Archive for Forced Sterilization

Black woman sterilized due to eugenic agenda of Planned Parenthood board member

Posted in Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Clarence Gamble, Eugenics by State, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

At the age of 14, after becoming pregnant from a violent rape, the eugenics board of the State of Nort

North Carolina decided Elaine Riddick should not have any more children and sterilized her without consent. Riddick claims the reason she was sterilized without her knowledge or approval was because the state of North Carolina had ruled her “feebleminded,” a degrading term commonly used in eugenics. She recently told her emotional story in the powerful documentary film, produced by Life Dynamics, Inc., called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America, which Live Action is screening on social media this month. North Carolina’s eugenics program was funded in part by a member of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s Board of Directors and close friend of the Federation — Clarence Gamble. Gamble sat on the boardof Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) as well asPlanned Parenthood, and was also a financier of Sanger’s birth control crusade. In addition, he helped to fund the North Carolina Eugenics program.

Sanger, an established member of the American Eugenics Society, stacked her organization with like-minded men and women. In 1942, the ABCL changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Image: ABCL Directors

Clarence Gamble, a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League

Elaine Riddick was kidnapped, molested, and became pregnant as a result of rape at 13 years of age. At the time, Riddick was living with her grandmother, Maggie Woodard, known as “Miss Peaches,” when a social worker with the State discovered her pregnancy. Her name was Sue L. Casebolt, and she referred Elaine’s case to the state’s Eugenics Board. Casebolt had been installed as the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Eugenics Board in 1961.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick speaks about eugenic sterilization in Maafa21

According to Maafa21:

At a board meeting held three weeks later, she stated that she intended to keep a file on every child whose name reached her desk so that they could be picked up as soon as they reached childbearing age. Casebolt was still on the board in 1968 when it approved the sterilization of Elaine Riddick.

Sue Casebolt board that sterilized Black woman funded by Planned Parenthood member/ Sue Casebolt on eugenics board that sterilized Elaine Riddick (Image credit: Maafa21)

Riddick said that her grandmother was illiterate and did not understand what she was signing. Knowing this, the social worker pressured her to sign with an “X,” threatening to send Elaine to an orphanage, and remove her grandmother’s government aid for food if she did not. Unfortunately, the document her grandmother was pressured to sign was not a medical consent form for the birth, but a consent to have Elaine sterilized after she gave birth to her son Tony, now a successful businessman.

“I did not find out that they had sterilized me until I was nineteen years old,” Riddick says in Maafa21, adding:

I asked the State of North Carolina why they did this to me and they said that [they did it] because I was feebleminded. That I would not be able to take care of myself…. That I was incompetent…. They were saying that feeblmindness is hereditary. So, they sterilized me so I would not produce my kind. Mind you, I am not illiterate nor am I feebleminded…. They sterilized kids, my understanding…-as young as eight years of age. I don’t know what an eight year-old can do that could cause them to do this to them? The only reason I can give myself is that [it’s] because they’re Black.”

Riddick’s powerful testimony and nearly 40-year battle for justice secured millions of dollars for surviving victims in North Carolina. As a result of Riddick’s willingness to tell her story, North Carolina also agreed to make its eugenics records public.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

North Carolina Eugenics Program document

North Carolina’s sterilization program began with the passage of the North Carolina Sterilization Act in 1929. In 1933, according to the North Carolina History Project online, the act was declared unconstitutional on the grounds that it “did not allow an appeals process. In the same year, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a law allowing an appeal process and created the Board of Eugenics to oversee sterilizations.”

“Between 1929 and 1974, more than 7,600 North Carolinians were sterilized,” reports the Winston-Salem Journal, which wrote extensively on this tragedy, “many of them against their will. Young girls who had gotten pregnant, some by rape or incest, were frequently the targets. Some were flagged because faulty intelligence tests labeled them “feeble-minded,” others simply because they were epileptic. Many were young, poor and black.”

“It’s a very paternalistic model,” author and researcher Johanna Schoen said. “(Women) certainly weren’t supposed to choose when to use birth control or when not to use birth control, or when to be sterilized or when not to be sterilized. The model was, the physician knows best.”

Schoen writes in his book, “Choice & Coercion: Birth Control, Sterilization, and Abortion in Public”:

[M]any philanthropists and health officials believed that African Americans lacked the intellectual  capacity to use any form of birth control. Elsie Wulkop, a social worker who collaborated with [Clarence] Gamble to establish small contraceptive field trials, commented on the attempt to educate African Americans on birth control, “It impresses me as being like trying to get sheer animals to conform.”

Schoen continues, “Sources indicate that some health officials might have found birth control programs appealing as a form of population control.”

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick

Riddick is also understandably outspoken against Planned Parenthood, as the abortion corporation’s founder was  financially supported by Clarence Gamble, the man who also helped fund the very eugenics program that sterilized Riddick. “Euphemisms and sterilization target code words, for example, “feebleminded”, were used to describe Black women like me,” Riddick wrote in an op-ed:

“I was forcibly sterilized at the age of 14 years under North Carolina’s inhumane forced sterilization policy. A policy that was derived from Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood population control handbook, which spread across the United States by her loyal band of eugenicists and lobbying our elected officials.”

Despite Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s ties to the horrors of eugenics, many laud her as a hero, including modern-day Planned Parenthood itself. But, as Mary Senander explains in the Star Tribune, Sanger was anything but a heroine:

Contemporary liberal social planners have elevated Sanger to sainthood, protesting that her birth control campaign was nothing more than a vehicle for economic betterment and health for the masses. But Sanger’s own well-documented words, publications and associations indicate a deeper and darker motivation. Sanger began publishing the Birth Control Review in 1917 and served as its editor until 1938. The May 1919 Review proclaimed, “More children for the fit, less for the unfit.” By unfit, Sanger meant the mentally retarded or physically handicapped; later her definition expanded.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Birth Control to Create a Race of Thoroughbreds, by Margaret Sanger (Image Birth Control Review)

In November 1921 the review issued a clarion call: “Birth control, to create a race of thoroughbreds.” Sanger suggested that parents should “apply for babies as immigrants have to apply for visas.” By 1925, she was a true convert to eugenics, setting up birth control clinics in poor neighborhoods populated by “Latins” and “Slavs” (both groups heavily Catholic) and “Hebrews” – groups she had targeted as threats because of their increasing numbers. She spoke of those who were “irresponsible and reckless,” among them those “whose religious scruples prevent their exercising control over their numbers”…

In the October 1926 Review, Sanger announced her idea for eugenic sterilization: “There is only one reply to a request for a higher birthrate among the intelligent, and that is to ask the government to first take off the burdens of the insane and the feeble-minded from your backs.” Eugenicists like Sanger concluded that the poor were both stupid and immoral, fueling campaigns for sterilization during the Depression. (By 1932, 27 states had compulsory sterilization laws.)

Sanger supporter Clarence Gamble was a graduate of Harvard Medical School graduate, the heir to the Procter & Gamble fortune, and a teacher at the University of Pennsylvania. He was also a medical consultant for the Human Betterment League of North Carolina, another organization with ties to eugenics.

                                                            Eugenics pamphlet from Human Betterment League Association

                                                        Eugenics pamphlet from Human Betterment League Association

According to the book, “Intended Consequences,” in 1933, Gamble was elected president of the Pennsylvania Birth Control Federation, an organization affiliated with Sanger. And, according to researcher James A. Miller:

In December 1937, Gamble was appointed ‘Medical Field Director’ of Sanger’s Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau and at the same time became a member of the editorial advisory board of the Bureau’s Journal of Contraception, a propaganda vehicle for Sanger’s birth control and eugenics agenda…When the North Carolina plan was launched, there were just three (private) birth control clinics in the state; by the end of 1938, with Gamble’s backing, the state had created 56. At that time, with less than 3 percent of the country’s population, North Carolina had 13 percent of the nation’s birth control clinics. By mid-1939 the number of birth control clinics in North Carolina had risen to 62, second only to New York.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Margaret Sanger letter to Clarence Gamble (image credit: Maafa21)

By 1939, Gamble joined others in funding Sanger’s Committee on Planned Parenthood. And, according to Senander’s article, “Eugenics part of Sanger legacy”:

 Dr. Clarence J. Gamble, previously a director of the ABCL, was elected the BCFA regional director in the South. Almost immediately, he drew up a memorandum for his plans for the “Negro Project.” Gamble’s plan included placing black leaders in positions where it would appear that they were in charge (in order to counter the perception by black leaders who might regard birth control as an extermination plot). Sanger agreed: “We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten that idea out if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Sanger’s 1939 letter to Gamble, about the infamous “Negro Project,” can be seen excerpted in the image below:

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Gamble referred to eugenic sterilization as “preventative medicine,” writing in the North Carolina Medical Journal in 1951:

One method of preventive medicine, the sterilization of the insane, the feeblemided and the epileptic, is supervised by the Eugenics Board of North Carolina…. Petitions for the sterilization of a mentally diseased, feebleminded, or epileptic person may be initiated by a county superintendent of welfare, or the head of a state institution. If the Board finds that the operation is for the best mental, moral or physical improvement of the patient, or for the public good, it may authorize the procedure…. Of those sterilized under the law, 23 per cent were Negro. That this figure is lower than the proportion of Negroes in the population of the state-approximately one-third-is due partly to the fact that the state hospital caring for the Negro insane and feebleminded has not had sufficient surgical services to perform many of these operations.

Then, by the early 1960’s, Gamble co-authored a booklet on family planning with Planned Parenthood’s president, Alan F. Guttmacher. It was published by Pathfinder Fund, an organization Gamble helped to found. The book was  entitled, “Family planning: a challenge to health workers of every nation.”

Guttmacher, a former vice-president of the American Eugenics Society, had been a longtime advocate of abortion and a strong proponent of government funded “family planning.” Author Angela Franks notes in her book on Sanger:

As both Sanger and Gamble had foreseen, once government got involved, Planned Parenthood [PPFA] and Gamble’s Pathfinder Fund would be able to spend great sums of money carrying out their original eugenic and population control mandates, and with people like Gamble and PPFA’s Alan Guttmacher directing the organizational bureaucracy, the continued influence of eugenics was inevitable.

Research from the Winston-Salem Journal discovered that “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

According to the film, Maafa21, “In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s State’s sterilization program saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.”

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Clarence Gamble calls for eugenics sterilizations (Image: Maafa21)

Gamble had been promoting birth control since the late 1930s…” writes the Winston-Salem Journal. In addition:

Gamble was sure that eugenic sterilization was a good idea, but after World War II few states were willing to consider the kind of aggressive program that he wanted. Gamble contributed time, money and a keen public-relations sense to the Human Betterment League. He also paid for most of the sterilizations in Orange County during one year, and he paid for the research that went into the book Sterilization in North Carolina, written by researcher Moya Woodside.

According to Maafa21, “North Carolina was not the only state whose eugenics programs were influenced by friends of Sanger or Planned Parenthood. In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.” You can watch Maafa21 on Live Action’s Facebook page.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick embraces her son (Image credit: Maafa21 blog)

In her quest to get justice for eugenics victims, Elaine Riddick testified tearfully:

I was a victim of rape…I was a victim of child abuse… I have to get out what the state of North Carolina did to me. I am not feeble minded. I’ve never been feeble minded. They slandered me. They ridiculed and harassed me….

They cut me open like I was a hog… at the same time they gave me a cesarean birth and took my child and when they did that – they sterilized me. What do you think I’m worth?

Riddick told the lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment.

Between 1929 and 1974, nearly 7,600 documented males and females were sterilized by choice, force or coercion under the authority the NC Eugenics Board program. The youngest victims were ten years of age.

  • 85% of victims were female.
  • 40% of victims were minorities, including African Americans and Native Americans.

In 2010, the Justice for Sterilization Victims Foundation was established as a Division of the NC Department of Administration to compensate victims who were forcibly sterilized by the State. The exact number of victims alive today is unknown. However, the State Center for Health Statistics estimates that 2,944 victims may have still been alive as of 2010. It is more realistically estimated by the State Center that 1,500 to 2,000 victims may still be alive.

In 2013, the NC state legislature included $10 million in the budget to be divvied among verified victims.

Eugenics is an evil ideology that tragically remains alive today. As Live Action News has previously documented, the philosophy of eugenics continues to morph under different terms such as abortion and euthanasia. Today, abortion disproportionately targets the African American community — and the main promoter of abortion is Planned Parenthood.

Although Planned Parenthood was founded by Margaret Sanger, an eugenics enthusiast, the organization has yet to denounce her. That is because Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics run just as deep as their founder’s — and that evil root, which claims to decide who is worthy to live or to die, exists to this day.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

NARAL tweets: Abortion is fundamentally about “Parenting” i.e. Killing is parenting?

Posted in License to breed, NARAL, RH Reality Blog with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 12, 2015 by saynsumthn

Naral Pro-choice America is tweeting, “Being pro-choice *is* fundamentally about *parenting!

NARAL Prochoice parenting

The NARAL Tweet takes you to RH Reality Blog’s tumblr page where they posted this:

RH Reality prochoice parenting

They think that because Ilyse Hogue, President of NARAL has announced that she was pregnant with twins, that it is, “confounding anti-choice activists.”

NARAL Pregnant twins

Well not really.

See, we have always known that the babies the abortion lobby wants killed are NOT their own.

In their warped elitist world – they are the ones “deserving” to have children.

After all wasn’t it Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger and other eugenics leaders that she followed, who suggested the government enact a “License to breed?”

guttmachr

In fact, as late as 1970, former Planned Parenthood president Alan Guttmacher called the idea of a limitation of families to only 2 children in America “desirable.” (read about that here)

He endorsed the concept of limiting births by force.

As early as 1966 , in an article in Medical World News Reports, Guttmacher lauded the possibility that coercion will be used to control population, “Each country will have to decide its own form of coercion,” he wrote, “and determine when and how it should be employed. At present the available means are compulsory sterilization and compulsory abortion. Perhaps some day a way of enforcing compulsory birth control will be feasible.

Later, Guttmacher figured out that society would frown on the idea, so he endorsed a plan that he says would work, ABORTION, “If we could get the abortion law liberalized, most of the 750,000 unwanted pregnancies would not lead to babies…”he stated.

LICENSE TO BREED

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger once wrote that no one should have the right to bear a child and no permit for children shall give a couple the right the have more than one birth, requiring parents to obtain a “license to breed.”

LicensetoParent

In her “A License for Mothers to Have Babies” with the subtitle, “A code to stop the overproduction of children.” Sanger writes:

A marriage license shall in itself give husband and wife only the right to a common household and not the right to parenthood.

Article 4. No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood.

Article 5. Permits for parenthood shall be issued upon application by city, county, or State authorities to married couples , providing the parents are financially able to support the expected child, have the qualifications needed for proper rearing of the child, have no transmissible diseases, and on the woman’s part, no medical indication that maternity is likely to result in death or permanent injury to health.

Article 6. No permit for parenthood shall be valid for more than one birth.

Hardin AES

The idea of Forced Population Control is not a new concept as I detail here but was opposed by society generally.

In 1970, Guttmacher said it was inadvisable for Planned Parenthood to go public with their ideas to “limit births” because it would essentially cause a public relations backlash among Americans and especially minorities who see this language as genocide and eugenics. Planned Parenthood was knee deep in Eugenics and Guttmacher knew the sensitivity of how the minority black community felt about population control which we have documented before (here) and here.

So, in conclusion, NARAL prez having babies is not a surprise.

What is a shock is that somehow being for the “choice” to kill your baby at any time prior to birth and for any reason under the sun makes you a “good parent.”

That- is ridiculous!

NARAL tweets article quoting eugenicist Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood

Posted in Margaret Sanger, NARAL with tags , , , , , , on May 18, 2015 by saynsumthn

NARAL Pro-choice NC is a friend of Planned Parenthood that is why it was a puzzle to me when they tweeted to a story on forced sterilizations that begins with a Margaret Sanger quote.

NARAL Forced sterilization

“We Will Not Be Erased: Confronting the History of Black Women and Forced Sterilization http://www.forharriet.com/2015/05/we-will-not-be-erased-history-of-black.html … via @ForHarriet,” NARAL Tweeted.

For Harriet

For Harriet author, Anna Nti-Asare, writes:

    “More children from the fit, less from the unfit.”

    These words were supposedly spoken by Margaret Sanger, founder of Planned Parenthood, and resonate with contemporary attempts to eradicate Black existence. In response to these words, I want to bring light to an issue that many forget or are unaware of. It is a history of social injustice that affects Black women’s reproductive rights and the civil rights of people of color as a whole. Furthermore, it is a reminder that the attempts to erase our people have come in many different forms.

    I am talking about the little known history of forced sterilization.

Unfortunately, that is where the For Harriet story ends as far as Margaret Sanger is concerned – yet- the out-spoken advocate of forced sterilization said much more.

By sterilizing Black women and those she and her eugenics friends considered feeble-minded, Sanger could guarantee they would never become pregnant again.

Margaret Sanger from her autobiography

In Margaret Sanger’s, “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” Sanger states clearly that eugenics, the ideology Stone denounces is not complete without birth control , “Before eugenists and others who are laboring for racial betterment can succeed, they must first clear the way for Birth Control. Like the advocates of Birth Control, the eugenists, for instance, are seeking to assist the race toward the elimination of the unfit. Both are seeking a single end but they lay emphasis upon different methods.

Eugenists emphasize the mating of healthy couples for the conscious purpose of producing healthy children, the sterilization of the unfit to prevent their populating the world with their kind and they may, perhaps, agree with us that contraception is a necessary measure among the masses of the workers, where wages do not keep pace with the growth of the family and its necessities in the way of food, clothing, housing, medical attention, education and the like.

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health.While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfitEugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit…

Sanger also called for those who were poor and what she considered to be “morons and immoral‘, to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called, “Better moral conduct”.

In an interview with Mike Wallace, Sanger called the bringing of these “unfit” children, created by God in the womb, into the world a sin:

Just who was Sanger directing her Birth Control Pill advocacy towards? Her description is below

Sanger I Consider

I consider that the world and almost our civilization for the next twenty-five years, is going to depend upon a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people,” Sanger wrote in 1950, “Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

The Planned Parenthood founder was also a racist:

In her Autobiography KKK

This is what Sanger wrote in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Source: Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366 and Maafa21. )

Sanger 1965 Population Control

In 1964, Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger said she believed that it would take the US Government to accept “Population Control” to convince other nations to do the same.

I just don’t see how we can control the birth rate until we get the government to agree that this is something which should be taken seriously. Other countries feel that if our government is against it, it must be bad. Americans would be much more acceptable when they go abroad to work on the problem if we get our government to approve it- perhaps under some such term as population control,” Sanger stated.

For further information about forced sterilization and eugenics, watch the film, Maafa21.

Second state offers reparations to eugenic forced sterilization victims

Posted in Ernst Rudin, Eugenics in North Carolina, Eugenics in Virginia, Forced Sterilization, Reparations with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on March 4, 2015 by saynsumthn

On March 20, 1924 the Virginia General Assembly passed two racist laws “The Racial Integrity Act” and “The Sterilization Act

Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act was overseen by an avid eugenicist named Walter Ashby Plecker.

Plecker became a darling of the Eugenics movement and at one point he dined at the New York home of another famous eugenicist Harry H. Laughlin.

Laughlin was an official with both the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League

Laughlin was also an unabashed Nazi sympathizer.

Harry Laughlin BCR Margaret Sanger

In 1932, Plecker gave a keynote speech at the Third International Conference on Eugenics in New York.

Among those in attendance was Ernst Rudin of Germany and in 1933, Rudin’s call for racial purity was published in Sanger’s Birth Control Review.

Ernst Rudin Eugenics Nazi Margaret Sanger Maafa21

Later, according to the documentary film, Maafa21, Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws and, at one point, he personally helped the Gestapo round-up and sterilize between 500 and 600 blacks who they referred to as “Rhineland bastards.” After the war, Rudin would be identified as one of the architects of the barbaric medical experiments that the Nazis carried out in their concentration camps.

Walter Ashby Plecker Eugenics racism Quote

When Hitler’s sterilizations were reported in the United States Plecker wrote a letter to the German Bureau of Human Betterment and Eugenics praising them for the action and expressing his hope that not one child had been missed.

Ten years earlier, Plecker had written that African-Americans were “the greatest problem and most destructive force which confronts the white race and American civilization.”

Virginia’s Racial Integrity Act played havoc on couples who wished to marry but were of different races. In June, 1958, two residents of Virginia, Mildred Jeter, a Black woman, and Richard Loving, a white man, were married in the District of Columbia pursuant to its laws. Shortly after their marriage, the Lovings returned to Virginia and established their marital abode in Caroline County. At the October Term, 1958, of the Circuit Court of Caroline County, a grand jury issued an indictment charging the Lovings with violating Virginia’s ban on interracial marriages.

On January 6, 199, the Lovings pleaded guilty to the charge, and were sentenced to one year in jail; however, the trial judge suspended the sentence for a period of 25 years on the condition that the Lovings leave the State and not return to Virginia together for 25 years.

Eugenical Sterilization Act

Between 1927 to 1979, Virginia sterilized about 8,000 people deemed unfit to reproduce for reasons such as mental illness, physical deformity or homelessness.

The Virginia Eugenical Sterilization Act declared that “heredity plays an important part in the transmission of insanity, idiocy, imbecility, epilepsy, and crime.”

The act was based on Harry Laughlin’s Model Law.

Harry Laughlin BCR

Laughlin was an official with both the American Eugenics Society and Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League and, in 1928, his plan for using forced sterilization to eliminate those who might produce what he called “degenerate offspring” was published in the Birth Control Review.

Just a few years prior, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld Buck v. Bell, a case challenging Virginia’s eugenics sterilization law, a model law used by many other states to sterilize their people.

VA Eugenic Sterilization Law Upheld

In deciding Carrie Buck’s fate, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, wrote, “Carrie Buck is a feeble minded white woman who was committed to the State Colony above mentioned in due form. She is the daughter of a feeble minded mother in the same institution, and the mother of an illegitimate feeble minded child. She was eighteen years old at the time of the trial of her case in the Circuit Court, in the latter part of 1924. An Act of Virginia, approved March 20, 1924, recites that the health of the patient and the welfare of society may be promoted in certain cases by the sterilization of mental defectives, under careful safeguard, that the sterilization may be effected in males by vasectomy and in females by salpingectomy, without serious pain or substantial danger to life; that the Commonwealth is supporting in various institutions many defective persons who, if now discharged, would become a menace, but, if incapable of procreating, might be discharged with safety and become self-supporting with benefit to themselves and to society, and that experience has shown that heredity plays an important part in the transmission of insanity, imbecility…The statute then enacts that, whenever the superintendent of certain institutions, including the above-named State Colony, shall be of opinion that it is for the best interests of the patients and of society that an inmate under his care should be sexually sterilized, he may have the operation performed upon any patient afflicted with hereditary forms of insanity, imbecility…on complying with the very careful provisions by which the act protects the patients from possible abuse.”

Carrie-Emma-Buck

“The judgment finds the facts that have been recited, and that Carrie Buck “is the probable potential parent of socially inadequate offspring, likewise afflicted, that she may be sexually sterilized without detriment to her general health, and that her welfare and that of society will be promoted by her sterilization,” and thereupon makes the order.”

OliverWendallHolmes

Holmes went on to state, “It is better for all the world, if instead of waiting to execute degenerate offspring for crime, or to let them starve for their imbecility, society can prevent those who are manifestly unfit from continuing their kind … Three generations of imbeciles are enough.”

According to the Claude Moore Health Sciences Library, it is likely that Carrie’s mother, Emma Buck, was committed to a state institution because she was considered sexually promiscuous, that the same diagnosis was made about Carrie when she became an unwed mother at the age of 17 due to being raped, and that her daughter Vivian was diagnosed as “not quite normal” at the age of six months largely in support of the legal effort to sterilize Carrie.

The law was eventually overturned and in 2002, Virginia’s Governor apologized to the victims.

VA Gov Apologizes for Sterilization Eugenics

Now, the state of Virginia has decided to compensate the victims of forced sterilization and the General Assembly has set up a fund which should give $25,000 to each victim.

The appropriation makes Virginia the second state to take such action following North Carolina.

The North Carolina effort was due in part to the moving testimony of eugenics victim, Elaine Riddick. Her story has been captured in the film, Maafa21 available here wwa.maafa21.com

Forced vaccinations lead to forced abortion and sterilization

Posted in forced abortion, Forced Population Control, Forced Sterilization, Vaccinations with tags , , , , , on February 13, 2015 by saynsumthn

Fox News guest Jonathan Hoenig said the idea of mandating vaccines is a slippery slope to the government forcing all sorts of medical procedures upon people, like abortion and forced sterilizations.

Blacks matter to Planned Parenthood if they push abortion

Posted in Black Genocide, Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood abortion numbers, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Racism with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2014 by saynsumthn

I have blogged many times about the racist history of Planned Parenthood. In addition, I have documented how the Black community warned that Planned Parenthood was deliberately placing their centers in Black communities something the Black community saw as clear genocide.

Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, was a member of the American Eugenics Society. In addition, Sanger admitted in her autobiography that she gave speeches to the Klan.

SANGERKKK2

Over the years, Planned Parenthood morphed from an organization under Sanger which pushed the sterilization of the “unfit” or “feeble minded” (terms often used for Black people) to one that saw abortion as a solution to their agenda. During Sanger’s rule, there was little discussion of abortion as a solution to this population due to the fact that eugenics boards across the country were able to forcefully sterilize those they deemed unworthy.

Once the ability to legally coerce or force sterilizations onto the populations Planned Parenthood didn’t want too many of, the discussion of abortion began. As time progressed and America began experiencing the Civil Rights Movement, Planned Parenthood was becoming more aware that Blacks saw their programs as a form of genocide. Internal memos within their organization, which I have read, indicate that Planned Parenthood was discussing a solution to this ever growing problem of Blacks being suspicious of them.

Guttmacher VP AES article

In a letter dated March 7, 1966, Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher, who was also a vice president for the American Eugenics Society wrote to Mr. William Searle, VP of Marketing of the CD Searle Company telling him that he had been picketed by a group of very attractive young men, and noted that this was “just one of several manifestations of increasing racist apprehension in regard to birth control by minority groups, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans.”

Guttmacher had a solution, he continued, “I am seriously considering adding to my staff a minority relations man or women from one of the minority groups, and since the largest is the Negro, probably someone of the Negro race. It would be his task to work not only with the conventional groups like the NAACP, CORE, etc. but actively to confront three militant groups and see whether or not we couldn’t persuade them of the error of their ways.”

A month later, a memo from Naomi T. Gray, Elsie Jackson, Helen Stanford, and Wylda B. Cowles, Community Relations Program for Planned Parenthood-World Population, to Alan F. Guttmacher, dated April 11, 1966, reads, “ there was a consensus at the staff retreat that the tax-savings approach as a rational for providing birth control services has generated mistrust of Planned Parenthood’s motives among some segments of minority group communities—especially the Negro. This approach coupled with the population control message has proved to be explosive. The question now is how to handle the situation in such a way as to improve Planned Parenthood’s image , and if possible, to prevent the generation of further mistrust.”

Then, in a letter from Helen P. Stanford (ACSW) to Mrs. Anne Huppman, Executive Director Planned Parenthood Association of Maryland dated May 14,1968, Stanford tells Huppman , “The charge of Black Genocide as it relates to PP [Planned Parenthood] is being heard more frequently, and I suspect there will be much more of this kind of feeling. This makes it all the more important for us in PP [Planned Parenthood] to focus a great deal of our attention on ways to reach poor urban whites, to put greater emphasis on fostering maternal and child care facilities and to push toward developing social services for family planning by the community. If our services can move in this direction , we will begin to erase the image of birth control , as a planned way of limiting blacks.”

Dr Jerome H Holland sm

That same year of 1968 Planned Parenthood World Population approved unanimously a policy recognizing abortion and sterilization as proper medical procedures. It called for the legalization of both.

Planned Parenthood then put their plan of hiring Blacks to push their agenda in the Black community into motion when elected the first Black man as Chairman of Planned Parenthood.

Dr. Jerome H. Holland pledged his support to the organization and said that those who called birth control a form of genocide, “Are not aware of the real meaning of Family Planning and its uses.”

HollandAbPPPic

Planned Parenthood then used this BLACK MAN to introduce abortion into the organization:

The board of directors, which Holland was Chairman, recommended adopting a policy recognizing abortion and sterilization as medical procedures which should be removed from the criminal law. The wording of the resolution. which was drafted and passed by Planned Parenthood’s National Medical Advisory Committee read, “Abortion is a medical procedure the decision for which must rest with the woman and her physician.” This remains the Planned Parenthood’s verbiage to today.

HollandBlackAbortion

That same year, Eugenics Society Officer Frederick Osborn, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics.”

Frederick Osborn

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Just a few years later, a new Black leader would emerge to push abortion for Planned Parenthood. In 1978, Faye Wattelton became the first Black president of Planned Parenthood.

Faye Wattleton

At a press conference, the then president-elect of Planned Parenthood held in February of 1978, Wattelton told the media that she was “putting the world on notice” that Planned Parenthood was going to be much more aggressive on abortion rights, “What has happened is that we have allowed them [ right-to-lifers] to have center stage,” Wattelton said, “I’d like to say those days are over.”

Wattleton then vowed to restore “to the poor” access of abortion under Medicaid.

Wattelton was then asked if having a Black woman as the head of Planned Parenthood would put to rest the suspicion that abortion and specifically Planned Parenthood were tools of Black Genocide.

Wattleton

Wattelton replies, “I don’t think a lot of people are yelling genocide anymore, because I’m Black. I’m in a watchdog position on these issues and no one should assume I’ve been co-opted. What better way is there to guard against those types of abuses?

Wattelton then said that Blacks should be more concerned about the quality of life than “increasing our numbers.”

One side note, in spite of Planned Parenthood’s continued push back on any legislation to regulate or restrict abortions, Wattelton assured the press that she would call for a 30 day waiting period on sterilization to avoid coercion and abuse. Fast forward to today, where Planned Parenthood calls ANY waiting period on abortion an attack on a “woman’s right to choose” despite documented proof that women are pressured and coerced into killing their unborn children.

For her service and dedication to the eugenics founded organization, in 1992, Wattleton received Planned Parenthood’s highest award, named after their racist founder, the Margaret Sanger Award. Under Wattelton’s leadership, Planned Parenthood’s budget grew from $90 million in 1978 to $384 million in 1990 and clients increased by $3 million.

But, the idea that Blacks would no longer be targeted for eugenics because a Black person was at the helm of a eugenics organization was short-lived.

During her tenure at Planned Parenthood Wattelton admit that supporters of Planned Parenthood contributed to the abortion giant to keep the Black population down.

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On CNN, in a debate with Bob Dornan, an outspoken pro-life member of the US House of Representatives, at that time, Wattleton, admitted, “ As a matter of fact Mr. Dornan, if I may finish, we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all black women to stop having children.”

Go to .50 in this section from the documentary film Maafa21 to hear her statements. But, watch the entire clip to see that even today, racism is a part of the abortion and Planned Parenthood agenda.

Today, abortion is the number one killer of the African American community surpassing all other diseases.

Year after year, abortion stats confirm that it is indeed desecrating the Black community. In fact, according to the most recent stats, of the abortions reported for race or ethnicity in 2011, 36.2% of the total number of abortions recorded for race or ethnicity were reported on Black women.

Mississippi, which currently has only one abortion clinic in the state, had the highest number of abortions reported on Black women coming in at 63.4%.

Alabama, reported that 58.7% of their abortions were on Blacks while in Georgia they reported 52.1% abortions on Black.

Tennessee performed 49.9% of their abortions on Black women and Virginia performed 43.9% on Black women, while Michigan’s Black abortion percentage was 47.9%.

New York City alone performed 46.1% of their abortions on Black women and 41.1% of Black abortions was reported in Missouri.

The use of Blacks by Planned Parenthood to carry out their eugenics agenda is nothing new as I document to some degree here.

Sadly, just a few years ago, another Black leader would seal the deal by incorporating abortion into a National Healthcare plan.

obama-planned-parenthood

President Barack Obama once told Planned Parenthood that abortion was at the heart of his healthcare bill.

Today, many African Americans are again awakening to the eugenics agenda of abortion through Planned Parenthood and speaking out as I document here.

Despite this, Planned Parenthood remains determined to push their agenda and use Black people to do so. I only hope that the African American community will reject Planned Parenthood before they succeed.

Blacks sterilized by eugenics program funded by Margaret Sanger supporter

Posted in Clarence Gamble, Elaine Riddick, Eugenics in North Carolina, Eugenics Review, Life Dynamics, Margaret Sanger and AES, North Carolina Eugenics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 11, 2014 by saynsumthn

Maafa21 logo by Life Dynamics originally published here

Apr 11, 2014 10:57:00 AM

Eugenic sterilization programs existed in America in at least 31 states. Many of the women forced or coerced into sterilization were black.

From 1929 to 1974, the state of North Carolina forcibly sterilized thousands of people who were deemed to be mentally handicapped, promiscuous or unfit to have children.

Life Dynamics has documented the history of the American Eugenics Society including North Carolina’s forced sterilization program in their film, Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America.

Eugenics Society member, Margaret Sanger, who later founded Planned Parenthood, also advocated sterilization of the so-called unfit.

In 1950 Sanger advocated eugenic sterilization in a personal letter she wrote to Katharine Dexter McCormick, an heir to the International Harvester fortune who used her immense wealth to fund the development of the birth-control pill.

Sanger wrote, “I consider that the world and almost our civilization for the next twenty-five years, is going to depend upon a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people. Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately; there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

Sanger I Consider

Sanger’s connections to eugenics was nothing new. She had long praised their ideologies and published several articles on the topic in her Birth Control Review.

In 1935, Sanger’s American Birth Control League published a resolution to unite with the American Eugenics Society.

Sanger 1935abcl-eugenics

Mark Crutcher, President of Life Dynamics elaborates, “These ties between eugenics and Planned Parenthood’s founder were so well established that Sanger, who was a long standing member of the American Eugenics Society, once pursued a plan to merge the American Birth Control League, or Planned Parenthood as it was later called, with the American Eugenics Society. However, despite Sanger’s strong support for the merger, it would eventually be rejected by the leadership of the American Eugenics Society. Sanger then pushed a proposal that would have combined the publications of the two organizations into one magazine. But again, that idea was also rejected by the American Eugenics Society.”

In 1939, Sanger described the American Birth Control League’s Negro Project in a letter to fellow eugenicist, Clarence Gamble, “The minister’s work is also important and also he should be trained, perhaps by the Federation as to our ideals and the goal that we hope to reach. We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

SangerNegroQuote

Gamble was a heir to the Proctor and Gamble fortune and a major financial backer of Sanger’s.

Gamble was also a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Gamble Sterilization EU

In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s State’s sterilization program saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.

Research from North Carolina’s Winston-Salem Journal reveals a long history of abuses in the N.C. sterilization program — abuses that Gamble consistently glossed over. According to the Journal, “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

But merely wanting the sterilizations to happen was not enough for this Margaret Sanger supporter. Clarence Gamble put his money where his eugenics views were and actually funded the North Carolina Eugenics Board that sterilized many blacks, including 14 year old Elaine Riddick.

This is her story excerpted from Life Dynamics’ film: Maafa21:

Shortly after this interview in Maafa21, Elaine Riddick testified before the North Carolina State Legislature in a successful effort to receive compensation for the sterilization.

They cut me open like I was a hog,” Elaine Riddick testified tearfully, “I didn’t even know nothing about this stuff.”

Riddick told the lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, BLACK, and from a bad home environment.

North Carolina was not the only state whose eugenics programs were influenced by friends of Sanger or Planned Parenthood. In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.
PP Eugenics Tree
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In fact, documents from eugenics publications reveal that ‪later, as Sanger’s American Birth Control League morphed into Planned Parenthood they received rent free space from ‪the Eugenics Society.

A fact which is rarely reported is that, in many places, Planned Parenthood was one and the same as the Eugenics Society.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.
Hilda Cornish ARK eugenics Society letter

Later the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Planned Parenthood ARK eugenics society

Supporters and directors of Margaret Sanger were, like her, entrenched in eugenics. Sanger’s backers knew that they were promoting views that would limit the population of a certain group or race of people, primarily African Americans. Their eugenics agenda reached into the lives of innocent and unsuspecting victims like Elaine Riddick with programs of coerced sterilization. But Elaine represents merely a fraction of the black women affected by eugenics.

Over the years the names of these organizations may have changed but their eugenics agenda remains the same and are targeting more unsuspecting people today.

Elaine Riddick

Euphemisms and sterilization target code words, for example, “feebleminded”, were used to describe Black women like me, Elaine Riddick. I was forcibly sterilized at the age of 14 years under North Carolina’s inhumane forced sterilization policy. A policy that was derived from Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood population control handbook, which spread across the United States by her loyal band of eugenicists and lobbying our elected officials,” Elaine Riddick wrote recently.

For more on the forced sterilization of Black women and the eugenics movement, watch Maafa21.

For more on Life Dynamics go here http://www.lifedynamics.com