Archive for Georgia

Prior to Roe, Abortion Legalization by State (1960’s and 1970’s)

Posted in Abortion History, Abortion legalization by state with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 5, 2018 by saynsumthn

Researched by: Carole Novielli

Prior to the infamous Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision that forced abortion on the nation, abortion was illegal in a majority of states, except to save the life of the mother. At that time the decriminalization of abortion was left up to states to decide.

Laws legalizing abortions by state began in the late 1960’s as follows:

1966: Mississippi allows abortion for rape

In 1966, Mississippi altered its existing abortion law by adding rape as an indication for hospital abortion, according to the CDC’s first abortion surveillance report in 1969.

Image: State Laws Abortion (Image credit: CDC 1969)

State Laws Abortion (Image credit: CDC 1969)

1967: Colorado becomes first state to decriminalize abortion further, followed by North Carolina and California

On April 25, 1967, Colorado became the first state in the U.S. to decriminalize abortion, along the lines proposed by the American Law Institute (ALI.) The bill was introduced by then Representative Richard D. Lamm. According to the Associated Press:

“On April 25, 1967, Colorado became the first state to allow abortion for reasons other than rape or an imminent threat to a woman’s health. The bill passed a Republican-controlled Legislature with bipartisan support and was signed into law by Republican Gov. John Love despite strong objections from many constituents…Love said the new law requires that abortions be performed only in accredited hospitals and that each operation must have the unanimous consent of a special three-man board of physicians… Colorado law previously allowed abortions only in cases presenting a severe threat to the physical health of the mother or in pregnancies resulting from forcible rape. The new law permits the ending of pregnancies presenting a severe threat to the health — mental or physical — of the mother. It allows the termination of pregnancies resulting from incest or from any of the classifications of rape — including statutory rape.”

Image: 1967 Colorado legalizes abortion

1967 Colorado legalizes abortion

According to a report by the New York Times, in 1966, only 50 abortions were committed in the state and permitted if the mother’s life was endangered. In the first 14 months of legalization, more than half of the abortions were reported for reasons of “mental health” and only 32 for “medical reasons.”

Abortions rose in Colorado over the years as follows:

  • 1967 (last half of year) – 140
  • 1968 – 500
  • 1969 – 946

In May of 1967, North Carolina liberalized its abortion statutes, similar to the Colorado law.

Image: 1967 North Carolina liberalizes abortion laws

1967 North Carolina liberalizes abortion laws

In June of 1967, the California legislature also passed abortion law reforms. The law was signed by then Governor Ronald Reagan on June 14, 1967. The so-called Therapeutic Abortion Act took effect November 8, 1967 and restricted abortion after the 20th week of pregnancy.

Image: 1967 California liberalizes abortion laws

1967 California liberalizes abortion laws

According to the National Review, there were 518 abortions reported in the state that same year, and the New York Times reports that by the first half of 1968, 2,035 legal abortions were reported. A separate New York Times report states that by 1969, 14,000 abortions were reported. Sadly, the National Review claims that by the end of Reagan’s remaining years as Governor, the number of abortions would soar to an annual average of 100,000. Reagan later admitted that abortion had been “a subject I’d never given much thought to.”  

By 1971, a state appeals court ruled that all abortions could be legal in the state of California.

Reagan biographer Lou Cannon claims this was “the only time as governor or president that Reagan acknowledged a mistake on major legislation.” Reagan’s longtime adviser and Cabinet secretary Bill Clark called the incident “perhaps Reagan’s greatest disappointment in public life.”

Ronald Reagan went on to become the most pro-life president the US has had since the legalization of abortion through the Roe v. Wade decision.

1968: Georgia and Maryland become fourth and fifth states to legalize abortion

In 1968, Georgia became the fourth state to legalized abortion. The bill passed the House 144 to 11 and the Senate 39 to 11.

Image: 1968 Georgia legalizes abortion

1968 Georgia legalizes abortion

Maryland also passed a similar law that same year.

1969: Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, New Mexico, and Oregon pass abortion legislation

By 1969, twelve states in addition to Colorado and California had legalized abortion, most for very restrictive reasons, according to the Willkes. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) issued their first abortion surveillance report noting that in the same year, five states had passed new abortion legislation (Arkansas, Delaware, Kansas, New Mexico and Oregon) and 24 other states considered new bills.

According to the Abortion Surveillance Report Annual Summary 1969, published by the US Department of Health, Education, and Welfare… National Communicable Disease Center, “Oregon became the first state to follow the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology [ACOG], which makes the following allowance, “In determining whether or not there is substantial risk (to the woman’s physical or mental health), account may be taken for the mother’s total environment, actual or reasonably foreseeable. The other four states enacted laws based on the American Law Institute Penal Code.”

Image: 1969 CDC and HEW report on states that legalized abortion

1969 CDC and HEW report on states that legalized abortion

In June of 1969, New Mexico liberalized its abortion law.

Image: 1969 New Mexico liberalizes abortion

1969 New Mexico liberalizes abortion

According to Jonathan B. Sutin:

“New Mexico’s 1969 abortion law… makes it unlawful for any person to produce an untimely interruption of a woman’s pregnancy with intent to destroy the fetus. Yet termination of the pregnancy is justified, under certain consensual and medical requirements, in the following instances:

  • The continuation of the pregnancy … is likely to result in the death of the woman or the grave impairment of the physical or mental health of the woman; or
  • The child probably will have a grave physical or mental defect, or
  • The pregnancy resulted from rape… or
  • The pregnancy resulted from incest.

According to the CDC, “In 1969, four of the nine states with recently changed abortion laws reported *12,417 legal abortions to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).” (*See end as numbers were later updated).

This same year, the Supreme Court of California rendered a decision in the case of People vs. Belous, which, according to the CDC, invalidated the pre-1967 California abortion law and raised the issue of constitutionality of state abortion statutes. Also in 1969, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia decided on the case of Dr. Milan Vuitch, a Washington abortionist indicted for illegal abortions. The court ruled that the State’s law labeling abortion as a felony was unconstitutional.

Image: 1969 CDC Judicial Decisions affecting abortion

1969 CDC Judicial Decisions affecting abortion

Next, we will detail abortion legalization by state in the 1970’s.

1970: New York, Washington, Hawaii, and Alaska legalize abortion

In 1970, eleven states, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia, Kansas, Maryland, New Mexico, North Carolina, Oregon and South Carolina, had reform laws similar to the ALI’s Model Penal Code. And, according to Time.com, “four more lifted all abortion restrictions — New York, Washington, Hawaii and Alaska — before 1970.”

By 1970, more than *180,000 legal abortions were reported to the CDC from 19 states and the District of Columbia, according to the Abortion Surveillance Report published that year. (*See end as numbers were later updated).

The following table shows reported legal abortions for 14 states and the District of Columbia:

Image: 1970: CDC reported abortions in 14 states plus DC.

1970: CDC reported abortions in 14 states plus DC.

In April of 1970, New York decriminalized abortion (by one vote) up to the 24th week. The law went into effect on July 1st.

Image: 1970 New York legalizes abortion CDC

1970 New York legalizes abortion CDC

At that time, the state had a Republican Governor and Republicans controlled both Houses of the legislature, according to the New York Times. During the debate to liberalize abortion in New York in 1970, the false claim that thousands of  women died annually from unsafe abortions one representative to change his vote on the floor, opening the door to abortion on demand in New York.

More states followed: South Carolina, Virginia, Kansas, Washington

An American Law Institute (ALI) type law became effective in South Carolina on January 27, 1970 and Virginia on June 27, 1970.

Although Kansas passed its abortion reform law in 1969, it did not become effective until July 1, 1970. In March of 1970, Hawaii changed its law on abortion allowing for no restrictions on the reasons why a woman might obtain an abortion. Shortly thereafter Alaska followed suit and their law became effective on July 29, 1970.

Image: 1970 states that liberalized abortion laws CDC

Washington State’s abortion law change was enacted by a referendum held during the November 1970 general elections and went into effect December 3, 1970, according to the CDC.

Also on March 17, 1970, a woman by the name of Norma McCorvey  signed affidavit challenging the Texas law on abortion. Oral arguments in that case were heard before a  three judge district court in Dallas in May of that same year. By June, the court ruled the Texas statute unconstitutional, opening up the challenge that led to the Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision in 1973.

1971: 24 states plus Washington, D.C., liberalize abortion laws – and abortions nearly triple

In 1971, *480,259 abortions were reported to the Center for Disease Control from 24 states and the District of Columbia. (*See end as numbers were later updated).

 

Image: 1971 reported number of legal abortions to CDC

1971 reported number of legal abortions to CDC

At this time 79.2% of all legal abortions were performed on White women and 18.9% were performed on Black women or women of other races, according to the CDC’s 1971  Abortion Surveillance Report.

Image: 1971 reported number of legal abortions to CDC

1971 reported number of legal abortions to CDC

Although several states attempted to liberalize or change their abortion abortion statutes, most failed due in part to strong pro-life sentiment. Author and researcher Daniel K Williams reports:

In 1971, twenty-five states considered abortion legalization bills. Every one of them failed to pass. In 1972, the pro-life movement went on the offensive and began campaigning for measures to rescind recently passed abortion legalization laws and tighten existing abortion restrictions.

In 1971, several important court decisions were also rendered as follows:

  • Illinois: Doe v. Scott
  • North Carolina: Corkey v. Edwards
  • District of Columbia: United States v. Vuitch
  • Wisconsin: Babbitz v. McCann

1972: 27 states plus Washington D.C. have abortion laws on the books, and abortions are rising

By 1972, *586,760 legal abortions were reported to the CDC from 27 states and the District of Columbia. (*See end as numbers were later updated).

  • 75.7% were White
  • 22.6% were Black or other races
Image: 1972 reported abortions by state to CDC

1972 reported abortions by state to CDC

In 1972, the Supreme Court heard two cases, Roe v. Wade and the companion case Doe v. Bolton. The court, made up of nine male justices, ruled by a vote of seven to two to legalize abortion and released their decision on January 22, 1973.

Although Norma MCCorvey, the plaintiff in the Roe case claimed she was gang raped, and thus needed an abortion, she later recanted the claim admitting, “[I] made up the story that I had been raped to help justify my abortion.”

In 1995, Norma Joined pro-life movement.

Image: Roe in abortion case joins pro-life groups (Image credit: New York Times 8/11/1995)

Roe in abortion case joins pro-life groups (Image credit: New York Times 8/11/1995)

In like manner, Sandra Cano, a/k/a/ “Doe” in the companion case to Roe later claimed that she was unaware her name had been used in this case and that she never sought or had an abortion. 

Image: Sandra Cano was Doe in the Doe v Bolton Supreme Court abortion case

Sandra Cano was Doe in the Doe v Bolton Supreme Court abortion case

Cano told members of the media, “The case brought by my lawyer in the name of Mary Doe was a fraud upon the Supreme Court of the United States and the people of America. My mother and my lawyer wanted me to have an abortion. Not me.”

In 2003, Norma filed an unsuccessful motion to have Roe V. Wade overturned, it was denied in 2005.

*NOTE: In the 1973 CDC Surveillance Report, abortion numbers in previous years were updated as follows:

  • 1969: 22,670
  • 1970: 193,491
  • 1971: 485,816
  • 1972: 586,760
  • 1973: 615,831
Image: CDC Abortion Surveillance Report 1969 to 1973

Abortion stats by CDC prior to 1973

 

The following years abortions reported to the CDC, increased:

  • 1974: 763,476
  • 1975: 854.853
  • 1976: 988,267
  • 1977: 1,079,430
  • 1978: 1,157,776
  • 1979: 1,251,921
  • 1980: 1,297,606
Image: CDC Abortion numbers 1969 to 1980

CDC Abortion numbers 1969 to 1980

 

Planned Parenthood celebrates as woman who killed baby with abortion drugs not charged with murder

Posted in Abortion pill, Cyotec, Planned Parenthood illegal activity with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 11, 2015 by saynsumthn

REPUBLISHED FROM LIFE DYNAMICS BLOG:

The nation’s top seller of abortions, Planned Parenthood said they are “glad” a murder charge has been dropped against a woman who killed her unborn child using an abortion pill she purchased online.

Kenlissia Jones

23-year-old Kenlissa Jones allegedly took the abortion pill, Cytotec, after she purchased it off the internet to abort he five-and-a-half-month-old baby boy.

The drug, also known as Misoprostol, is promoted by abortion advocates in home abortion remedies online.

According to reports, Jones got a neighbor to take her to the hospital, but she delivered the baby boy in the car on the way.

Dougherty County police say that Jones’ baby boy died after about half an hour at the hospital and originally charged Jones with malice murder and possession of a dangerous drug.

Now, according to the AP, Dougherty County District Attorney Greg Edwards has dropped the murder charge and is pursuing a drug possession count instead.

He said Jones still faces a misdemeanor charge of possessing a dangerous drug, which Georgia law defines as any drug requiring a prescription.

In a tweet posted just after the decision became public, Planned Parenthood wrote, “We’re glad to see Kenlissia’s murder charges dropped—but alarmed at what can happen if safe abortion is inaccessible.”

Kenlissia Jones PP Glad abortion supporters  2

As previously reported, abortion supporters originally came to Jones’ defense in a similar way as they rushed to defend Purvi Patel, an Indiana woman who was sentenced to 20 years in prison on feticide and neglect charges after she took abortion pills she had ordered to abort her roughly thirty (30) week pregnancy.

While Planned Parenthood says they are “alarmed at what can happen if safe abortion is inaccessible” they are blocking measures to tell women that they can reverse the affects of abortion pills to keep their babies.

The abortion business has recently filed a federal lawsuit to stop a new law in Arkansas which requires abortionists to notify their patients that the abortion pill can be reversed.

No Choice XSmall2

They join a litany of so-called pro-choicers who oppose the pro-life measure.

Read more here.

Life Dynamics president, Mark Crutcher has correctly pointed out in the past that abortion advocates have never met a baby they didn’t want to kill.

Abortionist charged with Medicaid Fraud in court today

Posted in Abortion, Abortion and medicaid fraud, Abortion Clinic Worders, Abortion clinic worker arrested, Abortion complication, Abortion death, Abortion injury, Abortion medicaid fraud, Abortionist arrested, Abortionist Medicaid Fraud, Eric Holder, Medicaid Billing Practices, Planned Parenthood with tags , , , , , , , , on February 14, 2013 by saynsumthn

TyronneMalloy

The Georgia Supreme Court heard an appeal of a pre-trial ruling involving an abortionist accused of illegally using Medicaid funds to perform services associated with abortions. Tyrone Malloy who was involved in the 2009 abortion related death of a 23 year-old patient, was indicted in 2011 by a Georgia DeKalb County grand jury for two counts of Medicaid fraud. The indictment alleges that from 2007-2010, Malloy accepted $131,615 in Medicaid payments to which he wasn’t entitled “because such services were associated with the performance of elective abortions.” The second count alleges that in the same period, Malloy then fraudulently accepted $255,024 in Medicaid payments for “detailed” ultrasounds which had not been performed. If convicted, Malloy could be sentenced to a $10,000 fine or up to 10 years in prison.

Read more here

MalloyMedBoardDeath1MalloyMedBoardDeath2

On March 21, 2008, 23 year old Sherika Mayo, went to Summit Medical Associates in Atlanta, Georgia for the elective abortion of her 25 week unborn child. After the abortion, while in the recovery room, the woman went into cardiac arrest and was transferred to Atlanta Medical Center where she underwent a hysterectomy and bowel repair. Medical records indicate that vigorous blood product replacement was undertaken, but the women coded in the I.C.U. where she died. The Georgia State Medical Board reviewed the case and determined that the abortionist, Tyrone Malloy, “failed to conform to minimal standards of acceptable and prevailing medical practice.” His license was reprimanded and while he was ordered to pay a $10,000.00 fine, he was allowed to continue practicing and performing abortions.

A Search for Malloy uncovers his resume reveals he is linked to other abortion clinics:

drmalloy

1985 – Present Morehouse School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
Assistant Clinical Instructor
1990 – 1997 Atlanta Surgi-Center, Atlanta, GA
Medical Director
1994 – Present Feminist Women’s Health Center, Atlanta, GA
Medical Director
1995 – Present Old National GYN, LLC, College Park, GA
CEO & President
2000 – Present Atlanta Surgi Center, Inc., Atlanta, GA
Chief Operating Officer

And this Search has him saying he is a member of Planned Parenthood:

Malloy PPSHort

Mallory also has ties to Obama’s Attorney General Eric Holder- Read story here

Georgia KKK wants to adopt a stretch of Highway to “clean up the trash” – Yeah Right !

Posted in Klan with tags , , , on June 20, 2012 by saynsumthn

According to the Atlanta Journal Constitution: Driving in, the stretch of Route 515 approaching Union County is as pristine and the Blue Ridge Mountains that loom up ahead. It’s also ground zero in a brewing fight with national implications over the limits of the First Amendment.

That, and fodder for jokesters like Jay Leno, who seized gleefully on the news that the International Keystone Knights of the KKK Realm of Georgia want’s to “adopt” this wholly unremarkable piece of North Georgia asphalt. “KKK wants to join Georgia’s Adopt-A-Highway for litter removal. So you’re just replacing litter w/white trash,” Leno quipped via Twitter.

At least two people in Union County claim membership in the Klan. Self-described Grand Cyclops Harley Hanson gave his name on the state application he filed May 21, along with his wife’s. Hanson said he could deliver at least six volunteers for road clean up, but he didn’t list any other names.

Stalin statue goes up in United States, gets torn down in Georgia

Posted in Communist, Soviet Union with tags , , , , , , , on June 25, 2010 by saynsumthn

BBC Reports: Stalin Georgia statue latest in long line of removals

Stalin’s statue has been removed from the central square in his birthplace and is to be housed in a museum in the town. He is not the first leader to be toppled from his place on a plinth. So who are some of the others?

UK’s Telegraph Reports:

Erected in the Georgian town of Gori in 1952, a year before Stalin died, the 20ft bronze statue stood on a soaring granite plinth and had survived a 1960s Kremlin campaign to banish Stalin’s memory as well as a Russian military bombardment in 2008.

But Mikheil Saakashvili, Georgia’s pro-Western president, said he wanted the statue moved into a local museum that devoted to the Soviet dictator.

He argued that the late dictator was too closely associated with what he called the “Soviet occupation of Georgia”.

“A memorial to Stalin has no place in the Georgia of the 21st century,” he said.

In The United States, However:

A bust of dictator Joseph Stalin has been placed at the National D-Day Memorial in Bedford despite public protest over its presence.

The sculpture was installed at the memorial Tuesday, said William McIntosh, president of the memorial foundation.

Teacher allows students to dress up as Ku Klux Klan

Posted in Klan with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on May 26, 2010 by saynsumthn

Teacher allows students to dress up as Ku Klux Klan as they ask black classmate if they can re-enact a lynching
By UK Mail Foreign Service
25th May 2010

A U.S. teacher has defended herself after allowing members of her class to dress up as the Ku Klux Klan for a school project.

Catherine Ariemma, a history teacher in Atlanta, Georgia, allowed her students to dress up as members of the white supremacist group as part of a video assignment on the history of racism in America.

The students paraded through their school cafeteria wearing white Klan hoods last Thursday.

‘I don’t apologize’: Teacher Catherine Ariemma, who allowed her students to dress up as the Ku Klux Klan; and student Corey Rider, who was furious after the students asked his cousin if they could re-enact a lynching on him

They stopped another, black student at the school and asked if they could re-enact a lynching on him, witnesses said.

‘I don’t apologize for the project,’ a tearful Ariemma told CBS Atlanta.

‘I do apologize that someone felt threatened. I teach about United States history. I teach about the good, the bad, and the ugly.

‘I would tell the students, why don’t you film that off campus on your own time. Would I tell them not to? No, because that’s part of history and to not acknowledge it is saying, that it’s OK. I’m sorry, it isn’t. It’s unacceptable.’

Student Cody Rider told reporters the incident left him ‘outraged’.

He said he wanted to fight the students when they asked his cousin, also a student at the school, if they could ‘re-enact the lynching of him for their class project’.
‘My little cousin comes up and taps me on the shoulder, and there was fear in his eyes,’ he said.

‘He was like, he just started pointing, like he couldn’t even talk, that’s how bad it was. There was fear in his eyes, and I looked up and they are walking through the hallway in white sheets.’

However other students dismissed the incident as ‘blown out of proportion’. ‘I don’t think it’s worth getting upset about because it’s small-town talk,’ said one.

Ariemma was on paid leave for two days after the incident. She was facing dismissal – but returned to work on the day the controversial assignment was due.

A Lumpkin County High School spokesman said Ariemma had been working there for five years and had a perfect record.

‘We’re upset about it,’ the spokesman said. ‘It was inappropriate and unacceptable… It was a lapse in judgment.’

The Southern state of Georgia still struggles with the legacy of racism today, making incidents like this one flashpoints that cause outrage in the community.

The NAACP and Abortion Politics

Posted in Abortion, NAACP, Racism with tags , , , , , , , , , , on May 4, 2010 by saynsumthn

The NAACP and Abortion Politics
by Star Parker

Monday, May 03, 2010

Why would a bill that criminalizes abortion motivated by race not have the support of the NAACP? Or, even more perplexing, why would the NAACP endorse such a bill and then rescind its endorsement?

This is exactly what just happened in Georgia.

The Georgia Senate passed a bill that would make it a crime to abort a child because of its race or gender.

The bill had the endorsement of Georgia’s NAACP, along with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and over 100 local, mostly black, pastors.

After the bill moved to the House for passage, suddenly Edward DuBose, president of the Georgia NAACP, had a change of heart. In a statement withdrawing NAACP’s support for the bill, DuBose claimed they didn’t “fully understand” it when they endorsed it.

In NAACP’s press statement, DuBose said they came to the realization that the bill amounted to “nothing more than using women’s health as a political tool.”

It’s not news that an abortion holocaust is taking place in black America. Blacks, about 12% of our population, account for almost 40% of the abortions that are performed nationwide each year.

Georgia, Mr. DuBose’s state, has the distinction of leading the nation in abortions in the black community.

According to Catherine Davis, Director of Minority Outreach for Georgia Right to Life, there were 18,901 abortion performed on black women in Georgia in 2008, amounting to 60% of all abortions performed in the state.

Clearly there was concern at Georgia’s NAACP about this troubling reality. They passed a resolution in 2007 noting the need to minimize abortion in the black community.
With this background, Georgia Right to Life reached out to the NAACP to endorse the “Prenatal Nondiscrimination Act” and got it.

And then suddenly, mysteriously, after giving its endorsement, the NAACP realized it didn’t “fully understand” and backed off.

Particularly troubling for a matter this grave, they felt no compunction to provide any serious arguments regarding concerns about the language or provisions of the bill that provoked the change of support. They only served up the usual political buzzwords of the pro-abortion community about women’s “health.”

It doesn’t take much imagination to conclude that the NAACP’s priority became politics and not the welfare of the black community, its alleged mission.
Taking a pro-life stand would have put the Georgia NAACP out of sync with its national organization.

The NAACP Legal Defense Fund recently issued a statement of effusive praise for retiring Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens – a member of the court’s liberal and pro-abortion contingent, who now must be replaced.

Organizations come into existence to solve problems. What happens when those problems get solved? Three possible outcomes. The organization closes. The organization shifts focus to new problems. Or it starts just existing to perpetuate itself and sustain the power and income of those whom it employs and who have political interests in its existence.

It’s the latter reality that defines today’s NAACP. It’s why it has lost major support over recent years and no longer holds the hearts and minds of most black Americans.

NAACP was born when the primary problem of black Americans was political. Blacks needed political action to secure equal protection under law they weren’t getting. This was achieved in the 1960’s through the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act.

The challenge facing black America today is moral, not political. Abortion, AIDS, crime, poor education, family breakdown. These reflect poor personal decisions, not politics.
Apparently for Georgia’s NAACP, being out of sync with political interests was too much to handle.

For black Americans to solve their considerable problems today, we’re going to have to get back to caring more about truth than political interests.

MORE : About the NAACP , abortion and Black Genocide in the film: Maafa21 Black Genocide in 21st Century America