Archive for John Rockefeller

How many women died from illegal abortions prior to Roe v. Wade?

Posted in Abortion death, Abortion Death List, Abortion History, CDC, Illegal abortion, Planned Parenthood Employee with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 28, 2017 by saynsumthn

Pro-abortion professor testifies against Heartbeat Bill using bogus, debunked abortion statistics

Prior to the legalization of abortion, those who sought to legally end the lives of preborn children falsely marketed their position by claiming that women were dying by the thousands (and even millions) from illegal abortions. However, there is absolutely no evidence to back up those figures.

Despite this, those figures continue to be repeated by abortion advocates any time they sense that the so-called “right” to abortion is potentially in jeopardy.

A pro-abortion professor, testifying under oath before Congress, unfortunately used these disputed and highly suspect statistics regarding the number of women who died from illegal abortions in an effort to oppose the federal pro-life Heartbeat bill, HR490, which proposes to stop abortions at a point when it can be documented that the preborn child’s heartbeat can be detected:

Prof Priscilla Smith testifies HR490 Heartbeat abortion bill

In her testimonyProfessor Priscilla Smith claimed that 5,000 women died annually from illegal abortions prior to Roe v. Wade:

Women have been obtaining abortions since the beginning of time, before Roe when abortions were illegal… An estimated 1.2 million women each year still resorted to illegal abortion in the US. As many as 5000 of these women — already born – living, breathing, lungs working, hearts beating, women, many with children at home who depended on them — 5,000 of them died each year as a result of illegal abortions and many more were severely injured. This is the world we would return to if HR490 went into effect….

But the facts don’t agree with Smith’s claims. A 1975 report by National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, entitled, “Legalized Abortion and the Public Health: Report of a Study,” disputes these statistics (emphasis added):

It is difficult to find credible estimates of the number of deaths associated with illegal abortion. One estimate, which has been frequently quoted, is between 5,000 and 10,000 deaths per year. That is hardly plausible, considering that the total number of deaths of women aged 15-44 from all causes in the United States is approximately 50,000 annually, and the total number of deaths due to abortion reported by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) has been below 500 since 1958 and below 100 since 1971.

The 5,000 figure originates from a piecemeal of several sources based largely on assumptions, and comes straight from the largest abortion lobby group in the nation: National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL.)  NARAL’s footnote quotes from a source that allegedly “discussed Dr. Christopher Tietze’s estimate of nearly 8,000 deaths from illegal abortion annually in the United States.” The truth is that Tietze disputed the 5,000 to 10,000 number, as did records of maternal deaths reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) in the years just prior to national legalization.

NARAL Footnotes on illegal abortion deaths

In fact, in Lawrence Lader’s book “Abortion,” also sourced, he clearly states, “Tietze places the figure nearer 1,000.” But, as Dr. John C. Willke explains in the video below, that trend decreased over time:

Tietze was a senior consultant to the Center for Policy Studies of the Population Council, a radical organization founded by John D. Rockefeller III. That organization’s second president was Frederic Osborn, a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. (Osborn may have coined Planned Parenthood’s “Every Child a Wanted Child” slogan, and once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.”)

In 1967, Dr. Tietze, who was speaking at a conference on abortion sponsored by the Harvard Divinity School and Joseph P. Kennedy Jr. Foundation, called the 5,000 illegal abortion deaths, “unmitigated nonsense,” according to a September 13, 1967 article in the Berkshire Eagle.  The paper went on to give substantially fewer numbers by Tietze, writing, “The known deaths attributed to abortion in 1964 were 247 and he thinks it is fairly safe to estimate that the real figure may be double that, even a little more, but certainly no more than a thousand.” Note that Dr. Tietze was no pro-lifer: In 1973, he was awarded Planned Parenthood’s infamousMargaret Sanger Award, named after a eugenicist who gave at least one speech to the Ku Klux Klan.

The Kingsport News reported on that same conference, pointing out that Tietze disputed the reported illegal abortion totals, which some claimed ranged from 200,000 to 1.2 million annually. The paper quotes Tietze as saying, “we have no real basis for guessing which extreme is closer to the truth.”

Tietze disputes illegal abortion deaths, 1967

Tietze, who favored abortion on demand, also opined that legalizing abortion would “not have a big impact on mortality.”

The Register, a Virginia paper, notes in its article entitled, “Supporters of Liberal Abortion Laws use Inflated Statistics, Expert says,” that Tietze suggested that the larger numbers (5,000 to 10,000) were made up to scare politicians into legalizing abortion. “The higher estimates are made by people who feel in order to raise sympathy for liberalized abortion laws they have to make people afraid.”

Tietze Illegal Abortion Deaths Inflated 1967

Tietze Illegal Abortion Deaths Inflated 1967 b

Tietze was right.

Dr. Bernard Nathanson, one of the early founders of NARAL (then known as the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws), revealed that he and his colleagues fabricated the large numbers of deaths from illegal abortion in an attempt to sway public opinion toward making abortion legal.

In his book, “The Abortion Papers,” Dr. Nathanson admitted that the 5,000 to 10,000 figure which was fed “to the public and the media in the late 1960’s,” was fabricated because it was a “nice, round, shocking figure.” And, just like they do today, the media — willingly and with no documentation — repeated that figure with no demand for proof.

However, there was data available, and it didn’t support those fabricated figures.

On October 19, 1959, Mary S. Calderone, a medical director of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, presented a paper before the Maternal and Child Health Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA) at the Eighty-Seventh Annual Meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey, where she also gave far fewer numbers than Professor Smith:

In 1957 there were only 260 deaths in the whole country attributed to abortions of any kind. In New York City in 1921 there were 144 abortion deaths, in 1951 there were only 15; and, while the abortion death rate was going down so strikingly in that 30-year period, we know what happened to the population and the birth rate.

In 1967, New York Assemblyman, Albert Blumenthal, who sponsored a law to legalize abortion that year, was quoted by the media as claiming that between 35 and 60 deaths from illegal abortions were reported in New York City annually. That same year, an Illinois Health Director by the name of Dr. Herbert Ratner called the 5,000 to 10,000 figure “outlandish,” noting, “This hardly leaves room for deaths from other causes.”

1967 article Illegal abortion Chicago Tribune

Dr. Ratner also correctly warned that the liberalization of abortion, which he called “exterminative medicine,” would start a dangerous trend in medicine — a prophetic insight America has sadly seen come true.

By 1969, the very first abortion surveillance report was published by the Centers for Disease Control, noting a “lack of accurate incidence, prevalence, morbidity and mortality data” on abortion. At that time, five states had passed abortion legislation and 24 others had bills under review. According to this same CDC report, in 1966, the National Center for Health Statistics reported 189 maternal deaths from abortion complications.  And, while no one would diminish those numbers, they are a far cry from the 5,000 touted by Professor Smith.

By 1970, the CDC reported that in just a six month period (July to December), out of sixteen reported abortions in New York City, eight women — yes, HALF — had died from legal (not illegal) abortions. In total, the 1970 report states that 25 women died in New York City (where abortion had been liberalized), and eleven of those were from illegal abortions. The report also noted that Black and Puerto Rican women suffered higher legal abortion mortality rates.

According to that CDC document, “although there was substitution of legal for illegal abortion deaths, no significant decrease in total abortion mortality occurred following institution of the new law….”

CDC Abortion Deaths, 1970

In 1972, the year prior to national legalization, CDC reports revealed that deaths from illegal abortion were nothing close to Professor Smith’s 5,000 figure. In this table from the CDC report (shown below), just 39 women died from illegal abortion in 1972 while 24 died from legal abortion.

CDC Abortion deaths 1972 to 1990

Live Action News previously documented that the majority of illegal abortions were performed by physicians, and many of those same doctors went on to perform legal abortions, some of whom have seriously injured and even killed women. But, today, instead of protecting the women who are being butchered or are dying from legal abortion, advocates like Professor Smith spew made up numbers from the illegal abortion days.

It would appear that abortion advocates do not actually care about the safety of women or even about real statistics; they care only about legalizing abortion at any cost.

Group that brought abortion pill to US has eugenics history

Posted in Abortion pill, American Eugenics Society, Bernard Berelson, Eugenics, Every Child a Wanted Child, Frank Notestein, Frederick OSborn, Guttmacher, Population Council, RU-486 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

The Population Council has a shocking 65-year history, and it’s nothing to celebrate

(From Live Action News)

John D Rockefeller-founded Population-Council

The Population Council, the eugenics organization credited with bringing the abortion pill RU-486 to the United States, turns 65 this month — but it is nothing to celebrate.

In 1952, John D. Rockefeller III founded the Population Council and served as the organization’s first president.  According to the Rockefeller Foundation, the Population Council, Inc., was incorporated following Rockefeller’s Conference on Population Problems, “…to stimulate, encourage, promote, conduct and support significant activities in the broad field of population.”

Like its founder, the Population Council’s other members were concerned about population issues — and, like other population organizations such as Planned Parenthood, high ranking Population Council leaders were well connected to the eugenics movement.

Frederick Osborn

 

Frederic Osborn followed Rockefeller as Population Council president in 1957. Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in April of 1938. Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan, “Every Child a Wanted Child,” may have originated with Osborn. It is no wonder that Osborn also said that “Birth Control and abortion are turning out to be the great eugenic advances of our time.”

Frank W Notestein

Frank W. Notestein followed Osborn as president in 1959. Like Osborn, he was member of the American Eugenics Society and as the American Philosophical Society, according to a biography published by Princeton University. He was also one of the organization’s original four trustees, according to the Population Council’s 1957 Annual Report.

In 1939, Notestein and Osborn served together on the Medical Advisory Board for Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Federation. By 1967, under Notestein’s leadership, the Population Council released a controversial film, entitled “Family Planning,” which featured Disney’s iconic cartoon figure Donald Duck. It was one of many efforts in the 1960s and ’70s to indoctrinate the culture on the use of birth control.

By 1970, Notestein was serving on the Board of Directors of Planned Parenthood-World Population.

Bernard Berelson

Bernard Berelson took the helm of Population Council in 1968, as its fourth president. A year later, in 1969, Berelson published an article which suggested that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods. The article was published in the journal, “Studies in Family Planning,” published by the Population Council. Berelson was also featured in the Population Council’s first issue of “Population and Development Review.”

 

Alan F. Guttmacher, M.D. sat on the Population Council’s first Medical Advisory Board. Guttmacher, a former Planned Parenthood president, was also vice president of the American Eugenics Society. His ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger, who made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics. Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute, would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.

Alan Guttmacher, president of past Planned Parenthood (screenshot: CBS news)

Thomas Parran, Jr. was on the original Population Council’s board of trustees. On paper, he has a very distinguished career, having been named the nation’s sixth U.S. Surgeon General, building support for the passage of Social Security as well as the establishment of the World Health Organization. His name even appeared on the public health building of the University of Pittsburgh as “one of the giants of 20th-century medicine.”

Thomas Parran (Photo: NIH/NLM)

But according to USA Today, “Parran’s legacy was tainted in 2010, when the U.S. government apologized to Guatemala for the syphilis experiments that exposed 1,308 men, women and children to syphilis without consent from 1946 to 1948. Parran approved of the experiments, conducted by U.S. Public Health Service physician John Cutler.” (Cutler and his wife Eleise contributed to the Population Council and Cutler’s wife admitted that she served on the board of Planned Parenthood.)

Earlier this year, Philly.com reported that Parran was suspected of being the “intellectual inspiration of the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Study”:

Regrettably, Parran’s great work, impressive resume, and proud legacy are besmirched by his ethical violations. The truth of his association with horrendous experiments using impoverished Alabama sharecroppers, federal prison inmates, and an array of vulnerable subjects in Guatemala who were purposefully infected with syphilis were already known. But newly discovered evidence disclosing his role as the architect of the Tuskegee study may have caused his already troubling case to reach the tipping point…

Pitt trustees now must confront evidence showing Parran was more than a distant bureaucrat during the Tuskegee study. New documents disclose that Parran believed the African American population of Macon County, Ala., was perfect for a nontreatment exercise. “If one wished to study the natural history of syphilis in the Negro race uninfluenced by treatment,” Parran wrote in January 1932, “this county would be an ideal location for such a study.”

Eugenics founded Guttmacher praises Eugenics founded Population Council which turned 65

The Rockefeller family has long been connected to eugenics. According to author Rebecca Messall, “Rockefeller money funded eugenic scientists decades before Hitler put eugenic theories into practice.”

Rockefeller eugenics (image: New York Times)

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

Black added, “In May 1926, Rockefeller awarded $250,000 to the German Psychiatric Institute of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, later to become the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Psychiatry. Among the leading psychiatrists at the German Psychiatric Institute was Ernst Rüdin, who became director and eventually an architect of Hitler’s systematic medical repression.” (NOTE: In 1933, Rüdin’s call for racial purity was published in Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Review. According to the documentary film, Maafa21, Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws.)

Rockefeller III once claimed that birth control was “directly related to the matter of meaningful peace.”

In her review of the book, “Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population,” written by Columbia University historian Matthew Connelly, C-Fam author Susan Yoshihara, Ph.D, discovered what led up to Rockefeller’s founding of the Population Council:

John D Rockefeller III (Image: Rockefeller Foundation)

In 1952, at a secret, invitation-only gathering in Colonial Williamsburg, John D. Rockefeller III brought together what would become the modern population control establishment. Setting the agenda for the following decades were the heads of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, National Academy of Sciences, and top scientists “from embryology to economics,” including past and present Nobel Prize winners.

From verbatim transcripts of the “Conference on Population Problems,” just one of the countless number of such meetings the book exposes, Connelly found that what drove them were the questions of how many people the world could hold along with “whether ‘industrial development should be withheld’ from poor, agrarian countries like India.” By decreasing mortality and encouraging “breeding,” development would increase inferior populations and further degrade “the genetic quality of the human race.” They decided radical measures to reduce birthrates were justified in order to save “Western Civilization” from being dragged down by the growing humanitarian demands of Third World countries.

Thus was born the Population Council, which would in turn become the nexus of the entire population control movement, going on to coordinate the work of the United Nations, the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) – founded three weeks later – as well as major pharmaceutical firms.

In 1994, with the encouragement of the Clinton administration, french pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf assigned the US rights of marketing and distribution of abortion pill RU-486 to the Population Council. The right to distribute the harmful drugs were later handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.

In 2015, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report found that from fiscal year 2010 through 2012, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) reported sending about $236 million to six organizations and their affiliates and member associations: Advocates for Youth, Guttmacher Institute, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA), the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), and the Population Council.

Today, abortion remains among the Population Council’s strategic priorities, according to its latest annual report.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Population control film produced by Walt Disney: children in large families ‘sickly and unhappy’

Posted in Bernard Berelson, Disney, Frederick OSborn, John D Rockefeller, Population Control, Population Council with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 25, 2017 by saynsumthn
screen shot from film

A newly discovered 1960’s video produced by Walt Disney Productions promotes “family planning” propaganda as a way to solve overpopulation and enter into the utopia that can only be attained by having smaller families.  The company known for animated cartoons was started in 1923 by Walt Disney and his brother Roy O. Disney.  In 1966, a year prior to the film’s release, Walt Disney died, leaving his brother Roy in charge.  The controversial film, entitled Family Planning was released in December of 1967 and produced in association with the Population Council, which advocates abortion.

Walt Disney Production produces FP film with Population Council

The Population Council is credited with bringing the abortion pill RU486 to the United States. The organization was founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller 3rd.

News Disney Family Planning film

Frederic Osborn, a founding member of the American Eugenics Society became the group’s second president in 1957. Osborn, who once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics,” signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood” published in her Birth Control Review in April of 1938, as Live Action News has previously documented.

Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

In 1969, Population Council’s president, Bernard Berelson, published an article suggesting that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods.

The Population Council brags about their Disney collaboration on their website’s timeline noting the film has been translated into 25 languages.

Disney film Family Planning with Population Council

The propaganda film features Disney’s iconic animated character, Donald Duck who introduces the alleged gloom of having a large family. Children, in smaller sized families are “healthy and happy and go to school to gain an education,” the film states, as if, children of large families are unhealthy, unhappy, and uneducated.

The mother of a smaller sized family doesn’t “have to work too hard and stays healthy and happy,” producers of the film go on to claim.

The propaganda film begins by referring to the “Common Man” who “by nature” is “one of the animals.” It states:

But he has something the rest do not have, human intelligence and the ability to reason and plan ahead. Other animals are at the mercy of the world around them. But by his ability to reason man has learned to improve his life.

Donald Duck narrates Family Planning film

In what they call an “upward rise” of man, the film’s narrator claims that man is being held back by increased numbers:

But this upward rise is being slowed by the sheer weight of numbers. The family of man is increasing at an astonishing rate. Almost doubling every generation. Ironically, this too comes about through man’s intelligence.

The film takes a slight Malthusian look at population growth blaming the increase in population on medical advances.

“The number of people in the community remained about the same for many generations,” it says. “There was almost a balance. A balance between the large number of babies born each year and the large number of people who died.”

The film credits, disease, epidemics, and famine with the death of earlier generations, until,  “[…] in the space of a single generation, man began to change these conditions. There was great progress in medical science.”

Donald Duck family planning film

Adding, that now (in 1967):

There are still about the same number of babies being born each year but, today, deaths are cut in half, or better especially among children. The old balance is upset. Those who live now, instead of dying, are added each year to the number of people in the community.

The film indoctrinates its viewers that a “happy family” is one with a modest number of children while large families basically starve with “no money for modern conveniences. […] The mother will have too much to do. She’ll be tired and cross and her health will suffer. The children will be sickly and unhappy with little hope for the future.”

This was the attitude Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger once advocated when she suggested that parents get a license to parent.

License to Breed Margaret Sanger

In Sanger’s“A License for Mothers to Have Babies” with the subtitle, “A code to stop the overproduction of children,” she writes:

Permits for parenthood shall be issued upon application by city, county, or State authorities to married couples, providing the parents are financially able to support the expected child, have the qualifications needed for proper rearing of the child, have no transmissible diseases, and on the woman’s part, no medical indication that maternity is likely to result in death or permanent injury to health.

Sanger later told journalist Mike Wallace, “I think the greatest sin in the world is bringing children into the world — that have disease from their parents.”

In their January 1968 edition of the publication Studies in Family Planning, Population Council explained why they produced the film:

Throughout the world there is great need for more energetic programs of information and education on family planning. As we have deliberated about the problem, we have considered that one of the most familiar, most popular, and most effective materials for mass exposure is the animated cartoon; and certainly among the leading producers of this form is the Walt Disney organization. Accordingly, the Council authorized the Disney studios to prepare a short color cartoon, featuring Donald Duck, that deals with the desirability of family planning. In addition to the talent and reputation of the Disney studio in this field, the Disney style is familiar throughout the world and its identification with wholesome family life is well-known.

The film is called “Family Planning.” […] The film is designed primarily for men and women of reproductive age in the developing countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin America, and we have reason to believe that it will be utilized in the United States as well.

The goal of the film is then laid out in the article:

The film will, we hope, help to develop attitudes favorable to the small family norm; […] stimulate discussion of the matter; and, importantly, help to legitimate the very concept and practice of family planning throughout the developing world.

PP Children by Choice Not Chance

To no one’s surprise, Disney’s film captured a version of Planned Parenthood’s oft repeated “every child a wanted child” slogan, mentioned previously as attributed to Osborn.

“This picture can be true for complex families if the number of children born is left to chance! ” the film says.

And the solution?

Today things have changed,” the film explains, “modern science has given us a key that makes possible a new kind of personal freedom – family planning!”

“Family Planning” is key according to Disney film

It’s pure bliss in Disney’s family planning world and there is no mention in the film about the complications of birth control, the unpredictability of pregnancy or the effectiveness of each family planning method.

Nor is there any mention of whether some “family planning” methods could be abortive.

Nope.

Just rainbows and unicorns and of course, Donald Duck and the promise of miraculous results because allegedly “[family planning] improves the health of mother and children” and, as the propaganda film claims, “both are better off if children are not born too close together.”

And, as a reward, for limiting your children you will have room for “modern conveniences.”

Disney Family Planning for Modern conveniences

The film ends with the concept that family planning will somehow usher in a utopia world which benefits all of society:

[…] if enough couples choose family planning the balance will be restored. But, this time in a better way. Thus, every couple has the opportunity to help build a better life not just for themselves but for people everywhere. And, all of us have a responsibility toward the family of man, including you.

The film is one of many efforts in the 1960’s and 70’s to indoctrinate the culture on the use of birth control. It was sold by Planned Parenthood in certain areas, but went out of production in 1988 because of decreasing demand, according to a report by the Population Research Institute.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.