’s views were apparently shared by his Republican successor as well.

John Ehrlichman, who was an assistant to President Richard Nixon, wrote that Nixon once told him that African-Americans could not really benefit from federal programs because they are genetically inferior to whites.

nixon-blacks-inferior

Later, Nixon would label birth control a national priority and sign legislation to make it available as a service of the U.S. government.

Then in March of 1972, the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future which Nixon had created three years earlier with the help of Congressional Democrats, began calling for the nationwide legalization of abortion.

Commission-on-Poulation-Growth-and-teh-American-future-Maafa21

This excerpt from Maafa21 explains Nixon’s attitude:

Watch Maafa21 in full here.

Although Johnson’s 1964 Civil Rights Act is worthy of celebration today, we should also remember that there is another civil war being waged against an entire class of people going on today, the unborn child in the womb.

Millions of babies have been murdered by abortion since the Supreme Court legalized it in all fifty states back in 1973.

And tragically, today, more Blacks are killed by abortion than by all other causes of death combined.

Since 1973 25 percent black Maafa21

Abortion targets the Black community as Life Dynamics has documented in their report, Racial Targeting and Population Control, which can be read here.

As we celebrate this important day, Crutcher says that we should fight until the Civil Rights of all lives and all Black lives are protected, “Civil Rights matter to everyone not just to those who have escaped the womb,” he said.

___________________

More on LBJ on Saynsumthn blog here.

Black Lives Matter message at pro-life rallies where abortion was mourned

Posted in Black Babies, Black Conservative, Black History Month, Black Lives Matter, March for Life with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 26, 2015 by saynsumthn

While abortion radicals from the communist group Stop Patriarchy tried to shut down Black pro-life events ( read here), Blacks were busy speaking out about how abortion targets their community with Black Genocide.

Black LIves Matter MFL

The following was originally published at the Life Dynamics Blog here!
__________________________________________________________________________________________

This week, as many gathered to mourn the 42nd anniversary of legalized abortion in America, many African Americans spoke up about Black Genocide from abortion in their communities.

Rev. David Young spoke at a pro-life event focusing on “Black Lives Matter — Every Life Matters,” where, according to a story published by New Castle News, Young painted a picture of a centuries-long effort to marginalize and diminish American blacks.

David Young

Young pointed out that African Americans are being targeted with a disproportionately high number of black abortions. The article states:

    Since 1973, when the Supreme Court legalized abortion, 58 million lives — including up to 23 million black infants — were ended by the procedure, Young said.

    I am African American, I know what racism is,” he declared. “But we in the African American community should be just as upset that 23 million of us have been killed by our own people.”

    Young cited statistics showing that although blacks make up just 13 percent of the general population, they have 35 percent of the abortions in America. Similarly, in Pennsylvania, they comprise 11 percent of the population, but in 2013, had 42 percent of the abortions.

    How did such a culture of death infiltrate America?

    The beginning of the answer, he said, goes back to the days of slavery.

What Young said rings true and was documented by Life Dynamics in their film, Maafa21.

EndofSlavery

A teaser published on the Maafa21 website reads, “They were stolen from their homes, locked in chains and taken across an ocean. And for more than 200 years, their blood and sweat would help to build the richest and most powerful nation the world has ever known. But when slavery ended, their welcome was over. America’s wealthy elite had decided it was time for them to disappear and they were not particular about how it might be done. What you are about to see is that the plan these people set in motion 150 years ago is still being carried out today. So don’t think that this is history. It is not. It is happening right here, and it’s happening right now.”

The film goes on to expose the ties that Planned Parenthood’s founder had to eugenics and the real agenda behind the organization.

That may be why, this week, Ryan Bomberger penned an open letter to Planned Parenthood president, Cecile Richards where he asked that they, “Stop Targeting Black Babies in Abortions.

RyanBomberger

Today’s Planned Parenthood isn’t like it was during Margaret Sanger’s days. And you’re right. It’s worse,” Bomberger who founded the Radiance Foundation wrote, “Back then, black communities and other designated “unfit” citizens were targeted with birth control. Today, your blood-soaked abortion empire kills the “unwanted” over 330,000 times a year. Yes, I can already hear you proudly proclaim: “Three percent!” As if killing human beings only 3% of the time is okay. I wonder if the American public would be okay with just 3% of their food tainted with toxic sewage. It’s only three percent,” he said.

Ryan Bomberger published this show vid a year ago to drive home the message “Too Many Aborted

More and more we are witnessing the African American community taking a stand for life and opposing what abortion is doing in their communities.

Since 1973 25 percent black Maafa21

This week, on the anniversary of the law which legalized abortion on demand, we see more Blacks speaking out with the message that “Black Lives Matter even in the womb.

Black LIves Matter even in teh womb MFL 2015

Black Lives Matter Abortion

Black LIves Matter MFL

John Lomperis who writes for the Institute on Religion and Democracy Blog, described his experience at the March for Life in Chicago where he stated that,”among the more memorable signs I saw on our bi-partisan side were “#BlackLivesMatter Begins in the Womb!”

____________________________________________________

Day Gardner, president of the National Black Pro-life Union was on EWTN this week addressing how abortion is devastating the African American Community.

She also said that the Black pro-life community is growing, “We’ve developed a web of Black pro-life organizations. We have a much larger footprint and we are all about saving the lives of as many children as possible and protecting the women.”

We located this interview conducted by Facing Life Head On, with Black lack church leaders, Denise and Brian Walker, who speak openly about how their abortion has affected them.

The couple said the church should be a sanctuary for those facing an unplanned pregnancy. But, they also point out that abortion has affected many within the church, “It’s very real, it’s in the pews and I dare say, it’s in the pulpit. Abortion is not a respecter of persons and it affects leaders, it affects leader’s families and children. And it’s really an opportunity to evangelize. It’s one of those evangelism fields that’s not talked about very much,” Brian stated.

Brian and Denise Walker

Also interviewed was Rev. John Stevenson who addressed the failure of church leaders to speak out on abortion.

John Stevenson

“Unfortunately, we as Christian leaders, have not led with the courage that I believe we now have the opportunity to lead from that says we need to address these issues, we need to stand up for what we believe is right.

2009_0525_01_MG_1582LG

In addition, Life Dynamics’ monthly TV show, Life Talk TV, will have a segment on the black community stand against abortion. Special guest Walter Hoye, will speak about a rally in Oakland, California he organized, which will expose Black Genocide from abortion. The show will be available to view online during the month of February 2015 here.

This week, J. Kenneth Blackwell, who works as a policy board member of the American Civil Rights Union, spoke against abortion in an editorial published by the Washington Times on the 42nd anniversary of Roe V. Wade, which legalized abortion on demand in America.

J Kenneth blackwell

Blackwell wrote,Abortion is the greatest threat to black lives in America today. People who claim to represent the black community while also abetting the black holocaust — abortion — are hypocrites. Any “civil rights leader” who genuinely believes that “black lives matter” should be working to see that every black baby is accorded the very first civil right — the right to life.”

Also from his editorial, entitled, “Aborting black America: The ‘black lives matter’ slogan excludes the unborn

    Today, on the somber anniversary of the Supreme Court’s Roe v. Wade decision, it’s time for black leaders to face up to the real danger threatening black lives in America. It isn’t the police. According to an anti-police brutality organization, the Malcolm X Grassroots Movement, 313 blacks were killed by “police, security guards and vigilantes” in 2013. It isn’t even black criminals, who, as Rudy Giuliani famously pointed out on “Meet the Press,” are responsible for 93 percent of violent deaths among blacks. Sources estimate that between 6,000 and 8,000 blacks are murdered each year.

    No, the greatest danger to blacks is found precisely where we ought to be safest: in our mothers’ wombs. In 2010, the most recent year for which statistics are available, 138,539 black babies were aborted…

    Blackwell BlackLivesMatter

    I’ll say it again: 138,539 black babies, nearly one baby in three, were killed in the womb in 2010. According to the CDC, between 2007 and 2010, innocent black babies were victimized in nearly 36 percent of the abortion deaths in the United States, though blacks represent only 12.8 percent of the population. Some say the abortion capital of America is New York City. According to LifeSiteNews, the city’s Department of Health reported that in 2012, more black babies were aborted (31,328) than born (24,758). That’s 55.9 percent of black babies killed before birth. Blacks represented 42.4 percent of all abortions.

    Legalized abortion is working out exactly as Margaret Sanger intended. Sanger, the founder of the nation’s largest abortion provider, Planned Parenthood, was part of the eugenics movement back in the 1930s. Her goal was to use abortion to cull what she considered inferior races from the human gene pool. According to Sanger, “Colored people are like human weeds and are to be exterminated.” She opened her first abortion clinics in inner cities, and it’s no accident that even today, “79 percent of Planned Parenthood’s abortion facilities are located in black or minority neighborhoods.

Sanger’s vision continues to this day today and Life Dynamics is helping to expose the realities in the black community.

BlackAbNumbers

Life Dynamics’ powerful documentary film, Maafa21, along with brochures and projects have detailed the racist agenda of abortion.

BlackHistoryPoliticiansSlavery ImageHost Screening

This February is Black History Month and Life Dynamics encourages all those opposed to the Black Genocide agenda of abortion to hold a public screening of Maafa21.

Interested persons can contact Life Dynamics for details here.

Planned Parenthood “Heck Yes” to Ginsburg comes on heels of Gruber abortion comments

Posted in Abortion saves taxpayers, Gruber, Maafa21, Mark Crutcher, Planned Parenthood Ginsburg, Planned Parenthood poor care, Planned Parenthood Poor Women, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Saves Taxpayers with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2014 by saynsumthn

On the heels of a video by disgraced ObamaCare architect, Jonathan Gruber who said that abortion would save the taxpayers money because it would basically eliminate the poor, comes Planned Parenthood’s “Heck Yes” on another eugenics leader who said something similar.

No sooner did eugenics documentary and Planned Parenthood history film producer, Mark Crutcher release a statement comparing Jonathan Gruber’s comments on abortion to statements made by Supreme Court Justice and radical abortion advocate Ruth Bader Ginsburg – that – abortion giant Planned Parenthood gave her the “Heck Yes” award.

Planned Parenthood Ginsburg Heck Yes

There were times in 2014 when we just wanted to stand up and give a round of applause,” writes the eugenics founded Planned Parenthood organization,”When people spoke up for women’s health and rights so boldly, so bravely, so perfectly, we couldn’t help but cheer them on. As this year comes to a close, we took a look back with Planned Parenthood Action Fund’s Best and Worst of 2014, and asked you to vote for the top “Heck Yes!” moment of the year.

Drumroll please…
And the Winner Is:
Ruth Bader Ginsburg!

Planned Parenthood continues, “U.S Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg gave us our “Heck Yes!” Moment of the Year for her scathing dissent in the Court’s decision in favor of Hobby Lobby. In June, she wrote that the Court’s ruling — which lets some bosses deny their employees birth control coverage — is so startlingly broad that it can override the health care needs of employees and their dependents across the country.

“There were so many gripping lines from her 35-page dissent it’s hard to pick our favorite. In one of the most ominous, she warned that the precedent being set “would deny legions of women who do not hold their employers’ beliefs access to contraceptive coverage. The Court, I fear, has ventured into a minefield.”

Maafa21 logo

Life Dynamics president, Mark Crutcher writes on his blog, “In 2009, we released Maafa 21 – a 2 hour documentary in which we proved that the legalization of abortion had nothing to do with women’s rights, or choice, or reproductive freedom or any of the other sales pitches you hear from the abortion lobby. The truth is, abortion was legalized as an instrument of eugenics and racial genocide.

RuthBaderGinsberg

“Ironically, within a few months after we released Maafa21, the most radical abortion enthusiast on the U.S. Supreme Court issued a statement to the New York Times that confirmed exactly what we were saying. Ruth Bader Ginsburg stated, “Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”

“Here’s my question: when she said that abortion was legalized to deal with populations we don’t want to have too many of, do you get the feeling she was suggesting that there might be too many rich white people in the world? Or is it possible she might have had some other folks in mind?

And the answer is clear – YES she did. if you want to know who Ginsburg was referring to- watch the film Maafa21 – which is available to view in full on the website http://www.maafa21.com.

Jonathan Gruber CSPAN Hearings Dec 9 2014

Ironically, just yesterday during a Congressional hearing with ObamaCare architect Jonathan Gruber, Kentucky Representative Thomas Massie exposed the very thing that Ginsburg stated in 2009 during his questioning of Gruber.

(Partial Transcript Below: )

MASSIE:I have a question for you have you. Have you had any ethics training at MIT or Harvard ?

GRUBER: I as a condition for receiving federal grants we have to take a human subjects

MASSIE: okay so this is a little bit philosophical what I’m gonna ask you now but you’re doctor of philosophy so to speak. Under what circumstances is it ethical to deceive someone for their own benefit?

GRUBER: Uh…I’m not aware circumstances in which I ..

MASSIE: Could you could you imagine maybe an adult could withhold information from children for their own benefit?

GRUBER: I guess

MASSIE: Now so if you understand that then you understand why my constituents are so offended by your proposition that it’s okay to deceive or obfuscate for somebody’s benefit compounding the insulted you delivered to them is the fact that they pay your salary . Do you did you understand fully why it was so insulting? You patronize them you were condescending.

GRUBER: I was

MASSIE: And my colleagues on the Democrat side of the isle are upset with you simply because you committed candor- you said what you thought- you said what they were all thinking -when they wrote road Obamacare – that they knew what was best for my constituents. I submit to you my constituents are not your children. And they have the right to self-determination. So this gets me to another instance where you commit candor.

In 1997 you co-authored a paper entitled , “Abortion legalization and child living circumstances who was the marginal child?” On page twenty you conclude that abortion legalization appears to be associated with an improvement in the average living circumstances and birth outcomes among a birth cohort and on page 26 you state that your research indicates that the legalization of abortion saved the government fourteen billion dollars in welfare payments through 1994.

Is providing more access to abortion – is that a worthy social outcome to achieve cost savings for the government?

GRUBER: That is uh not what my paper was about. It was a philosophical paper it was about empirical facts…

MASSIE: tell us what you meant by this sentence by 1993 all cohorts under the age 18 were born under legalized abortion and we estimate steady state savings of 1.6 billion dollars per year from positive selection. What did you mean by positive selection? Because in this paper you’re talking about providing more access to abortions to a socio-economic strata of our constituents.

MASSIE: What did you mean by positive selection?

GRUBER: In that paper, we were studying the characteristics of children who were born before and after abortion was legalized. By comparing those characteristics you can infer the characteristics as a ….

MASSIE: So what’s you inferred I find chilling. What you inferred is that if we reduce the number of people of children born life would be better for the rest of us still living. Specifically, you seem to suggest that if we eliminate or reduce the number of poor people that are born this will make life better for all Americans. And this gets me to my final point, which is the Independent Payment Advisory Board, my constituents fear that this is in fact a method by which Obamacare will ration health care for the elderly and therefore implement cost savings for Medicare. So, my question to you is, is your philosophy on abortion, that it can save money and improve outcomes, have any implications in the realm with end of life care? You argue that abortions for poor (?) children raise the average living circumstances in your paper, for the rest of us and save the government money. So, Dr. Gruber, if there are fewer elderly people, particularly poor elderly people, wouldn’t that save a ton of money to? As an economist wouldn’t that would save money too and do you understand the dangerous implications of going down this path?

GRUBER: I have no philosophy of abortion. I have no philosophy of end of life care. My job’s an economist is to deliver the empirical facts ( ??) can make the necessary..

MASSIE: And what would your facts be on the elderly?

GRUBER: I don’t understand the question?

MASSIE: the end of Life Care? Do you advocate that the federal government should ration that?

GRUBER: no I …

MASSIE: as an economist would it save money?

GRUBER: I do not advocate the federal government’s should ration end of life care.

MASSIE: thank you, I yield back.

Crutcher summarized Gruber’s comments well, “Gruber tried bobbing and weaving around Congressman Massie’s questions but, in the end, it was clear his position was that legalized abortion has allowed our country to kill off the children of the poor and, thereby, provide a higher quality of life for those who are still living. In one of his previous writings he had described the victims of abortion as “marginal children” and referred to the process of eliminating them as “positive selection.” During his testimony he refused to define exactly what “positive selection” means, but you’d have to actually be as stupid as Gruber thinks you are not to understand what he was saying.

“So let’s recap. Now we have not one, but two, radical, high-profile, godless abortion supporters, confirming what we documented in Maafa 21. First, Ruth Bader Ginsburg admits that eugenics was the driving force behind the legalization of abortion, and then Jonathan Gruber admits that it’s working exactly as it was intended. And make no mistake, everyone at the top of the abortion lobby food chain has also known that this was the agenda since day one. They know that this issue is about political power, money, race and eugenics, but unlike Ginsburg and Gruber, they don’t go out in the public and talk about it.”

Read Crutcher’s full statements here.

Worth reading is my blog: Margaret Sanger and Ruth Bader Ginsburg : population control a national policy