Archive for Black minister

Black minister with Planned Parenthood calls abortion a God given right

Posted in Abortion Sacred, Heartbeat Bill, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Planned Parenthood's black spokespeople with tags , , , , , on December 4, 2014 by saynsumthn

Earlier this month, abortion giant Planned Parenthood invited two Black supporters of abortion-on-demand to share about their support for child killing in Ohio, one of whom said she was a minister.

They were opposing Ohio’s pro-life Heartbeat legislation which was coming up for a vote. HB248 would generally prohibit an abortion of an unborn human individual with a detectable heartbeat. The heartbeat is detected usually around six weeks gestation.

HeartBeat Bill

Speaking for abortion giant Planned Parenthood which was founded in eugenic racism was an African American mother of six who said that her decision to have an abortion should not be judged.

Ohio Black WOman

Samantha Williams began her speech on the south lawn of the Ohio Statehouse by saying, “I am here because I want our politicians to trust women…and to not judge us for the decisions we make.

Williams told the reporters who came to the press conference that she had six children, “For some people that’s a large family,” she said, “On any given day someone would question why I would have so many children. If they were to learn I’d had an abortion they also would wonder what difference would one more would have made.”

She went on to explain her abortion, “The right thing for me and my family at that time was to have an abortion. I went to counseling with a healthcare professional and with the support of my family. I looked at it from every angle, I made my choice and I moved on…Just like everyone doesn’t agree with my decision to have six children, some people do not agree with my decision to abort a child. But at the end of the day it was my choice to make…No one should be forced to carry a pregnancy to term if she doesn’t want to.

Heartbeat Bill Minister PP

Next up was another African American woman who said she is an ordained minister within the United Church of Christ. She also opposed restricting abortion because it discriminated against the poor, “Laws that limit or prohibit abortion are neither just nor enforceable. But they do have the distinct effect of discriminating against the poor…Abortion simply must be medically safe and legally available to all women.”

The so-called minister went on to push abortion as a matter of faith and belief in God, “Abortion is a matter of faith, conscience and justice…There are as many different points of view and beliefs as there are denominations, clergy and faith leaders. Yet there is broad consensus, that a women’s right to make decision about her own reproductive life is God given…The idea that because a person is religious that person must be rabidly anti-abortion is radically false. I and many other persons of faith believe that a woman should have access to compassionate abortion care…For 40 years, clergy from many traditions have supported a woman’s right to exercise moral agency, have prayed with women as they made difficult decisions and have stood with them at the intersection of faith and policy…The question of when life begins is a matter of science to some and theology to others…”

My guess is that this alleged minister does not read her Bible.

Black Powers collide: Black minister and black activist defend Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally

Posted in Abortion, Black Conservative, Glenn Beck, Ted Hayes with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

My challenge to the race hustlers
Exclusive: Mychal Massie invites tea-party-dissing black ‘leaders’ to debate him publicly

________________________________________
Posted: August 31, 2010
1:00 am Eastern


By Mychal Massie
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At a press conference sponsored by the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice, Walter Fauntroy blasted Glenn Beck’s “Restoring Honor” rally and said the Ku Klux Klan and the tea party have to be “used interchangeably.”

He continued, “Conservatives of this country have declared war on the civil-rights movement of the ’60s that brought together a coalition of conscience of people of every race, creed and color for a march on jobs and freedom.”

First of all, Fauntroy should acquaint himself with factual history. It was the Democratic Party, which he belongs to, that founded the Ku Klux Klan. Secondly, as long as he and liberal Democrats are offended that Beck would have his rally on the same date and venue as Dr. King’s march, they should explore another piece of factual history.

The Ku Klux Klan was founded on Dec. 24, 1865. Shouldn’t he, as a minister, be offended that the party he belongs to and shills for founded a terrorist hate group whose expressed purpose was to terrorize, intimidate and murder Jews, Blacks, Catholics and whosoever else they would, on the sacred eve of Christ’s birth? As a minister, which should be more offensive, Beck’s rally or that tidbit of fact?

But it’s not about date and venue at all. His vitriol (along with the same from others) is the apoplectic, knee-jerk hysteria intended to foment discord where none exists and none was intended. Furthermore, I find it indefensible that his malevolent and divisive diatribes are presented by the media without contradiction or an addressing of the facts.

Erik Rush’s brand new book is bold, daring and needed: “Negrophilia: From Slave Block to Pedestal – America’s Racial Obsession”

Specific to that point, I say it’s time for the likes of Fauntroy, Marc Morial of the National Urban League and Al Sharpton to defend their rhetoric. Over the years, I have quietly offered to debate these types – now I throw down the gauntlet and publicly challenge them. I will personally secure a venue to debate any one, or all of them together, pursuant to the legitimacy of their comments. After all, perhaps they have been misquoted or taken out of context. Perhaps they intended to say something else.

I challenge these men to defend their remarks and publicly explain how the tea party compares to a segregationist terror group started by Democrats. I challenge Marc Morial to openly explain, in a debate format, why the Beck rally was “insulting” and a “hijacking of the imagery and symbolism” of Aug. 28 and the Lincoln Memorial?
The tea party is a joining together of persons from all political parties. It epitomizes the very thing Fauntroy readily acknowledged that the 1963 march did – it brings together people of conscience of the every race, creed and color to march for jobs and the restoration of constitutional freedoms.

It is time they were called to, not only explain, but stand under the microscope of public debate and demonstrate how their Erebusic rhetoric binds together the fabric of the American community.

I call upon the media to assist me in my effort. The media are quick to parrot every word these so-called civil-rights leaders say that is antagonistic and divisive. In the interest of fair reporting, let them be equally quick to insist that they accept my challenge.

Let Fauntroy explain under the scrutiny of debate how he can be so quick to condemn people for joining together – fighting to bring our country back to its roots – while supporting those responsible for the murder of more than one-third of the present black population through abortion. Let him explain how he calls himself a minister, a reputed man of God, and encourage people to commit murder.

Religious beliefs may allow one to focus on being a community rabble-rouser, i.e., organizer – but as a minister, the Word of God calls one to focus on soul-winning, spreading the Word of God and making disciples, i.e., those who will follow after Christ.

Fauntroy, Morial and Sharpton are brave attackers in the comfort of their minions – but my challenge is now on the table to see if they have the collective backbone to face me in a debate. It’s easy to throw stones from behind a fence, but let them step out and defend themselves publicly.

After all, it’s just little ol’ me. They can’t be afraid to face me in a debate. Fauntroy and Sharpton are former presidential candidates, and Morial is certainly accustomed to making accusations from the secure confines of the National Urban League. Here is their chance to defend their convictions, in a public forum, against a lowly essayist such as myself.

C’mon boys, are you going to step up, or are you cowards talking loud and saying nothing, for the sake of fomenting discord?

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Ted Hayes Debates Rev. Eric Lee on Glenn Becks …, posted with vodpod

Ted Hayes is also speaking about the black genocide issue – Watch

The Elite’s are NOT Pro-black watch Maafa21 – The film features a number of Black leaders:

Black Leader Comments on Glenn Beck Rally and Dr. King’s Speech

WASHINGTON, Aug. 30 /Christian Newswire/ — Day Gardner, President of the National Black Pro-Life Union, submits the following and is available for comment:

I can’t explain what I felt as I watched Dr. Alveda King bounding down the steps of the Lincoln Memorial steps to deliver her speech, “I Too, Have a Dream.”

In the moments before I was introduced, I was taken back 47 years to when I was eight years old. I remember that day vividly–sitting on the floor, my back leaning against my father’s chair. My eyes were glued to the television. Dr. Martin Luther King had become my hero, he was a deliverer. Even then, my parents seemed worried about his future–would someone try to silence this man of God? Unfortunately, it did happen –we all lost him.

Eventually, it became evident we had to strive to make “the dream” a reality so that Dr. King’s death would not be in vain. We became energized for a few seasons, I think. The world was changing and black Americans knew that if they stayed the course–they might just get there. Many of the Black clergy awkwardly stepped forward in an attempt to fill the void left by Dr. King and his murdered brother Rev. A.D. King; but it never happened.

The Reverend Jesse Jackson tried and was believable for awhile as his star began to rise with “I am somebody” and his powerful writings against abortion.

More and more black ministers wanted the adulation Dr. King had, as they all vied for his coveted “leadership” role.

Growing up, I was saddened to see them drop like flies–becoming sell-outs to immorality. Sidelining their worship of God, many chose power, greed and money instead. Men of God became less and less Godly–some became God-less.

Jesse Jackson, the once adamant supporter of all children born and unborn–switched tracks to board the abortion train. That train has brutally killed more than 50 million children since 1973–more than 17 million black children. He became part of America’s downfall.

On August 28, 2010, the 47th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King’s historical speech, I find myself standing beside his niece, Dr. Alveda King as she delivered her amazing speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. My eyes welled–a lump formed–this is what her uncle saw! Looking out over the mall into thousands and thousands of faces, Alveda, my black brothers and sisters and I stood in solidarity–in unity. From the Lincoln Memorial, past the Washington Monument, as far as the eye could see in any direction, American people of all colors stood shoulder to shoulder to honor the one true God–to show love for our great country, a country founded on the Solid Rock which is the word of God–to fix the places where we are broken–to help the weathered masses–to see the humanity of unborn children–to heal the terrible hurts–to lift each other up and to never stand down until the “dream” is restored and I was there.

Arrest of N.C. minister upsets Valley pastors Racism gaining ground, they say

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Pastor, Racism with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 20, 2010 by saynsumthn


By Francis Scarcella The Daily Item
SELINSGROVE — A black minister from North Carolina said he never attracted the attention of police while protesting outside abortion clinics until he started to speak about racism as well.

Valley ministers said the arrest of Pastor Ronnie Wallace is an alarming infringement of the minister’s right to free speech.

Wallace, 67, of Charlotte, N.C., was arrested on July 17 after beginning to preach from atop a ladder to several people waiting outside the Family Reproductive Health Abortion Clinic in Charlotte.

Wallace begin preaching in the parking lot across the street from the clinic about eight years ago and said he never had any trouble until he added racism to his teachings.

“I get there about 7:30 a.m. every Saturday, and the police are already there waiting for me, but I started speaking about racism and how it is coming back to this country, and I guess the police didn’t like to hear that,” Wallace said.

Pastor Mark Gitten, of Higher Hope Ministries in Selinsgrove, agreed with Wallace about racism becoming a problem, but said he isn’t the preach-from-a-ladder type.

“I’m not one for picketing or soliciting in that way, but I don’t think it is right to just shut someone down for preaching,” he said. “As a pastor I know the laws, and Wallace had the freedom to preach.”

A female officer from the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department made the arrest. Wallace said there were more then 20 officers standing by.
Be quiet
“I told the officer I was there to preach about saving babies’ lives and racism, and she told me to get down from the ladder and be quiet,” he said. “I told her I had a constitutional right, and then she handcuffed me.”

Wallace was charged with resisting an officer and was fined $300.

Gittens said that if members of other organizations are allowed a forum to speak about racial issues, all opinions should be granted the same access.

“This just seems to be kind of a double standard,” he said. “Racism is alive and well in America and it’s a shame because it has a way of finding its way in every generation.”

An employee from Hillcrest Medical Center, an abortion clinic in Harrisburg, said she heard about Wallace and thinks he shouldn’t be allowed to preach outside abortion clinics.

“How far can you take freedom of speech?” she asked. “We provide a service and yet we get all kinds of people outside protesting and preaching, and it just doesn’t help.”

Pastor James Bond, of the Revival Tabernacle Church in Watsontown, said that whenever a preacher is targeted by law enforcement, it deserves attention.

“I am deeply concerned anytime when any preacher of the Gospel is silenced,” he said. “That is a real concern we could have.”

Bond has witnessed racism and said he hopes it doesn’t find its way to the Valley.

“There is still a bit of it everywhere,” he said.

Nisan Trotter, 27, of Lewisburg, is a pastor of Bucknell University campus ministry. He said he doesn’t feel any effects of racism but understands being a minority minister.

“I haven’t ever encountered anything like that, so I think I have been blessed in that way,” he said. “But I will be praying for Pastor Wallace to get through this.” Wallace is scheduled to appear in a North Carolina court on Aug. 23.

Learn about the racism of abortion in the film: Maafa21 (clip below)