Archive for Hormones

RUSH : CNN Pulls Story on Arousal Gap

Posted in Abortion clinic worker arrested, Earth Day, Outrage, Police State with tags , , , , on October 26, 2012 by saynsumthn

On the 10/25/2012 Rush Limbaugh Show – Rush stated:

CNN had to pull a story that they had on their website after reader backlash. “Following a firestorm of negative feedback, CNN hastily deleted from its website late Wednesday virtually all mention of a study about the effect hormones have on women’s political preferences. ‘A post previously published in this space regarding a study about how hormones may influence voting choices has been removed,’ a message posted on the website at 8:15 p.m. read. ‘After further review it was determined that some elements of the story did not meet the editorial standards of CNN. We thank you for your comments and feedback.’ The study, authored by researchers at the University of Texas at San Antonio, used an ‘Internet survey of 275 women who were not taking hormonal contraception and had regular menstrual cycles’ to mine its data.”

That was the sample group, 275 women not taking hormonal contraception. For those of you in Rio Linda, what that means is they were not taking a pill. Condom didn’t matter. Taking a pill, [sic] regular menstrual cycles, 275. “The results showed that ovulating single women tend to support President Barack Obama because, in the words of lead researcher Kristina Durante, they feel ‘sexier.'” This is the arousal gap. Now, look, Dawn’s in there rolling her eyes. You’re probably getting mad at me. This is a female study conducted by female scientists, conceived by a female. It’s not some man sitting around, “Let’s go get 275 women who are ovulating and having menstrual cycles and they’re not taking a pill, let’s ask them about their political views.” It was a woman doing this.

According to NewsMax:

CNN on Wednesday night deleted its report on the study after reader outrage over the suggestion that women’s votes could be tied to hormones, drawing even more scrutiny to both the study and the network’s decision to write about it.

The study was conducted by Kristina Durante, an assistant professor of marketing at UTSA, whose research centers on how social and physiological factors can influence decision making.

“The researchers found that during the fertile time of the month, when levels of the hormone estrogen are high, single women appeared more likely to vote for Obama and committed women appeared more likely to vote for Romney, by a margin of at least 20 percent,” CNN reported, based on Durante’s study. “This seems to be the driver behind the researchers’ overall observation that single women were inclined toward Obama and committed women leaned toward Romney.”

The study included 502 women, asking them questions about their voting preferences. The survey sample focused on women who menstruate regularly who are not taking hormonal contraception. The original study, titled “The Fluctuating Female Vote: Politics, Religion, and the Ovulatory Cycle,” is not linked on the list of Durante’s journal articles.

Research such as Durante’s survey can partially be blamed for women being held back from positions of power over their reaction to hormonal imbalances, said Susan Carroll, professor of women’s and gender studies and political science at Rutgers University.

“There is absolutely no reason to expect that women’s hormones affect how they vote any more than there is a reason to suggest that variations in testosterone levels are responsible for variations in the debate performances of Obama and Romney,” Carroll said.

Although the original post has been removed from the CNN website, and replaced with an apology both for its absence and for the editorial choice to publish it in the first place, the story was picked up by Indiana’s WTHI and other websites across the Internet.

Birth Control may decrease bone density , says new study

Posted in birth control, Birth Control Dangers with tags , , , , , , , on August 3, 2011 by saynsumthn

Gradual bone reduction seen in some pill users

Changes in bone density in oral contraceptive users depends on age and hormone dose

Seattle, WA—Birth control pills may reduce a woman’s bone density, according to a study published online July 13 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism by Group Health Research Institute (GHRI) scientists. Impacts on bone were small, depended on the woman’s age and the pill’s hormone dose, and did not appear until about two years of use. The study size and design allowed the researchers to focus on 14- to 18-year-old teenagers, and to look at how bone density might change when a woman stops using the pill.

GHRI Senior Investigator Delia Scholes, PhD, led the study. Hormones are a key component of bone health, she says, and hormonal contraceptives are a major source of external hormones for women—the pill is the most common birth control method worldwide. A woman’s risk of fractures later in life is influenced by the bone mass she gains in her teens through her 20s, and this age group has the highest use of oral contraceptives. “The teen years are when women most actively gain bone, so we thought it was important to look at that age group,” says Scholes. “We found that oral contraceptive use had a small negative impact on bone gain at these ages, but took time to appear, and depended on hormone dose.”
The researchers measured hip, spine, and whole-body bone densities in 301 teen women aged 14-18, and in 305 young adult women aged 19-30, all Group Health Cooperative members. The bone densities of 389 participants using oral contraceptives were compared to 217 similar women who were not using this method, looking at both teens and young adults, and the two most commonly prescribed estrogen doses in pills: 20-25 micrograms and 30-35 micrograms. Bone density measurements were taken at the start of the study, and every 6 months for 2 to 3 years. During that time, 172 oral contraceptive users stopped taking the medication, allowing the researchers to measure bone changes after pill use was discontinued. They found:

* After two years, teens who used 30-35 microgram pills showed about 1% less gain in bone density at both the spine and whole body sites than teens who did not use hormonal contraceptives.
* For young adult women, users and non-users of oral contraceptives showed no differences in bone density at any site.
* Any differences in bone density between users and nonusers of oral contraceptives were less than 2%, and were seen only after two or more years of use, and only at some measured sites.
* At 12-24 months after stopping, teens who took 30-35 microgram pills still showed smaller bone density gains at the spine than teens who did not use oral contraceptives.
* At 12-24 months after stopping, young adult women who used either pill dose showed small bone density losses at the spine compared to small gains in women who did not take oral contraceptives.

Scholes says additional studies, including looking at bone changes for a longer time after pill use is discontinued, may tell us more about how oral contraceptive use is related to fracture risk. For now, the results of Scholes’ study may help women make informed decisions. “Bone health, especially for long-term users of the pill, may be one of many factors women consider in choosing a contraceptive method that’s right for them,” she says. The US Surgeon General recommends that women maintain bone density by eating foods high in calcium and vitamin D, getting weight-bearing exercise, not smoking, and limiting drinking alcohol.

Dr. Scholes’ co-authors are Rebecca A. Hubbard, PhD, Laura E. Ichikawa, MS, and Leslie Spangler VMD, PhD, Group Health Research Institute (GHRI); Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD, MPH, and Jeannette M. Beasley, PhD, MPH, RD, Women’s Health Initiative, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle WA; Susan Reed, MD, MPH, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (UW); and Susan M. Ott, MD, Department of Medicine, UW.
Funding was from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health.

Group Health Research Institute
Founded in 1947, Group Health Cooperative is a Seattle-based, consumer-governed, nonprofit health care system. Group Health Research Institute (www.grouphealthresearch.org) changed its name from Group Health Center for Health Studies on September 8, 2009. Since 1983, the Institute has conducted nonproprietary public-interest research on preventing, diagnosing, and treating major health problems. Government and private research grants provide its main funding.