Archive for feminism

How pro-abortion men hijacked the women’s movement for their own benefit

Posted in Abortion pill, Abortion prior to Roe, Bernard Nathanson, Betty Friedan, Birth Control and Eugenics, Civil Rights, DANCO, Eugenics, Feminism, Frederick OSborn, Lader, Live Action, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, Population Control, Roe V Wade History, RU-486, Subverted, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 25, 2019 by saynsumthn

 

Image: Larry Lader in 2000

Larry Lader in 2000

The “Father of Abortion Rights,” Larry Lader, held eugenic beliefs inspired by Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger — but on abortion, they parted ways, with Lader being extremely in favor of abortion. Lader and his colleague Bernard Nathanson were the two men most instrumental in pushing the 1960’s women’s movement towards abortion.

The reason we know this information, says “Subverted” author Sue Ellen Browder, is because Nathanson, an abortionist who later converted to the pro-life cause, had stories to tell.

Image: Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson. Both men worked against the feminist pro-life movement to push abortion on women.

Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson — two men behind the 1960s abortion push in the U.S.

Browder told Live Action president Lila Rose in an interview, “These two men, Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson, had founded this organization [NARAL] and… Lader knew Betty Friedan very well. They were magazine writers together in New York. Larry Lader had graduated from Harvard University. He was fairly independently wealthy… and his greatest passion was to make abortion legal. And he worked on Betty Friedan for years to try to convince her to insert abortion into her list of demands [within the National Organization for Women (NOW)]….”

“We would never had known it was Lader who at last persuaded Betty to insert abortion into NOW’s package of ‘women’s rights’ if it weren’t for the written testimony of a third party who eye-witnessed events as they unfolded behind the scenes,” Browder wrote in her book. That eyewitness was Nathanson.

“If we’re going to move abortion out of the books and into the streets, we’re going to have to recruit the feminists,” Browder quotes Lader as suggesting.

“Friedan has got to put her troops into this thing – while she still has control of them,” Lader stated.

READ: 8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Friedan, Browder notes, had agreed to write a foreword in the jacket of Lader’s book. “He wrote a book on abortion and it was full of half truths, selective truths and truths out of context. But it was trying to prove to women that they need abortion to be free,” Browder stated. “And Betty Friedan bought it. She gave him a wonderful blurb on the back cover saying what a wonderful book this was. So, she now agreed with him.”

Image: Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Lader wanted to “unleash the fury of women”

Nathanson, who reluctantly agreed to work with Lader in 1967 to convince Friedan’s feminists to support an abortion plank, once admitted, “Larry’s marriage with the feminists was a brilliant tactic.” But Nathanson later regretted the decision.

“In short I found, to my surprise, that I had been subtly dragooned into planning political strategy with Lader,” Nathanson wrote regretfully in his book, “The Hand of God.” Nathanson called himself and Lader “radicals,” writing, “We would settle for nothing less than striking down all existing statutes and substituting abortion on demand.”

The scheme was simple. In “Abortion,” Lader placed the responsibility on women to pronounce abortion as a freedom:

Women themselves must bear the special responsibility of rallying opinion behind reform, standing up and making their demands for justice known throughout the country. Nothing is stronger than the moral power of an idea once it has come of age. And the moral power of legalized abortion will surely prevail when women have directed their anger against the superstitions of centuries, and cried out for the final freedom of procreative choice.

In “Abortion II,” Lader prophetically concluded that to legalize abortion, women would need “to stand before television cameras and describe their own abortions to the public…. It needed brawling women, shouting defiance of the law….” Lader then took credit for convincing women to join, writing, “It took only a few of us in 1966 – the early fanatics – to break the silence and unleash the fury of women. Once the National Organization for Women and Women’s Liberation groups joined the abortion movement, we were ready to shake the country.”

“Significantly, even Friedan, one of the most impressive militants of her time, avoided the abortion issue at first,” Lader recounted in the same book. He wrote, “[W]hile she was writing Mystique, I occasionally suggested that all feminist demands hinged on contraception and abortion and a woman’s control over her own body and procreation. Yet, her book hardly touched this fundamental problem and mentioned Margaret Sanger only peripherally….”

Image: Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique

Betty Friedan’s Feminine Mystique

 

READ: Film documents Planned Parenthood’s history of Black genocide, eugenics

“The breakthrough came slowly,” Lader wrote. “In June 1966, at a meeting of the Commissions on the Status of Women in Washington, Friedan emerged from the status of woman to activist,” Lader said, recounting how Friedan founded NOW. “Although pounding away at the abortion issue in her lectures, she still hesitated to force it into the NOW platform for fear of splitting off Catholics and conservative professionals.”

Then, in a 1966 news conference announcing Lader‘sbook, the LA Times recounted how reporters began using new rhetoric, calling abortion “a civil rights movement for women.”

One year later, in 1967, Lader would convince Friedan to add an abortion plank into NOW.

“Friedan has claimed that she did not start out consciously to start to a revolution,” Lader noted in his book “Ideas Triumphant.” But, he said, “This is not completely accurate. At the time she agreed to write a plug for my book jacket in 1965, we were discussing how to turn ideas into organizing. The founding of the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966 was pivotal.”

“By bringing NOW and eventually Women’s Lib into the abortion campaign, Friedan assured that the struggle for feminine liberation was solidly rooted in the one base that could turn theory into reality – a woman’s control over her own body and procreation,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II.”

Lader’s abortion obsession continued into the 1990’s when he pushed for the legalization of the abortion pill, RU486. In a 2000 press release, Lader bragged about his “plot” to break the law and smuggle the drug into the US.

He told an audience, “We have all sorts of little tricks; we’re tricky people. We smuggled some in from China through a doctor I knew coming in…. We then set up a very small lab… to make a small amount… and then we were very lucky; we found a very good manufacturer in the US and we have been with them ever since.”

Lader died in 2006 from colon cancer. He was 86.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

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  • ( Part One) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • (Part Two) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger
  • (Part Three) ‘Father of abortion rights’: Minorities need abortion to prevent future ‘drug addicts’
  • (Part Four) Pro-abortion leader hoped abortion would end ‘morality’ and ‘the nuclear family’
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

Pro-abortion leader hoped abortion would end ‘morality’ and ‘the nuclear family’

Posted in Black Babies, Black Genocide, Eugenics, Garret Hardin, Garrett Hardin, Human Betterment, Lader, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, Roe V Wade History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 23, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion, abortion rates, Roe v. Wade

The “father of the abortion movement,” Larry Lader, was heavily influenced by Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, about whom he wrote a biography. Planned Parenthood was also steeped in eugenics from its beginning, and boasted a list of eugenics proponents as its board members. Although the two shared a eugenics ideology, Lader would eventually part ways with Sanger over abortion. But it was perhaps Sanger’s warped eugenic ideology that motivated Lader to manipulate the 1960s women’s movement to push for abortion legalization.

 

Lader wasn’t interested in equal rights… just ‘abortion rights’

“Larry never seemed to be interested in the rest of the women’s movement, the equal rights amendment, child care and so forth,” Sey Chassler, a consulting editor at Parade magazine, recalled to the LA Times in 1995. But on abortion, “he is absolutely single-minded. He just keeps going forward on it.”

Image: Lawrence Lader abortion crusader

Lawrence Lader abortion crusader

READ: Did a eugenics proponent coin Planned Parenthood’s iconic slogan?

In 1966, Lader authored the book “Abortion” on the heels of the Supreme Court’s 1965 decision in Griswold vs. Connecticut, granting a so-called right to privacy. “If I had written it five years earlier, it would have sunk like a stone,” he admitted.

Lader stressed in the book, “We will only defeat ourselves by producing an endless cycle of unwanted children. Those born in slums, for example, denied even the smallest share of education and economic opportunity, have little chance of realizing their full potential as citizens.” He goes on to quote Garrett Hardin, a leading eugenic ecologist, whose views influenced debates on abortion, immigration, foreign aid, overpopulation, and other provocative issues.

Hardin, a member of the American Eugenics Society, who was given Planned Parenthood’s highest national award in 1980, once called it insanity to rely on voluntarism to control population. He advocated coercive birth control, stating that citizens should be willing to give up their right to breed for the betterment of society.

“When unwanted children become parents,” Lader quotes Hardin in “Abortion,” “they are more likely than others to be poor parents themselves and breed another generation of unwanted children. This is a vicious cycle if there ever was one. It is ruinous to the social system.”

Image: Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

“Above all, society must grasp the grim relationship between unwanted children and the violent rebellion of minority groups,” Lader went on to state, then using Planned Parenthood’s iconic slogan, “every child a wanted child,” coined by eugenicist Frederick Henry Osborn, a founding member and president of the American Eugenics Society (AES) who also signed Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April 1938.

Frederick Osborn

READ: Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go far beyond Margaret Sanger

“As long as a reasonable chance of contraceptive failure persists, however, abortion must be included as part of birth control to insure every child’s becoming a wanted child,” Lader wrote. He then turned from a eugenics emphasis to couching abortion as liberating for women, calling it, “the final freedom,” and quoting Sanger as saying, “No woman can call herself free until she can choose consciously whether she will or will not be a mother.”

“The complete legalization of abortion is the one just and inevitable answer to the quest for feminine freedom,” Lader stated. “All other solutions are compromises.”

Lader sought “a complete restructuring of sexual morality”

Lader saw abortion as liberating for women, sexually. But in reality, abortion was a man’s dream and the last barrier keeping him from free sex without consequences… and has shifted the responsibility of pregnancy to the woman alone.

“The rapid advance of legalized abortion in turn gave the feminist movement an explosive boost,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II,” adding, “Abortion provided the prime weapon against sexism and the ‘biological imperative’ – the prison of unwanted childbearing that had chained most women to the role of housekeepers, nurses, and cooks under male dominance. Once sex had been detached from pregnancy, Women’s Liberation could construct its own ethics on the ash-heap of puritan morality.”

Lader then suggested that the “feminist revolt” was the “rebirth of sex… an explosion of sexuality” while also pointing out that a recent study had shown that “nearly half of all unmarried women have had sexual intercourse by the age of nineteen.” Of course, Lader also observed from that Commission on Population Growth study that, “more Blacks than Whites had intercourse in each age group.”

Lader described the feminist demands as “a complete restructuring of sexual morality,” claiming that the “most radical feminist wants an even more sweeping revolt – the end of the nuclear family itself.” He claimed the feminist had replaced the security of a “husband’s salary” for the “biological security of abortion.”

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

 

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  • ( Part one) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • (Part Two) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger
  • (Part Three) ‘Father of abortion rights’: Minorities need abortion to prevent future ‘drug addicts’
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger

Posted in abortion used as birth control, Betty Friedan, Lader, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, NARAL, National Organization for (Some) Women, Planned Parenthood History, Subverted, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2019 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder

Larry Lader, rightly dubbed the “father of the abortion rights movement,” influenced the women’s movement of the 1960s to push abortion. Lader was a writer by trade and became the biographer for Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, even referring to himself as her “disciple.” The two eventually parted ways over abortion. Watch to learn more:

In his biography, Lader said Sanger’s obsession with eugenics (an ideology the two shared) originated with her introduction to Henry Havelock Ellis in 1914, a psychologist and author of several books on sex, with whom Sanger was rumored to have had an affair. At the time Lader’s biography was published, it received some favorable reviews with Sanger herself arranging book signings. It was also reportedly distributed through Planned Parenthood offices.

 

Image: Lawrence (Larry) Lader

Lawrence (Larry) Lader

But, in co-authoring his second book on Sanger, Lader can be credited for remaking her from a eugenic fanatic into, as Planned Parenthood describes her, a heroine. Thanks to Lader, Sanger “the eugenicist” became known instead as Sanger “the birth control pioneer.”

Lader’s books barely mention the word eugenics and certainly fail to connect the evil philosophy to Sanger. But the Planned Parenthood founder admitted to meeting with members of the Ku Klux Klan, openly advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.”

Forced sterilization as a permanent solution was, in Sanger’s mind, a preferred solution to procreation of the so-called “unfit” over abortion.

Image: Margaret Sanger Story by Lawrence Lader

Margaret Sanger Story by Lawrence Lader

In his push for legalizing the abortion pill RU486, Lader recounted that Sanger had “skimpy” knowledge about abortion and claimed the topic caused a split between the two. “Ironically, I would eventually split with Margaret over abortion – only in a theoretical sense since, by 1963, she was too ill to carry on our old discussions,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II.”

“Margaret had always opposed abortion…. Naturally, she was right in the context of her time,” he continued.

According to the LA Times, Lader had observed Sanger’s strong opposition to abortion, “seeing the horrors of the women on the Lower East Side, with $5 in their hands, submitting themselves to butchers.” To Sanger, “birth control was a solution to abortion,” Lader realized.

Lader’s abortion activism birthed with Sanger 

Nonetheless, Lader’s time with the Planned Parenthood founder seems to have been the catalyst for Lader’s own abortion obsession. “I hesitated to deal with the subject after writing my biography of Margaret Sanger,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II.” “In 1955, I evaded it again…. By 1962, I made the first step, soliciting dozens of editors to write a magazine article on abortion, but being rejected by all. A year later, still concerned that I could be damaged as a writer by this connection, I started work on a book that was published under the blunt title, ‘Abortion,’ in early 1966.”

Image: Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

On April 14, 1966, during a discussion about abortion recorded by WNYC in New York, Lader was asked about his feelings on abortion. He said:

I did a biography of Margaret Sanger of the birth control movement ten or twelve years ago and from that point on I’ve been extremely interested in anything that denies to women — and to men also, but basically to women — what I consider their basic right to decide whether they should or should not become a mother.

I think this is summed up very well by a great phrase of Margaret Sanger’s which she stated, ‘No woman can call herself free who does not own and control her own body. No woman can call herself free until she can choose consciously whether she will or will not be a mother.’

Image: Margaret Sanger quote

Margaret Sanger quote

And then I add in my book, I state my own statement, the laws that force a woman to bear a child against her will are the sickly heritage of a feminine degradation and male supremacy. In brief, I believe that the right of a woman to bear or not to bear a child is one of the basic human rights and that this cannot be taken away from her….

Lader reiterated the Planned Parenthood founder’s influence in his book, “RU486.” He wrote (emphasis added), “My first book on Margaret Sanger indicated I had a feminist bent. Three crowded years of talking and working with Sanger had completely convinced me that a woman’s freedom in education, jobs, marriage, her whole life, could only be achieved when she gained control of her childbearing. I came gradually to understand that birth control required abortion as a backup measure when contraception failed or wasn’t used at all.”

Prior to the Roe decision, Lader took part in an illegal underground abortion referral service called the “Clergyman’s Consultation Service on Abortion,” founded by the Reverend Howard Moody. Lader made more than 2,000 referrals for women seeking illegal abortions while participating in this “service.”

Then, in 1967, Lader, along with former abortionist Bernard Nathanson (who later became pro-life) hijacked Betty Friedan’s 1960’s women’s movement and influenced the so-called feminist icon to add a pro-abortion plank to the National Organization for Women (NOW), which she founded. Soon after, in 1969, Lader helped Nathanson to found NARAL, originally called the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws, and remained active until 1976, when Lader left NARAL for reasons “no one chooses to discuss,” as the LA Times noted.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

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Part of series on Larry Lader.

  • ( Part one) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

Feminist icon: The way we sold abortion to public caused ‘lack of reverence for life’

Posted in Bernard Nathanson, Betty Friedan, Feminism, Garret Hardin, Lader, Lila Rose, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood History, Subverted, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 19, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy

Feminist icon Betty Friedan, a founding leader of the National Organization for Women (NOW), which bills itself as the first national organization to endorse the legalization of abortion, admitted that it was pro-abortion men who drove the push to legalize abortion. Friedan, who falsely claimed she “started the Woman’s Movement,” was once granted the “Humanist of the Year” award. She authored the book, “The Feminine Mystique,” which didn’t even mention abortion in its first publication. Friedan has been quoted as saying, “Ideologically, I was never for abortion. Motherhood is a value to me, and even today abortion is not.”

But the NOW founder was eventually convinced — by these patriarchal men — to push abortion as part of NOW’s official platform.

Friedan’s admission to NARAL supporters was captured in CSPAN’s 1989 video, “Who Decides? Political Action for Pro-Choice.” She referred to the 1960s pro-choice push as the “second American evolution of women.”

“First of all, the word ‘abortion’ was almost never heard in the early 60s. It was never used in the newspapers,” Friedan told the group. “There were many founders of NOW… and they persuaded me this was too controversial to take on, it might split the burgeoning women’s movement,” Friedan stated.

And, in fact, it did.

She added that at the time, the issue was too controversial even for Planned Parenthood.

Image: Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

READ: A look at the past, present, and future of pro-life feminism

Labeling her fight the “NAACP for Women,” Friedan confessed that it was men who convinced her to use NOW to promote abortion. “I remember that there were some men — doctors, lawyers — that had been trying to reform these criminal abortion laws. And they got a sense somehow that the women’s movement might make everything different,” she said. “They had gotten nowhere but they had a sense. So, they kept nagging at me, to NOW, to try and do something….”

“When it was clear that NOW wasn’t going to [promote it] in those first years,” Friedan says the men came to her pleading for help. These men were Lawrence Lader and Dr. Bernard Nathanson (a founder of NARAL who later became pro-life). Because of her book, Friedan had “a little bit of fame,” and “these guys, they loved me, because I was helping to give them some visibility.”

Friedan helped establish NARAL, (known then as the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws) at the First National Conference on Abortion Laws held in Chicago in 1969. She admitted that at NARAL’s founding, few women attended: “I have to tell you. It wasn’t very large and my hunch is that women were not the majority of people even at it.”

In fact, according to Harvard University Library, two of NARAL’s three member pre-formation planning committee were men: Garrett Hardin and Lawrence Lader. (Lader met Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger in 1953, and in 1955, he published a biography on her, later co-authoring another account of Sanger.)

Abortionist and NARAL founder Bernard Nathanson also played a role in convincing Friedan to push abortion.

In her book, “Subverted,” author Sue Ellen Browder described Lader as being adamant that the women’s movement was key to decriminalizing abortion. “We’ve got to keep the women out front… and some Blacks,” she quotes Lader as telling Nathanson at a NARAL strategy meeting. On a 1967 trip the men took together, Lader said, “If we’re going to move abortion out of the books and into the streets, we’re going to have to recruit the feminists…. Friedan has got to put her troops into this thing – while she still has control of them.”

Browder says Nathanson originally objected to the idea of using feminists to further their movement but later proclaimed, “I was dead wrong.”

Image: Larry Lader in 2000

Larry Lader in 2000

READ: An actress, a singer, and a supermodel show that true feminists are pro-life

In his book, “Abortion II,” Lader recounted his interaction with Friedan: “We had known each other for years, and while she was writing Mystique, I occasionally suggested that all feminist demands hinged on contraception and abortion and a woman’s control over her own body and procreation.” He also wrote that Friedan was hesitant, fearing it would “split[] off Catholics and conservative professionals.”

Image: Abortion 11 by Larry Lader

Abortion 11 by Larry Lader

Lader eventually convinced Friedan to market abortion as a way women could “control their bodies,” crediting Margaret Sanger, who said, “No woman can call herself free who does not own and control her own body.”

Over time, Friedan saw problems with her male-created feminism, and noted that her movement’s failure “was our blind spot about the family.” In promoting her book, “Second Stage,” Friedan called for her movement to “stop overemphasizing abortion rights and reaffirm the importance of family.” But the damage was done.

In 1981, Friedan decried the “lack of reverence for life and the mysteries of conception and birth” in pro-choice feminism:

Maybe there was something slightly off in the way we handled abortion. Such slogans as ”free abortion on demand” had connotations of sexual permissiveness, affronting not only the moral values of conservatives but implying a certain lack of reverence for life and the mysteries of conception and birth.

After all, why do feminists seem to be fighting ”for abortion” against women who say they are fighting for ”the right to life”? How can we fight the real battle in such terms? Who is really for abortion? That is like being for mastectomy…

In contrast to NOW, early feminist leaders like Susan B. Anthony referred to abortion as “child murder” and viewed it as a means of exploiting both women and children. They, unlike Friedan, demonstrated that true feminism was pro-motherhood, pro-woman, and pro-child.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Feminist movement leader admits: ‘Ideologically, I was never for abortion’

Posted in Betty Friedan, Feminism, Feminism prolife, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 17, 2019 by saynsumthn

To the modern feminist movement, the National Organization for Women (NOW) purported to be an advocate for women in the same way that the NAACP was for the Black community. But deep in the foundation of NOW lay another agenda that would eventually drive a large number of women away: legalizing abortion. Today, NOW claims it was the first national organization to endorse the legalization of abortion, adopting a resolution on the “repeal of abortion laws” in 1967. But the group was founded in June of 1966 by a group of feminists including Betty Friedan, author of the 1963 book The Feminine Mystique, which never even mentioned abortion

 

While Friedan stated publicly over the years that she was in full support of abortion, she was not in favor of it personally. In 2000, Friedan admitted in her memoir, “Ideologically, I was never for abortion,” adding, “Motherhood is a value to me, and even today abortion is not.”

Image: Betty Friedan and Richard Graham (Photo: The Sisterhood, by Marcia Cohen)

Betty Friedan and Richard Graham
(Photo: The Sisterhood, by Marcia Cohen)

While Friedan identified injustices facing women in her day, she unfortunately ended up promoting the idea that women could gain “rights” on the backs of their dead children. “Our culture does not permit women to accept or gratify their basic need to grow and fulfill their potentialities as human beings,” Friedan told the New York Times in 1966, adding that women should enjoy the “equality of opportunity and freedom of choice which is their right….” Friedan later claimed that “the personhood of women” was what NOW was all about.

NOW was originally formed by 28 women. In September of 1966, NOW created a steering committee, which included some women and several men. One of those men was Richard Alton Graham, who became the organization’s first vice president. Graham, a member of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) appointed by President Lyndon B. Johnson, once told Friedan, “what we need is a political force for women’s rights.”

In 1967, a list of proposals was offered at the NOW Membership Conference, including the alleged “right” to abortion.

Author Sue Ellen Browder detailed this event in her book, Subverted.

“Friedan has saved the vote over the abortion resolution for last,” Browder writes of that meeting at the Washington, D.C., Mayflower Hotel. “Without warning, she suddenly shocks many delegates, including Marguerite Rawalt, by belligerently pressing for full repeal of all abortion laws.”

Minutes published online show that at 2:00 p.m., Friedan told members:

The purpose of this afternoon meeting is to discuss and vote upon two resolutions: A resolution urging the House and Senate Judiciary Committees to approve the Equal Rights amendment and to call the Ninetieth Congress to approve this amendment, for the submission to the States for ratification.

And a resolution endorsing the principle that it is a basic right of every woman to control her reproductive life, and that those laws preventing abortion should be repealed….

Image: Subverted

Subverted

 

READ: 8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Rawalt, mentioned above, was a retired IRS attorney who served as a 1961 appointee to President John F. Kennedy’s Commission on the Status of Women. According to Browder, Rawalt had “serious reservations” about NOW endorsing abortion because she believed NOW should avoid controversial issues.

She was not alone.

One member noted that if NOW added abortion to its “Bill of Rights,” Catholic members would quit. Another member declared she was “against murder.” Some suggested the issue should be left to local chapters, while another member stated, “We must be cautious. We don’t want to be considered a NUT group.”

Friedan later acknowledged the opposition, telling a NARAL audience in 1989, “When I wrote the statement of purpose in NOW, I was going to include the right to abortion. And I was talked out of it, probably rightly. For heaven’s sake, we were doing this controversial thing…. There were many founders of NOW: Catholic nuns, very militant women… one respected their religious values – and they explained to me that this was too controversial and it might split the women’s movement.”

Browder says reasonable voices were drowned out by students and radicals who “ha[d] shown up in unexpected numbers to cast their votes for abortion.”

The first resolution was put to a vote. It failed (Yes: 32/No 42). Then, according to Browder, a second abortion-supporting statement was proposed. And, despite what Browder described as “bitter controversy,” that proposed abortion resolution passed with a vote of 57-14.

Friedan said 150 people attended the conference — yet only 71 voted. Browder was quick to note that the math did not add up: “What happened to the other thirty-four votes? Did those people abstain? Did they get tired of the fight and go home? The minutes of the meeting don’t say…. A great mystery remains.”

The final proposal to NOW’s “Bill of Rights” was published the following year, stating:

NOW endorses the principle that it is a basic right of every woman to control her reproductive life, and therefore NOW supports the furthering of the sexual revolution of our century by pressing for widespread sex education, provision of birth control information and contraceptives, and urges that all laws penalizing abortion be repealed.

Abortion quickly became a primary focus for NOW, which disturbed NOW’s founding vice president, Richard Graham. When he died in 2007, the New York Times mentioned his outspoken criticism, describing him as “publicly critical” of NOW, noting how he faulted “what he saw as its emphasis on abortion rights… at the expense of more general issues like child care and health care.”

Image: Richard Graham objects to NOW’s abortion focus

Richard Graham objects to NOW’s abortion focus

So if Friedan was really not in favor of abortion, what drove her to push this radical agenda? This will be discussed in future articles.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Cosmo writer: Men pushed reluctant women’s movement to demand legal abortion

Posted in Bernard Nathanson, Cosmo Magazine, Feminism, Lader, Subverted, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 16, 2019 by saynsumthn

Author Sue Ellen Browder once aligned with 1960’s pro-abortion feminism. As a former writer for Cosmopolitan Magazine, she was also complicit in promoting the sexual revolution, which she now believes reduced women to ambitious sex objects. After years of research, Browder concluded that her thinking was being manipulated by a propaganda machine which would unite two movements — the feminist movement and the sexual revolution — to push abortion. She compiled her findings in the captivating book, “Subverted: How I Helped the Sexual Revolution Hijack the Women’s Movement.”

Browder, who was trained as investigative journalist at the University of Missouri School of Journalism, spoke in an interview with Live Action founder Lila Rose:

 

“People don’t remember how bad it was for women”

“In 1963, that was the relaunch of the women’s movement in the 20th Century,” Browder told Rose. “People don’t remember how bad it was for women.”

Women entering the workforce were not treated equally, Browder said. “Women were fired for being pregnant…. Women in some states could not serve on a jury. A married woman could not get credit in her own name…. Women couldn’t go to college in some places…. Very few women were doctors or lawyers. Women were shut out of the professions. So, this was a time when women were very concerned about a lot of injustices and they were all pulling together to try to correct those.”

Image: Subverted

Subverted

 

READ: 8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Arriving on the scene at that time were two women: Helen Gurley Brown — who took over Cosmopolitan Magazine hoping to morph it into a “Playboy” for women — and feminist Betty Freidan, who wrote “The Feminine Mystique,” a book which transformed the way women were viewed. “… [E]verybody went crazy and said, ‘yes, we agree with this [book],’” Browder said.

“By the time I got out of college it was 1968. I thought I could set the world on fire,” she told Rose. But Browder herself was fired after she became pregnant. “I was like, ‘What? What?’ Well, this women’s movement was obviously for me.”

“So, we… had the baby… and then moved back into New York City. And one of the first jobs I got… was at Cosmopolitan Magazine…. I was glamour struck.”

“The whole sexual revolution was made up of lies”

Browder told Rose that she later attended a conference where former NARAL founder Bernard Nathanson, who had since become pro-life, was speaking. “And he told us about all the lies that they had told to sell abortion to the American people. And then… I realized that if [Alfred] Kinsey had lied, and if the abortionists had lied, and if we at Cosmo were lying, then the whole sexual revolution was made up of… all lies. Then, we sold it to the American people through more and more lies – and through the women’s movement… the sexual revolution was sold to the world.”

Browder notes that, because women had been subjected to injustices, they became prime targets for one particular master propagandist skilled in the manipulation of public opinion. His name was Larry Lader, a journalist by trade who became an ardent voice in the fight to legalize abortion. He had been Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s biographer and had known Betty Friedan for many years.

“Larry Lader co-founded NARAL with Bernard Nathanson,” Browder said. “Lader… graduated from Harvard University and was fairly independently wealthy. [H]e worked on Betty Friedan for years to try to convince her to insert abortion into her list of demands….”

Image: Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

Browder said that Lader “began to convince [Friedan] that [abortion] was something that women needed to be free.” Browder added that Friedan “was having problems on two fronts. She was losing control of the National Organization for Women and she was also trying to get her Bill of Rights passed through to Congress. She was creating a political Bill of Rights that would guide Congress for women….”

At a time when women were being fired for pregnancy, Lader convinced Friedan to add abortion to her feminist Bill of Rights “… so they can say to the businessmen, ‘don’t worry about it guys, she’s on the pill and if the pill fails she have an abortion. So, you’re fine – you can pass all these other rights….’”

Feminists eventually caved to the abortion lie, pushed by white, well-to-do men 

The call to legalize abortion was not coming from women but primarily white, well-to-do men who had embraced the Hugh Hefner-style sexual revolution. Cosmopolitan editor Helen Gurley Brown enabled this by painting a deceptive image of a “Cosmo Girl” who had free sex, no kids, and earned plenty of money — an image NOW’s founder, Betty Friedan, originally denounced. “[Friedan] was fighting for equal respect and dignity and education in the workforce,” noted Browder.

“Helen Gurley Brown would have loved to have been part of the women’s movement, but feminist Betty Friedan called Cosmo quite obscene and quite horrible and even at one point called for a boycott of the magazine. [Friedan] never mentioned abortion or contraception in her ‘Feminine Mystique’…. In fact, Friedan had been fired herself for being pregnant…. She did not believe that abortion was a woman’s ‘right’….”

But, as Browder details in “Subverted,” and as Live Action News will detail further, Friedan, under the influence of Lader, eventually bought into abortion. And, while pro-abortion feminists obsessed over abortion, pro-life feminists left NOW to concentrate on real injustices affecting women, splitting NOW’s membership.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Atlantic reporter embeds with Millennial pro-life org: Live Action

Posted in Lila Rose, Live Action with tags , , , , , , , , , , on October 2, 2018 by saynsumthn

 

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