Archive for injury

Black woman removed from late term abortion clinic by ambulance with history of medical emergencies

Posted in 911 calls, Abortion injury, Black Women, Carhart with tags , , , , , , , on July 15, 2014 by saynsumthn

An African-American patient of the notorious late-term abortionist LeRoy Carhart, 72, was transported to the hospital after suffering a medical emergency at Germantown Reproductive Health Services in Germantown, Maryland, on Wednesday, July 2, 2014.

Black Woman July 2014

This represents the EIGHTH known medical emergency for which Carhart has been responsible since March, 2012. The recently injured women include Jennifer Morbelli, who died on Feb. 7, 2013.

Operation Rescue has details here !

Medical license suspended on NJ doc who botched several abortions

Posted in Abortion, abortion clinic safety, Abortion Clinic Worders, Abortion complication, Abortion injury, Abortion Regulation, Abortionist, pro-choice, pro-choice violence, Steven Chase Brigham with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 14, 2010 by saynsumthn

Vodpod videos no longer available.

N.J. Med Panel Suspends Abortion Doctor, posted with vodpod

N. J. abortion doctor temporarily suspended
By Marie McCullough
Inquirer Staff Writer 10/14/2010

TRENTON – The New Jersey Board of Medical Examiners on Wednesday temporarily suspended the license of abortion doctor Steven Chase Brigham, ruling that the Voorhees-based entrepreneur is “a clear and imminent danger to the public health and safety.”

Brigham, the board said, “has consistently and repetitively engaged in manipulative and deceptive behavior . . . to eviscerate the protections afforded New Jersey patients.”
The board sided with the state Attorney General’s Office, which is prosecuting that case, in concluding that Brigham initiated late-term abortions in Voorhees and completed them in his facility in Elkton, Md., because “he could not qualify to provide those abortions in New Jersey.” The board also concluded that Brigham routinely and purposely had kept patients in the dark about where their abortions would take place, and who would do the surgery.

Brigham scribbled furiously as the decision was read aloud shortly before 10 p.m., and a tiny smile briefly appeared on his lips.

His lawyer, Joseph Gorrell, immediately asked that the case be appealed on an expedited basis to the Office of Administrative Law. The board declined to ask for expedited treatment, but said it would ask that the case be heard as soon as possible.

Brigham, 54, who has been in and out of trouble for much of his two-decade career, operates at least a dozen abortion clinics in New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia under the name American Women’s Services.

Brigham is under investigation in Maryland for criminal and regulatory offenses, and faces tax problems with the IRS. He has the rare distinction of being disliked by both sides of the abortion debate. Even many supporters of the procedure view him as a rogue doctor.

Much of Wednesday’s hearing, which began at 1 p.m. and lasted past 9, reprised issues raised in the mid-1990s when Brigham also faced licensing problems.
At issue was whether Brigham would keep his New Jersey medical license.

The board, which regulates doctors, was considering whether Brigham had falsified medical records, misled patients in advertisements, and endangered them by starting late-term abortions in his Voorhees clinic, which does not meet outpatient-surgery standards, and then finishing those procedures in Elkton.

The board rejected the request of Gorrell, of Roseland, that the case be dismissed because the board had already ruled in two cases in the 1990s that the doctor’s actions were legal.
The medical board found that the differences between the current and earlier cases were “substantial.”

Brigham was alternately portrayed as a dangerous scofflaw and a conscientious caregiver in dueling presentations at the hearing’s start.

Deputy Attorney General Jeri Warhaftig said the abortion doctor was “grossly negligent” for transporting some patients to Maryland to take advantage of disparities in the two states’ abortion laws.

Brigham insisted that he didn’t need a Maryland license because he was merely consulting in the Elkton clinic. But he acknowledged that “I did the care.”

He said George Shepard, an 88-year-old OB-GYN who worked for Brigham, would simply come into the operating room, say hello to the patient, and stand there during the procedure. “He would ask me questions so we were engaging in consultation,” Brigham recalled.

Under questioning from a board member, Brigham said Shepard had had a mild stroke and was unable to use one of his arms. So he probably could not have done any surgery.

Brigham was asked if he had a cutoff for doing late-term abortions. He said the latest case he had done was 36 weeks – 38 weeks is full term – because the fetus had a lethal defect. He said patients seeking a third-trimester abortion had to fill out an application explaining their or their fetus’ health problems that necessitated the abortion.

However, his clinic’s records showed that a woman who was 25 weeks pregnant with twins conceived through in-vitro fertilization had sought an abortion because she and her husband were embarrassed that they had used donated sperm.

A board member asked why, when he could do a late abortion in a hospital or an ambulatory-care facility, did Brigham find it necessary to “schlep patients to other states for the procedure?”

“If the board said, ‘Don’t do that,’ I wouldn’t do that,” Brigham said, referring to his two-state procedure. “I only did these things because I thought I had the approval of the New Jersey medical board.”

Brigham said he was not sure whether his New Jersey malpractice insurance covered him in Maryland. He said, “I think I have malpractice” coverage, but couldn’t be more definitive.
In his direct testimony, Brigham was mostly poised and deferential. Wearing a gray pin-striped suit, red tie, and white shirt, the Columbia University medical school graduate talked confidently and displayed a passing resemblance to actor Greg Kinnear.

Just before the closing arguments, Brigham begged the board members not to let their feelings about abortion color their decision. “This is a very incendiary issue,” he said. “I would just ask you to recognize the efforts I’ve made over 24 years to comply with the board’s rules.”

The case against Brigham arose after an 18-year-old New Jersey woman who was 21 weeks pregnant suffered life-threatening injuries during an abortion in August that Brigham oversaw in Elkton. She had to be airlifted to a Baltimore hospital for emergency surgery to repair her uterus and bowel. She and the surgeon subsequently filed complaints against Brigham, according to documents released by investigators.

The first two witnesses Wednesday – obstetricians Gary Mucciolo of New York City and Rengan Rajan from Philadelphia – defended the care that Brigham provided.
Mucciolo said it wasn’t risky to send patients an hour away to Brigham’s clinic in Elkton after initiating the abortion in Voorhees.

And loading an injured patient at the Elkton clinic into a car and driving her to the hospital was not dangerous, either, he said, because she was stable and not bleeding.
Mucciolo said the abortions described in the charges against Brigham had been performed “the way they are typically and safely done.”

And he praised Brigham for going to a patient’s hotel room at midnight to treat her for abdominal pain and urinary obstruction. He also acknowledged under questioning from Warhaftig that Brigham might have done so to keep the woman from going to the hospital and alerting authorities about what had happened.

Rajan also testified that Brigham had met the “standard of care” in the abortions he performed. Rajan, who served as the director of a Philadelphia abortion clinic in May, was asked to explain why he had left that affiliation off his resume.

“You won’t get promotions. You pay a price for serving women,” he said. “We have created a major crisis. There are very few doctors trained to do abortions.”

For Brigham, the hearing Wednesday covered familiar ground. He defended himself against some of the same charges he faced in the mid-1990s. Brigham has spent much of his 20-year career fighting lawsuits and disciplinary actions in multiple states.

Pennsylvania in July barred him from owning clinics here because he persistently employed unlicensed caregivers; he is appealing that ruling.

Legal abortions leave women in comas

Posted in Abby Johnson, abortion clinic safety, Abortion coma, Abortion Regulation, Violence against women with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 14, 2009 by saynsumthn

NJ Abortion Clinic Pays $1.9 Million for Botched Abortion
Written by Operation Rescue
• Posted December 14, 2009

Huge pay-out raises questions about the dangers of abortion facilities that will be eligible for tax-funding should health care reform include abortion coverage.

Englewood, NJ – A troubled New Jersey abortion clinic affiliated with the National Abortion Federation (NAF) has paid out $1.9 million to settle a lawsuit brought by a Rasheedah Dinkins, who suffered a horrifically botched second trimester abortion in 2007.

The huge pay-out raises questions about the quality and safety of abortion facilities that will be eligible for tax-funding should health care reform now under consideration in the Senate include abortion coverage.

“We also have to wonder if taxpayers will be footing the bill for enormous malpractice settlements for botched abortions done on the public option plan,” said Operation Rescue President Troy Newman. “This case should be a wake up to Congress.”

Dinkins sued the Metropolitan Medical Associates and abortionists Keith Gresham and Nicholas Kotopouloswas alleging that during her abortion, she suffered a massive loss of blood from a uterine rupture that resulted in a stroke, a collapsed lung, a tracheotomy, and a hysterectomy. She was placed on a respirator and suffered a coma that lasted three weeks. The NAF was also named in the Dinkins suit.

“Businesses don’t pay out an amount like $1.9 million unless it fears that a jury would award a whole lot more. It shows how negligent and shoddy this abortion mill is,” said Newman.

After Dinkins’ suit became public, two other women came forward to tell of botched abortions at Metropolitan Medical Associates that nearly killed them.
Metropolitan Medical then failed an inspection and was closed by the State for nearly a month while they cleaned up filthy conditions including dirty forceps, rusty crochet hooks used to remove IUDs, and a quarter-inch of dark red “dirt and debris” under an examining table. After it failed a second inspection Operation Rescue undercover investigators caught the clinic scheduling appointments, even though it did not have permission to re-open at that time.

“We’ve seen what NAF affiliation mean. We bought and closed an NAF-affiliated abortion clinic in Wichita, Kansas, in 2006, and discovered dangerous, filthy conditions including roach and mold infestations, out of code plumbing and electrical, and dirty, blood-stained carpets, to name a few,” said Newman.

“Considering the appalling conditions at NAF abortion mills, it is disturbing to know that they are pulling out the stops to lobby for abortion funding in the health care bill. It would be monumentally irresponsible to give one cent of our tax money to these filthy abortion chop shops.”


Despite Deaths, D.C. License Upheld
City Board Chose Less Severe Penalties After Md. Abortion Complications

By Cheryl W. Thompson
Washington Post Staff Writer
Monday, April 11, 2005; Page A09

Two years after OB-GYN Gideon M. Kioko was found by the Maryland medical board to have mishandled abortions in 1989, he surrendered his license, which allowed him to avoid punishment. In one case, the patient died three days after the abortion; in the second, the woman suffered brain damage and died three years later. He petitioned the board for reinstatement a year later but was turned down. Nearly six years passed before the board restored his license — with conditions.

In the District, however, where Kioko also was licensed, the city’s medical board did not take the same hard line. It allowed him to continue practicing after the Maryland incidents.

When the board decided to act in 1996, it ignored an administrative law judge’s recommendation to revoke his license. Instead, it placed him on probation, fined him $5,000, ordered community service and banned him from performing abortions in the city for five years. Three months later, the board lifted the abortion ban after a request from Kioko.

“I think they did the right thing,” Kioko said in a recent interview. “They should have just left me alone.”

Kioko, 65, maintained at the time that he did nothing wrong and in neither case was responsible for the anesthesia that was blamed for the problems. “The old story about me was completely twisted,” he said in a recent interview.

In addition to the two deaths in Maryland, which prompted about a dozen people to write letters to city officials urging them to revoke his license, Kioko also had settled a $1 million malpractice lawsuit in 1995 filed by a female patient.

The D.C. medical board reinstated Kioko to unrestricted status in 1999 in an order signed by then-Chairman Robert T. Greenfield Jr., a physician who previously shared a practice with Kioko for 19 years, according to Kioko and board records.

Greenfield, who no longer has a medical practice with Kioko, said he recused himself from board deliberations. But because he was chairman, he said in an interview, “I had to sign it. He came before the board, we looked at his record and . . . deemed him fit to practice.”

Kioko said his working relationship with Greenfield did not play a role in his reinstatement.

“Did he give me a break? No,” Kioko said. “Should the vice chairman have signed it? Probably.”

In August, the medical board received a new complaint about Kioko from Northeast Washington resident Thakerya Drayton, 21, who was referred to Kioko’s clinic when she sought an abortion in 2001.

“I didn’t know anything about him,” she said in an interview.

After the procedure, she said, Kioko sent her to the recovery room for about an hour. “I knew something wasn’t right because of the pain,” she recalled.

When she got home, she was “bleeding out of control,” she said. After a few days, she told her mother, who called an ambulance that took her to Howard University Hospital.

Hospital records state that Drayton suffered an “incomplete abortion.”

Kioko said an incomplete abortion is considered a surgical complication and shouldn’t warrant a complaint to the medical board.

“I know the medical board will respond if they think there’s a serious deviation in standard of care,” he said.

The medical board sent Kioko a letter in September with a copy of Drayton’s complaint and added that he was not obligated to respond. He said he remembers her handwritten complaint.

“Her letter was so poorly written, I couldn’t understand what she was complaining about,” he said.

Kioko said he responded to Drayton’s complaint in December but heard nothing from the board until he contacted it March 17 after being questioned by The Washington Post about the complaint.

James R. Granger Jr., the board’s executive director, told him that the case was closed, Kioko said.

Drayton said that six days later, she received a letter from Granger stating that the case was closed with no action to be taken against Kioko. The board found no evidence of a violation of city law “that would warrant disciplinary action,” Granger said in an interview. It was the first time Drayton had heard from the board since filing the complaint six months ago.

“I thought we would have a meeting with the board and Dr. Kioko,” she said. But the board, she added, was “no hel