Archive for Black History Month

These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Jesse Jackson, NAACP, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Samuel Yette with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action screened the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Image: Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

Image: article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Omage: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

 

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

 

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

 

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

Article on abortion (Pamela Carr and Faye Wattleton) published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

 

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Former Planned Parenthood board member: Defund this ‘racist’ organization

Posted in Black Babies, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black Lives Matter, Black Pastor, Black Women, Former Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  (From Live Action News)

Image: Dr. Laverne Tolbert

Dr. La Verne Tolbert is an accomplished professor, author and outspoken advocate for adoption and foster care. She is also a former Planned Parenthood board member turned staunch pro-life advocate who admits that at one time she hated children. Her journey to the truth led her to become a role model for children and an outspoken representative against the agenda of abortion and Planned Parenthood, which she says targets the Black community.

Early in her career, Tolbert, who then went by the name La Verne Powlis, landed a job as editor/reporter for Family Circle Magazine and went on to become the first Black beauty editor of Brides Magazine, where she claims she lived a “very glamorous life in the beauty world.” (In 1979, she authored her first beauty book and became a spokesperson for L’Oreal.)

Image: LaVerne Tolbert book on beauty

La Verne Powlis: Beauty from the Inside Out

“Why is it more necessary for women in the inner city to have the ‘right’ to abortion?”

Due in part to her success as a magazine writer, after joining the Coalition of 100 Black Women in New York, Dr. Tolbert was asked to join the board of Planned Parenthood. Tolbert had been raised in church and her father was a pastor, but she writes, “I knew little about abortion.” In her book she also describes being sought after to join Planned Parenthood: “When a speech I made received media coverage back home, I was greeted with my organization’s applause along with invitations to join two boards – The Young Women’s Christian Association (YWCA) and Planned Parenthood.”

“In 1975, when I was asked to be a part of the board, I thought, this is a wonderful way for me to volunteer and help the women in my community. This is a great way to give back,” Dr. Tolbert told an audience.

Dr. Tolbert often points out that abortion had just been legalized a few years earlier and many people, including her, were uneducated about abortion and the development of the preborn child in the womb.

Dr. Tolbert says that while she was with Planned Parenthood, she discovered that at one time, the state of New York’s Health Department required a death certificate for each baby that was aborted. “And I thought, death certificates? Well a death certificate is only required if somebody dies.”

“And so, the information that I had learned that it was just a ‘blob of tissue,’ a ‘mass in the uterus,’ was not true.”

“Later on, as I began to read, I asked a [Planned Parenthood] board member how abortions were performed – I protested that this was traumatic for the mother and her baby. But, I was corrected and told, ‘It is not traumatic!’”

 

Image: Dr. LaVerne Tolbert

Dr. La Verne Tolbert, former Planned Parenthood board member (Image credit: TooManyAborted.com)

She described her first Board meeting: “I remember walking into the first board meeting. And I was filled with anticipation. I was so excited to be there. And I took the bus from my job and the magazine where I worked and took it over to the Margaret Sanger Center.”

Dr. Tolbert writes that almost immediately she began to notice board members arriving to meetings in style:

Over time I noticed that several of the board members arrived in chauffeured limousines. Who were these men of wealth, I wondered, and why were they so interested in the people who lived in the inner-city?

Once in the building, I walked past the clinic that served primarily African-American and Latino girls. The elevator took me upstairs to an imposingly large boardroom, and I took my seat with the striking observation that I was the only person of color in the room. The majority of board members were male, and the handful of women appeared to be much older than my twenty-seven years.”

Today, we know that many of these “well-to-do men” as she described them later, had been indoctrinated with the ideology of eugenics and population control, and Dr. Tolbert soon realized this as well, writing about it in her book, “Keeping You & Your Kids Sexually Pure”:

During the course of my five-year tenure, we received a lot of literature. Most discussed population control and the concern for the growing number of people in the world—poor people in the United States and in developing countries. As the population grew, natural resources like air, water, and food were shrinking. I soon understood why the full name for this organization was Planned Parenthood World Population. I struggled with the question, “Which population are they trying to control?” As a black woman, the question kept coming back to me like a boomerang. I wondered why abortion was more necessary for my ethnic group, why this organization fought so hard to give us this particular “right” when the rights for better education, better jobs, and better housing seemed paramount.

Image: Dr La Verne Tolbert tweet about Planned Parenthood

Dr La Verne Tolbert tweet about Planned Parenthood

Tolbert has publicly shared her experiences of being the only African American on the Board of Planned Parenthood at that time, saying, “I would wonder, why are they so concerned about abortion being a right for us? Why is it more necessary for women in the inner city to have the ‘right’ to abortion?” She added at another event:

And I thought, what about housing and jobs and schools?… And every time I asked the question, the boomerang came back to me. And, I realized that Planned Parenthood-World Population [as it was called at that time] had one goal. And that was to control the population of those people they considered to be dysgenic – those people who should not be procreating.

Image: Definition of Dysgenic

Definition of Dysgenic

Tolbert added, “The reason I was asked to be on the board was because I was the daughter of a pastor. And they realized the importance of those in the religious community preaching to our own community the ‘right’ to have an abortion.”

“Part of our responsibility as board members was to become familiar with abortion procedures. We read documents detailing how abortions were performed, and for me, that’s when the viability debate ended,” Dr. Tolbert wrote.

In her book, she describes how reading details of the horrific D&E (dilation and evacuation) abortion brought her to tears:

The dilation-and-evacuation abortion literally tears the baby apart limb by limb…. I was horrified. I came to the next meeting shaking with disbelief and filled with protestations. Holding up the papers, I said that these procedures were traumatic for both the mother and her baby.

An older woman sitting directly across from me looked me coldly in the eye and said in a low, rabid voice, “It is not traumatic!” I was stunned by her insensitivity and chilled by her icy stare.

I was on the verge of resigning from the board. Now that I understood what was really involved, I wanted no part in this abortion business. But the question, “Who will speak up if I leave?” kept me in a quandary. Eventually deciding to remain, I determined to be a thorn in their side and often cast the lone opposing vote.

Dr. Tolbert had nightmares about the babies Planned Parenthood aborted. “We’re not just a board of directors. We are death’s directors!” she wrote.

We were told never to use the words embryo… or fetus… we were instead to use the inanimate terms “mass of tissue” or “contents of the uterus.

We were never to call a teenage girl a “mother.” We were to refer to her as a “woman” no matter how young she might be…Students were to be assured that parental notification or consent was not required for any of Planned Parenthood’s services.

While serving on Planned Parenthood’s board from 1975-1980, Dr. Tolbert became pro-life. When she retired from the board, she began to speak out against Planned Parenthood’s eugenics agenda. Dr. Tolbert’s career as a magazine writer began to take off and she relocated from New York to Los Angeles. She can be seen here in a 1978 article published by Black Enterprise — ironically featured with Planned Parenthood’s first Black president, Faye Wattleton:

Image: feature from Black Enterprise Magazine

La Verne Tolbert (then Powlis) shown with PPFA president Faye Wattleton (Image: edited from Black Enterprise Magazine)

“I thought I had seen everything. This is murder.”

Dr. Tolbert often recalls the day when the reality of what she had participated in hit her. She said at that moment, she fell to the floor and began weeping before God in repentance. Tolbert later recounted that she had been abused as a child and as a result she came to realize that she hated children. She struggled for many years as a young Black woman, but despite all her success, Dr. Tolbert admitted recently, “I just wanted to die. I had this gaping mother wound and I didn’t know how to fix it. Worst of all, I hated children — or at least that’s what I thought. Even though I was raised in the church and my dad was a pastor…. I still wondered if God was real enough…. I cried out to God to heal my pain.”

Then, after years of wondering why she hated children, she began to cry out to God for help. “I woke up, and something was different.” Shortly after this, Tolbert got a job at an elementary school, writing curriculum. She also ended up becoming a counselor… for children. Tolbert found herself walking through hallways and having children running up to her, hugging her… and suddenly she realized that she no longer hated children. “I thought, I’m not afraid anymore. I don’t hate children anymore…. God’s truth changed my life and impacted every area of my world.”

Today, Dr. Tolbert spends most her time instructing churches on how to educate and teach children. She is a favored speaker at pregnancy resource center events and is part of the National Black Pro-life Coalition. But as a former Planned Parenthood board member, Dr. Tolbert also says she remains focused on educating her community on the truth about Planned Parenthood. In a 1989 issue of Ebony Magazine, Tolbert (then Powlis) wrote scathing rebuke against abortion. It read in part:

Image: Ebony Magazine letter

Former Planned Parenthood board member writes to Ebony Magazine 3

I suggest that every pro-abortionist investigate just exactly who sits on these boards to so vigorously uphold “our” right to abortion. And if the finger is pointed to population control, ask yourself this next question: Just what population are “they” trying to control?

…And why is abortion more necessary to Black women? Can we honestly believe that when our children are dying in the streets because of the proliferation of drugs in our communities, when education for Black boys and girls is constantly and categorically inferior, when housing and employment opportunities for women of color  still scrape the bottom of the barrel- can we be so naive to believe that the same “they” who hold us down with one foot will stand up for us with the other? What if the monies spent to kill babies by abortion, were instead, targeted to keep the kids on our streets alive?

…If Black life is so valuable, why are we killing our babies?

In 2011, for the very first time, Dr. Tolbert saw a video of an actual abortion. “I thought I had seen everything,” she stated emotionally. “… I saw that baby’s little hands and the little feet ripped out of the cervix of that woman. This is murder! It must end!”

She added, “We are not a population that needs to be controlled. We must control ourselves. If we don’t walk into Planned Parenthood they cannot kill our babies….”

“There is no way to justify funding Planned Parenthood. Its roots are racist.”

Dr. Tolbert said that since her time on Planned Parenthood’s board she has extensively researched Planned Parenthood and its founder, Margaret Sanger, a former member of the American Eugenics Society:

One book in particular, Grand Illusions, The Legacy of Planned Parenthood by George Grant, confirmed what I had experienced and taught me much, much more. In it I learned about the Negro Project, which was Margaret Sanger’s directive that Planned Parenthood target African-American pastors. It dawned on me how valuable they considered me to be since I was a pastor’s kid!

I now understand more about the philosophical roots of the woman and the organization she launched.

Image: LaVerne Tolbert educating on Planned Parenthood's racist agenda

Former Planned Parenthood board member La Verne Tolbert (Image: Twitter)

Dr. Tolbert later wrote about her findings:

In her [Sanger’s] autobiography, she expresses disdain for the poor, whom she calls the wretched of humanity. Eugenics—the improvement of the race through controlled breeding—identifies certain ethnic groups as dysgenic, meaning they are biologically defective or deficient and therefore unworthy of procreation. Sanger’s mission was to “stop the multiplication of the unfit…[for] race betterment” to guarantee “a cleaner race.”  “Birth-control,” said Sanger in 1920, “is nothing more or less than the facilitation of the process of weeding out the unfit, or preventing the birth of defectives, or of those who will become defectives…

What began with Sanger’s Birth Control Federation in 1916 had, by 1960, become a national movement….

The organization in place, opportunity surfaced when African American women, who were perceived to be particularly fecund or fertile, became the focus of the government’s national family planning efforts. Reducing the size of traditionally large black families was a priority that eventually would impact other minorities as well.

Tragically, Dr. Tolbert said she also learned how the United States government has funded this Black genocide, telling CBN, “It is our government that hires Planned Parenthood to provide abortions to Black women in the inner city.”

Image: Dr La Verne Tolbert former Planned Parenthood board director

Dr La Verne Tolbert former Planned Parenthood board director

Tolbert added in her writings, “Sanger’s personal mission alone did not propel Planned Parenthood to such national status. To do so involves a shared goal, multiple committed partnerships, and the sustained dedication of financial resources—a monumental strategy that only the United States government could achieve.”

“There is no way to justify continuing to fund Planned Parenthood.  Its roots are racist!” she stated in 2015.

“Planned Parenthood targets minorities for abortion with the specific goal of keeping down (or lowering) the birthrate of Black babies…. Over twenty million African American babies have been aborted,” she added.

Dr. Tolbert has co-edited a book with Dr. Alveda King, the niece of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., entitled, “Life at All Costs: An Anthology of Voices from 21st Century Black Pro-Life Leaders.” The book details national efforts to end abortion and protect the traditional family. She sits on the board of Too Many Aborted and is also an advocate for abstinence education and teen pregnancy prevention. Dr. Tolbert is also President of Teaching Like Jesus Ministries Inc., a para-church ministry equipping leaders in the local church.

In March 2013, Dr. Tolbert recently received the Priscilla Award from Biola University during National Women’s History Month. In 2010, she was awarded a commendation by the County of Los Angeles for her efforts with the Department of Children and Family Services to find permanency for older children who are being raised in foster care. She also champions adoption in pulpits across America and invites pastors to partner with her program, Covenants for Kids, where volunteers drive children who are living in foster care to church.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Four Black pro-life women who spoke against abortion as ‘Black genocide

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  Republished from Live Action News

Image: Mildred Jefferson pro-life leader

Black pro-life leader Mildred Jefferson

In the early 1960s and 70s, organizations seeking to liberalize abortion laws, like the National Organization for Women (NOW), attempted to convince the nation that women wanted legalized abortion on demand. Many women actually opposed liberalized abortion laws, and those women’s voices were silenced by NOW (who was influenced by men seeking to profit from abortion) and NOW’s friends in the (at that time, majority male-led) media.

During that time, many pro-life women spoke out against the liberalization of abortion laws, including many women in the Black community, who saw abortion as “Black genocide.” Four of them are listed below:

Fannie Lou Hamer 

Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped to found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964, she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer pro-life women

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne said Hamer called abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition…. There she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. ‘I didn’t come to talk about birth control,’ she protested. ‘I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?’”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she ‘regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.’”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as saying, “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders. Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Dr. Mildred F. Jefferson

Mildred Jefferson pro-life, women

Mildred Jefferson (Image: Schlesinger Library)

Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and the first woman employed as a general surgeon at Boston University Medical Center. She was ardently pro-life, and was the co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) and Massachusetts Citizens for Life. She served as NRLC president from 1975-1978.

Dr. Jefferson was committed to defending human life from, as she described it, “conception to natural death.”

She first became active in 1970 when, as she recalled to the New York Times, “the American Medical Association first considered bending its founding principles in such a way that a doctor would not be considered unethical” if he or she committed an abortion.

She once described why she became a physician, “I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.”

Dr. Jefferson also warned that abortion would target the Black community, and in 1977, she stated, “Blacks suffer more from abortion because what looks like help is actually striking against them. Blacks are fewer. They will disappear sooner….” She insisted that “[a]bortion is class war against the poor,” and told the Pittsburgh Press in 1977, “Abortionists argue, ‘Let the poor have abortions like the rich can.’ Then abortionists should make a list of the other things rich women have that they’re going to give to poor women.”

Mildred Jefferson abortion Black genocide pro-life women

Mildred Jefferson: Abortion is Black genocide

At a press conference in 1989, Dr. Jefferson noted how the abortion lobby uses the poor to maintain abortion access. At that press conference, Dr. Jefferson joined with other pro-life women to release a declaration supporting life, stating that abortion is “not only genocide” but “national suicide.”

“It implies a fascist solution that now they call ‘liberal,’ to keep down the costs of caring for the poor. They get rid of those who are going to run up the costs,” she stated, adding:

Every women’s organization in this country has got to deal with these issues a little more forthrightly than has been possible in the past.  Because, for most of the organizations, of the general women’s organizations that support that point of view [abortion] there has never been any kind of real in depth discussion of such issues…

We have an idea that N.O.W., the National Organization of Some Women, in alliance with the other alphabet organizations — ACLU, PP, NARAL — are in deadly collusion to obtain the private right to kill all having the direct objective of establishing a socialist order, to replace our Democratic Republic.”

In a 1976 article with the New York Times, Dr. Jefferson summarized efforts of the pro-life movement as “dedication.” She went on to say, “It’s a simple matter that our people believe if they fail, other people will die. Today the unborn, tomorrow the elderly.”

READ: Bishops and pastors gather at Missouri Planned Parenthood to condemn Black genocide

Iowa Rep. June Franklin

Rep. June Franklin was one of many Black women who opposed abortion.

Rep. June Franklin (Image: Maafa21)

In 1971, one of the most convincing arguments against legalizing abortion in Iowa came from a Black female representative in the State’s legislature: June Franklin. According to a report published by the Burlington Hawk Eye, Rep. A. June Franklin, a Democrat from Des Moines, was joined in her opposition to abortion by another female Congresswoman, Hallie Sargisson, (D-Salix).

Rep. Franklin was the only African-American representative in the Iowa legislature, and saw liberalized abortion as a way to target the Black community. “Proponents… have argued this bill is for Blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all,” Franklin said. “Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of Blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either Blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

In July of 1972, she defended her vote to the Des Moines Register, saying, “Most of the people I’ve heard from are strongly opposed to legalizing abortion, and most of these people are not Catholics.”

The Des Moines Register later quoted the female lawmaker as being proud that her vote overturned the measure. “It would have led to genocide and euthanasia. God gave us life and only God can take it away,” Franklin said.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Clardy Craven was one of several Black women who opposed abortion.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Craven served on the board of the National Right to Life Committee and NRLC’s state affiliate, Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life. She was also a social human rights activist and chairman of the Minnesota Human Rights Commission and African-Americans Against Abortion.

In 1972, just prior to the Roe v. Wade decision, Craven wrote a piece titled “Abortion, Poverty and Black Genocide– Gifts to the poor?” and called abortion Black genocide:

Throughout the course of American history, the quality of human life has always been improved at the expense of the weak and oppressed…. It takes little imagination to see that the unborn Black baby is the real object of many abortionists….

The quality of life for the poor, the Black and the oppressed will not be served by destroying their children….

[T]he womb of the poor Black woman is seen as the latest battleground for oppression. In times past the Blacks couldn’t grow kids fast enough for their “masters” to harvest; now that power is near, the “masters” want us to call a moratorium on having babies. When looked at in context, this whole mess adds up to blatant genocide….

Government family planning programs designed for poor Blacks will emphasize birth control and abortion with the intent of limiting the Black population is genocide. The deliberate killing of Black babies in abortion is genocide- perhaps the most overt form of all…. The prevalent Black attitude toward birth control and abortion is distinctly in opposition!

Craven pointed to two studies showing that Blacks — and specifically, Black women — opposed abortion:

In a study conducted by the Bowman Gray Medical School on poverty-level Blacks, 79% of 776 poverty-level Black females, 86% of 500 of their sex partners, and 70% of 215 low-middle-income Black females were found to be “not in favor of abortions under any circumstances.”  Similarly, when 990 urban Black females were studied, 77% were found to be opposed to abortion under any circumstances, and this opposition was found to be manifest in their actions of carrying their children to term…”

In 1975, Craven told a Pennsylvania federal panel that abortion amounted to a “wholesale marketing of human flesh.”

In 1985, Craven described why she opposed abortion. “Having served women on welfare, I feel that the pro-choice movement is a male cop out,” she said. “I vowed on my dear grandmother’s grave that as long as there is breath in my body I shall fight for the right of the Black child to exist.”

Hamer, Jefferson, Franklin, and Craven were adamant in their belief that abortion was being used by those in power to cull the Black population. Planned Parenthood’s own founder, Margaret Sanger, was a eugenicist whose “Negro Project” had the goal of reducing population growth in the Black community. Even today, Planned Parenthood has been caught in controversy, as an undercover Live Action investigation found the organization willing to accept donations to abort specifically Black babies:

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News

Black Pastor we haven’t just lost a great Supreme Court Justice . . . we’ve lost our minds

Posted in Black Pastor with tags , , , , on February 16, 2016 by saynsumthn

We’ve Lost Our Minds
By:Walter B. Hoye II, Issues4Life Foundation

Walter Hoye

Walter B. Hoye II, President of the Issues4Life Foundation, releases the following and is available for comment:

As a Black American, I understand what happens when being human is not enough to be protected as a human being by the highest law of our land and I thank God for the Fourteenth (14th) Amendment to the United States Constitution.

The Fourteenth (14th) Amendment makes it extremely clear that no State shall deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, nor deny any person the equal protection of the law. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia understood this to apply to all human beings (from the womb to the tomb), when he said the United States Constitution “says what it says and doesn’t say what it doesn’t say.”

Scalia

Today, it is equally clear that the Empire State (New York) Assembly does not believe being human is enough to merit the full protection of the law. Today, not only can a full term baby in the womb of his or her own mother be violently dismembered from limb to limb, he or she can now be legally shot in the heart with a poison dart to kill him or her by both doctors and non-doctors. Today, in my opinion, we the people, who vote for such legislators, have sunk to a whole new level of depravity.

As of February 13th, 2016, the Court has one vacant seat following the untimely death of Justice Antonin Scalia, those who believe all human life matters will miss him dearly. However, as a Black American, in light of February being Black History Month where we remember the lives lost in the fight to have all human beings created in the image of God recognized as deserving life, liberty, property, and equal protection from the highest law of our land, it is apparent to me that we’ve lost more than a great Supreme Court Justice . . . we’ve lost our minds.

Black radio host on abortion “We need to be marching against this!”

Posted in Black Caucus, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter with tags , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2015 by saynsumthn

A Black Blog Talk radio host who uploads vids to TheAdviseShowTV YouTube channel has called Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, “Devil in a dress,” because of her racist agenda to eliminate the Black race.

AdviseShow YouTube abortion black genocide

In addition, he said that if Blacks could not march for the genocide going on from abortion they should not say that Black Lives Matter.

“I tell you right now, Darren Wilson is not killing us. The Ku Klux Klan isn’t killing us. It is abortion. Matter fact abortion is the number one killer a black people,” he told his subscribers.

Abortion since 1973 has claimed and more than the estimated $60 million babies within our community sixteen million.”

“Notice 79% of Planned Parenthood’s are in minority communities. I wonder why?”

He also said that the Black community needs to March against abortion.

I’m looking in the genocide proportion, Black women abort their babies at a rate of 5x’s more than their white counterpart,” he said.

This is something that Adolf Hitler would have dreamed of doing. 16 million people and it’s all about choice? And we all want to be out here screaming and yelling about Black Lives Matter?”

“Black lives are supposed to matter, but, they don’t matter about choice if you just want to kill your kid for whatever reason you want to kill your kid. It doesn’t matter. It only matters when a racist cop kills your kid. Or a racist guy kills your kid then that’s when Black lives matter. But, when it comes to abortion, Black lives don’t matter at all.If you’re not going to speak up about this genocide don’t even talk about Black lives matter the next time this stuff happens,” he stated.

Well…some Blacks do stand up:

PP KKK 2011-04-003

Watch the vid here:

4.4 million Blacks dead because of eugenic and racist abortion

Posted in Abortion stats, Black Abortion Stats, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black Lives Matter with tags , , , , , , , on February 11, 2015 by saynsumthn

4.4 million Blacks killed by abortion over the 22 years between 1990 and 2011.

abortion_is_black_genocide_10_sticker_rectangle

That translates to 200,069 black children each year, 548 black abortions each day or 22 abortions every hour, or about 1 every three minutes.

CNS News broke down the stats:

Those numbers are broken down as white, black, other, and Hispanic. For every year 1990 – 2011, the total number of “reported abortions” in black females were as follows:

1990 204,832 black abortions

1991 222,015

1992 228,280

1993 226,829

1994 226,323

1995 205,442

1996 207,831

1997 212,144

1998 218,344

1999 210,859

2000 214,212

2001 112,451

2002 206,973

2003 215,051

2004 209,603

2005 203,991

2006 219,598

2007 212,664

2008 194,694

2009 154,266

2010 148,261

2011 146,856

Total: 4,401,519 black abortions

Learn more about the racism of abortion by watching Maafa21.

Abortion and Planned Parenthood have no place in Black History Month

Posted in Black History Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 11, 2015 by saynsumthn

Life Dynamics has gathered up a fascinating number of pro-life tweets which are educating the masses about the racism of abortion and Planned Parenthood during Black History Month.

As we have all noticed, Planned Parenthood has been tweeting their faux interest in Black History Month just about every day – its a good thing to see that their tweets are being met with just a wee bit of push back.

From the Life Dynamics Blog Post:

As Planned Parenthood takes to Twitter during Black History Month, others are tweeting messages exposing the real agenda of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

Maafa21 Planned Parenthood Black History Month Tweet

Planned Parenthood was founded by Margaret Sanger, a racist member of the American Eugenics Society, and since Life Dynamics produced the powerful documentary Maafa21, their history and radical eugenic agenda is beening brought into the light of day.

Now, activists have taken to twitter to educate the public about the way abortion is being used to exterminate the Black Community, in accordance with Sanger’s plan.

Eugenics 101 Maafa21 tweet black history month

Here are just a few of those messages:

Planned Parenthood and Black History Month Tweets:

Artist Planned Parenthood and Black History Month

Planned Parenthood and Black History Month tweets

Planned Parenthood and Black History Month tweets 2

Planned Parenthood and Black History Month tweets 3

Planned Parenthood and Black History Month tweets 7

________________________________________________

From Rev. Walter Hoye of issues4life.org

Walter Hoye 1

If ‪#‎BlackLifeMatters‬, it’s got to matter in the womb first.”

Walter Hoye Black Lives Matter womb first Black History 2275114159920177206_n

The tweet below takes you to an interview with Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards saying that life begins at birth.

Walter Hoye PP Cecile Richards Black History Month

“Pastors: @PPact has admitted abortion kills a baby: http://bit.ly/1Ix8U0I . Can you do the same? #BlackHistoryMonth”

Walter Hoye Planned Parenthood abortion kills baby tweet Black

___________________________________________

The Radiance Foundation:

Radiance Foundation mEU4q-ov

Is there ONE black celebrity who has the courage to call out #PlannedParenthood? http://youtu.be/Uyk_TcdtXwM #BlackHistoryMonth #NumberOneKiller

Radiance One Black Celebrity black history abortion

Radiance Fannie Lou Hamer Black History

#FannieLouHamer called abortion a “genocide” against blacks. ProLifeHamer #BlackHistoryMonth #BlackLivesMatter

______________________________________________________

Dr. Alveda King

Alveda M21

“Hands Up- Don’t Abort” #blacklivesmatter #blackhistorymonth

Alveda King Hands up dont abort

_____________________________________________________________

Ryan Bomberger:

RyanBomberger

“Human beings should be remembered not dismembered.#BlackHistoryMonth #BlackLivesMatter #AllLivesMatter”

Ryan Bomberger Human beings remembered not dismembered

anna-duggar-twitter-scandal-pp

See the rest of the tweets here

_____END LIFE DYNAMICS _____

That last picture is of Anna Duggar with Ryan Bomberger founder of the Radiance Foundation and a picture of a tweet that has made her the brunt of Planned Parenthood loving criticism from the far abortion supporting left.

Ryan explains:

“Anna Duggar has done it now. Online “entertainment” news sites are up in arms that a woman would actually express her…gasp…opinion via Twitter! The Duggars are known for being unapologetically pro-life, and they are absurdly hated by those who rabidly defend a choice their mothers never made (ironically being alive to spew their pro-abortion nonsense). What did Anna do that has E!Online, RadarOnline, FishWrapper, InTouchWeekly and even Mommyish and Opposing Views so riled? She retweeted a Black History Month meme that I created and posted, via The Radiance Foundation, to highlight abortion’s devastating impact in the black community.

“Human beings should be remembered not dismembered. Because of the violence of abortion, over 16 million black people are history. TooManyAborted.com #BlackHistoryMonth #BlackLivesMatter #AllLivesMatter”

“These are the words that have offended some (evidently) disturbed Twitter folk—enough for them to post death threats and insanely profane tweets to both Anna and The Radiance Foundation. The black abortion rate (up to 5 times that of the majority population) isn’t controversial for these folks…just that a white person (namely a Duggar) dared to share this truth with the Twitterverse.”