Archive for Kenneth Edelin

1970’s Commission looks into fetal experimentation and research

Posted in Abortion History, Fetal Development, fetal heartbeat, Fetal Homicide, Fetal Organs, Fetal Pain, fetal Remains, fetal research, Fetal Stem Cell, Fetal Surgery, Fetal Tissue, The Ryan Program with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2018 by saynsumthn

Some abortion survivors were kept alive almost a day for experimentation

Image: 10 week old Fetus kept alive via artificial womb (Image credit: Life Magazine Sep 10, 1965)

In part one of this series on fetal research, Live Action News detailed a number of experiments conducted on living abortion survivors. Due to the outrage over such experiments reported in the media in the 1970s, the National Research Act established the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research. The commission was chaired by Kenneth John Ryan, MD, an abortionist who also taught others how to do abortions.

IMage: Dr. Kenneth Ryan chaired commission on fetal research (Image credit: Harvard Gazette)

Dr. Kenneth Ryan chaired commission on fetal research (Image credit: Harvard Gazette)

A report published by the Harvard Gazette at the time of Ryan’s death states:

 President Jimmy Carter appointed Ken to chair the National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects of Biomedical and Behavioral Research.

…When he became the Chief of Staff at the Boston Hospital for Women in 1973, one year after the Roe vs Wade decision, he established the first abortion service in a university hospital and included training in the necessary skills as a routine part of residency education. In 1975 Ken credentialed and granted admitting privileges to Dr. Kenneth Edelin, an African-American, even as he was under indictment for manslaughter in a politically motivated prosecution for performing a legal abortion at Boston City Hospital.

The Ryan Program, which bears the doctor’s name and partners with Planned Parenthood, was established in 1999 to train OB-GYN residents in abortion.

Dr. Paul Ramsey, a Professor of Religion at Princeton University, also served on the commission. He wrote a lengthy opinion in the section entitled, “Moral Issues in Fetal Research,” criticizing NIH definitions of life and death regarding the preborn child, with good reason:

The answer seems clear enough: the difference between the life and death of a human fetus/abortus should be determined substantially in the same way physicians use in making other pronouncements of death… the 1973 NIH proposed guidelines studiously refuses to speak of the previable fetus as “living” or having “life.” By studiously refusing to speak of a previable fetus/abortus who may still be medically “alive” and by leaving the determination of viability entirely to the discretion of physician researchers (not even excluding abortuses with respiration from being deemed previable and entered into experimentation), the American guidelines can be faulted for lack of definitional clarity. Indeed, if and only if the previable fetus is human, unique for certain purposes, and alive in significant medical respects–i.e., if it is not dead–could claims be made that researchers need the knowledge uniquely to be gained by using the fetus/abortus while it is still living, growing and reacting as a tiny, whole fetal human being or entity.

This national commission was tasked to investigate and study research involving abortion survivors, and to recommend whether and under what circumstances such research should be conducted or supported by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW). Up to this time, the July 1974 “National Research Act” had ruled that the “Secretary may not conduct or support research in the United States or abroad on a living human fetus, before or after the induced abortion of such fetus, unless such research is done for the purpose of assuring the survival of such fetus.”

Report Research on the Fetus

At the time the commission began, a New York Times article detailed how members of the commission had reviewed existing research of human fetuses. Members told the paper that the amount of research already conducted using aborted fetuses was “so substantial as to seem surprising.”

Image: article Hundreds of aborted fetuses delivered outside womb, NYT 1975

Hundreds of aborted fetuses delivered outside womb, NYT 1975

The most controversial form of research the commission found was on the “fetus outside the womb,” involving “fetuses delivered by abortion.” The commission claimed hundreds of reports of such cases had been conducted. Experiments were also conducted on already expired fetuses from spontaneous or induced abortions. Below is a small sample of what the commission found:

  • Physiologic and Metabolic Studies: Fetal hearts, removed just after death of a fetus following hysterotomy abortion, have been studied to establish physiologic response data.
  • Studies of the Pregnant Mother: Women undergoing elective midtrimester abortion have been starved for 87 hours before abortion in an attempt to learn the effects of caloric deprivation on pregnancy and to gain some information as to whether the fetus could adapt to fuels other than glucose.
  • Research With the Previable Fetus Outside the Uterus: To learn whether the human fetal brain could metabolize ketone bodies, brain metabolism was isolated in 8 human fetuses (12-17 weeks’ gestation) after hysterotomy abortion by perfusing the isolated head (the head was separated from the rest of the body). The study demonstrated that, similar to other species, brain metabolism could be supported by ketone bodies during fetal life suggesting avenues of therapy in some fetal disease states.
  • Another technique for studying the ability of the midtrimester fetus to carry out endocrine reactions used 4 fetuses (16-20 weeks’ gestation) immediately after hysterotomy abortion. The fetuses were perfused through their umbilical veins while being housed in a perfusion tank. Fetal tissues were examined at the end of the study.
  • After studies with newborn and fetal mice, cutaneous respiration (breathing through the skin) was studied in 15 fetuses (9-24 weeks’ gestation) from induced abortions. The fetuses were immersed in a salt solution with oxygen at high pressure. The fetuses were judged to be aliveby a pulsating cord or visible heart beat; if necessary the chest was opened to observe the heart. Four fetuses were supported for 22 hours in this attempt at developing a fetal incubator.
  • Seven previable fetuses (200-375 grams) from spontaneous or induced abortions were immersed in a perfusion tank and perfused with oxygenated blood through their umbilical vessels. The fetuses survived and moved for 5-12 hours.

Interestingly, in addition to general experimentation, the commission noted that if the fetus could “feel pain” then experimenting on abortion survivors would not be permissible. Of course, that debate continues to linger despite evidence that they do feel pain.

Still, members were mixed:

The fetus in utero or in process of being aborted provides a more difficult ethical analysis than does the dead fetus or the living viable infant. There is a presumption of viability at any stage in gestation for the living fetus as long as it remains inside the uterus. Thus experimentation involving that fetus must have acceptably low risk of any harmful effect on viability or on the potential for meaningful, healthy life. If the process of abortion has begun, the life of the fetus will soon end. There is debate about whether different standards apply in that situation and we disagree in our own analysis.

One view holds that no risks can be imposed that would not be acceptable for the fetus which was continuing life. Another view will accept an increase in risks if the information is important and alternate ways of obtaining the information are not practical, if the methods of the experiment are acceptable in themselves (i.e., would be used in other classes of human subjects), and if the process of dying for the fetus were not altered in an unacceptable way.

In any event, expected benefits from the experimentation still must be clear and must require the use of the human fetus to gain the desired information. Ethical considerations as to sensory perception by the fetus also must be addressed. We know of no evidence to suggest or support a contention that the fetus at midgestation or earlier, when abortions are performed, is aware of pain or has a psychologic fear of death.

Image: Ban on experimenting on live aborted fetuses (Image credit NYT, April 1975)

Ban on experimenting on live aborted fetuses (Image credit NYT, April 1975)

The commission ultimately drafted several recommendations, including a restriction on experimenting on living abortion survivors. But their report also recommended that research resulting in “no harm to the fetus” be permitted, so long as that research might benefit other fetuses.

Unfortunately, this did not stop the push for the research nor the push to obtain federal funding. According to a historical timeline of fetal research regulations published in a report by the Institute of Medicine:

After the National Commission issued its report (Report and Recommendations: Research on the Fetus), fetal research following abortion was permitted under subsequent [Department of Health Education and Welfare] DHEW regulations for therapeutic reasons, but otherwise held to the standard of “minimal risk.” Minimal risk means that no more potential harm is tolerated than would be encountered in daily life. In the case of a fetus, almost all interventions exceed minimal risk, and the regulations did not distinguish between fetuses that were carried to term and those intended for abortion. The DHEW regulations, however, contained the possibility of waiver of the minimal risk standard on a project-by-project basis by a complicated procedure to be decided ultimately by an Ethics Advisory Board.

Image: article 1975 Ban funding fetal research (Image credit Corpus Christi Times)

1975 Ban funding fetal research (Image credit Corpus Christi Times)

The first Ethics Advisory Board (EAB) was convened in 1978. The sole waiver issued by this body was to test the efficacy of using fetal blood samples for prenatal diagnosis of sickle cell anemia. The charter for the EAB expired in 1980, and despite publication of a draft charter in 1988, it has not been reactivated.

According to CQ Researcher, in 1988, an NIH commission “voted 18–3 to pronounce fetal tissue transplant research ‘acceptable public policy’—a position then unanimously endorsed by the standing advisory committee to the director of the NIH. That advice, however, was rejected in November 1989 by Louis W. Sullivan, the Bush administration’s secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), NIH’s parent department. Sullivan decided instead to extend, indefinitely, the moratorium on NIH funding of fetal tissue research first ordered by the Reagan administration in March 1988. The moratorium barred NIH funding of clinical transplantation studies using tissue from induced abortions.”

However, “The NIH moratorium did not affect privately funded research in the United States.”

Co-chairman on that 1988 NIH panel was none other than Kenneth Ryan, the same abortionist/trainer who chaired the 1970’s commission. When the push for federally funded research failed, Ryan began calling for private funding to experiment on aborted children.

In part three of this series, Live Action News will detail who eventually lifted the ban on federal funding of fetal tissue research and how much taxpayers spend on this research every year.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Dreaded Complication: Infants born alive during abortion haunt abortion profiteers

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 18, 2018 by saynsumthn

The abortion industry would like the public to believe that babies born alive after abortion attempts rarely occur. However, research shows that the so-called abortion live-birth dilemma has been haunting abortion profiteers since the days of legalization.

April 1973, Greater Bakersfield Hospital, Bakersfield, Calif.: A 4 1/2-pound infant was born live following a saline abortion (induced by an injection of salt solution) performed by Dr. Xavier Hall Ramirez. Informed by phone, Dr. Ramirez ordered two nurses to discontinue administering oxygen to the baby. His instructions were countermandated by another doctor; the baby survived and later was placed for adoption.

This above case was one of many highlighted by the Philadelphia Inquirer in a 1981 series entitled The Dreaded Complication.

The Dreaded Complication

Another example from the report described what a Nebraska abortion doctor ordered a nurse, who found a live baby boy crying following a saline abortion attempt, to do. She told the paper the following: “He told me to leave it where it was, just to watch it for a few minutes, that it would probably die in a few minutes.”

In another case from 1974, the paper recounted the prostaglandin abortion of a baby who survived the procedure, only to die later: “One of the nurses said that the baby was alive. They took the baby out of the room. He never did cry, he just made some kind of a noise.”

A young resident was the first doctor to arrive. After detecting a strong heartbeat, she took matters into her own hands. She clamped the umbilical cord and sent the baby to intensive care.

“It was a shock, a totally unique emergency situation, very upsetting to all of us,” the doctor said. “Some people have disagreed with me [about ordering intensive care for an abortion live birth] but that seems to me the only way you can go. It’s like watching a drowning. You act. You don’t have the luxury of calling around and consulting. You institute life-preserving measures first and decide about viability later on.”

In 1989,  Pennsylvania abortion doctor Joseph Melnick was convicted of infanticide after it was proven that a baby he aborted survived the abortion. Hospital staffers where the abortion occurred said that they had detected a heartbeat and saw the baby move and gasp. For this crime, Live Action News contributor Sarah Terzo reported that the judge gave him no fine or jail time – only probation and community service.

By the 1990’s additional incidents of babies surviving abortion were being reported.

In Florida, Miami Right to Life documented the case of a 23-week-old male with Down syndrome, who pro-lifers endearingly named “Baby Special,” after they were contacted by an anonymous caller who claimed she worked at the hospital where the incident occurred. The witness also called the police, telling them that the doctor smothered the baby after it lived through the abortion process.

The report, which was published in the Miami Right to Life’s newsletter just after the incident, said that the medical examiner testified that the autopsy found pockets of air in the baby’s stomach and that the child had taken a breath.

“When a fetus is aborted, sometimes there is some activity in the fetus and you normally don’t do anything. You let the fetus expire. The usual thing is just to take your time, don’t immediately do anything,” the abortionist told authorities. Authorities cleared the doctor saying there was no clear evidence that he smothered the baby.

Image: Baby Born Alive during abortion

Baby Special a Down Syndrome baby who survived abortion attempt

In 1993, a New York abortion doctor was convicted of performing an illegal third-trimester abortion which resulted in him severing the arm of a baby which survived his abortion attempt. The public was horrified by the story, causing the abortion doctor, Dr. Abu Hayat, to be nicknamed the Butcher of Avenue A.

The baby’s 20-year-old mother, Rosa Rodriguez, was estimated to be about eight months pregnant when Hayat began the $1500.00 abortion procedure on her.

Image: Baby born alive during abortion

Ana Rosa Rodriguez baby born alive during abortion with missing arm

According to the Daily News, Rodriguez described being strapped in stirrups and held down by Hayat and his assistants while she begged him to stop the abortion. She testified that she no longer wanted the abortion after Hayat inserted a four-inch needle in her stomach that appeared dirty, and she began hearing women in other rooms screaming.

Hayat was found guilty of assault on Rosa Rodriguez and her baby Ana Rosa.

After the incident, pro-abortion talk show host, Phil Donahue had the child’s mother as well as the injured infant as a guest on his television show where he described the horror of the incident. Despite the fact that Hayat practiced legally, Donahue attempted to spin the story as unrelated to the abortion issue. The truth is that every day, infants are ripped apart limb by limb during abortions – but the majority are not born alive.

In June of 1993, abortionist Abu Hayat was sentenced to prison but was released on parole in 2006. He was discharged from parole supervision in 2009 and his sentence has been officially deemed completed. He tried to have his name changed but a judge refused his request to do so.

Image: Baby Born Alive During Abortion

Ana Rosa Rodriguez lost an arm in a failed abortion attempt

Doctors who perform late-term abortions or any abortion for that matter, often convince themselves that a preborn baby is not a person. This distorted view then is easily transferred onto the child if they survive the abortion attempt. An example of this was seen in an interview with late-term abortionist Kenneth Edelin.

In this discussion taped in the 1990’s, Edelin referred to the preborn child in the womb as a “developing mass of tissue within the woman.”

In the early 1970’s Edelin was charged with manslaughter in the death of a 20 to 24-week old baby boy after an abortion. The prosecution claimed that the Boston abortionist tried to asphyxiate the child inside the mother during a C-section type abortion procedure.

The Boston Globe recounted the case this way:

The abortion, which took place in 1973, began as a routine procedure: the injection of a saline solution that usually causes uterine contractions and the expulsion of the fetus. But several tries were unsuccessful, and Edelin completed the abortion by a surgical procedure known as a hysterotomy — making a small incision in the uterus, like a cesarean section, and detaching the fetus from the placental wall by hand.

A photo of the child preserved in formaldehyde was shown to the jurors.

“It looked like a baby,” a juror in the original case told the Associated Press. “[…] it definitely had an effect on me.”

The photo was called inflammatory by the defense, but it had already had an effect on the jury. Edelin’s lawyers argued that since the child was in the uterus, a “person” had never existed, so therefore a person had never died. Edelin was convicted, but it was later overturned.

Edelin, who died in 2013 has been called a hero by Planned Parenthood.

Perhaps the most famous abortion survivor is Melissa Ohden. In 1977, Ohden survived a saline abortion at seven months gestation. In 2012 she formed The Abortion Survivors Network and now works to educate the public on the realities of abortion and how often babies survive the attempt on their lives.

Gianna Jessen also survived a saline abortion and has shared her survival story through speeches and testimonials before the government.

Abortionists don’t want people to know that babies survive abortions, but each of these individuals proves that life really does begin before birth. It is the duty of each of us to respect those lives and allow them the right to be lived.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Late term Abortionist Kenneth Edelin dies at 74 years old

Posted in Abortionist, Abortionist and Live Birth, Dreaded Complication with tags , , , , , , , , on December 31, 2013 by saynsumthn

Photo Convicted Ab Doc
Kenneth C. Edelin, a Boston physician whose 1975 manslaughter conviction for performing a legal abortion was overturned on appeal in a landmark test of medical, legal, religious and political questions surrounding #abortion in the United States, died Monday in Sarasota, Fla. He was 74. More in the Boston Globe here http://tinyurl.com/mjbwcb9

For his role – proJezebel Edelin Hero-abortion groups hailed the late term abortionist a HERO

Kenneth-EdelinAccording to the NY Times, Edelin was charged with causing the death of the fetus of an unwed 17-year-old during an elective abortion in her sixth month of pregnancy. In a six-week trial in Boston that explored uncharted legal ground and made headlines across the country, Edelin, who was black, was vilified as a baby-killer and defended as a victim of racial and religious prejudice being tried for an action that had never been defined as a crime: killing a fetus that may or may not have been a “person,” and whose rights had never been specified by law.

The abortion, which took place in 1973, began as a routine procedure: the injection of a saline solution that usually causes uterine contractions and the expulsion of the fetus. But several tries were unsuccessful, and Dr. Edelin completed the abortion by a surgical procedure known as a hysterotomy — making a small incision in the uterus, like a cesarean section, and detaching the fetus from the placental wall by hand.

Edelin Conviction Overturned

Kenneth Edelin, who remains a hero to the abortion rights movement, was found guilty of manslaughter when, during a hysterotomy abortion performed in a hospital operating room (basically a c-section performed with the intent to ensure the death, rather than the survival, of the baby), Edelin reached into the womb, detached the placenta, and watched the clock, waiting to make sure the baby was dead before removing him from the uterus. Edelin’s conviction was overturned on appeal.

“Nobody likes to do abortions,” Edelin told The New York Times in 1975, “but the least we can do is make it safe and humane.”