Archive for Jet magazine

Civil rights activist Dick Gregory: Abortion is Black ‘genocide’

Posted in Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Neighborhood, Black pro-life leaders, Civil Rights, Dick Gregory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2017 by saynsumthn

|  (From Live Action News)

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Comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory died August 19, 2017, and although he is best known for his humor, the satirist once called out government-funded abortion and birth control as a genocide effort targeting the Black community.

Gregory was the father of eleven children but tragically, one of his children died as an infant. He often used his humor to touch on the social ills of the day, and as a result, many white people attended his comedy events. He became a strong voice in the Black community during the tumultuous times of the 1960’s and 70’s during the African American civil rights struggle.

In 1967, Gregory joined more than 1,100 Black delegates for the First National Conference on Black Power where he along with others in the group adopted a black power manifesto that called for the “refusal to accept birth control programs on the basis that they seek to exterminate Negroes,” among other demands, according to a July 24, 1967, New York Times report obtained by Live Action News.

In the Journal of Social History, researcher Simone M. Caron described the view just after that conference saying, “The following year, the Third Annual National Conference on Black Power in Philadelphia called on all blacks to ‘resist the increasing genocidal tendencies of American society.’ Resistance ranged from a small California group called Efforts to Increase Our Size (EROS) to groups in Pittsburgh and Cleveland that protested Planned Parenthood programs to the ultramilitant group in New York known as the Five Percenters. These organizations asked two main questions: ‘Is birth control just a “white man’s plot” to “contain” the black population?’ and ‘Is it just another scheme to cut back on welfare aid or still another method of “keeping the black man down”?’ An editorial in The Thrust questioned why blacks could not get a free aspirin for a headache ‘yet when you’re a Black woman old enough to look sexy you can get a truck loaded down with control pills free. . . . The whole plot makes Hitler look like a Boy Scout.’”

The following year (1968) Gregory ran for president of the United States on the “peace and freedom” ticket calling the two-party system “corrupt and immoral.”

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine: Abortion is Genocide

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion is Genocide

Then, in 1971, Gregory penned a controversial Op-ed piece entitled, My Answer to Genocide, which was published in Ebony Magazine.

Gregory, like many other Black leaders of his day, believed that large families were important to the Black power struggle of their time. And, the civil rights activist perceived that the government might be attempting to limit the Black population through their funding of abortion and birth control.

This idea that abortion and birth control were plots to exterminate African Americans was not new.

In fact, there were many prominent African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, Samuel Yette, Fannie Lou Hamer, Whitney Young and more who were suspicious of government programs that pushed “family planning”, especially those that were placed within Black communities.

That suspicion appears to have had merit.

Research shows that family planning centers and abortion facilities often set up their locations in or near minority communities. In addition, the largest provider of abortions, Planned Parenthood, was founded by a radical advocate of racist eugenics who spoke with the Klu Klux Klan. And, Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go well beyond their founder Margaret Sanger, as Live Action has reported previously.

Today, with Planned Parenthood receiving half a billion in government dollars every year to promote their agenda, not only is the abortion corporation’s market share of abortions increasing, but nationally Black abortions are at frighteningly high levels as well.

In the Ebony article, Gregory begins by criticizing “planned parenthood groups” that call for people to only have 2.5 children.

He dismissed the terminology that claimed a preborn person was merely a fraction of a human to the way Blacks were described during slavery as “three-fifths” human:

My answer to genocide, quite simply is eight Black kids – and a another baby on the way […]

Now planned parenthood groups are saying that a couple should have a maximum of 2 1/2 children. I’m still trying to figure out that half a kid. I know my American history well enough to know what ‘three-fifths’ of a man is, but half-a-kid?

 

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion Genocide article

Gregory, who was born into a poor family, denounces birth control as something that “goes against Nature,” writing:

Can you believe that human beings are the only creatures who would ever consider developing birth control pills? You mention contraception to a gorilla and he will tear your head off.

Although Gregory’s humor is weaved throughout his piece, he is clear about the seriousness of genocide or as he also called it “subtle forms of genocide.” He said:

Genocide has come to mean, acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group as such; by killing members of the group […] imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group […]

Like many Black leaders today, Gregory pointed to a host of ills facing the Black community including police brutality, segregation, the KKK, poverty, and war. But of genocidal measures to “prevent births” within a group, Gregory wrote in Ebony:

There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.

In November of 1971, following the birth of Gregory’s ninth child, Jet Magazine pointed again to the civil rights leaders opposition to planned parenthood groups:

Dick Gregory opposed planned parenthood. Jet Magazine November 1971

At the time, Gregory’s colleague Jesse Jackson shared his views and decried abortion.

In 1971, during public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, the Rev. Jesse Jackson warned that, “Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove ( and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives, will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation[…]”

(Source: Statements at public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future as quoted in: Genocide? Birth Control and the Black American by Robert G. Weisbord, Greenwoor Press, 1972; P. 165)

In 1973, Jesse Jackson stated, “Abortion is genocide,in a Jet Magazine interview.

In that Jet Magazine, Mar 22, 1973, article Jackson added:

“Anything growing is living…If you got the thrill to set the baby in motion and you don’t have the will to protect it, you’re dishonest…You try to avoid reproducing sickness. You try to avoid reproducing deformities. But you don’t try to stop reproducing and procreating human life at its best. For who knows the cure for cancer won’t come out of some mind of some Black child?”

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

Jesse Jackson Dick Gregory oppose abortion Winnipeg Free Press 1975

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

According to the media outlet, the Black activists told the group that, “that the nation’s pro-abortion mentality undermines the value and dignity of every human life and that ‘killing babies’ is symptomatic of a civilization
and culture which operates without sacred absolutes.”

Upon news of Gregory’s death, CNN described his first-hand experience with injustice:

In a 1963 protest in which Gregory participated in Birmingham, Alabama, he was arrested and beaten by the police for championing the right of blacks to vote. After that incident, Gregory wrote, ‘It was just body pain, though. The Negro has a callus growing on his soul, and it’s getting harder and harder to hurt him there.’

Like a majority of dishonest media which support abortion, CNN failed to mention Gregory’s opposition to the horrific taking of human life in the womb.

But, stats do not lie, and sadly, reported abortion numbers in the Black and minority communities ring of a certain confirmation about the concerns Gregory and Jackson had.

As a result, the numbers of abortions performed on minorities and specifically Black women remain disproportionately high. As Live Action News has previously documented, in 2011, the CDC revealed that almost 56% of all abortions reported for race were committed on minority women.

 

The CDC’s 2012 report (dated November 27, 2015) reveals that 55% of abortions reported for race/ethnicity were performed on Black or Hispanic women.

The latest numbers for 2013 (published in 2016) show those numbers remained relatively the same (54.6%).

While Dick Gregory is rightly remembered for his many accomplishments, it is doubtful the news media will discuss how his suspicions about birth control and abortion proved to be true.

After all, if government-funded abortion and birth control are, in fact, genocide against Black community, then why does the media remain supportive of forced taxpayer dollars to such agendas?

And, more importantly, why does Congress continue to fund Planned Parenthood?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

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Jesse Jackson Calls ObamaCare Repeal Efforts ‘Creeping Genocide’ used to call abortion ‘Genocide’

Posted in Abortion, Black Genocide, Health Care, Jesse Jackson, Obama with tags , , , , , , , , on November 11, 2010 by saynsumthn

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Dear Jesse- You Used to call Planned Parenthood, birth control and abortion – GENOCIDE !

In an interview with JET MAGAZINE you said – QUOTE, ABORTION IS GENOCIDE!” ( Jet Magazine: Mar 22, 1973 P 15)

Contraceptives will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation.” Jesse Jackson, 1971


Jesse Jackson once phrased the issue this way, “In the abortion debate one of the crucial questions is when does life begin. Anything growing is living. Therefore human life begins when the sperm and egg join and drop into the fallopian tube and the pulsation of life take place. From that point, life may be described differently (as an egg, embryo, fetus, baby, child, teenager, adult), but the essence is the same. The name has changed but the game remains the same…Another area that concerns me greatly, namely because I know how it has been used with regard to race, is the psycholinguistics involved in this whole issue of abortion. If something can be dehumanized through the rhetoric used to describe it, then the major battle has been won. So when American soldiers can drop bombs on Vietnam and melt the faces and hands of children into a hunk of rolling protoplasm and in their minds say they have not maimed or killed a fellow human being something terribly wrong and sick has gone on in that mind. That is why the Constitution called us three-fifths human and then whites further dehumanized us by calling us “niggers.” It was part of the dehumanizing process. The first step was to distort the image of us as human beings in. order to justify that which they wanted to do and not even feel like they had done anything wrong. Those advocates of taking. life prior to birth do not call it killing or murder; they call it abortion. They further never talk about aborting a baby because that would imply something human. Rather they talk about aborting the fetus. Fetus sounds less than human and therefore can be justified.

Jesse- you were NOT Alone: The clip below is from the powerful documentary: Maafa21

In 1983– A study conducted in Waller County , Texas, which had a 52% Black population rate, The study found that a substantial percentage of the respondents indicated agreement with each of the following genocidal statements:

1. As the need for cheep labor goes down, there will be efforts to reduce the size of the Black population; (69.5% agreed)
2. As Blacks become more militant, there will be efforts to reduce the size of the Black Population; (62.6% agreed),
3. Survival of Black people depends on increasing the number of Black births; (55.8% agreed)
4. Birth control programs are a plot to eliminate Blacks; (45.3% agreed)
5. Abortions are a plot to eliminate Blacks. (42.6% agreed)

( SOURCE: Genocidal Fears in a Rural Black Community : An Empirical Examination, by Walter C. Farrell, Jr. ; Marvin P. Dawkins; and John Oliver, Journal of Black Studies, (Vol. 14, No. 1. ( Sep., 1983) pp. 49-67)

The findings reveal that fears of genocide were present among Blacks as late as 1984 and today those fears are a reality !

Maafa21 : New film exposes Eugenics and Black Genocide from Abortion

On June 11,1970, The Black Caucus issued a statement of withdraw from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment, It read: “ The Black Caucus has withdrawn from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment because of unmistakably clear evidence that the purpose of this conference is to use these delegates invited to legitimize a preconceived vicious plan of extermination. This plan is one of systematic reduction of a specific population, namely Blacks, other non-whites, the American poor and certain non-white and ethnic immigrants.” The statement was presented to a Press Conference by Felton Alexander, National Urban League and chairman of the Black Caucus and Dr. Alyce Gullattee, Psychiatrist from Washington D.C. ( SOURCE: Black Caucus Statement in withdrawing from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment : June 11,1970, located in the Planned Parenthood Federation Papers, Black Attitudes from 1962, copied from the Sophie Smith Collection, Sophie Smith College , Box 107/Folder 11:)

The birth control pill was introduced at a time when scientists such as Arthur Jensen and William Shockley were promoting genetic explanations of racial differences in intelligence-test scores. During the 1960s and 1970s, thousands of poor black women were coercively sterilized under federally funded programs. Women were threatened with termination of welfare benefits or denial of medical care if they didn’t “consent” to the procedure. Southern blacks claimed that black women were routinely sterilized without their consent and for no valid medical reason—a practice so widespread it was called a “Mississippi appendectomy.” Teaching hospitals in the North also performed unnecessary hysterectomies on poor black women as practice for their medical residents. During this period, state legislators considered a rash of punitive sterilization bills aimed at the growing number of blacks receiving public assistance. .. Black concerns about family planning had arisen decades earlier during Margaret Sanger’s crusade for birth control. As Sanger allied herself with the burgeoning eugenics movement, the call for birth control veered away from its radical, feminist origins to include programs to regulate the poor, immigrants and blacks, based on theories of genetic inferiority and social degeneracy. Some blacks of the period, including the nationalist leader Marcus Garvey, opposed birth control as a form of “race suicide.” ( SOURCE: Alan Guttmacher, Family Planning Perspectives, Volume 32, Number 2, March/April 2000 :Forum: Black Women and the Pill, By Dorothy Roberts )

Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger admitted in her autobiography of giving a speech to enthusiastic to the KLAN that she received an addition dozen invitations to speak to the, Sanger was a member of the RACIST American Eugenics Society, she hung around racists, allowed them to be published in her Birth Control Review – and today Planned Parenthood names their TOP AWARD after Margaret Sanger-the racist….Jesse Jackson, has NEVER called for Planned Parenthood to remove Sanger from that organization. Today Planned Parenthood abortion clinics kill more black children than all other top causes of death combined !

Dr. Alan Frank Guttmacher, president of the ‘Planned Parenthood World Population Federation’, and former VP of the American Eugenics Society attended the session on the family and specified the real differential between white and non-white fertility rates. He made what appears to be a flippant comment that nevertheless, reflected his worries about the ‘wrong’ people having too many children: “You can’t make a person take contraception. Unfortunately.” (SOURCE: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 1 ( Mar., 1998) pp. 259-282, The 1966 White House Conference on Civil Rights, by Kevin L. Yuill, quoting transcript records of the WHCCR)

1965– At the White House Conference on Civil Rights sponsored by Lyndon Johnson, Cecil Moore made this attack on population control, “ And I have noticed that every time that we talk about population and planned parenthood, the only country I find that wants to limit poverty by limiting the poor- they always want to do it in Africa and South America and Asia , but I never heard them talk about doing it in Paris or England. Then I hope I am not belaboring the point, but don’t take that away from Negroes because we don’t have much else.” ( SOURCE: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 1 ( Mar., 1998) pp. 259-282, The 1966 White House Conference on Civil Rights, by Kevin L. Yuill, quoting transcript records of the WHCCR)

1968– William “Bouie” Haden and other Negro militants have accused the [ Planned Parenthood] clinic of propagating “black genocide.” It is operated by Planned Parenthood, a nonprofit international family planning agency…”The idea,” says Dr. Charles E. Greenlee, a Negro physician and a member of Haden’s group, “is to make less niggers so they won’t have to build houses for them.” Greenlee is chairman of the Health Committee is the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP On December 4th of Last Year, He and Pittsburgh NAACP President, Byrd Brown , a Negro attorney, charged at a news conference that Planned Parenthood was keeping the Negro birth rate down. Greenlee and Brown also charged that the clinics were a not sanitary and lacked privacy. They said the agency was soliciting Negro women to take the Pill. Planned Parenthood denied the charges. ( SOURCE: The Problem of Black Birth Control THE TITUSVILLE HERALD, TITUSVILLE, PENNA, PAGE SEVEN: OCTOBER 7,1968)

1970– Julian Bond, in a commencement speech at Syracuse University. Bond had become the director of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, which he helped found. At the time of the speech, he was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Conference Education Fund, of the Advisory Board of the proposed Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library, and of the Executive Committee of the Atlanta NAACP. Bond suggested that the intense interest in the ‘population bomb” could lead to genocide of black Americans and other poor people. Bond begins, ”If Mother Nature don’t get you, then Father Time will.” Now Dr. Ehrlich hastens to assure us that in spite of the fact that some of the white people who are talking up population control do mean population control of blacks, or the poor, or the Indians, like most racist plots this one is incompetent. …Do we, as black people, have legitimate cause for alarm? Has genocide ever been tried before? Yes it has. Has the United States government demonstrated its commitment to the defense of the interests of Black people? It has not. Do we have legitimate cause for alarm? I believe we do.” ( SOURCE: Transcript, Commencement address delivered at Syracuse University by Julian Bond on June 6,1970)

MORE:

Under the cover of an alleged campaign to ‘alleviate poverty,’ white supremacist Americans and their dupes are pushing an all-out drive to put rigid birth control measures into every black home. No such drive exists within the white American world.” Black Unity Party, 1968

Proponents…have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.” Iowa State Rep. June Franklin, Democrat 1971.

The abortion law, hides behind the guise of helping women, when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people.” Brenda Hyson, New York chapter, Black Panther Party, 1971

A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.Detroit chapter, Black Panther Party, 1970

How the hell is getting the pill? The Mexican and the Negro. Do you want to wipe us out?Caesar Chavez, 1967

It is strange that they choose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.” Jesse Jackson, 1977

NAACP Crisis on “Genocide” from Planned Parenthood

The Crisis NAACP March 1970

“There is division within the Negro community how best to face this challenge. There are those of us who condemn the idea of birth control as a sinister “Genocide” conspiracy which white folk , fearful of steadily increasing Negro population, seek to foist upon the black community…Let those Negro men and women who despair of the future and turn their back on parenthood remember what their forbearers endured with faith and courage and dedication. Let them dig deep into the history of the black race in this country and realize what their ancestors were able to overcome. Let them not shrink from their duty to the future of their race in America. Let them be assured that there is hope for both the race and the country.”

The NAACP Crisis July 1995:

Rev. Dee Davis, pastoral care minister of the Harvest Church International, an African American Church in Landover, Maryland, strongly supports abstinence.
Ardent foes of Planned Parenthood , she and her congregation believe the birth control agency “has plans to bring genocide” to African Americans, citing Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood in 1929, as conceiving the plan.

Jet Magazine, November 1971

“An opponent of birth control [Dick] Gregory contends that “planned parenthood’ campaigns actually represent a conspiracy by whites to perpetrate genocide on blacks.”

Black Panthers Speak: Black Panther Party, 1969,

Shrewdly, cunningly, he starts to do you in. Genocide.
Planned Parenthood
Birth Control
Vietnamese War
Prostitution
Venereal Disease
Pigs, Punks, and Tricky Dicky Nixon.
Genocide. Dig it black man.”

Jet Magazine, Father George Clements , Feb 15, 1973
“People don’t go around saying there are to many white children being born, but there are many who talk about the overpopulation in the Black Communities. There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the US in the black or ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up , whereas in the white communities or suburbs fertility centers are being established.”

More interesting reading:

Ebony Magazine, My Answer to Genocide, by Dick Gregory – here

In a recent New York Times interview , Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told Emily Bazelon that, “...I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.

The “Populations” Ginsburg referred to in that interview is clearly defined in, Maafa21.