Archive for fetal organ

Cost of fetal liver from Stem Express who procures babies from Planned Parenthood

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 29, 2015 by saynsumthn

Besides the invaluable cost of a human life, aborted babies are being harvested for their organs. One of the most valued parts if the liver, so I decided to see what a fetal liver actually costs.

After news that Stem Express was in the baby parts industry with Planned Parenthood, I started looking around to see what I could find.

Stem Express financial benefit Planned Parenthood 1

I have already written a little about them here and here if you’d care to read those posts.

After a little digging online, I happened upon a Stem Express catalog that has been removed.

But, a cached version still exists. For that reason, the screen grabs will look a little distorted than if the actual PDF was available.

What the document contains may explain Planned Parenthood’s desire for the livers of the babies they abort:

Standards Stem Express

In the 2013-2014 Stem Express Catalog, owner Cate Dyer, CEO brags that they are the largest provider of fetal tissue globally:

Cate Fyer of Stem Express fetal body parts

    The addition of new products is not the only area of growth we have experienced. Relocating our main headquarters into a new state-of-the-art facility added 17,000sqft to our workspace. The team has grown by 30%, recruiting people from companies such as Genentech and Telik. We added an on-site procurement center specializing in the collection of leukapheresis and bone marrow. Continuing to be an industry leader in procurement, we realized exponential growth with regard to human tissues such as cadaverous tissue, umbilical cord blood, diseased tissue and tumors. Finally, StemExpress is now the largest provider of maternal blood and fetal tissue globally

Strem Express Catalogue

The document goes on to say:

    StemExpress is a global biotechnology company that was founded in May of 2010. We have the largest variety of raw materials available in the industry. Combined with our access to raw material, StemExpress is also your one stop location for fresh, fixed and cryopreserved human primary cells. Our human tissue products range from fetal to adult tissues and healthy to diseased samples.

    StemExpress procures specimens from various hospitals and clinics throughout the United States. We are licensed and/or certified in accordance with local, state and federal requirements. Our IRB approved protocols and consents protect you as well as our donor’s privacy in accordance with HIPAA guidelines. The StemExpress team takes pride in being researcher oriented and our goal is to build strong, responsive, and long-lasting relationships with our clients. By partnering with StemExpress, we can reduce the time your team spends isolating cells or collecting raw materials. Let us take your research to the next level.

And:

    Stemexpress has the largest variety of raw materials available in the industry Human tissues range from human fetal, adult, cadaverous, diseased samples and bone marrow. No other biotechnology company offers the vast variety of tissue types that we procure. All tissues are collected by StemExpress trained Procurement Technicians which allows us to quality control the procurement of the sample from beginning to end.

Center-for-medical-progress-planned-parenthood-_4074235482570710431_n

In the Center for Medical Progress videos exposing the Planned Parenthood / Stem Express aborted baby parts harvesting scheme, the need for fetal livers came up over and over again.

Planned Parenthood intact-livers

In the first video released, Planned Parenthood’s Senior Director of Medical Services Dr. Deborah Nucatola id heard telling what she thought was buyers of a Biotech company, “I’d say a lot of people want liver. And for that reason, most providers will do this case under ultrasound guidance, so they’ll know where they’re putting their forceps. The kind of rate-limiting step of the procedure is the calvarium, the head is basically the biggest part. Most of the other stuff can come out intact. It’s very rare to have a patient that doesn’t have enough dilation to evacuate all the other parts intact.”

planned-parenthood-video-crush-b

Nucatola went on to say how she would crush the unborn baby above and below the desired organ,” Exactly. So then you’re just kind of cognizant of where you put your graspers, you try to intentionally go above and below the thorax, so that, you know, we’ve been very good at getting heart, lung, liver, because we know that, so I’m not gonna crush that part, I’m going to basically crush
below, I’m gonna crush above, and I’m gonna see if I can get it all intact. And with the calvarium, in general, some people will actually try to change the presentation so that it’s not vertex, because when it’s vertex presentation, you never have enough dilation at the beginning of the case, unless you have real, huge amount of dilation to deliver an intact calvarium. So if you do it starting from the breech presentation, there’s dilation that happens as the case goes on, and often, the last, you can
evacuate an intact calvarium at the end. So I mean there are certainly steps that can be taken to try to ensure—

She goes onto to say that the abortionist can “change the presentation” to breech in what some think was describing an illegal Partial Birth Abortion.

Stem Express Fetal Liver COsts

Stem Express Fetal LIver cost 2

Stem Express Fetal Liver Costs 3

Stem Express Fetal Liver Costs 4

A look at the outdated StemExpress catalog shows that livers can run $500 to over $2000.00.

Stem Express Fetal Liver

STemExpress Fetal Liver

A current (2015) screen grab of the Stem Express fetal liver order page shows the much higher prices:

Stem Express Fetal Liver costs 2015

Below are screen grands from more parts of the Stem Express catalogue:

Capture

Human Tissue STemExpress

Standards Stem Express

StemExpress Lead Time tissue

StemExpress Ordering and Delivery

More on owner Cate Dyer and the Stem Express beginnings from Sacramento State University:

    The company initially operated out of Dyer’s home in rural El Dorado County. Her initial investment was $9,000. Her first month’s income was $800 –and then the business took off, earning several hundred thousand dollars within 18 months. Dyer predicts that this year the company will double its 2013 revenue. StemExpress, with its sparkling cell-isolation laboratory and cutting-edge blood and bone marrow donation center, is headquartered in a sleek, 19,000-square-foot building in downtown Placerville. Dyer still maintains close ties to her alma mater. Seventy-five percent of her laboratory staff –including cell biologists, microbiologists and a geneticist –are Sacramento State alumni. And she hires Sac State students for summer internships. They are paid and receive college credit for their work.

    Among StemExpress’ clients are Yale, Harvard and Stanford universities and such companies as Genentech and Pfizer.

    “I got really comfortable with tissue and organs, and I loved the human body, loved all of it. I saw organ transplant teams come into the ER when a donor had died. The hospital needed someone to assist in organ collection, and I was good at procurement, so they tagged me to assist with the organ transplant teams. That’s when I got exposed to organ and tissue collection. That was the first ‘light bulb’ for me to start this company.”

    Dyer was employed by a small Bay Area company that specialized in collecting tissue for medical research. “I came in contact with researchers who said they waited six to eight months for adult liver tissue. I couldn’t believe it,” she says. “I asked, ‘Why don’t you get it from the transplant banks if they can’t use it?’ The thing is, the banks spend a lot of money doing that type of collection, and they’re not about to hand it over to a researcher for $500 or $1,000. Transplantable corneas are worth about $24,000 to eye banks, for example. So I became passionate trying to figure out how to change those things. I didn’t know where it would lead. I just saw it as a problem and wanted to fix it.”

Stem Express is now a multi-million dollar company that provides human blood and tissues for researchers all around the world.

Dyer said that samples can get as specific as age, gender and ethnicity, she told a local news outlet.

New research: harvest organs from aborted fetuses to implant in animals

Posted in Aborted Babies, Aborted Baby Body Parts, Alex Jones, Fetal Organs, Fetal Stem Cell, Fetal Tissue, Humanized mice, stem Express with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 6, 2015 by saynsumthn

UPDATE NOTE: This blog was posted before The Center for Medical Progress (CMP) released videos showing Planned Parenthood’s operation of harvesting aborted baby parts. As I note in this post, Stem Express, which procured fetal parts from Planned Parenthood is listed as a source for these babies implanted into animals. The Washington Examiner writes of Gu, that, through his start-up research company, Ganogen, Gu has obtained fetal organs from StemExpress, which is being investigated by the House of Representatives Select Investigative Panel on Infants’ Lives. It is noteworthy that Gu and Stem Express owner Cate Dyer have authored a response together to the Select Panel investigating the use of fetal tissue.

It is now feasible to remove a kidney from an aborted human fetus and implant the organ into a rat, where the kidney can grow to a larger size. That was a statement written in an article published by The Genetic Literacy Project.

It’s possible that further work could find a way to grow kidneys large enough that they could be transplanted into a person, the researchers said, although much more research is needed to determine whether this could be done, the article states.

The new findings are published in the American Journal of Transplantation.

eugene-gu

The research, co-authored by Eugene Gu (Guhe) founder and CEO of Ganogen, Inc., a biotech company in Redwood City, California, raises a number of ethical questions, including whether it is acceptable to use human fetal organs in research, or to transplant human organs into animals. If the research moves forward, it must be determined that the organs were obtained with proper consent, and that the research was conducted with adequate oversight, experts told CBS News.

cuff-kidney-renal-anastomosed-abdominal-aorta

On their website, Ganogen, Inc., says that they have found a way to successfully transplant human fetal kidneys, livers, hearts, lungs, and other organs into animal hosts using advanced microsurgery.

Human fetal heart transplant rat abortion Ganogen

We also use our patented medical device, the arterial flow regulator, to make the fetal organ compatible for transplantation into the adult animal host.

kidney-growth-620w

“After transplantation, the fetal organ continues to grow and mature. It even demonstrates function, and in the case of the kidney, can keep the host animal alive all on its own,” they explain.

According to CBS, Gu and his colleagues obtained human fetal kidneys from Stem Express, a Placerville, California-based company that supplies researchers with tissue from deceased adults and fetuses.

On their website, Stem Express writes that their “human tissue products range from fetal to adult and healthy to diseased, and we also collect bone marrow and leukapheresis for isolation.”

They go on to say that, “Working with hospitals and clinics across the United States, all human tissue and blood procurement is performed in accordance with IRB-approved protocols and consents. Protecting the privacy of our researchers and donors is always the highest priority at StemExpress.

The company, which operates in more than 30 procurement sites across the United States and delivers product to hundreds of researchers worldwide has an online market of fetal cells that be purchased:

Stem Express Fetal LIver cost 2

According to Gu, people who donated the fetal tissues gave consent for the kidneys to be used in research.

The researchers transplanted the fetal kidneys into adult rats that lacked an immune system (so as to avoid tissue rejection), and connected the animals’ blood vessels to the organs using a challenging procedure that involved tiny stitches, about three to four times smaller than the width of a human hair.

Kidney Transplant fetal Ganogen abortion

We did this study in rats as proof-of-concept to show that human fetal organs can indeed survive in an animal host, can function to keep the animal alive, and can grow larger over time,” Gu told Medical Daily. The rats survived roughly four months after the transplant, and one even lived for 10 months.

Cate Dyer, CEO and founder of Stem Express, claimed that all “donors”, that is the pregnant women seeking the abortion and not the unborn child whose kidney’s were taken, are, “properly consented through an Institutional Review Board (IRB) consent, and donors are made aware of the potential use of any sample that we collect.”

IRB Fetal Research

The IRB defines a Fetus as, “the product of conception from the time of implantation until delivery. If the delivered or expelled fetus is viable, it is designated an infant. (Hereafter, the term “fetus” will refer to a living fetus unless otherwise specified.) The term “fetus” generally refers to later phases of development; the term “embryo” is usually used for earlier phases of development.

Research involving the human fetus raises special concerns for IRB reviewers, the review boards states on the HHS website, “The fetus has a unique and inextricable relationship to the mother. It cannot consent to be a research subject. These circumstances have aroused lengthy public debate on the ethics of fetal research, and led to special federal regulations that guide IRB deliberations about fetal research. The fetus may also be an indirect subject of research when women who may be pregnant participate. Research involving pregnant women is also regulated.”

IRB Research abortion fetus

Under the section: CONSIDERATIONS, the IRB address abortion, “If abortion is involved, the investigators may have no part in either the decision to abort or decisions about the timing or the method to be used; no change in the abortion procedure that would present more than minimal risk to the fetus or its mother can be introduced for research purposes. No monetary or other inducements (e.g., free care) may be offered to a woman to induce her to terminate her pregnancy for research purposes, IRB states.

In another section the IRB addresses research on non-viable fetuses, “A fetus is judged nonviable if it cannot possibly survive to the point of sustaining life independently, even with the support of available medical therapy, and will therefore die. Research involving a nonviable fetus that would either artificially maintain vital functions or hasten their failure is forbidden. Ethical considerations call upon investigators to maintain the dignity of this dying human subject and to avoid unseemly intrusions in the process of dying for research purposes.

However, in detailing how to obtain aborted fetal tissue, the IRB says the following should be followed:

    The decision to terminate a pregnancy and procedures of abortion should be kept independent from the retrieval and use of fetal tissue.
    The timing and method of abortion should not be influenced by the potential uses of fetal tissue for transplantation or medical research.
    Payments and other forms of remuneration and compensation associated with the procurement of fetal tissue should be prohibited, except payment for reasonable expenses occasioned by the actual retrieval, storage, preparation, and transportation of the tissues.

Addressing the possibility of research on a live fetus where the mother has already decided to have an abortion, The IRB says that, “The National Commission for the Protection of Human Subjects wrestled with this problem and concluded that there is no difference between the moral status of a fetus destined for abortion and that of a fetus to be carried to term. Therefore, only those research procedures that would be acceptable for a fetus going to term may be performed in anticipation of abortion.”

In all research in which human fetuses are the subjects of research, the consent of the mother on behalf of the fetus is required. As a general rule, the consent of the father on behalf of the fetus is also required before a fetus may be enrolled in research. Exceptions to the requirement that the father provide consent are permitted if: (1) the father’s identity or whereabouts cannot reasonably be ascertained; (2) the father is not reasonably available; or (3) the pregnancy resulted from rape,” IRB states.

Rats Human Kidney abortion fetus

In addition to kidneys, the researchers have also transplanted human fetal hearts into rats, Gu told CBS, which details the process.

Ultimately, the researchers plan to transplant the kidneys into larger animals, such as pigs, where the organs could grow large enough to be transplanted back into people, Gu said.

Hank Greely, an ethical and legal expert on biomedical science at Stanford Law School outlined his concerns, “The key issues are the existence of the pregnant woman’s consent and the total separation of the decision to abort from the decision to let the fetal remains be used in research,” Greely told Live Science.

In other words, a woman must have already decided to have an abortion before she can be asked whether she is willing to donate the fetus for research.

We feel that our research is more palatable than all the other researchers who use taxpayer money to fund their research involving aborted human fetal tissues, which is the vast majority of major biomedical research labs,” Gu said to Medical Daily.

Addressing his use of harvested organs from aborted fetuses, Gu says he and his colleagues “do not want to encourage abortions in any way, shape, or form. … If the organs are available, it is better to use them to save somebody’s life rather than throw them into the trash bin.”

Undoubtedly, writes Medical Daily, Gu’s argument is probably echoed in many research labs around the world. That said, most people would still find the details of his work unsavory… unless of course they needed a kidney, they say.

But, they fail to mention, religious, pro-life people, and many others find the use of aborted fetal tissue or organs for research morally objectionable.

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Below InfoWars discusses harvesting aborted baby body parts and printing organs

SECOND UPDATE: CMP’s 5th video transcript implies Planned Parenthood is using the aborted babies for “mice” studies and “Humanized mice”.

The Center for Medical Progress released a 5th video showing the nation’s largest Planned Parenthood abortion facility offering intact fetal cadavers which they refer to as “specimens.”

Center for Medical Progress, posing as buyers for a Biotech company sat with the Director of Research for Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, Melissa Farrell, at the abortion-clinic headquarters of Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast in Houston, Texas.

Humanized Mice 2 Farrell Planned Parenthood Houston

Humanized Mice Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood implant aborted baby mice

Read more here: Planned Parenthood uses aborted baby parts for humanized mice research