Archive for driver’s license

When FAKE DOCUMENTS save lives: CMP pro-life leader indicted as Planned Parenthood walks

Posted in Center for Medical Progress with tags , , , , , , , , , on January 26, 2016 by saynsumthn

David Daleiden Planned Parenthood Center for Medical Progress

The Houston Chronicle has reported that rather than indicting a Houston Planned Parenthood for illegally selling aborted baby parts, a grand jury instead indicted Center for Medical Progress undercover journalists behind the allegations.
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The Harris County grand jury indicted David Daleiden and Sandra Merritt on charges of tampering with a governmental record, after they allegedly created a fake I.D. in their undercover sting. The charge is a second-degree felony with a possible sentence of up to 20 years in prison. It also charged Daleiden, with the same misdemeanor he had alleged – the purchase or sale of human organs, presumably because he had offered to buy in an attempt to provoke Planned Parenthood employees into saying they would sell.

The decision has shocked many prompting the public to ask how Planned Parenthood could be cleared and the undercover journalists, who did what other journalists have done, are being indicted.

If you believe the unborn child in the womb is human, then all you need do is look to other times in history when life was cheapened and those who protected it were called criminals.

And, since the issue here is FAKE DOCUMENTS – we can see that in times past other “criminals” resorted to using fake papers to save lives – below is a small snippet:

Nazi fake docs jews

According to the United States Holocaust Museum:

    For Jews to pass as “Aryans,” it was essential to have false identity papers, which were often gained through contacts with the anti-Nazi resistance. Using forged or acquired papers, such as a birth or baptismal certificate, Jews sometimes could obtain legitimate documents under an assumed name from the authorities. These ruses posed great risks to the bearer since the Germans and collaborating police forces closely examined identity documents in their frequent searches for Jews, resistance members, and individuals evading conscript labor.

EXAMPLES:

Adolfo Kaminsky started forging documents after escaping deportation to a Nazi death camp. The Frenchman went on to become one of the world’s best forgers, creating documents that saved the lives of Jews, spies and freedom fighters. But even his daughter knew nothing about the real man behind the fake documents…Kaminsky was a forger and counterfeiter for purely humanitarian reasons. During World War II, he produced amazingly authentic-looking blank passports that saved many Jews from certain death. Later, he provided left-wing underground organizations with stacks of fake identifications papers. His family was kept completely in the dark about these activities. (Source: Fighting Nazis with Fakes: The Hidden Life of the Humanitarian Forger, By Nora Reinhardt, Spiegel)

It was ordinary German people who fought to help persecuted Jews during the war. Out of Christian charity, friendship, love, or because they did not agree with the politics of the National Socialists. They provided food and supplies, forged documents and hiding places. They saved Jews from deportation trains or even from concentration camps. Such as the caretaker who helped to alleviate the suffering of an elderly man in a Jewish retirement home. The married couple from Frankfurt who hid a young man in their attic who had fled from the Majdanek concentration camp. The priest who acted as an escape agent. The police officer who tampered with registration papers so that it was possible for a number of Jews to survive in the city of Frankfurt. (Source)

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Thanks to the bravery of a Catholic family, a Jewish teenager in Poland obtained false identification papers during World War II. Posting as a Catholic, she worked several years in a posh hotel in Germany – surrounded by Nazi officers. Sabina Schwartz Zimering was 16 when she and her family were rounded up by Nazis in 1939 and forced into a ghetto in her hometown in Poland. Worse was coming, and the family knew it. “We’ve got to do something,” the girl pleaded with her mother after three years in the ghetto. “I’m 19. I don’t want to die.” Her mother – once dignified; by then starving, scared and depressed – said nothing could be done. “What will happen to others will happen to us,” she said flatly. But later she suggested that her daughter turn to a Catholic friend for help. Maybe Danka Justnya would give Sabina her identification papers, then pretend she had lost them and ask authorities for a replacement passport. It was a daring move for Sabina’s family, and it put the Catholic family in tremendous jeopardy. Yet the Catholic friends came through for them. They provided false identities – not only for her sister and mother. (Not for the little brother, though. It would be useless. The Nazis routinely checked males for circumcisions. Rarely was a European non-Jew circumcised in that time.) Before the war, Sabina’s family was photographed on a street of their town in Poland. Her father, Bernard Schwartz, and mother, Teofila, were with their two daughters, Helka, left, and Sabina, right. Their little brother had not been born. Hours before the Gestapo rushed into town to round up the Jews and send them to their deaths, Sabina and her sister escaped. For two years, they posed as Polish Catholics in Germany. (SOURCE: Hiding in the Open by Peg Meier – Star Tribune)

The workers were “hired” to help the Nazis construct a wall along the Atlantic coast of Europe, but the men never laid a brick or even showed up at the work site. Dutch architect Jaap Penraat, who gave the men the bogus jobs, also gave them their lives. It was 1942, and Jews faced death in concentration camps if they remained in the Nazi-occupied Netherlands. So Penraat forged work permits and traveling papers, disguised young Jewish men as workers, then escorted them by train to France. From there the French Underground took them to safe houses in Gibraltar or Portugal and on to Britain. By the time World War II ended, Penraat had made that dangerous journey 20 times and saved 406 Jews from death. Decades later, he was honored by the Dutch government and in 1997 by Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Israel. Penraat died June 25 of esophageal cancer at his home in Catskill, N.Y. He was 88. (SOURCE: Jaap Penraat, 88; Forged Papers, Risked His Life to Save 406 Jews From Nazis in WWII Holland July 06, 2006|Jocelyn Y. Stewart | LA Times)

Photo: US Holocaust Museum

Photo: US Holocaust Museum

In his 2006 book, “Among the Righteous,” Robert Satloff, director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, uncovered stories of Arabs who saved Jews during the Holocaust, and included a chapter on the Grand Mosque. Dalil Boubakeur, the current rector, confirmed to him that some Jews — up to 100 perhaps — were given Muslim identity papers by the mosque, without specifying a number. Mr. Boubakeur said individual Muslims brought Jews they knew to the mosque for help, and the chief imam, not Benghabrit, was the man responsible. (SOURCE: Heroic Tale of Holocaust, With a Twist By ELAINE SCIOLINO – New York Times )

Gino Bartali was part of a secret Italian resistance movement which helped hide the country’s Jews during the Nazi invasion of 1943. Using the handlebars on his bike to hide counterfeit identity papers, Bartali would ride to Jews in hiding and deliver their exit visas which allowed them to escape transportation to the death camps — he is credited with saving the lives of 800 people…It was not just the rescued who were grateful to Bartali, those who were involved in creating the counterfeit papers in Assisi also took courage from the cyclist’s fearlessness. Worked in the counterfeiting business, Trento Brizi explained how Bartali’s influence gave him courage at a time where the Nazis began to get suspicious. In the book, Road to Valor, Brizi said: “The idea of taking part in an organization that could boast of a champion like Gino Bartali among its ranks, filled me with such pride that my fear took a back seat.” According to Yad Vashem, the Holocaust museum in Jerusalem, 7,680 out of 44,500 Italian Jews were killed by the Nazis…While Bartali rarely spoke of his actions before he passed away in 2000, his son, Andrea, attended the ceremony and met survivors, who had been helped by his father’s actions. (SOURCE: Gino Bartali: The man who helped save Italy’s Jews By James Masters, CNN )

I am sure there are many more of these kind of stories, but you get my point.

According to historian Martin Gilbert, approximately 800, 000 Jews escaped or found refuge during the Holocaust, less than one seventh the number of Jews murdered. However, for those who did survive, documents played a key role. Not surprisingly, many survivors have kept their old passports, letters and forged certificates as a testament to the means by which they eluded Hitler’s Final Solution.

And finally,for those who do not know: A Planned Parenthood X-board member actually works for Harris County DA’s office read here. This is NOT justice!

TSA to expand pre-check screening at airports to sporting events, music festivals, rodeos and train terminals

Posted in Homeland Security, TSA with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 22, 2013 by saynsumthn

The TSA is expanding its passenger screening process, according to a report in the New York Times. The TSA will use government and private records in order to pre-screen fliers and streamline the security process.

According to the New York Times, the agency says that the goal is to streamline the security procedures for millions of passengers who pose no risk, the new measures give the government greater authority to use travelers’ data for domestic airport screenings. Previously that level of scrutiny applied only to individuals entering the United States.

The prescreening, some of which is already taking place, is described in documents the T.S.A. released to comply with government regulations about the collection and use of individuals’ data, but the details of the program have not been publicly announced.

It is unclear precisely what information the agency is relying upon to make these risk assessments, given the extensive range of records it can access, including tax identification number, past travel itineraries, property records, physical characteristics, and law enforcement or intelligence information.

The measures go beyond the background check the government has conducted for years, called Secure Flight, in which a passenger’s name, gender and date of birth are compared with terrorist watch lists. Now, the search includes using a traveler’s passport number, which is already used to screen people at the border, and other identifiers to access a system of databases maintained by the Department of Homeland Security.

Privacy groups contacted by The New York Times expressed concern over the security agency’s widening reach.

The Transportation and Security Administration is expanding its’ reach to sporting events, music festivals, rodeos and train terminals. It’s all part of the TSA’s Intermodal Prevention and Response Squad (VIPR). However, complaints about TSA misconduct have increased by 27 % in the last two year, per a recent Government Accountability Office report. Michael Brooks, Producers producer for The Majority Report joins us to discuss whether the TSA is really the best situated agency to search Americans everywhere they go.

Critics argue that the problem with what the TSA calls an “intelligence-driven, risk-based analysis” of passenger data is that secret computer rules, not humans, make these determinations. Civil liberties groups have questioned whether the agency has the legal authority to make these assessments, which the T.S.A. has claimed in Federal Register notices and privacy disclosures about the initiative. Privacy advocates have also disputed whether computer algorithms can accurately predict terrorist intent.

The airline industry has supported the expansion of PreCheck and using data about travelers to decide who should receive more or less scrutiny at checkpoints, to reduce security bottlenecks and focus resources on higher-risk passengers.

At the heart of the expanded effort is a database called the Automated Targeting System, which is maintained by the Department of Homeland Security and screens travelers entering the United States.

Data in the Automated Targeting System is used to decide who is placed on the no-fly list — thousands of people the United States government has banned from flying — and the selectee list, an unknown number of travelers who are required to undergo more in-depth screening, like Mr. Darrat. The T.S.A. also maintains a PreCheck disqualification list, tracking people accused of violating security regulations, including disputes with checkpoint or airline staff members.

Much of this personal data is widely shared within the Department of Homeland Security and with other government agencies. Privacy notices for these databases note that the information may be shared with federal, state and local authorities; foreign governments; law enforcement and intelligence agencies — and in some cases, private companies for purposes unrelated to security or travel.

For instance, an update about the T.S.A.’s Transportation Security Enforcement Record System, which contains information about travelers accused of “violations or potential violations” of security regulations, warns that the records may be shared with “a debt collection agency for the purpose of debt collection.”

A recent privacy notice about PreCheck notes that fingerprints submitted by people who apply for the program will be used by the F.B.I. to check its unsolved crimes database.

“The average person doesn’t understand how much intelligence-driven matching is going on and how this could be accessed for other purposes,” said Khaliah Barnes, a lawyer with the Electronic Privacy Information Center, which has fought to block these initiatives. “There’s no meaningful oversight, transparency or accountability.”

For travelers who feel they have been wrongly placed on some type of watch list or experienced security screening problems, the Department of Homeland Security has established a Traveler Redress Inquiry Program. According to a review by the department’s Privacy Office, there were at least 13,000 inquiries to the redress program in the nine months ending March 31, but civil liberties groups and some travelers described the redress process as a black hole.

“A lot of people I know have tried it,” Mr. Darrat said. “And it just doesn’t really make a difference.”

Woman sues state over mandatory ‘mark of the beast’

Posted in Big Brother, biometrics with tags , , , , on September 22, 2011 by saynsumthn

WND Exclusive LIFE WITH BIG BROTHER
Woman sues state over mandatory ‘mark of the beast’
Challenges requirement for biometrics to get driver’s license
Posted: September 21, 2011

By Bob Unruh

An Oklahoma requirement that driver’s license applicants submit to “biometric” digital photographs – which are “stored and shared” without the applicant’s knowledge – is a violation of religious rights, charges a lawsuit filed against the state’s Department of Public Safety and several individuals.

The suit names Public Safety Commissioner Michael C. Thompson.

The state has told the plaintiff, Kaye Beach, that she must submit to the biometric requirement to obtain a license in the state, and there is no exemption based on religious beliefs.

The lawsuit contends the requirement, however, violates the Oklahoma Constitution because it “substantially” burdens Beach’s free exercise of religion and does not accommodate her sincerely held religious beliefs.

The case seeks a ruling that “in order to comply with the Oklahoma Religious Freedom Act, the state must provide an accommodation to Ms. Beach … which allows her to submit a low-resolution non-biometric facial photograph in order to obtain a driver’s license.”

“Constitutional Chaos: What Happens When the Government Breaks Its Own Laws”

“Whether a biometric ID card in the form of a driver’s license or other government-issued form of identification is the mark of the Beast or merely the long arm of Big Brother, the outcome remains the same – ultimate control by the government,” said John W. Whitehead, president of The Rutherford Institute, which is handling the case.

Read more: Woman sues state over mandatory ‘mark of the beast’

Big Brother wants Internet ID System

Posted in Big Brother, Internet, Privacy with tags , , , , , , , , on January 11, 2011 by saynsumthn

According to CNET President Obama is planning to hand the U.S. Commerce Department authority over a forthcoming cybersecurity effort to create an Internet ID for Americans, a White House official said here today.

It’s “the absolute perfect spot in the U.S. government” to centralize efforts toward creating an “identity ecosystem” for the Internet, White House Cybersecurity Coordinator Howard Schmidt said.

That news, first reported by CNET, effectively pushes the department to the forefront of the issue, beating out other potential candidates, including the National Security Agency and the Department of Homeland Security. The move also is likely to please privacy and civil-liberties groups that have raised concerns in the past over the dual roles of police and intelligence agencies.

The announcement came at an event today at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, where U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and Schmidt spoke.

Read more: http://news.cnet.com/8301-31921_3-20027800-281.html#ixzz1Al3y1CAq

Trust the government with all your private accounts? Can anyone say WIKILEAKS??????????

According to Bloomberg: Civil libertarians have expressed concern that the system may not protect privacy as well as the government is promising.

“If the concept were implemented in a perfect way it would be very good,” said Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst for privacy and technology at the New York-based American Civil Liberties Union. “It’s a convenience. But having a single point of failure may not be good for protecting privacy. The devil’s really in the details.” He said the ACLU would “vehemently oppose” anything that resembled a national ID card.

Aaron Brauer-Rieke, a fellow at the Center for Democracy & Technology in Washington, a civil liberties group, said it was important that the system would be operated by private companies, not the government. He said he was concerned about how the data on consumer online transactions would be used.

“New identity systems will allow moving from one site to another with less friction and open up data flows, but might also enable new kinds of targeted advertising,” he said. “We have to make sure privacy doesn’t get lost in this.”

Schwartz and McConnell said the new system wouldn’t be a national identity card and that companies, not the government, would manage the data being passed online.

“There will not be a single data base for this information,” McConnell said.

International biometric identification system allowed in Oklahoma

Posted in New World Order with tags , , , , , , on February 16, 2010 by saynsumthn

2:04 PM CST, February 15, 2010
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A state House panel has taken no action on a bill to prohibit facial recognition and digital fingerprinting technology on the driver’s licenses of Oklahomans who have religious objections.

The measure by Rep. Sally Kern of Oklahoma City was heard by a state House subcommittee on Monday. But the panel’s chairman, Rep. Randy Terrill of Moore, released the bill without a vote.

Terrill says he took the action in part because it would cost between $8 million and $37 million at a time when the state is facing a budget shortfall.

Terrill says the bill can still be heard in the House Appropriations Committee.

Under the bill, those applying for a license can object to enrollment in an international biometric identification system based on religious grounds.