Archive for Black Genocide

#TBT Planned Parenthood held sex-ed house parties in Black communities

Posted in Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections, Planned Parenthood House Party, Planned Parenthood in Black Neighborhoods, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood Parties, Planned Parenthood Poor Women, Planned Parenthood sex ed with tags , , , , , , , on February 27, 2020 by saynsumthn

Did you know that Planned Parenthood used to hold Sex-Ed House Parties in both the Black Community and Hispanic Community?

 

Planned Parenthood Kalamazoo held sex ed house parties on Black Community and Hispanic Community

 

 

Here is full article:

 

Planned Parenthood Kalamazoo held sex ed house parties on Black Community and Hispanic Community Argus Press 1991

 

More published here.

Planned Parenthood leaders saw abortion for eugenics reasons according to Justice Clarence Thomas

Posted in Eugenics, Guttmacher, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections, Supreme Court with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2019 by saynsumthn

 

Part Two of Two.

Abortion for eugenics reasons was advocated by Planned Parenthood leaders such as Alan F Guttmacher according to a multi-page summary written by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in the case Box v. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky Inc. In part one, we detailed how Justice Thomas linked eugenics ideology to Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. Here we will include additional statements from the Justice.

In his opinion, Thomas wrote a lengthy history of eugenics and touched upon one of Margaret Sanger’s notorious directors, Lothrop Stoddard. Thomas wrote, “[…E]ugenicist Lothrop Stoddard argued that the “prodigious birth-rate” of the nonwhite races was bringing the world to a racial tipping point…Stoddard feared that without “artificial barriers,” the races “will increasingly mingle, and the inevitable result will be the supplanting or absorption of the higher by the lower types….Eugenic arguments like these helped precipitate the Immigration Act of 1924, which significantly reduced immigration from outside of Western and Northern Europe….”

Read more about Stoddard’s views at Live Action News (here).

Thomas also implicated former PP president and eugenics VP, Alan F Guttmacher, writing, “Many eugenicists therefore supported legalizing abortion” adding how “abortion advocates—including future Planned Parenthood President Alan Guttmacher— endorsed the use of abortion for eugenic reasons…Even after World War II, future Planned Parenthood President Alan Guttmacher and other abortion advocates endorsed abortion for eugenic reasons and promoted it as a means of controlling the population and improving its quality…”

Image: Alan Guttmacher 1973

Alan Guttmacher 1973 (Image credit: WGBH)

Thomas went on to address PP leaders on eugenics, “One journal declared that “abortion is the one mode of population limitation which has demonstrated the speedy impact which it can make upon a national problem.” …Planned Parenthood’s leaders echoed these themes. When exulting over “‘fantastic . . . progress’” in expanding abortion, for example, Guttmacher stated that “‘the realization of the population problem has been responsible’ for the change in attitudes. ‘We’re now concerned more with the quality of population than the quantity.’”

Live Action News has documented how Guttmacher was instrumental in the decriminalization of abortion and then pushed PP into committing abortions.  The fact is that Guttmacher’s ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. After all, they were both members of the very racist American Eugenics Society, with Guttmacher serving as the group’s vice-president. As Live Action News has documented in the past, Sanger made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics.

Image: Planned Parenthood president Alan F Guttmacher VP of eugenics society

Planned Parenthood president Alan F Guttmacher VP of eugenics society

The Justice, a Black man himself, spoke about the suspicion that Blacks had about “family planning” and abortion becoming a tool of Black genocide, mirroring examples pointed out previously by Live Action News:

“Avoiding the word “eugenics” did not assuage everyone’s fears. Some black groups saw “‘family planning’ as a euphemism for race genocide” and believed that “black people [were] taking the brunt of the ‘planning’” under Planned Parenthood’s “ghetto approach” to distributing its services,” the Justice wrote.

Image: Article Blacks Charge Genocide from abortion

Blacks Charge Genocide from abortion

Thomas pointed out how eugenicsts were cited in the Roe v. Wade case, writing, “Similarly, legal scholar Glanville Williams wrote that he was open to the possibility of eugenic infanticide, at least in some situations, explaining that “an eugenic killing by a mother, exactly paralleled by the bitch that kills her misshapen puppies, cannot confidently be pronounced immoral.” …The Court cited Williams’ book for a different proposition in Roe v. Wade.”

Live Action President, Lila Rose pointed out that Live Action has seen first hand how the abortion industry targets vulnerable and minority demographics as evidence in the undercover call below:

 

“I applaud Clarence Thomas’ assertion that ‘Given the potential for abortion to become a tool of eugenic manipulation, the [c]ourt will soon need to confront the constitutionality of laws like Indiana’s…. Enshrining the constitutional right to an abortion based solely on the race, sex, or disability of an unborn child, as Planned Parenthood advocates, would constitutionalize the views of the 20th Century eugenics movement.’ Rose stated.

Although Thomas concurred with the Court’s decision to not rule on the discrimination portion of the case at this time, he recognized that this issue of eugenics must be addressed by the Court, writing, “Given the potential for abortion to become a tool of eugenic manipulation, the Court will soon need to confront the constitutionality of laws like Indiana’s…Although the Court declines to wade into these issues today, we cannot avoid them forever. Having created the constitutional right to an abortion, this Court is dutybound to address its scope.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is a longer – edited- version of one also published by Live Action News. 

Abortion victim imagery credited for win against 1972 abortion proposal in Michigan

Posted in Abortion Victim Images, Black Babies, Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Black Women, Blacks protest abortionn with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 24, 2019 by saynsumthn

The use of abortion victim imagery has been a debated topic for the pro-life movement for many years but the fact is that showing the American public what abortion looks like has been instrumental in changing hearts and minds on the humanity of the preborn person in the womb. The use of victim images dates back to the days prior to and just after legalization of abortion both at the state level and the federal level.

In 1972, a year before the infamous Roe V Wade Supreme Court decision which legalized abortion on demand in the nation, the State of Michigan asked voters to vote on Proposition B which would, “Allow abortion under certain circumstances.”

According to information obtained from the October 18, 1972 Claire Sentinel, the proposal would allow for only licensed physicians in hospitals or clinic settings to perform abortions rather than “allowing abortions to be [sic] preformed by the same hucksters who have been operating illegally for years.”

Image: michigan proposal b 1972 on abortion

Michigan proposal b 1972 on abortion

According to other reports, the measure was proposed to permit a woman to have an abortion for any reason up to 20 weeks of pregnancy. Backers of the abortion measure claimed the move would make abortions more available to the “poorer segment of the population,” according to a October 19, 1972 report by Wakefield News.

As a result, a coalition of pro-life groups, A Voice of the Unborn, under the direction of Detroit resident Dr. Richards Jaynes, launched an offensive. The coalition included the Michigan Catholic Conference as well as the Right to Life Committee and the Southern Baptist Church.

“The humanity of the child is the only issue,” Dr. Jaynes told the Holland Evening Sentinel on September 02, 1972 . “Nobody has a right to deprive him of his life, not even his mother.”

Pro-life activist Lynn Mills, who uncovered the flyer, told this blog that she remembers proponents of the pro-life measure, “Coming into my school in Livonia and explaining all of the different types of abortions.”

The organization mailed pamphlets like the one seen below (archived at the Bentley Historical Library) to the community. And, they  included abortion victim imagery:

Image: Michigan proposal to legalize abortion news 1972 pro-life pamphlet

Michigan proposal to legalize abortion news 1972 pro-life pamphlet

The effort paid off because voters rejected the measure.

 

Image: michigan proposal to legalize abortion news 1972

Michigan proposal to legalize abortion news 1972

According to historian Daniel K Williams in his book, Defenders of the Unborn, the group had mailed the brochures to 250,000 African Americans households, linking abortion concerns to race.

The strategy, Williams said originated with African American Democratic state representative and civil rights activist Rosetta Ferguson, who joined the cause as director of Michigan’s Voice of the Unborn.

 

Image: Voice of the Unborn advertisement 1972 Michigan

Voice of the Unborn advertisement 1972 Michigan

Ferguson called abortion legalization, “Black Genocide.”

Ferguson was not alone in linking abortion to eugenics and genocide.

This blog has extensive research documenting how Black leaders, including many Black women understood that abortion was targeting their community.

The use of abortion victim imagery also inspired the pro-life movement’s iconic “precious feet” pin.

Dr. Sacco’s image of aborted baby

In the early 1970’s, Dr. Russell Sacco, a urologist from Oregon began reading “anatomical books,” and when the Supreme Court ruled that murdering the preborn was “legal,” the doctor became, in his words, “furious.”

It was shortly after this that Sacco met a pathologist who had preserved aborted babies’ bodies in a bucket of formaldehyde, which he showed Sacco. “… [I]n the bucket were about seven or eight infant bodies. It was a little bit shocking for me to see that but, there they were.”

Dr. Sacco said he took out “one body at a time” to photograph them. Then, he cataloged each child and their estimated ages.

After developing the film, he discovered that the images of the feet were “better than I had thought. I really thought that… maybe God did that one for me.”

The image, which Dr. Sacco refused to copyright so it could be used worldwide, has been referred to as “Tiny Feet,” “Little Feet,” and “Precious Feet.”

Dr. Sacco’s picture of aborted baby feet

Sacco later met Dr. Jack Willke who asked to use those images in his book Handbook on Abortion. Following that, the picture was printed in early pro-life brochures such as “Life and Death” and “Did you Know?” The photo soon “went viral,” as they say, and was published in countless flyers, books and pamphlets. That photo then inspired an Arizona couple, Ellis and Virginia Evers, the founders of Heritage House, which now offers the pins for purchase.

Pro-abortion leader hoped abortion would end ‘morality’ and ‘the nuclear family’

Posted in Black Babies, Black Genocide, Eugenics, Garret Hardin, Garrett Hardin, Human Betterment, Lader, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, Roe V Wade History with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 23, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion, abortion rates, Roe v. Wade

The “father of the abortion movement,” Larry Lader, was heavily influenced by Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, about whom he wrote a biography. Planned Parenthood was also steeped in eugenics from its beginning, and boasted a list of eugenics proponents as its board members. Although the two shared a eugenics ideology, Lader would eventually part ways with Sanger over abortion. But it was perhaps Sanger’s warped eugenic ideology that motivated Lader to manipulate the 1960s women’s movement to push for abortion legalization.

 

Lader wasn’t interested in equal rights… just ‘abortion rights’

“Larry never seemed to be interested in the rest of the women’s movement, the equal rights amendment, child care and so forth,” Sey Chassler, a consulting editor at Parade magazine, recalled to the LA Times in 1995. But on abortion, “he is absolutely single-minded. He just keeps going forward on it.”

Image: Lawrence Lader abortion crusader

Lawrence Lader abortion crusader

READ: Did a eugenics proponent coin Planned Parenthood’s iconic slogan?

In 1966, Lader authored the book “Abortion” on the heels of the Supreme Court’s 1965 decision in Griswold vs. Connecticut, granting a so-called right to privacy. “If I had written it five years earlier, it would have sunk like a stone,” he admitted.

Lader stressed in the book, “We will only defeat ourselves by producing an endless cycle of unwanted children. Those born in slums, for example, denied even the smallest share of education and economic opportunity, have little chance of realizing their full potential as citizens.” He goes on to quote Garrett Hardin, a leading eugenic ecologist, whose views influenced debates on abortion, immigration, foreign aid, overpopulation, and other provocative issues.

Hardin, a member of the American Eugenics Society, who was given Planned Parenthood’s highest national award in 1980, once called it insanity to rely on voluntarism to control population. He advocated coercive birth control, stating that citizens should be willing to give up their right to breed for the betterment of society.

“When unwanted children become parents,” Lader quotes Hardin in “Abortion,” “they are more likely than others to be poor parents themselves and breed another generation of unwanted children. This is a vicious cycle if there ever was one. It is ruinous to the social system.”

Image: Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

“Above all, society must grasp the grim relationship between unwanted children and the violent rebellion of minority groups,” Lader went on to state, then using Planned Parenthood’s iconic slogan, “every child a wanted child,” coined by eugenicist Frederick Henry Osborn, a founding member and president of the American Eugenics Society (AES) who also signed Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April 1938.

Frederick Osborn

READ: Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go far beyond Margaret Sanger

“As long as a reasonable chance of contraceptive failure persists, however, abortion must be included as part of birth control to insure every child’s becoming a wanted child,” Lader wrote. He then turned from a eugenics emphasis to couching abortion as liberating for women, calling it, “the final freedom,” and quoting Sanger as saying, “No woman can call herself free until she can choose consciously whether she will or will not be a mother.”

“The complete legalization of abortion is the one just and inevitable answer to the quest for feminine freedom,” Lader stated. “All other solutions are compromises.”

Lader sought “a complete restructuring of sexual morality”

Lader saw abortion as liberating for women, sexually. But in reality, abortion was a man’s dream and the last barrier keeping him from free sex without consequences… and has shifted the responsibility of pregnancy to the woman alone.

“The rapid advance of legalized abortion in turn gave the feminist movement an explosive boost,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II,” adding, “Abortion provided the prime weapon against sexism and the ‘biological imperative’ – the prison of unwanted childbearing that had chained most women to the role of housekeepers, nurses, and cooks under male dominance. Once sex had been detached from pregnancy, Women’s Liberation could construct its own ethics on the ash-heap of puritan morality.”

Lader then suggested that the “feminist revolt” was the “rebirth of sex… an explosion of sexuality” while also pointing out that a recent study had shown that “nearly half of all unmarried women have had sexual intercourse by the age of nineteen.” Of course, Lader also observed from that Commission on Population Growth study that, “more Blacks than Whites had intercourse in each age group.”

Lader described the feminist demands as “a complete restructuring of sexual morality,” claiming that the “most radical feminist wants an even more sweeping revolt – the end of the nuclear family itself.” He claimed the feminist had replaced the security of a “husband’s salary” for the “biological security of abortion.”

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

 

____________________

 

  • ( Part one) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • (Part Two) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger
  • (Part Three) ‘Father of abortion rights’: Minorities need abortion to prevent future ‘drug addicts’
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

‘Father of abortion rights’: Minorities need abortion to prevent future ‘drug addicts’

Posted in Abortion prior to Roe, Agenda 21, Bernard Nathanson, Betty Friedan, Black Genocide, Black Women, Illegal abortion, Lader, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, NARAL, National Organization for (Some) Women, National Organization for Women, NOW, Roe V Wade History, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2019 by saynsumthn

Larry Lader, abortion

The abortion rights movement,” was inspired by eugenicist Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger, which influenced his own pro-eugenics ideology. Lader was a writer-turned-abortion enthusiast who penned several books on the subject. His 1966 book, “Abortion,” was cited several times in the Roe v. Wade decision.

But Lader was not as direct as Sanger. While Sanger openly used eugenic terms, Lader was more subtle, claiming that society needed to look out for the “protection of the child and its future.” But what Lader really meant was not the future of every child, but the future of the elites, the perfect, and those who were mostly Caucasian.

Lawrence (Larry) Lader

Lawrence (Larry) Lader, abortion and eugenics promoter

Here’s what Lader said to WNYC Public Radio (emphasis added):

In other words, I feel that what we have to protect and that we want to give the mother a chance to protect, is the right to bring into the world one, two, three, whatever number of children she can love, protect, educate, care for. That we cannot, as a society, our own country, in the world, today can no longer afford to bring into the world ten, fifteen children, most of whom will be starving not just in India, but often in our own home, will become the flotsam and jetsam of society, will become the drug addict.

Lader then stressed that the people who needed abortion the most were “the percentage of Puerto Ricans, Negroes, other minority groups.”

Lader also contradicted himself, calling the preborn child “potential life” on one hand, while also claiming to be “for the protection of the child.” In his book, “Abortion,” Lader sounded eerily similar to Sanger in her promotion of eugenics — the idea that certain people are “more fit” than others, and that these criteria can decide who should or should not live. During that previously mentioned 1966 WNYC discussion, Lader called eugenic protection acts “humanitarian.”

Lader had conspired with Bernard Nathanson to use the women’s movement of the 1960s as the perfect vehicle to push an abortion legalization agenda. In her book, “Subverted,” author Sue Ellen Browder describes Lader as being adamant that the women’s movement was key to decriminalizing abortion. Browder quotes Lader telling Nathanson at a NARAL strategy meeting, “We’ve got to keep the women out front… and some Blacks. Black women especially. Why are they so damn slow to see the importance of this whole movement to themselves?”

READ: Planned Parenthood raises abortion pill price in poor, minority community

By 1967, Lader’s plan had come to fruition, when feminist icon Betty Friedan brought the abortion plank to a vote in her National Organization for Women (NOW) organization, and it was adopted. As a result, one-third of NOW members left the group. “There was actually a night – and it took me many years to find this night… when abortion was inserted into the women’s movement,” Browder told Live Action President Lila Rose in an interview. She continued:

That night, it was wild.  There were eight rights that they voted on that night and most of them, six of them, passed unanimously. Rights we would all agree on. Women should have equal pay for equal work, women should not be fired for being pregnant, women should have equal access to educational opportunities, these are all things that everybody agrees on today.

There were only two rights that night that they fought over. One was Equal Rights Amendment. Now, why did they fight over that? Well, one woman who was very articulate said — and she was a civil rights attorney — that human rights are indivisible. And if you can separate women’s rights out from other people’s rights, you’ve destroyed a lot of things. The last right to be fought over that night, and they fought until almost midnight — that was the abortion right. It was wild. People were screaming. Now this is the founders of feminism in the 1960s, this is not a bunch of radical anti-abortions. These are the feminists fighting over abortion. And, some of the things they said in that meeting- because I got the minutes to the meeting, were things that people are seeing today.

One person said, “I’m against murder.”

There were a lot of people opposed. In fact, they were so opposed that at least one-third of those women walked out and later resigned from NOW.… And so, what you had there that night — behind the scenes — it has never been reported except in this book, Subverted, for the first time, is that you had pro-life feminists leaving the National Organization for Women, and pro-abortion feminists staying.

By the late 1960s, Lader had jumped into the abortion fight with both feet, joining Nathanson and Friedan, among others, to found NARAL (or as it was known then, the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws) and served as chair of the pro-abortion group’s medical committee.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

____________________________

  • ( Part one) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • (Part Two) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

Is Abortion industry push for more Black/ minority abortions reminiscent of eugenics?

Posted in Abortion and Hollywood, Abortion in Pop Culture, Abortion Stigma, ANSIRH, Black Abortion Stats, Black Genocide, Black Women, TARA Health Foundation with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 4, 2019 by saynsumthn

Abortion industry pushes for more minority abortions in TV and movies

pregnant, abortion, Black

Going hand in hand with Planned Parenthood’s announcement that abortion would be its number one focus in 2019 come plans to promote abortion as normal in movies and TV. This effort to change the so-called “stigma” that surrounds abortion by “working with content creators on honest and authentic portrayals of abortion in film and television” will include creating more portrayals of “women of color (WOC)” obtaining abortions — something that should raise the eyebrows of anyone who knows about the eugenic history of Planned Parenthood.

The move comes as women of color are experiencing declining abortion rates.

Planned Parenthood’s former “special affiliate,” the Guttmacher Institute, found that “Black women had the highest abortion rate in 2014 (27.1 abortions per 1,000 women of reproductive age) and white women had the lowest rate (10 per 1,000). Between 2008 and 2014, women of color experienced the steepest abortion rate declines: Rates fell 32%–39% among Hispanic and black women and those who identified with a race other than black or white, compared with a 14% decline among white women.”

“We’ll be enhancing our efforts to destigmatize abortion in the media and across popular culture — including working with the music, fashion, movie, and television industries, and announcing additional public awareness campaigns in the coming months,” wrote the nation’s largest abortion corporation. To that end, Planned Parenthood has a full time “director of arts and entertainment engagement.” Director Caren Spruch’s job, according to her LinkedIn page, is to advance “sexual and reproductive health and rights through pop culture.”

Image: Caren Spruch planned parenthood director arts and entertainment (Image: LinkedIn )

Caren Spruch planned parenthood director arts and entertainment (Image: LinkedIn )

READ: Pro-life leaders condemn ‘sick’ abortion billboard targeting Black women

Planned Parenthood’s eugenic agenda was driven by founder Margaret Sanger who strategically worked to convince the Black community to control its population through her infamous “Negro Project.” Sanger is still viewed as a hero by the abortion industry, despite her admission that she met with members of the Ku Klux Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.”

Like Sanger’s Negro Project, a review of a 92-page report from the Tara Health Foundation, a philanthropic effort that funds abortion facilities and efforts, reveals an abortion industry insider strategy to promote abortion among Women of Color — namely, “… specific demographic groups (18-19 year olds, Black [WOC] and Hispanic women, and low-income women) that lag behind the national average in their rates of contraceptive use….”

Image: TARA Health Foundation invest in Women of Color for pushing abortion

TARA Health Foundation invest in Women of Color for pushing abortion

The report includes statistics and analysis from “ANSIRH, the Guttmacher Institute, Ibis Reproductive Health, and the Kaiser Family Foundation.” All of these organizations are heavily involved with abortion. TARA’s founder, Ruth Shaber, previously held research positions at Kaiser Permanente and serves on the Medical Advisory Committee for Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Guttmacher’s founder was a eugenicist that helped mold Planned Parenthood into an abortion vendor. The organization is the former “special affiliate” and research arm of Planned Parenthood.

To monitor this goal, the Abortion On Screen program database was created by Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH). This group was founded by a board member of the National Abortion Federation who was a medical director and staff physician at Planned Parenthood facilities in California, and it publishes workbooks on abortion training. In the group’s database of abortion in TV and movies, unsurprisingly, “Plotlines in which a character considers but does not have an abortion… are not included….”

Image: Planned Parenthood tweet celebrates TV showing Blacks having abortions (Image: Twitter)

Planned Parenthood tweet celebrates TV showing Blacks having abortions (Image: Twitter)

READ: These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Image: Planned Parenthood Black Community celebrates portrayals of Women of Color having abortions

Planned Parenthood Black Community celebrates portrayals of Women of Color having abortions

Image: Gretchen Sisson sociologist ANSIRH

Gretchen Sisson sociologist ANSIRH

At InStyle.com, Gretchen Sisson, Ph.D, ANSIRH sociologist and lead researcher, lamented:

TV often shapes our views of the world…. Women of color and women who are mothers are dramatically under-represented… characters tend to get abortions for self-focused reasons… barriers to accessing abortion are either non-existent or easily overcome…. All of these misrepresentations shape what people know and believe about abortion. They could be doing better.

…[O]ur 2015 report found that nearly 90% of television characters getting abortions were white, the finding that almost half of this year’s plot lines in which a character obtained or disclosed an abortion included black women represents the beginning of a corrective course toward more inclusive storytelling — even as Latina characters remain underrepresented. As the majority of American women who have abortions are women of color, it is essential that their stories are told… if we are to capture the current reality of abortion in our country.

ANSIRH celebrated momentum behind Black abortion portrayals:

2018 marked an important moment in fictional abortion stories on television: a shift towards highlighting the nuanced experiences of women of color, more specifically Black women. This year, we identified 18 plotlines where a character has an abortion, discloses a past abortion, or considers getting an abortion. Of those, four of the five characters who obtained an abortion in the course of the plotline were either Black or biracial women.

Image: ANSIRH promotes portrayals of Black woman having abortion at Planned Parenthood (Image: Abortion Onscreen in 2018)

ANSIRH promotes portrayals of Black woman having abortion at Planned Parenthood (Image: Abortion Onscreen in 2018)

A recent survey by the Guttmacher Institute discovered that — in their words — “being black,” among other reasons, contributed to women having multiple abortions.

Guttmacher Prior Abortion Survey

The report found that Black women had a higher rate of prior abortions: “Slightly more than half of Black abortion patients had a prior abortion (54%), higher than any other racial and ethnic group.”

If the overall Black abortion rate is already disproportionately high, strategies like this will likely force that rate even higher. Is this the outcome wanted by the abortion industry? We can only speculate.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.