Archive for contraceptives

STERILIZE THE POOR? Michigan Columnist promotes putting BIRTH CONTROL in drinking water to ‘fight poverty’, can you say EUGENICS?

Posted in birth control in water, Eugenics, Sterilizing agents in Drinking Water with tags , , , , , , , , on February 17, 2012 by saynsumthn

This Op-Ed should have never been printed and is an OUTRAGE- one must read it to see why:

Michigan is breeding poverty
• FEBRUARY 12, 2012 AT 6:47 PM

By:NOLAN FINLEY

Since the national attention is on birth control, here’s my idea: If we want to fight poverty, reduce violent crime and bring down our embarrassing drop-out rate, we should swap contraceptives for fluoride in Michigan’s drinking water.

We’ve got a baby problem in Michigan. Too many babies are born to immature parents who don’t have the skills to raise them, too many are delivered by poor women who can’t afford them, and too many are fathered by sorry layabouts who spread their seed like dandelions and then wander away from the consequences.

Michigan’s social problems and the huge costs attached to them won’t recede until we embrace reproductive responsibility.

Last year, 43 percent of the babies born in Michigan were to single mothers. And even though Medicaid pays for birth control, half of the babies born here were to mothers on welfare. Eighteen percent were born to teenagers who already had at least one child. And nearly 1-in-5 new babies had mothers with no high school diploma.

In Michigan, poverty is as much a cultural problem as it is an economic one.

I spoke with an educator who is dealing with a single mother, mid-30s, with 12 children and a 13th on the way. The kids have an assortment of fathers with one thing in common — none married their mother. This woman’s womb is a poverty factory.

It wouldn’t matter if Michigan’s economy were bursting with jobs, the woman and her children would still be poor.

Who’s supporting these kids? If you’re a taxpayer, you are. The roughly 45,000 children a year born onto the welfare rolls is a major reason Medicaid will consume 25 percent of next year’s budget.

Those kids are more likely to grow up to be a strain on Corrections spending or welfare recipients themselves. And they’ll drain money from the schools and universities that could help break this cycle.

In the 1990s, Michigan considered penalizing women who had more babies while on welfare, but pro-life groups killed the idea out of fear it would lead to more abortions.
Now, says state Human Services Director Maura Corrigan, the state is trying other measures, including attacking school truancy and the new four-year limit on welfare benefits, which she says is already increasing participation in work training programs.

“We are trying to get at generational poverty,” she says. “We’re studying positive incentives to change.”

But she says the cultural breakdown is a strong tide to row against.

“We’re watching marriage move from being part of the social fabric to being merely optional,” says Corrigan, who devotes her personal time to working with disadvantaged children. “The kids I mentor don’t know people who are married.”

They do know people whose irresponsible behavior is being subsidized by their neighbors.

And as long as the taxpayers of Michigan keep paying for them, those babies will keep on coming.

You can contact Mr. Finley here: nfinley@detnews.com (313) 222-2064

Get the facts about eugenics- Watch Maafa21

FDA Report: Abortion Drug Killing Moms, Babies

Posted in Abortion, Abortion complication, Abortion death, Abortion injury, Abortion pill with tags , , , , , , , , on January 9, 2012 by saynsumthn

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FDA Report: Abortion Drug Killing Moms, Babies, posted with vodpod

FDA Report: Abortion Drug Killing Moms, BabiesThe abortion drug RU-486 is not only killing babies but also mothers, according to a report issued by the Food and Drug Administration.

According to the FDA report:
• Fourteen women died after taking the drug.
• More than 600 women had to be hospitalized, with more than half requiring major blood transfusions.
• The drug also led to serious or severe infections in 256 patients.
• Overall, more than 2,200 women reported serious medical problems from RU-486.

“I think there’s a huge industry behind this abortion drug, and so I don’t suspect it will be pulled from the market despite the fact that it’s not good for women’s health,” said
Jeanne Monahan, director of the Center for Human Dignity at the Family Research Council.

“Women have a right to know what it does, and they’re not being told the truth,” she said.

But the problems don’t end there. Abortion businesses have also misused the drug.

In 58 cases, abortion doctors gave RU-486 to patients who had an ectopic pregnancy even though the FDA explicitly warns against doing so.
FDA Downplaying Report?

There are also complaints about how the FDA handled the release of the report. It was given to a senator who requested it but was not made public or posted on the agency’s website.

“It really wasn’t released into the media,” Mandi Campbell, an attorney with theLiberty Counsel, said. “We don’t hear a lot of mainstream media talking about this issue, talking about how abortions do kill women.”

“If you think about it, that would really put a halt to the business, if women were informed and educated about the side effects of drugs like RU-486, and really the procedures as well,” she added.

RU-486 works during the first three months of pregnancy by blocking the production of progesterone. That hormone supplies the lining of the uterus with critical nutrients needed to keep the baby alive.

Without it, the baby starves to death, detaches from the wall of its mother’s womb and exits her body.
A New Drug in Town

Meanwhile, there’s a new drug on the market, called Ella that was just released last year and is very similar to RU-486.

Critics worry it will also harm women, and they’re concerned about the way it’s marketed.

The FDA calls Ella a contraceptive because it prevents the fertilized egg from ever attaching to the uterus.

But since pro-life advocates believe pregnancy begins when the egg is fertilized, they consider Ella an abortion drug. They also say it needs to be tested in higher doses.
“It has the exact same chemical compound and mechanism of action as RU-486, so in other words it can also work post-implantation,” Monahan explained.

“So even by the Food and Drug Administration’s own wrong definition of when life begins, this drug is an abortion drug,” she said. “But they labeled it as an emergency contraceptive.”

While the government and drug companies might try to blur the line between contraception and abortion, it’s important to know the facts.
Studies show that many women who are willing to take contraceptives clearly draw the line at taking an abortion drug.
This story originally aired on Friday, January 6, 2012.

Birth Control may decrease bone density , says new study

Posted in birth control, Birth Control Dangers with tags , , , , , , , on August 3, 2011 by saynsumthn

Gradual bone reduction seen in some pill users

Changes in bone density in oral contraceptive users depends on age and hormone dose

Seattle, WA—Birth control pills may reduce a woman’s bone density, according to a study published online July 13 in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism by Group Health Research Institute (GHRI) scientists. Impacts on bone were small, depended on the woman’s age and the pill’s hormone dose, and did not appear until about two years of use. The study size and design allowed the researchers to focus on 14- to 18-year-old teenagers, and to look at how bone density might change when a woman stops using the pill.

GHRI Senior Investigator Delia Scholes, PhD, led the study. Hormones are a key component of bone health, she says, and hormonal contraceptives are a major source of external hormones for women—the pill is the most common birth control method worldwide. A woman’s risk of fractures later in life is influenced by the bone mass she gains in her teens through her 20s, and this age group has the highest use of oral contraceptives. “The teen years are when women most actively gain bone, so we thought it was important to look at that age group,” says Scholes. “We found that oral contraceptive use had a small negative impact on bone gain at these ages, but took time to appear, and depended on hormone dose.”
The researchers measured hip, spine, and whole-body bone densities in 301 teen women aged 14-18, and in 305 young adult women aged 19-30, all Group Health Cooperative members. The bone densities of 389 participants using oral contraceptives were compared to 217 similar women who were not using this method, looking at both teens and young adults, and the two most commonly prescribed estrogen doses in pills: 20-25 micrograms and 30-35 micrograms. Bone density measurements were taken at the start of the study, and every 6 months for 2 to 3 years. During that time, 172 oral contraceptive users stopped taking the medication, allowing the researchers to measure bone changes after pill use was discontinued. They found:

* After two years, teens who used 30-35 microgram pills showed about 1% less gain in bone density at both the spine and whole body sites than teens who did not use hormonal contraceptives.
* For young adult women, users and non-users of oral contraceptives showed no differences in bone density at any site.
* Any differences in bone density between users and nonusers of oral contraceptives were less than 2%, and were seen only after two or more years of use, and only at some measured sites.
* At 12-24 months after stopping, teens who took 30-35 microgram pills still showed smaller bone density gains at the spine than teens who did not use oral contraceptives.
* At 12-24 months after stopping, young adult women who used either pill dose showed small bone density losses at the spine compared to small gains in women who did not take oral contraceptives.

Scholes says additional studies, including looking at bone changes for a longer time after pill use is discontinued, may tell us more about how oral contraceptive use is related to fracture risk. For now, the results of Scholes’ study may help women make informed decisions. “Bone health, especially for long-term users of the pill, may be one of many factors women consider in choosing a contraceptive method that’s right for them,” she says. The US Surgeon General recommends that women maintain bone density by eating foods high in calcium and vitamin D, getting weight-bearing exercise, not smoking, and limiting drinking alcohol.

Dr. Scholes’ co-authors are Rebecca A. Hubbard, PhD, Laura E. Ichikawa, MS, and Leslie Spangler VMD, PhD, Group Health Research Institute (GHRI); Andrea Z. LaCroix, PhD, MPH, and Jeannette M. Beasley, PhD, MPH, RD, Women’s Health Initiative, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle WA; Susan Reed, MD, MPH, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (UW); and Susan M. Ott, MD, Department of Medicine, UW.
Funding was from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute for Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health.

Group Health Research Institute
Founded in 1947, Group Health Cooperative is a Seattle-based, consumer-governed, nonprofit health care system. Group Health Research Institute (www.grouphealthresearch.org) changed its name from Group Health Center for Health Studies on September 8, 2009. Since 1983, the Institute has conducted nonproprietary public-interest research on preventing, diagnosing, and treating major health problems. Government and private research grants provide its main funding.