Archive for Food and Drug Administration

Obama Admin hires former Planned Parenthood media director who advocated pro-lifers fund abortion pills

Posted in Democrat, Obama, Obama and Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood and Obamas, Planned Parenthood Democrat Party, Planned Parenthood elected, Planned Parenthood Employee with tags , , , , , , on April 23, 2012 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood Media Director Accepts Job in Obama Administration
By Paul Stanley , Christian Post Reporter
April 22, 2012|10:22 am

Planned Parenthood’s former media director Tait Sye is now working for the Department of Health and Human Services as deputy assistant secretary for public affairs.

Sye played a major role in speaking for the nation’s largest abortion provider on a daily basis and most recently had to defend HHS’s rule that required most employers, including some self-insured religious institutions, to provide free birth control, and abortion pills

Planned Parenthood performs more than one-quarter of all abortions in the United States and has sued multiple states for either cutting or eliminating a portion of their public funding.

In his new role, Sye will assist the communication efforts for the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Read Rest Here http://www.christianpost.com/news/planned-parenthood-media-director-accepts-job-in-obama-administration-73656/

Former Monsanto VP for public policy – Obama’s deputy commissioner for foods at FDA

Posted in Genetically Modified Food, Monsanto with tags , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2011 by saynsumthn

According to a 2010 Press Release posted on the FDA’s website:

Michael R. Taylor was named deputy commissioner for foods at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in January 2010. He is the first individual to hold the position, which was created along with a new Office of Foods in August 2009.

Mr. Taylor is leading FDA efforts to

* develop and carry out a prevention-based strategy for food safety
* plan for new food safety legislation
* ensure that food labels contain clear and accurate information on nutrition

Taylor served as administrator of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) and acting under secretary for food safety at USDA. He spearheaded public health-oriented reform of FSIS, guided the development of new safety requirements for meat and poultry products, and addressed the hazard associated with E. coli O157:H7 in beef products.

Taylor began his career as a staff attorney at FDA, holding various positions including deputy commissioner for policy. He was involved in issuing regulations to address seafood safety and in carrying out nutrition labeling requirements.

Other positions held by Taylor include senior fellow, Resources for the Future; professor, School of Medicine, University of Maryland; partner, King & Spalding law firm; and vice president for public policy, Monsanto Company.

“I am fully committed to working with my FDA colleagues to make the changes necessary to ensure the safety of America’s food supply from farm to table,” said Mr. Taylor.

Huffington posted a story on insidious way rBGH (the bovine growth hormone) made it into our country’s food supply, with the help of Michael R. Taylor. They wrote about the dangerous effects of the addition of rBGH to our dairy supply:

In humans, studies indicate milk from cows treated with rBGH may contain elevated levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IFG-1), which can increase the risk of breast cancer and other types of cancer.

Here is a portion of what was detailed about Taylor’s connections in that story:

“An excerpt from a 1998 article in The Ecologist magazine details Taylor’s journey and its significance:

“In March 1994, Taylor was publicly exposed as a former lawyer for the Monsanto corporation for seven years. While working for Monsanto, Taylor had prepared a memo for the company as to whether or not it would be constitutional for states to erect labeling laws concerning rBGH dairy products. In other words. Taylor helped Monsanto figure out whether or not the corporation could sue states or companies that wanted to tell the public that their products were free of Monsanto’s drug.”

In June of 2011: Obama food safety chief and former Monsanto lawyer Michael R. Taylor defended the FDA’s sting operations and armed raids against raw milk producers, including Pennsylvania Amish farmer Dan Allgyer, who is facing an injunction for selling milk across state lines. None of Allgyer’s milk was contaminated. The agency’s actions are likely to put him out of business.

“We believe we’re doing our job,” Taylor said at a presentation at the Ogilvy Washington public affairs group. He promised to “keep doing our public health job,” and described his agency’s campaign against raw milk producers as based on a “public health duty” and “statutory directive.”

Taylor said he had a “quibble” with the notion that the agency is spending too much of its resources targeting boutique raw milk producers even as huge contamination outbreaks have occurred among large Iowa egg farms and elsewhere.

The FDA is in the midst of writing the critical regulations that will implement the Food Safety Modernization Act Congress passed last year with applause all around from the Obama administration, Democrats and Republicans despite ferocious opposition from small-farm advocates. The sweeping new law gives the agency extraordinary powers to detain foods on farms. It also denies farmers recourse to federal courts.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/nov05election/detail?entry_id=90472#ixzz1VzM5L9jT

According to one blogger:

When FDA scientists were asked to weigh in on what was to become the most radical and potentially dangerous change in our food supply — the introduction of genetically modified (GM) foods — secret documents now reveal that the experts were very concerned. Memo after memo described toxins, new diseases, nutritional deficiencies, and hard-to-detect allergens. They were adamant that the technology carried “serious health hazards,” and required careful, long-term research, including human studies, before any genetically modified organisms (GMOs) could be safely released into the food supply.

But the biotech industry had rigged the game so that neither science nor scientists would stand in their way. They had placed their own man in charge of FDA policy and he wasn’t going to be swayed by feeble arguments related to food safety. No, he was going to do what corporations had done for decades to get past these types of pesky concerns. He was going to lie.

Alex Jones Eugenics Report: Genetically Altered Air, Water and Food Supply

Posted in Alex Jones, Eugenics, Food Safety, Genetically Modified Food, Mercury, New World Order, Peter Singer, Population Control, Rockefeller with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 1, 2010 by saynsumthn



Doomsday Seed Vault in Svalbard Norway

“The Svalbard Global Seed Vault, or the Doomsday Vault as the media have nicknamed it, was officially opened on February 26, 2008, to serve as the ultimate safety net for one of the world’s most important natural resources. The world’s seed collections are vulnerable to a wide range of threats – civil strife, war, natural catastrophes, and, more routinely but no less damagingly, poor management, lack of adequate funding, and equipment failures.“ Global Crop Diversity Trust

This ‘Doomsday Vault’ is part of an effort to protect the planet’s diminishing biodiversity.

The facility was dug deep into the frozen rock of an Arctic mountain on Spitsbergen, one of 3 Arpichelago Islands in Norway. Any seeds stored here will be secure for centuries, or longer.

As well as protecting against the loss of multicultural diversity, the vault is going to provide the salvation for restarting agricultural production at the regional or global level in the wake of a natural or man-made disaster.

Contingencies for climate change have been worked into the plan. Even in the worst-case scenarios of global warming, the vault rooms will remain naturally frozen for up to 200 years.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

“How The Earth Changed History” premieres Sunda…, posted with vodpod


Africans suspicious of Bill Gates investment

Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation invests in Monsanto
Thursday, August 26, 2010

Farmers and civil society organizations around the world are outraged by the recent discovery of further connections between the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and agribusiness titan Monsanto. Last week, a financial website published the Gates Foundation’s investment portfolio, including 500,000 shares of Monsanto stock with an estimated worth of $23.1 million purchased in the second quarter of 2010. This marks a substantial increase from its previous holdings, valued at just over $360,000.

“The Foundation’s direct investment in Monsanto is problematic on two primary levels,” said Dr. Phil Bereano, University of Washington Professor Emeritus and recognized expert on genetic engineering, in the press release. “First, Monsanto has a history of blatant disregard for the interests and well-being of small farmers around the world, as well as an appalling environmental track record. The strong connections to Monsanto cast serious doubt on the Foundation’s heavy funding of agricultural development in Africa and purported goal of alleviating poverty and hunger among small-scale farmers. Second, this investment represents an enormous conflict of interests.”

Monsanto has already negatively impacted agriculture in African countries. For example, in South Africa in 2009, Monsanto’s genetically modified maize failed to produce kernels and hundreds of farmers were devastated. According to Mariam Mayet, environmental attorney and director of the Africa Centre for Biosafety in Johannesburg, some farmers suffered up to an 80% crop failure. While Monsanto compensated the large-scale farmers to whom it directly sold the faulty product, it gave nothing to the small-scale farmers to whom it had handed out free sachets of seeds. “When the economic power of Gates is coupled with the irresponsibility of Monsanto, the outlook for African smallholders is not very promising,” said Mayet. Monsanto’s aggressive patenting practices have also monopolized control over seed in ways that deny farmers control over their own harvest, going so far as to sue—and bankrupt—farmers for “patent infringement.”

News of the Foundation’s recent Monsanto investment has confirmed the misgivings of many farmers and sustainable agriculture advocates in Africa, among them the Kenya Biodiversity Coalition, who commented, “We have long suspected that the founders of AGRA—the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation—had a long and more intimate affair with Monsanto.” Indeed, according to Travis English, researcher with AGRA Watch, “The Foundation’s ownership of Monsanto stock is emblematic of a deeper, more long-standing involvement with the corporation, particularly in Africa.”

Rest of Story Here

For a good look at Eugenics watch this film – Maafa21

RU 486 companion drug blamed in 2001 death

Posted in Abortion, Abortion death, RU-486 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 10, 2010 by saynsumthn

By Ed Langlois Jan 12,2001

Of the Sentinel

A just-settled Portland lawsuit has called into question the safety of a drug being used in concert with the abortion compound RU 486.

The 1997 death of 34-year-old Margaret O’Connor is being blamed on a dose of misoprostol, an ulcer medication that doctors have for several years used to induce labor in expectant mothers.

The undisclosed settlement, achieved last month after a two-year trial in Multnomah County Circuit Court, went to Michael O’Connor of Portland. On Jan. 28, 1997, O’Connor lost his wife an hour after she gave birth to their third child at Legacy Emanuel Hospital in Portland.

The Food and Drug Administration in September approved the use of RU 486, and doctors have been using Cytotec as a companion drug to complete the chemical abortion process.

But FDA figures show 30 cases of rupture of the uterus related to the use of misoprostol, known by its brand name Cytotec. In eight cases, the child died even though abortion was not the intent.

In the Portland case, the mother died.

Peggy O’Connor was admitted to Emanuel for what Dr. Barry Davis says appeared to be an ‘uneventful’ labor. But Dr. Davis did note that O’Connor was anxious to have the baby and had consulted with another physician, Dr. Joseph Weick, about using Cytotec to hurry the birth and avert complications. The drug had been used in Legacy delivery rooms for less than a year. Dr. Weick said he saw no problem and Dr. Davis ordered the dose.

Powerful contractions set in and O’Connor delivered the child. About 20 minutes later, the placenta came. O’Connor, who had had a child previously via cesarean section, then began bleeding profusely. She went into shock, and surgical measures to save her life failed.

An autopsy revealed that the placenta had broken off too abruptly and that amniotic fluid entered Peggy O’Connor’s bloodstream.

‘The pro-life community has always warned that RU 486 abortions are deadly not only to the unborn but to the women,’ says Gayle Atteberry, executive director of Oregon Right to Life. ‘This tragically proves us right.’

Oregon was one of the states where doctors tested RU 486 and developed protocol for its use.

In a pre-trial deposition, the O’Connors’ attorney Keith Tichenor asked Dr. Davis if he had warned his patient of the risks involved with Cytotec before he administered it.

Tichenor: ‘Did you tell her anything about whether it was used as an abortifacient?’

Davis: ‘No.’

Tichenor: ‘Did you tell her anything about warnings on the package inserts about not using it if you were pregnant because of the abortifacient property?’

Davis: ‘No.’

Attorneys for Dr. Davis, Legacy Health System and Monsanto argued that the harm to Margaret O’Connor was ‘not foreseeable.’

Cytotec is manufactured by G.D. Searle, a drug company owned by chemical giant Monsanto. The FDA approved Cytotec as an ulcer medication in 1988.

The drug literature from the late 1980s warns, in bold type, against the use of Cytotec by pregnant women.

But medical experts are split on the use of the drug during labor.

The O’Connor case showed that some strong proponents of its use are at Portland’s Oregon Health Sciences University. It was there, at a 1995 continuing education seminar, that Dr. Davis was told that the ulcer drug Cytotec was a good labor quickener.

But doctors elsewhere argue strongly against the drug, citing its tendency to cause the strong contractions and even kill the child in the process of being born.

Dr. Marsden Wagner, a Washington, D.C., physician who once worked with the World Health Organization, relays reports from Medford that obstetricians there are using Cytotec to try to fit deliveries into a daytime schedule.

‘We can’t just throw drugs at people in an uncontrolled way,’ Dr. Wagner writes in a recent article in the magazine Midwifery Today.

‘These women and babies paid a very big price because their practitioners were willing to use a very powerful drug before it has been approved by the FDA for this purpose and before it was adequately evaluated by prospective, controlled research.’

Dr. Charles Lockwood, chairman of obstetrical practices for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, says that Cytotec is the ‘agent of choice’ for inducing labor in the United States.

During the 12-year debate that resulted in the approval of protocol for RU 486, many physicians argued that women should be able to take Cytotec at home to make the abortion process cheaper and quicker.

‘Not being able to use misoprostol at home is a barrier to entry to providing medical abortion services,’ Dr. Suzanne Poppema, Seattle-based president of the National Abortion Federation, said in March 1999.

So far, the FDA has approved Cytotec only for use in treating peptic ulcers, but did recommend it to cause miscarriage after use of RU 486. When doctors use the drug to induce labor they are engaging in a common, legal but risky practice called ‘off-label use.’

In August 2000, Searle sent an update letter from its Skokie, Ill., office to doctors warning that Cytotec was approved only for treating ulcers and posed dangers to women if used to induce labor or abortions.

‘Serious adverse events reported following off-label use of Cytotec in pregnant women include maternal or fetal death,’ the Searle letter reported.

Just last week, two doctors from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists chided Searle for the attempted dissuasion.

The editorial, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, charged Searle with letting a fear of abortion politics and potential boycotts override science.

‘It is a sad state of affairs when a pharmaceutical company attempts to restrict the use of a drug although a large body of scientific evidence indicates that the drug has unique benefits and is safe for a large group of patients,’ wrote Drs. Ralph Hale and Stanley Zinberg. ‘Women in the United States should not be deprived of access to misoprostol.’

Other labor-induction drugs are more dangerous and more expensive, the doctors argued.

Though 30 cases may not seem like an epidemic, observers say Cytotec could pose a greater risk now that RU 486 is approved.

Doses for causing abortion will be higher than those used to speed labor.

Even in smaller doses, the drug causes overwhelmingly powerful contractions in some women and can bring on the kind of rupture and bleeding that killed Margaret O’Connor.
‘I’m not sure this kind of thing is isolated, or if it is, whether it will stay isolated,’ says the O’Connors’ Portland attorney Keith Tichenor.