Archive for black racism

The population control advocate behind Planned Parenthood’s transition to abortion

Posted in Abortion History, Forced Population Control, Forced Sterilization, Guttmacher, Illegal abortion, Lader, Planned Parenthood History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 19, 2018 by saynsumthn

Alan Guttmacher, abortion, Planned Parenthood

This article is part two in a series on the history of Planned Parenthood. Read part one here.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s focus was eugenic sterilization and birth control, rather than decriminalizing abortion. But it wasn’t a female eugenics crusader who rolled out the abortion agenda of Planned Parenthood — that came from Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, a physician and past vice-president of the American Eugenics Society who was already steeped in abortion prior to his election as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) in 1962. Guttmacher worked with Mary S. Calderone, who joined Planned Parenthood’s staff in 1953 as its medical director, a post she held until 1964. Years earlier, Guttmacher had vowed to work to decriminalize abortion, eventually persuading the PPFA board to commit the procedures.

Image: Alan F Guttmacher

PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

Planned Parenthood was initially reluctant to perform abortions — that is, until Guttmacher came on the scene. Before making millions committing abortions, Planned Parenthood admitted that abortion takes human life. A Planned Parenthood pamphlet from 1952 reads, “Abortion kills the life of a baby after it has begun.”

Another pamphlet from Planned Parenthood Federation of America also describes abortion as a procedure that “kills life after it has begun” and one which is “dangerous” to a woman’s “life and health.”

In the early 1960s, abortion enthusiasts like Larry Lader bemoaned Planned Parenthood’s lack of involvement with abortion, noting in his book, “Abortion II,” that “Abortion never became a feminist plank in the United States among the suffragettes or depression radicals. It was ignored, even boycotted by Planned Parenthood women in those days.”

Lader notes in his book, “Ideas Triumphant” how, other than the National Organization for Women (NOW), few groups were willing to support abortion: “In medicine, only the American Public Health Association (APHA) had taken a stand…. The huge network of Planned Parenthood Federation clinics remained on the sidelines except for its outspoken medical committee under Dr. Alan Guttmacher.”

Image: Lawrence Lader

Lawrence Lader, abortion crusader

Lader expounds further in his book, “Abortion II,” writing, “Planned Parenthood, with hundreds of chapters and clinics throughout the country, had been a particular disappointment. Legalized abortion, I insisted from the start, was the logical measure for contraception and an essential form of birth control. Under the leadership of Dr. Alan Guttmacher, the medical committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population proposed the ‘abolition of existing statutes and criminal laws regarding abortion’ in 1968. After this plank was approved by the members in 1969, Planned Parenthood chapters soon started abortion referrals, and even clinics, as an ‘integral part of medical care.’”

Guttmacher was an avid eugenicist, who joined others of his day in voicing a concern about rising population growth.  In spite of national calls for coercion to slow down the rate of population growth, Guttmacher instead advocated the decriminalization of abortion as an effort that he felt would accomplish the same result. But, although Guttmacher had learned how to finesse the rhetoric, he did not discount the use of coercion altogether. In 1966, Guttmacher compared the world population with the threat of nuclear war, telling the Washington Post that governments may have to act officially to limit families. “It may be taken out of the voluntary category,” Guttmacher said.

Image: article Guttmacher abortion coercion possible

Guttmacher abortion coercion possible

Population concerns drove public policy

In Michael W. Perry’s compilation of one of Sanger’s works with others of her period, “The Pivot of Civilization in Historical Perspective: The Birth Control Classic,” Perry writes of Alan Guttmacher, “In 1962, Alan Guttmacher, former vice president of the American Eugenics Association, assumed the presidency of Planned Parenthood. Soon, a ‘population bomb’ hysteria… was driving public policy. In 1969, a medical news magazine revealed what was really going on when it quoted Guttmacher, warning that if ‘voluntary means’ did not achieve the desired goals, ‘Each country will have to decide its own form of coercion and determine when and how it should be employed. At present, the means available are compulsory sterilization and compulsory abortion.’”

“That’s what [Margaret] Sanger intended to do with birth control…. So, why should it be surprising that Guttmacher felt the same?” Perry added.

 

This 1968 interview with Alan Guttmacher and a member of the clergy, which, according to Ball State University,  originated from WLBC-TV and was (possibly) a part of a segment titled, “Week in Review,” demonstrates the concern the PPFA president had about the so-called “population crisis.” Guttmacher began the interview by defining Planned Parenthood as a “movement which tries to make each child a wanted child born to responsible parents….”

In the interview, Alan Guttmacher, addressed the issue of population growth:

“Now, I think everyone is conscious of the fact that in some areas of the world there is explosive type of population increase, unsupportable, in that it is outdistancing food, it retards economic development… and, what we are attempting to do, of course, is to encourage countries to curtail the rate of growth.”

https://youtu.be/G1pwA6onfR0

He added this about the threat of a global “population crisis:”

Now, I’ve been in this a really long time and I am encouraged because, we have governments becoming deeply involved. Each year, one or more – many governments make population control part of national policy.

In 1969, after seeking government funding for “family planning” specifically for “low income Americans,” Guttmacher responded to criticism from some that population growth could be reduced by “voluntary methods” rather than government coercion. “I do not share their despair,” he stated. “The appropriate response, in my view, is to mobilize rapidly a total, coordinated U.S. program by government, in collaboration with voluntary health services, in an all-out maximum effort to demonstrate what voluntary fertility control can accomplish in a free society.”

A year later, in 1970, Guttmacher, told Boston Magazine that the United Nations should be the organization the United States used to carry out population control programs worldwide. Guttmacher explained his reasoning:

If you’re going to curb population, it’s extremely important not to have it done by the dammed Yankees, but by the UN. Because the thing is, then it’s not considered genocide. If the United States goes to the black man or the yellow man and says slow down your reproduction rate, we’re immediately suspected of having ulterior motives to keep the white man dominant in the world. If you can send in a colorful UN force, you’ve got much better leverage.

The fact is that Guttmacher understood that coercive means of population control would not be well received, especially by members of the Black community. The eugenics movement, of which he was a part, had come under criticism after the Nazis’ implemented their eugenic “final solution” for a “pure race” — something many believe originated with American eugenics leaders.

“So even though the plan [of coercion] may be desirable and would make us a stronger nation, a less polluted nation, I feel it would be strategically unwise at this time,” the former Planned Parenthood president told Lee McCall, a reporter for the Sarasota Herald Tribune in 1966.

Image: article Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

The push for taxpayer-funded birth control for the poor and minorities

Guttmacher, who also founded Planned Parenthood’s research arm and “special affiliate,” the Guttmacher Institute, then proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to pay for birth control access for the poor, as Live Action News detailed previously.

The plan was highly criticized by the Black community, which saw the move as a means of racist Black genocide.  “Among other things, this policy has brought the Planned Parenthood Federation under attack from black militants who see ‘family planning’ as a euphemism for race genocide,” the NYT reported at that time. So, a 1966 internal memo from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe outlined a new “community relations program” for winning over the Black community by “form[ing] a liaison between Planned Parenthood and minority organizations.” The plan, according to Planned Parenthood, was to emphasize that “all people have the opportunity to make their own choices,” rather than, as the memo states, exhortation telling them how many children they should have.”

Image from 1940’s Birth control pamphlet published by Planned Parenthood

In its 1969 article entitled, “Dr. Guttmacher is the Evangelist of Birth Control,” the New York Times was forced to acknowledge that many leaders sitting on Planned Parenthood’s board were in favor of coercive measures of population control. While painting the picture of an agency which was pushing birth control on the “ghetto” rather than the “middle-class” who were having more than the optimal amount of children, the paper noted that a “sizable” number of Planned Parenthood’s board was made up of “preponderantly white and well-to-do” people. They then quoted a Planned Parenthood board member who admitted the racist attitude of the organization when he stated, “What it all comes down to is that we want the poor to stop breeding while we retain our freedom to have large families. It’s strictly a class point of view.”

Guttmacher and Sanger were both (as eugenicists) concerned that the world population was a threat, but, Guttmacher, much savvier than Sanger, chose to couch his agenda as a “right.” He even told the paper that they were not trying to take away anyone’s rights, but trying to “show ghetto families how to space their children and avoid having children they don’t want.”

“Admittedly Guttmacher is buying time,” writes the New York Times in that 1969 report. “He thinks the voluntary movement should set a deadline of 1980. If world population growth has not dropped below 1.5 percent by then, he says, ‘we’ll have to get tough.’”

Guttmacher on coercive population control New York Times

Whatever Guttmacher meant by getting “tough” never materialized, because he believed decriminalizing abortion was the solution and noted this in a 1970 interview where he stated:

If we could get the abortion law liberalized, most of the 750,000 unwanted pregnancies would not lead to babies – rejected children, battered baby syndrome and illegal abortions.

Proposing the availability of “unlimited abortion” to curb population growth

And, in that same year, Guttmacher admitted to a 1970 Cornell Symposium, (according to an April 7, 1970, article published by the Cedar Rapids Gazette), that although he did not know when life began, he believed that “unlimited abortion” was the only way to reduce population growth, saying, “There is no question that the most effective way of reducing population growth is by unlimited abortion.”

According to researcher and author Mary Meehan, “Guttmacher undoubtedly believed that [abortion] helped women; in fact, he had referred patients to an illegal abortionist as early as 1941. Yet he also had other motives, indicated by his service as vice president and board member of the American Eugenics Society.”

Omage: book The Case for Legalized Abortion Now, edited by Alan F Guttmacher

The Case for Legalized Abortion Now, edited by Alan F Guttmacher

In 1967, Guttmacher edited a book on legalizing abortion, where he admitted, “Today it is possible for almost any patient to be brought through pregnancy alive, unless she suffers from a fatal illness such as cancer or leukemia, and, if so, abortion would be unlikely to prolong, much less save, life.” Former abortionist Dr. Anthony Levatino agrees with this, stating that there is never a valid medical reason for abortion:

Guttmacher became Chief of Obstetrics at Baltimore’s Sinai Hospital in 1942, eventually creating a staff committee of five to make decisions about abortion. Like Sanger, Guttmacher allegedly watched a woman die from an illegal abortion while serving as an intern in Baltimore. He later wrote of other women, “In a short period I witnessed three deaths from illegal abortions: a 16-year old with a multiperforated uterus, a mother of four who died of sepsis rejecting another child, and a patient in early menopause who fatally misinterpreted amenorrhea.”

Image: Alan Guttmacher 1973 (Image credit: WGBH)

Alan Guttmacher 1973 (Image credit: WGBH)

For years, Guttmacher referred women to physicians for illegal abortion procedures. He once wrotehow an illegal abortionist, nicknamed Dr. T,  showed him the abortion technique. “His technique was to pack one inch gauze strips into the cervix and lower uterine segment the night before he was to evacuate the conceptus,” Guttmacher wrote. “After 12 hours of packing, the cervix was wide open, and he was able to empty the uterus with an ovum forceps, followed by currettage without anesthesia. In advanced pregnancies he inserted intrauterine bougies, held in place by a vaginal pack until strong contractions commenced, which not infrequently took several days.”

“These early medical experiences with the unavailability of abortions in reputable hospitals and the incidence of illegal abortions convinced me that permitting abortion only ‘to preserve the life of the mother’ was undesirable and unenforceable…. My sentiment was that as long as the law was as restrictive as it was, doctors should not breach it, but work to change the law – a position which I forthrightly espoused in the classroom,” Guttmacher stated.

Dr. T later attended a 1950’s Abortion in the United States conference sponsored by PPFA, which focused on abortion. PPFA leader Mary Calderone writes, “Those very concerned with the problem of abortion will be full of gratitude for this report; gratitude to the P.P.F.A. for convening the conference and for the frankness of the thirty-eight participants, who comprised eminent gynaecologists, psychiatrists and a few social workers. The highlight of the proceedings was an M.D.’s testimony as a convicted (but not imprisoned) abortionist. The chairman stated that Dr. T. was his valued friend, known for nearly three decades, and described him as ‘an extremely competent abortionist … who some years ago fell into disagreement with the law and is no longer in practice”.’”

The PPFA group heard from abortion advocates worldwide, and in the end, Calderone indicates that there was no clarion call to push for abortion reform.

In his book, “Babies by Choice or by Chance,” published in 1959, Guttmacher allegedly deplored “the performance of abortion on virtual demand.” But Guttmacher also noted how he had learned from experience how hospitals were “allowed to interpret and administer the abortion law of their respective states without supervision or interference from either the police, the courts or medical agencies.”

Babies by Choice or By Chance, by Alan F Guttmcher

In 1952, Guttmacher had relocated from Baltimore to New York, where he became the first Director of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Mount Sinai Hospital, which had already been approving and performing abortions. “I was told that if a private patient was denied abortion in another institution, she frequently sought abortion at Mt. Sinai because of its well-known, relatively liberal policy,” Guttmacher claimed.

Alan Guttmacher appointed head of obstetrics at Mount Sinai Hospital (Image New York Times June 27,1952)

By 1962, Guttmacher was at the helm of Planned Parenthood and he was positioned to put his dream of decriminalizing abortion into action. That same year, as chairman of the medical and scientific committee of the Human Betterment Foundation, Guttmacher called the existing abortion laws “archaic” and “idiotic.”

Guttmacher named president of Planned Parenthood, 1967 (Image: New York Times)

“The idea that the fetus has a sacred right to survive from the moment of fertilization is a Judeo Christian creation,” he said according to a May 2, 1962, Poughkeepsie Miscellany News report.

Alan Guttmacher calls 1960 abortion laws archaic

“I believe that a new abortion statute for New York and each of the other states is needed…. I think it is high time that a commission of physicians, lawyers, judges, sociologists, and religionists convened in an attempt to wrestle with the problem realistically…. The only way progress can be made is through an aroused citizenry. What we need in the United States is a uniform abortion law,” Guttmacher wrote in “Babies by Choice.”

A few years later, during a 1965 “Abortion and the Law” BBC program, Guttmacher, then president of PPFA, put forth the infamous “health” exception for abortion, stating (36:20):

Now, the law as you know is simply to preserve the life of the mother. This is wholly inadequate.

Number one, I’d preserve the life or health of the mother. And, as you know, health could be interpreted quite broadly and I think it should be. In 1960, the World Health Organization gave us splendid definition of health. They said health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well being. Not simply the absence of illness and disease.

Second, I feel that abortion should be done, when competent medical opinion feels that there’s strong likelihood of the current [inaudible] to result in the malformed or abnormal child. I think whenever pregnancy is the result of proved rape, incest, or the impregnation of a child of sixteen or less, with or without the consent, that we have legal grounds for interrupting this pregnancy.

Interestingly, this language comes directly from the 1959 American Law Institute’s Model Penal Code on abortion. In our next report in this series, we will learn Guttmacher’s connection to that organization and detail what led up to Planned Parenthood’s decision to push for the decriminalization of abortion and begin referring for the procedure.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Black women never demanded right to abortion says woman who decried it as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks protest abortionn with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 27, 2018 by saynsumthn

Remembering Dr. Dolores Grier, pro-life activist who decried abortion as Black genocide

Image: Dr. Delores Grier

The Catholic and pro-life communities are mourning the death of Dr. Dolores Bernadette Grier, an advocate for life and a gracious Black leader in the New York archdiocese, who passed away on February 22, 2018 — her birthday. As a Black pro-life activist, Dr. Grier founded the Association of Black Catholics Against Abortion and served on the board of the African American Society Against Abortion. She was outspoken about abortion’s impact on the Black community.

Dr. Grier’s voice in defense of life will be missed, but we in the pro-life community are grateful for the legacy she has left behind. A Funeral Mass will be offered at Dr. Grier’s parish church, St. Charles Borromeo in Harlem, on Wednesday, March 7 at 11 a.m.

Image: Delores Grier

Delores Grier

In 1989, Dr. Grier joined a group of pro-life women, including, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and the first woman employed as a general surgeon at Boston University Medical Center, for a press conference picked up by C-SPAN. Dr. Grier began her speech by calling abortion racism:

We do believe that more than anything else, abortion is racism. It is a way of pruning, if you will, the Black population…. In 1973, shortly after civil rights struggles – when there were more benefits for the Black people, all of a sudden we were given this free, free thing from the society of America: abortion. 78 percent of your free abortion clinics were placed in Black and Urban areas, for the purpose of [inaudible] free of charge from a racist society. To put it in words of one pro-abortionist, “We don’t need so many Negroes anymore – there’s no more cotton to pick.”

… Black women, let it be stated, Black women never demonstrated, demanded or even requested the right to an abortion. We’ve been asking for the right to decent housing, the right to education, in fact, the right to health car, and all we’ve been given free of charge is the right to kill our unborn child…

It is demeaning to the Black woman, because, when you wanted us (in other words) when we were on the plantation, you snatched the newborn baby from our arms and sold it into slavery. Today, you cut it out of the womb and throw it in the garbage or use it for human experimentation.

Dr. Grier later told those attending that conference that a majority of Blacks oppose abortion and she said she was hopeful that the attitudes of Americans are changing. “I believe that as more and more of the education and the true fact, that there is a life in the womb, that people will begin to say, ‘I do not want to kill,’” she said.

In a prepared statement (page 173) before the Senate Labor and Human Resources Committee during its May 1990 hearing on the “Freedom of Choice Act,” Grier wrote:

After many years of the civil rights struggle for equal opportunity in housing, education and employment, Black women have only been granted the right to kill their children in the womb. Free health care only includes abortion…. The White master is still telling Black people what is best for us – death instead of life.

Image: Delores Grier statement abortion and racism

Delores Grier written statement before Congress abortion and Black Genocide

Grier went on to say (page 170) in part:

I believe that one of the reasons that so many women, especially poor women, minority women, Black women in particular and young women, have abortions is because they really do not know what an abortion does, how it is performed and the effects after they have an abortion and the complications…. Abortion is the termination of a pregnancy which results in the death of a developing human. This is how it is defined in Webster’s medical dictionary 1986. Abortion, as many people may believe, is not a medical procedure; it is invasive surgery where the surgeon uses steel instruments to terminate the life of the unborn child in the mother’s womb….

Image: Dr. Grier testimony on abortion

Delores Grier statement before Congress abortion and racism

Advances in science have opened the womb that was once hidden, so we can now observe the growth and the movement of the unborn child through ultrasound…. Yet, the child terminators endeavor to hide the humanity of the unborn by describing the child as a “fetus….”

I would like to now say that I am speaking as a [B]lack women…sad to say that…many of the [Bl]ack men and women in Congress will be recorded in history as having contributed to the demise of the African American race in this country. They are rejecting their own African heritage, which regards the unborn as those waiting to be born. As they say in the African villages, no one knows whose womb will bear the chief. I would also like to say that 97 percent of the abortionists who kill unborn [B]lack babies in the inner city are white American males, and they are paid, directly or indirectly, by funding from the United States Government…

In 1992, Dr. Grier again agreed with other Black leaders within her community that abortion was a tool of genocide. “What do you see here? Unless you are white, unless you are wealthy… you really shouldn’t come into the world,” she stated.

She then questioned why abortion was being used to solve the problems of poor women, and referred to abortion as “pruning the Black race,” a concept Dr. Grier said began with Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s “Negro Project”:

We were not equal to white people and she [Margaret Sanger] didn’t think that we should populate the earth and she wanted to eliminate anybody who had color.

Why are you taking that woman, because of her situation, and resolving her problem by murder? What are you doing to her and what are you doing to yourself as a society by saying that this is the only way you can solve it? She is a human being, she can be talked to?

pro-life

Dr. Dolores Grier saw Planned Parenthood and abortion as Black Genocide and the pruning of the Black race

In that same article, Dr. Grier said that as a woman of color, she was influenced to speak out about abortion after hearing a moving speech in 1977 by civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson, who was once an outspoken advocate for life, at that time. She said, “After the talk, I went up and said, ‘Rev. Jackson, I’m going to join the pro-life movement. You said the pro-life movement needed youth and color, and I am the color.’”

Sadly Jesse Jackson soon changed his position on abortion when he ran for president. Read Jackson’s pro-life statements before his flip here.

In 1995, after President Bill Clinton nominated Henry W. Foster, a Black abortionist who had served on the board of Planned Parenthood, to be the Surgeon General of the United States, Dr. Grier spoke out, saying,”The man is not Black. The man is not white. He is an abortionist who terminates life in the womb and that’s what he should be judged by.”

Dr. Grier recently told the Catholic Program, The Journey Home, that we need to pray and fast more for life:

We must bear witness to true life. I say true-life because we have too many of those who say pro-choice. Pro-choice is the comfort zone for our legislators who’d rather say pro-choice – the right to choose. Choose what? Whether or not to kill the child in the womb, that’s what she’s choosing.

According to Catholic New York (CNY), Grier was named vice chancellor by Cardinal John O’Connor, then Archbishop of New York, in 1985. An announcement about Grier’s death published by in CNY says that the Grier was “believed to have been the first black woman appointed to such a position nationwide.” The publication then expounded on Grier’s pro-life stance:

Miss Grier spoke with conviction and authority against the “black genocide” of abortion that continues to grip the black and Hispanic communities in New York City, a message that was unpopular in some circles. In a 1994 CNY article about the first Central Harlem Vicariate Respect Life Conference, Miss Grier strongly criticized Planned Parenthood’s abortion practices. “What are they bringing to us, people of color?” she asked. “They’re not bringing jobs, they’re not bringing food, they’re not bringing skills. They’re bringing death.”

In 1993, Miss Grier refused an honor from the New York City branch of the NAACP because of the organization’s pro-abortion stance.

That 1993 NAACP “honor” was for Grier to be the recipient of the Women’s History Month award. She refused, stating, “As president of the Association of Black Catholics, I believe abortion to be a racist weapon of genocide against black people.”

Today, abortion disproportionately targets Blacks in the womb more than any other race, and the number one provider of abortions in the nation is Planned Parenthood. The abortion lobby would like to convince Americans that our society — and specifically the Black population of America — is okay with abortion, but this is simply false. Black activists like Dolores Grier have been warning America for years and years that abortion would decimate the Black community and become a tool of eugenic genocide against Black people.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Did Planned Parenthood appoint Black leaders to quell suspicion of Black genocide?

Posted in Black Genocide, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Planned Parenthood CEO, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood, Black genocide

Despite the fact that Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger promoted eugenics, it was actually under another eugenicist leader, Alan F. Guttmacher, that Planned Parenthood began referring for and eventually committing abortions. At the exact same time that abortion was being pushed publicly, the organization elected a Black chairman to roll out this agenda. All of this transpired in the late 1960s, a time when America was in conflict over the struggle for the civil rights of Black Americans.

During this time frame, many of the organization’s leaders were concerned about overpopulation. The organization’s history is steeped in eugenics, and this ideology manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As laws about these eugenics courts began to be challenged, a new tool of eugenics was making its way across the land: abortion.

Even though many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion would be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit,” Guttmacher, by now a Planned Parenthood president, was able to convince his friends that abortion, at first in perhaps a voluntary way, would be a better solution. However, there was a slight problem, because Black citizens and other minority groups were already suspicious of birth control efforts aimed at them. How would they feel about abortion?

Image: article Blacks Charge Black Genocide from Planned Parenthood

The solution for Planned Parenthood was to bring Black leaders to the organization’s board, in an effort to convince Black Americans that Planned Parenthood’s efforts were not genocidal. This strategy was not a new one; Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger — who gave a talk for the Ku Klux Klan — had already implemented the so-called “Negro Project” to accomplish the exact same thing. Memos between Planned Parenthood staffers and leadership indicated a great concern over how the Black community viewed their efforts. In response, Planned Parenthood’s public relations machine also reached out to Black publications, as they had already done with push for birth control.

Image: Guttmacher article on Birth Control

Alan Guttmacher Birth Control Article (Image: Ebony Mag April 1962)

In 1967,  the Pittsburgh Branch of the NAACP had criticized the swarming of Planned Parenthood facilities into minority neighborhoods. Other leaders like H. Rap Brown and Fannie Lou Hamer had called abortion “Black genocide.” And, as late as 1973, a study published by the American Journal of Public Health,”Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans as Related to Age, Sex, and Region,” found that Black men and women had a level of unease about “family planning.” Researchers Castellano Turner, Ph.D., and William A. Darity, Ph.D., concluded that Blacks were more suspicious when “family planning” was under the control of Whites. “It is noteworthy that the greatest degree of agreement is found where the issue of black control of family planning (as against white control) is at issue,” they said.

Graph: Black Genocide Fears

Study on how Blacks feared family planning – Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans 1973 study Castellano Turner, Ph.D. and William A. Darity, Ph.D.

After dialoguing internally about the unease of the Black community, the suggestion was made to add Black members to Planned Parenthood’s board; this took place at the same time that Planned Parenthood was calling for the decriminalization of abortion. According to a New York Times article from November 14, 1968, the first time that Planned Parenthood went on record calling for abortion, they also elected their very first Black board chairman to roll out the new agenda — Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: Jerome Holland of PPFA

Planned Parenthood names first Black Chairman to push abortion – First Black Chairman of Board elected by Planned Parenthood 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate.

Holland was also added as chairman of the Board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood.

But Holland’s post as chairman of the board of Planned Parenthood was short lived.

In 1970, Holland was named ambassador to Sweden by President Richard Nixon; however, the headlines of the first Black chairman of Planned Parenthood had seemingly done their job. Holland was openly endorsing abortion as a “health matter” between the woman and her doctor.

Image: PPFA article

Black chairman Jerome Holland lauds Planned Parenthood eugenics

The same year Planned Parenthood elected its first Black chairman of the board, Frederick Osborn, a founding Eugenics Society officer connected to Planned Parenthood, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

A few years later, a new Black leader would emerge to reinforce the push for abortion within Planned Parenthood: Faye Wattleton.

After 62 years as an organization, why did Planned Parenthood wait until 1978 to elect the very first Black female as president? Like Holland,  Wattleton was not a novice where abortion was concerned. She had been with Planned Parenthood for a while, serving as a volunteer in the early 1970s and eventually serving as director of the Dayton affiliate.

Article about Faye Wattleton elected to PPFA

Faye Wattleton elected first Black Planned Parenthood president

At a press conference held in February of 1978, then president-elect of Planned Parenthood Wattleton told the media that she was “putting the world on notice” that the organization was going to be much more aggressive on abortion rights. “What has happened is that we have allowed them [right-to-lifers] to have center stage,” Wattelton said, “I’d like to say those days are over.”

Wattleton then vowed to restore — “to the poor” — access of abortion under Medicaid.

Wattleton was asked if her leadership of Planned Parenthood as a Black woman would alleviate suspicions within the Black community linking abortion and her organization to Black genocide. Wattleton responded, “I don’t think a lot of people are yelling genocide anymore, because I’m Black. I’m in a watchdog position on these issues and no one should assume I’ve been co-opted. What better way is there to guard against those types of abuses?”

Wattleton then said that the Black community should be more concerned about quality of life than “increasing our numbers.”

Image: Faye Wattleton

Faye Wattleton first Black president Planned Parenthood

Wattleton served as president of the abortion corporation for 14 years, where, among other radical abortion advances, she helped to legalize the sale of the RU-486 abortion pill in the United States. Under Wattleton’s leadership, Planned Parenthood’s budget grew from $90 million in 1978 to $384 million in 1990. For her service and dedication to the eugenics-minded organization, in 1992, Wattleton received Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award. Despite Sanger’s known eugenics and Klan connections, Wattleton once referred to her as “[t]he great heroine of our time,” telling Hubbard News in 1979 that Sanger would be proud of Planned Parenthood’s progress.

But the idea that Blacks would no longer be targeted for eugenics because a Black woman was at the helm of a eugenics organization was short-lived. During Wattleton’s tenure at Planned Parenthood, she stated that supporters of Planned Parenthood contributed to the abortion giant to “keep the Black population down.” On CNN, in a debate with Bob Dornan, an outspoken pro-life member of the US House of Representatives, at that time, Wattleton, admitted, “As a matter of fact… we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all Black women to stop having children.”

And also clipped in the documentary film, Maafa21, below:

Wattleton went on to help form the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, she has been described by some in the media as “a pioneer, a crusader, a media star and a rebel of sorts.”

Today, many within the Black community still see abortion as a tool of eugenics, and the abortion statistics show that it has become a leading cause of death of Blacks in the nation. Margaret Sanger’s vision of limiting births among certain races may not have begun with abortion, but it appears to have led to abortion.

Tragically, today, as a result of Guttmacher continuing Sanger’s eugenics agenda by introducing abortion to Planned Parenthood, over 800 preborn children of all races die there every day from abortion.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Former Planned Parenthood board member: Defund this ‘racist’ organization

Posted in Black Babies, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black Lives Matter, Black Pastor, Black Women, Former Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  (From Live Action News)

Image: Dr. Laverne Tolbert

Dr. La Verne Tolbert is an accomplished professor, author and outspoken advocate for adoption and foster care. She is also a former Planned Parenthood board member turned staunch pro-life advocate who admits that at one time she hated children. Her journey to the truth led her to become a role model for children and an outspoken representative against the agenda of abortion and Planned Parenthood, which she says targets the Black community.

Early in her career, Tolbert, who then went by the name La Verne Powlis, landed a job as editor/reporter for Family Circle Magazine and went on to become the first Black beauty editor of Brides Magazine, where she claims she lived a “very glamorous life in the beauty world.” (In 1979, she authored her first beauty book and became a spokesperson for L’Oreal.)

Image: LaVerne Tolbert book on beauty

La Verne Powlis: Beauty from the Inside Out

“Why is it more necessary for women in the inner city to have the ‘right’ to abortion?”

Due in part to her success as a magazine writer, after joining the Coalition of 100 Black Women in New York, Dr. Tolbert was asked to join the board of Planned Parenthood. Tolbert had been raised in church and her father was a pastor, but she writes, “I knew little about abortion.” In her book she also describes being sought after to join Planned Parenthood: “When a speech I made received media coverage back home, I was greeted with my organization’s applause along with invitations to join two boards – The Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and Planned Parenthood.”

“In 1975, when I was asked to be a part of the board, I thought, this is a wonderful way for me to volunteer and help the women in my community. This is a great way to give back,” Dr. Tolbert told an audience.

Dr. Tolbert often points out that abortion had just been legalized a few years earlier and many people, including her, were uneducated about abortion and the development of the preborn child in the womb.

Dr. Tolbert says that while she was with Planned Parenthood, she discovered that at one time, the state of New York’s Health Department required a death certificate for each baby that was aborted. “And I thought, death certificates? Well a death certificate is only required if somebody dies.”

“And so, the information that I had learned that it was just a ‘blob of tissue,’ a ‘mass in the uterus,’ was not true.”

“Later on, as I began to read, I asked a [Planned Parenthood] board member how abortions were performed – I protested that this was traumatic for the mother and her baby. But, I was corrected and told, ‘It is not traumatic!’”

 

Image: Dr. LaVerne Tolbert

Dr. La Verne Tolbert, former Planned Parenthood board member (Image credit: TooManyAborted.com)

She described her first Board meeting: “I remember walking into the first board meeting. And I was filled with anticipation. I was so excited to be there. And I took the bus from my job and the magazine where I worked and took it over to the Margaret Sanger Center.”

Dr. Tolbert writes that almost immediately she began to notice board members arriving to meetings in style:

Over time I noticed that several of the board members arrived in chauffeured limousines. Who were these men of wealth, I wondered, and why were they so interested in the people who lived in the inner-city?

Once in the building, I walked past the clinic that served primarily African-American and Latino girls. The elevator took me upstairs to an imposingly large boardroom, and I took my seat with the striking observation that I was the only person of color in the room. The majority of board members were male, and the handful of women appeared to be much older than my twenty-seven years.”

Today, we know that many of these “well-to-do men” as she described them later, had been indoctrinated with the ideology of eugenics and population control, and Dr. Tolbert soon realized this as well, writing about it in her book, “Keeping You & Your Kids Sexually Pure”:

During the course of my five-year tenure, we received a lot of literature. Most discussed population control and the concern for the growing number of people in the world—poor people in the United States and in developing countries. As the population grew, natural resources like air, water, and food were shrinking. I soon understood why the full name for this organization was Planned Parenthood World Population. I struggled with the question, “Which population are they trying to control?” As a black woman, the question kept coming back to me like a boomerang. I wondered why abortion was more necessary for my ethnic group, why this organization fought so hard to give us this particular “right” when the rights for better education, better jobs, and better housing seemed paramount.

Image: Dr La Verne Tolbert tweet about Planned Parenthood

Dr La Verne Tolbert tweet about Planned Parenthood

Tolbert has publicly shared her experiences of being the only African American on the Board of Planned Parenthood at that time, saying, “I would wonder, why are they so concerned about abortion being a right for us? Why is it more necessary for women in the inner city to have the ‘right’ to abortion?” She added at another event:

And I thought, what about housing and jobs and schools?… And every time I asked the question, the boomerang came back to me. And, I realized that Planned Parenthood-World Population [as it was called at that time] had one goal. And that was to control the population of those people they considered to be dysgenic – those people who should not be procreating.

Image: Definition of Dysgenic

Definition of Dysgenic

Tolbert added, “The reason I was asked to be on the board was because I was the daughter of a pastor. And they realized the importance of those in the religious community preaching to our own community the ‘right’ to have an abortion.”

“Part of our responsibility as board members was to become familiar with abortion procedures. We read documents detailing how abortions were performed, and for me, that’s when the viability debate ended,” Dr. Tolbert wrote.

In her book, she describes how reading details of the horrific D&E (dilation and evacuation) abortion brought her to tears:

The dilation-and-evacuation abortion literally tears the baby apart limb by limb…. I was horrified. I came to the next meeting shaking with disbelief and filled with protestations. Holding up the papers, I said that these procedures were traumatic for both the mother and her baby.

An older woman sitting directly across from me looked me coldly in the eye and said in a low, rabid voice, “It is not traumatic!” I was stunned by her insensitivity and chilled by her icy stare.

I was on the verge of resigning from the board. Now that I understood what was really involved, I wanted no part in this abortion business. But the question, “Who will speak up if I leave?” kept me in a quandary. Eventually deciding to remain, I determined to be a thorn in their side and often cast the lone opposing vote.

Dr. Tolbert had nightmares about the babies Planned Parenthood aborted. “We’re not just a board of directors. We are death’s directors!” she wrote.

We were told never to use the words embryo… or fetus… we were instead to use the inanimate terms “mass of tissue” or “contents of the uterus.

We were never to call a teenage girl a “mother.” We were to refer to her as a “woman” no matter how young she might be…Students were to be assured that parental notification or consent was not required for any of Planned Parenthood’s services.

While serving on Planned Parenthood’s board from 1975-1980, Dr. Tolbert became pro-life. When she retired from the board, she began to speak out against Planned Parenthood’s eugenics agenda. Dr. Tolbert’s career as a magazine writer began to take off and she relocated from New York to Los Angeles. She can be seen here in a 1978 article published by Black Enterprise — ironically featured with Planned Parenthood’s first Black president, Faye Wattleton:

Image: feature from Black Enterprise Magazine

La Verne Tolbert (then Powlis) shown with PPFA president Faye Wattleton (Image: edited from Black Enterprise Magazine)

“I thought I had seen everything. This is murder.”

Dr. Tolbert often recalls the day when the reality of what she had participated in hit her. She said at that moment, she fell to the floor and began weeping before God in repentance. Tolbert later recounted that she had been abused as a child and as a result she came to realize that she hated children. She struggled for many years as a young Black woman, but despite all her success, Dr. Tolbert admitted recently, “I just wanted to die. I had this gaping mother wound and I didn’t know how to fix it. Worst of all, I hated children — or at least that’s what I thought. Even though I was raised in the church and my dad was a pastor…. I still wondered if God was real enough…. I cried out to God to heal my pain.”

Then, after years of wondering why she hated children, she began to cry out to God for help. “I woke up, and something was different.” Shortly after this, Tolbert got a job at an elementary school, writing curriculum. She also ended up becoming a counselor… for children. Tolbert found herself walking through hallways and having children running up to her, hugging her… and suddenly she realized that she no longer hated children. “I thought, I’m not afraid anymore. I don’t hate children anymore…. God’s truth changed my life and impacted every area of my world.”

Today, Dr. Tolbert spends most her time instructing churches on how to educate and teach children. She is a favored speaker at pregnancy resource center events and is part of the National Black Pro-life Coalition. But as a former Planned Parenthood board member, Dr. Tolbert also says she remains focused on educating her community on the truth about Planned Parenthood. In a 1989 issue of Ebony Magazine, Tolbert (then Powlis) wrote scathing rebuke against abortion. It read in part:

Image: Ebony Magazine letter

Former Planned Parenthood board member writes to Ebony Magazine 3

I suggest that every pro-abortionist investigate just exactly who sits on these boards to so vigorously uphold “our” right to abortion. And if the finger is pointed to population control, ask yourself this next question: Just what population are “they” trying to control?

…And why is abortion more necessary to Black women? Can we honestly believe that when our children are dying in the streets because of the proliferation of drugs in our communities, when education for Black boys and girls is constantly and categorically inferior, when housing and employment opportunities for women of color  still scrape the bottom of the barrel- can we be so naive to believe that the same “they” who hold us down with one foot will stand up for us with the other? What if the monies spent to kill babies by abortion, were instead, targeted to keep the kids on our streets alive?

…If Black life is so valuable, why are we killing our babies?

In 2011, for the very first time, Dr. Tolbert saw a video of an actual abortion. “I thought I had seen everything,” she stated emotionally. “… I saw that baby’s little hands and the little feet ripped out of the cervix of that woman. This is murder! It must end!”

She added, “We are not a population that needs to be controlled. We must control ourselves. If we don’t walk into Planned Parenthood they cannot kill our babies….”

“There is no way to justify funding Planned Parenthood. Its roots are racist.”

Dr. Tolbert said that since her time on Planned Parenthood’s board she has extensively researched Planned Parenthood and its founder, Margaret Sanger, a former member of the American Eugenics Society:

One book in particular, Grand Illusions, The Legacy of Planned Parenthood by George Grant, confirmed what I had experienced and taught me much, much more. In it I learned about the Negro Project, which was Margaret Sanger’s directive that Planned Parenthood target African-American pastors. It dawned on me how valuable they considered me to be since I was a pastor’s kid!

I now understand more about the philosophical roots of the woman and the organization she launched.

Image: LaVerne Tolbert educating on Planned Parenthood's racist agenda

Former Planned Parenthood board member La Verne Tolbert (Image: Twitter)

Dr. Tolbert later wrote about her findings:

In her [Sanger’s] autobiography, she expresses disdain for the poor, whom she calls the wretched of humanity. Eugenics—the improvement of the race through controlled breeding—identifies certain ethnic groups as dysgenic, meaning they are biologically defective or deficient and therefore unworthy of procreation. Sanger’s mission was to “stop the multiplication of the unfit…[for] race betterment” to guarantee “a cleaner race.”  “Birth-control,” said Sanger in 1920, “is nothing more or less than the facilitation of the process of weeding out the unfit, or preventing the birth of defectives, or of those who will become defectives…

What began with Sanger’s Birth Control Federation in 1916 had, by 1960, become a national movement….

The organization in place, opportunity surfaced when African American women, who were perceived to be particularly fecund or fertile, became the focus of the government’s national family planning efforts. Reducing the size of traditionally large black families was a priority that eventually would impact other minorities as well.

Tragically, Dr. Tolbert said she also learned how the United States government has funded this Black genocide, telling CBN, “It is our government that hires Planned Parenthood to provide abortions to Black women in the inner city.”

Image: Dr La Verne Tolbert former Planned Parenthood board director

Dr La Verne Tolbert former Planned Parenthood board director

Tolbert added in her writings, “Sanger’s personal mission alone did not propel Planned Parenthood to such national status. To do so involves a shared goal, multiple committed partnerships, and the sustained dedication of financial resources—a monumental strategy that only the United States government could achieve.”

“There is no way to justify continuing to fund Planned Parenthood.  Its roots are racist!” she stated in 2015.

“Planned Parenthood targets minorities for abortion with the specific goal of keeping down (or lowering) the birthrate of Black babies…. Over twenty million African American babies have been aborted,” she added.

Dr. Tolbert has co-edited a book with Dr. Alveda King, the niece of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., entitled, “Life at All Costs: An Anthology of Voices from 21st Century Black Pro-Life Leaders.” The book details national efforts to end abortion and protect the traditional family. She sits on the board of Too Many Aborted and is also an advocate for abstinence education and teen pregnancy prevention. Dr. Tolbert is also President of Teaching Like Jesus Ministries Inc., a para-church ministry equipping leaders in the local church.

In March 2013, Dr. Tolbert recently received the Priscilla Award from Biola University during National Women’s History Month. In 2010, she was awarded a commendation by the County of Los Angeles for her efforts with the Department of Children and Family Services to find permanency for older children who are being raised in foster care. She also champions adoption in pulpits across America and invites pastors to partner with her program, Covenants for Kids, where volunteers drive children who are living in foster care to church.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Margaret Sanger’s statue at the Smithsonian Institute is ‘a slap in the face to Black folks’

Posted in Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger Statue with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2017 by saynsumthn

|  From Live Action News

The controversy around the removal of statues that portray racist historical figures fail to spotlight Margaret Sanger, whose bust is in the Smithsonian and whose name is displayed on a Planned Parenthood building. Sanger was a proponent of eugenics who spoke to the women’s branch of Klan in 1926. She also created the “Negro Project” in which she schemed to use Black ministers in her work because she did not, “[…] want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population.”

Despite acknowledgment that their founder had “flaws,” Planned Parenthood continues to honor her as a “trailblazer.” But, as society learns of Sanger’s eugenic ideology which led to the forced sterilization of minorities, as well as her speech before the Klan, they have become increasingly critical.  This has prompted the abortion corporation, whose history also includes associations with the racist eugenics movement, to allegedly “disavow” Sanger’s racist beliefs.

But, as Live Action News has documented, those words have little meaning when you see that Sanger’s name is prominently displayed on one of their facilities. And worse yet is the fact that the Finger Lake facility is listed as Title X-funded in New York’s 2016 directory. This means that this Planned Parenthood facility receives tax dollars, despite displaying the name of a racist on their building.

Margaret Sanger’s name on Planned Parenthood building

Just as outrageous is the fact that when a local media outlet highlighted this Planned Parenthood they failed to mention Sanger’s past. Instead, the news outlet touted Planned Parenthood’s “services” even though nationally Planned Parenthood is losing patients and decreasing legitimate health services while increasing the number of abortions.  By using half a billion in tax dollars every year, Planned Parenthood has managed to garner over 34 percent of the nation’s abortion market share while skating criticism of their racist history.

In addition to placing her name outside the facility, Planned Parenthood’s centers in two states are named after Sanger:

As a result, the city of New York’s website shows the street in front of Planned Parenthood’s New York facility has been designated “Margaret Sanger Square”..

Margaret Sanger Street

In addition, NYC’s Margaret Sanger Clinic has been designated a National Historic Landmark even though it is not open to the public. But, Margaret Sanger buildings and landmarks are just the tip of the iceberg.

Statues of the Klan speaker also exist and surprisingly have been allowed to remain. According to Halpern Blog, the Old South Meeting House in Boston has a statue of Sanger on display as seen below:

Margaret Sanger Statue Old South Meeting House (image credit Halperns blog)

And the Brooklyn Museum celebrates the eugenicist with a display called, “Margaret Sanger’s plate at The Dinner Party.” They describe the table setting as “painted with bright red glazes that evoke the female reproductive organs and the blood that is involved in the reproductive process, as well as the battle for reproductive freedom.”

Margaret Sanger bust national portrait gallery of Smithsonian

Just as disturbing is the fact that Sanger’s bust is displayed at the Smithsonian Institute next to those of legitimate civil rights heroes. The bronze sculpture is owned by the National Portrait Gallery and is located in the “Struggle for Justice” exhibit. The Gallery’s description of Sanger reads in part:

Adding to her life of controversy is her association with the eugenics movement-which included promotion of forced sterilization for those deemed mentally unfit-a movement that for a time was endorsed by many of the era’s prominent thinkers.

The bust was the gift of Mrs. Cordelia Scaife May an anti-immigration zealot who was a key backer of John Tanton, a former Michigan Planned Parenthood Director who founded anti-immigration groups, such as FAIR.  May was also instrumental in a failed bid to pressure the US Postmaster in 1966 to produce a commemorative stamp in honor of Sanger.

According to a report by the LA Times May was, “a generous supporter of Planned Parenthood, which in its early days supported population control.”

A letter of outrage, written and signed by several prominent Black leaders, called for the removal of the bust. The group asked if the Smithsonian Institute was aware that Sanger supported eugenics, held an elitist attitude toward those she regarded as “the feeble minded,” spoke to Ku Klux Klan supporters, and communicated with Hitler sympathizers:

How can a person like Sanger, who found common cause with the racial agenda of the Ku Klux Klan (“KKK”), be ranked among true champions of ‘justice?’ She was a purveyor of grave injustice against the most vulnerable.

Adding:

Ironically, Sanger’s bust is featured in the NPG’s ‘Struggle for Justice’ exhibit, alongside two of America’s most celebrated and authentic champions of equal rights – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks. If Sanger had her way, MLK and Rosa Parks would not have been born.

screenshot

At a press conference denouncing Sanger’s bust two years ago, the Rev. Dr. Johnny Hunter, spokesperson for BlackGenocide.org, commented that “Putting that mess up there is not going to help. The last thing we need is a White Supremacist sitting between the bust of Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks. That’s just a slap in the face to Black folks.”

Star Parker, a Black pro-life advocate, also responded, “Margaret Sanger is a racist who wanted to end the black population through birth control and abortion. She founded Planned Parenthood. But the Smithsonian, funded by our tax dollars, celebrates this woman, even mentioning her advocacy of eugenics! They don’t even hide it! It is breathtaking in its idiocy.”

In Fiscal Year 2016, the Smithsonian’s federal appropriation was $840 million and by 2017 it grew to $922 million. Tax dollars make up about 60 percent of their budget (a combination of the congressional appropriation and federal grants and contracts).

Instead of removing Sanger’s bust, the National Portrait Gallery Director Kim Sajet’s response was to diminish Sanger’s racism, by writing, “Her association with the eugenics movement shadowed her achievements in sex education and contraception, making her a figure of controversy, one whose complexities and contradictions mirror her times.” She told the Black leaders, “I […] respectfully decline to remove her portrait [sic] from the museum.”

Apparently, the excuse that a racist was just a product of their time and therefore deserves to be honored holds true only if you are the founder of the largest abortion corporation in the United States.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Black clergy speak out on racist genocide from abortion

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black Pastor, Church with tags , , , , , , , , , , on September 16, 2015 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood supporter: abortion for “preserving white countries”

Posted in Planned Parenthood Supporter, Pro-choice Logic, Pro-choice People, William Shockley with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 26, 2015 by saynsumthn

I stumbled upon a tweet that read:

    I unfollow anyone who is against the right to an abortion. Get over #plannedparenthood “scandals” and focus on preserving white countries.

Planned Parenthood racism support white countries abortion

In another tweet he suggested that pro-life people who oppose abortion be “ethnically replaced.”

Capture4

The tweets came from user Edgar Ulrich who supports Planned Parenthood.

He even retweeted one of their messages:

Capture

Edgar Ulrich’s support of Planned Parenthood is not surprising. The organization was founded in eugenics and focused on a desire to limit the population of non-whites.

Edgar’s tweet revealed his support of abortion for infanticide:

Capture2

This Edgar Ulrich Tweet below implies that abortion eliminates those whose IQ’s are not in par with “Whites.”

Capture3

Again, that idea came from supporters of Planned Parenthood.

In the 1970’s, Dr. William Shockley, a national committee member of Planned Parenthood and a featured speaker at at least one Planned Parenthood conference, agreed with Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger that Blacks should be sterilized because their rates of reproduction was disproportionate.

William Shockly 1974 race

He also suggested that Black IQ was inferior to Whites:

William Shockly IQ Black

In 1967 the eugenicist and Nobel Prize caused a national uproar when he stated that it was a waste of taxpayer money to create better schools and welfare programs for what he called “Ghetto Negroes.”

Shockley advocated licensing women to have children.

He said what he called “unskilled Negroes” are reproducing at a much higher rate than unskilled whites.

He advocated birth control and said the Census Bureau would decide how many people could have children.

The Planned Parenthood speaker advocated Eugenics in this article – The Montreal Gazette – Dec 13, 1967:

Shockly license

He claimed to have research showing that people of African descent are genetically inferior to whites in intelligence and simply not smart enough to take advantage of programs designed to help them.

William Shockley Certificates to be pregnant

To save tax money, he proposed that the U.S. government implement forced birth control to lower the reproduction of the inferior classes and then issue certificates to become pregnant that would be sold on the New York stock exchange.

Mr. Ulrich would love for pro-life people to “get over the Planned Parenthood scandals” but that will never happen. He, by his own tweets is adding fuel to the “scandal” that the abortion biz was founded in racist eugenics.