Archive for Black Caucus

These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Jesse Jackson, NAACP, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Samuel Yette with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action screened the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Image: Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

Image: article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Omage: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

 

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

 

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

 

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

Article on abortion (Pamela Carr and Faye Wattleton) published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

 

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Abortion is a tool of “Black Genocide” say Black leaders in history

Posted in Birth Control and Eugenics, Birth Control Federation, Black Babies, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Black History Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn
abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action is screening the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Article: Abortion is Black Genocide

Abortion is Black Genocide- Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Conely opposed abortion

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

IMAGE: Abortion is Pooricide article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Image" Dick Gregory in Ebony from Maafa21

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Image: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK from Maafa21

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Image from Maafa21

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Image from Maafa21

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Article on abortion and Black Genocide

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Image from Maafa21

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Article on Black abortions

Black religious leaders – see abortion as Black Genocide Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Article on Black genocide from abortion

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory see abortion as genocide/ Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Image: Mildred Jefferson

Black pro-life doctor Mildred Jefferson/ Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

Article: NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood

NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood/ NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

Article: NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood

NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood/ NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Image: Planned Parenthood meets with Malcolm X

Planned Parenthood meets with Malcolm X/ Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

                                                                     1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

                                                         Article on abortion published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Black man rails on NAACP and Phony Black Activists for silence on Black abortion genocide in NY

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black Population Demographics with tags , , , , , , , , , on February 22, 2014 by saynsumthn

This black man is asking some good questions: Where is Al Sharpton, NAACP, Obama and “Phony Black Activists”?

He states, “More black babies killed than were born in NYC, I don’t hear the black activists talk about the black genocide of black babies.”

In 2012, there were more black babies killed by abortion (31,328) in New York City than were born there (24,758), and the black children killed comprised 42.4% of the total number of abortions in the Big Apple, according to a report by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

New statistics published by the New York Health Department reveal that more black babies were aborted than were born.

Of 197,046 total viable pregnancies, 73,815, or about 37 percent, ended in “induced terminations” in 2012.

In 2012 73.4 percent of all abortions reported to New York City’s health department were performed on Black and Hispanic women. That rate is slightly lower than previous years.

To break the numbers down further:

Of the 73,815 abortions reported New York City’s health department for 2012, 14,197 were performed on Asian and White women while 22,917 were performed on Hispanic women and 31,328 were performed on Black women.

NY 2012 Abortion HD

Alabama Black Politician ( Artur Davis) defects from Democrat Party criticized Obama’s birth control mandate, forced abortion payments in ObamaCare and gay marriage

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Dems with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 1, 2012 by saynsumthn

A Southern Democrat defecting to the GOP is not news. A black Southern Democrat defecting to the GOP is pretty big news. A black Southern Democrat who is a member of Congress and a vocal supporter of President Barack Obama warrants a screaming headline.

Former Alabama Congressman Artur Davis, an early Obama supporter who ran for governor in 2010, hinted on Tuesday that he may run for office in his new home state of Virginia. “If I were to run, it would be as a Republican,” he wrote. The former Alabama Congressman Artur Davis has announced he is leaving the Democratic Party, joining the Republican Party, and says he will likely vote for Mitt Romney in November.

“[F]aith institutions should not be compelled to violate their teachings because faith is a freedom, too,” he wrote on his blog, which he refers to as “free opposition research.”

He jabbed the administration for plunging “headfirst into a fight over contraception and Catholic hospitals” in February. He wrote of Obama, “something seems to have been drained out of this presidency. Since the start of 2012, it has been curiously devoid of an economic agenda, preoccupied with interest group politics, deliberately unwilling to assert much of a long term priority list. The administration has spent inordinate time on two causes, mandating Catholic institutions to cover birth control in their employee insurance plans—an issue few Americans had stressed over prior to this year—and challenging state voter ID laws, which 70 percent of the country support.Even if you deeply believe that on both issues, the administration is right and its critics are wrong-headed, it is impossible to argue that Obama gave much attention to either fight until recently. As a senator and presidential candidate, he offered no criticism of the Supreme Court’s 2008 ruling that Indiana’s voter ID law was a legitimate means to preclude voter fraud (a ruling written by a liberal icon, John Paul Stevens). Nor did the Obama of 08 question the long-time practice of Catholic workplaces leaving contraceptives out of their employee benefits. Right or wrong, each fixation seems more an election year bow to his political base than a response to a tide of public urgency.”

Davis is black, but even in Congress he didn’t toe the Black Caucus line. He was an opponent of what has become known as Obamacare, and left his U.S. seat to run for governor of Alabama.

In 2009, Davis and other Democrats sent a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi saying they don’t want any abortion funding or mandates in the health care bill under consideration by the U.S. House. Speaker Pelosi received a first letter signed by 20 pro-life Democrats several weeks ago. Among the five Democrats who signed the letter was Rep. Artur Davis (D-Ala.), a moderate Democrat who is running for governor of Alabama. Excerpt of the letter:

“…we believe that a common ground solution is to include language in the final legislation that makes clear that no insurance company will be required to pay for an abortion except in extraordinary circumstances — nor will they be prohibited from paying for an abortion, so long as health insurance plans offered in the exchange that choose to provide abortion coverage pay for those services with funds that are separate and distinct from any federal subsidies.

This solution maintains the current status quo in the private market – where insurance companies can choose whether to include this coverage in their plans and individuals can choose which plan (and what sort of coverage) fits their individual needs and values while ensuring that no federal funds are used to pay for abortions.

Lastly, we believe that health reform legislation should not preempt constitutionally permissible state laws that establish pre-requisites that a patient must satisfy before obtaining an abortion, such as parental consent and waiting period laws.
In addition to Rep. Davis, liberal Rep. Kendrick Meek (D-Fla.) is another member of the Congressional Black Caucus who signed on to the letter.

Davis has a mixed record on abortion legislation ( Read here). Just this year, while opposing requiring Ultra Sounds before abortion, Davis made this observation, “The fact is that in a country turning left on most social issues, pro-life politics is stronger than it’s been in decades—Gallup says about half the country opposes the legality of abortions, and the number who favor making the practice rare and hard to get approaches a super majority. One undeniable reason is that technology is simultaneously exposing the violent details of abortion and the vitality of an unborn fetus. The science is making abortion on demand look more hard-hearted than ever to young, college educated women, whose opinions on the issue have shifted dramatically in the last decade.”

Davis is evolving and perhaps he will see the real dangers of a pro-choice stance in the black community on abortion especially since new information being released in a documentary Maafa21 is awakening African Americans to the real racist agenda of abortion.

I hope more will watch the documentary Maafa21 and see how abortion will affect the African American Community

Davis was also outspoken against OBAMA’s position on Same Sex Homosexual Marriage.

Local Urban League and eugenic founded organization whose founder gave Klan speeches host “family event”

Posted in Black Genocide, Planned Parenthood, Urban League with tags , , , , , , , , , on August 31, 2010 by saynsumthn

Titled by the media as : Family Fun Challenge Day at Columbus Park

Monday was the second annual Family Fun Challenge held by Planned Parenthood and the Broome County Urban League.

The free event featured arts and crafts,food, and games.

Several other social service agencies were also there, providing interactive games to “help foster family communication.”

One African American Women told the news media that, ” “It opened up my eyes on certain things that I really didn’t know about, you know, and to help other people know what their children, if something goes wrong I have like a pamphlet to show them like this is what’s going on, you need to go get help.” said Tonia Benjamin

But- I have to wonder if this woman knows the history of Planned Parenthood and their racist and eugenic roots. Perhaps if the Urban League educated her on this- she’d have her eyes opened in a whole new direction.

Does she know that in 1962, the National Urban Leaguerescinded its support of contraception, and so did many local NAACP chapters and that twenty-eight percent of the Blacks surveyed in the late 1960’s agreed that “ encouraging blacks to use birth control is comparable to trying to eliminate this group from society” (Source Medical Apartheid, by Harriet Washington)

In 1962 Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception as black genocide directed at them.

One Urban League leader, Whitney Young, revoked his group’s support of contraception and in 1963- Whitney M. Young, Jr. Executive Director, National Urban League, explained why blacks are suspicious of family planning, “Let me conclude by trying to explain why many Negro citizens are either suspicious of the motives of family planners or why they are reluctant to make the program a sole responsibility of public institutions, and are sometimes less enthusiastic about the program…First, the administrators of most public institutions are political appointees. It is a rare exception when a Negro is ever represented at policy level, and in some states the top administrators are well known racists..Second , since so few of the proponents of family planning including [Planned Parenthood] PPFA, are ever prominently identified fighting the basic problem of discrimination and segregation …either as individuals or through established agencies …many interpret this interest in family planning as designed more to control population expansion in this particular racial group and to reduce taxes, than to achieve a humane and social goal..

In a letter addressed to Planned Parenthood President, to Alan F. Guttmacher in 1966, one Connecticut Planned Parenthood associate admonished Guttmacher at how shocked he was to learn that blacks opposed their group “ Since the luncheon phase of the last board meeting I have been very much concerned. I do not know if your report was the bombshell to the others that it was to me, but the fact that the Urban League, NAACP, etc. were actively and vocally naming PP*WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] a racist organization shocked me. I remember as long ago as 1935 hearing the then Catholic inspired reaction from the Negro community, “The whites want to keep our numbers down so they can rule us.” However, to hear this view point promulgated in 1966 by the leaders of the Negro group was a shock. More upsetting was the apparent acquiescent nod of the PP*WP spokesperson to the accusation. We can and should admit that our efforts have been geared toward the low socio-economic segment of the population-and probably the Negro population more than others…As to Negro board membership- Should a person be elected to the board because his skin is brown or yellow? Isn’t this also racism? Do the leaders of the Negro community have the time to give to Planned Parenthood over and above their other commitments? Let’s put the burden of cure on them and ask the leadership of the NAACP, CORE, the Urban League, etc. to submit names of qualified people to our nominating committee on the same basis as our affiliates…If we tell our story and stick to our viewpoint often enough we will be believed.

Then in on June 11,1970, The Black Caucus issued a statement of withdraw from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment,
The Black Caucus has withdrawn from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment because of unmistakably clear evidence that the purpose of this conference is to use these delegates invited to legitimize a preconceived vicious plan of extermination. This plan is one of systematic reduction of a specific population, namely Blacks, other non-whites, the American poor and certain non-white and ethnic immigrants.” The statement was presented to a Press Conference by Felton Alexander, National Urban League and chairman of the Black Caucus and Dr. Alyce Gullattee, Psychiatrist from Washington D.C.

A 1971 Planned Parenthood World Population memorandum issued to: Alan F. Guttmacher and John C. Robbins from Douglas Stewart, contained an article from Muhammed Speaks dated September 10, 1971. Stewart writes, “ The Community Affairs Committee members and staff are devising appropriate means of dealing with this communication problem. It must be noted that, thus far, the dialogue is not affecting the utilization of family planning services in the Black Community.”
The Article from Muhammad Speaks is entitled, “New Population Control Program disguised as ‘preventative medicine’,“ It exposes the fact that blacks were Upset by growing awareness that the imbalance between funds for population control and funds for health, housing, and education is a sign of a genocidal policy. It stated that the rich whites who want to reduce the Black population are coming up with population control disguised as “comprehensive health” programs, and read , “Muhammad Speaks learned from a [Urban] League source who objects to the program that the League is seeking a grant to try a “new approach to family planning outreach and follow up. The main trick in this “new approach” is to pretend to parents that infant mortality, mental retardation, malnutrition, poor education, poor housing and other real problems suffered by black citizens are caused by so-called overpopulation… The program which the League is embracing is, in the words of the proposal itself only an effort “to update and broaden” the attack against the Black population launched by the Rockefellers and other multi-billionaries whose sole interest is to reduce the number of US citizens seeking wages from the business enterprises run in the sole interest of a few wealthy whites. To participate in this genocide, to give it a Black “Stamp of approval” , the League and the well-known “revolutionary party” have joined in the grant proposal with the US Food and Drug Administration ( pill and IUD dispensers)…and other organizations that have never been known for their concern for the health of Black people.”

Suspicion of Planned Parenthood as an agent of Black Genocide did not end in the 60’s and 70’s – in fact, records now open from Planned Parenthood’s founding reveal that their board was full of American Eugenics Society Members and Margaret Sanger was buddies with the Klan and even admitted that she gave speeches to them in her autobiography.

A documentary has gathered much of this information together- it is called Maafa21 and it will reveal the proof that abortion, Planned Parenthood, and population control are all efforts at slowing the black population. I recommend that the Urban League referenced in the story above get a coy of Maafa21 before they link arks with the eugenics Planned Parenthood again !

NAACP’s lost courage on “Racism” charge some used to identify it as Black Genocide from abortion

Posted in Abortion, Black Caucus, NAACP with tags , , , , , , on August 5, 2010 by saynsumthn

The NAACP used to speak out against ALL RACISM- but- today the ones who kill unborn black babies get a pass. Read Past Statements of courageous NAACP and Civil Rights Leaders on the abortion racism connection and compare those to today’s weak-kneed NAACP leadership:

The elites are targeting Africans here and abroad.

In 1983– A study conducted in Waller County , Texas, which had a 52% Black population rate, The study found that a substantial percentage of the respondents indicated agreement with each of the following genocidal statements:

1. As the need for cheep labor goes down, there will be efforts to reduce the size of the Black population; (69.5% agreed)
2. As Blacks become more militant, there will be efforts to reduce the size of the Black Population; (62.6% agreed),
3. Survival of Black people depends on increasing the number of Black births; (55.8% agreed)
4. Birth control programs are a plot to eliminate Blacks; (45.3% agreed)
5. Abortions are a plot to eliminate Blacks. (42.6% agreed)

( SOURCE: Genocidal Fears in a Rural Black Community : An Empirical Examination, by Walter C. Farrell, Jr. ; Marvin P. Dawkins; and John Oliver, Journal of Black Studies, (Vol. 14, No. 1. ( Sep., 1983) pp. 49-67)

The findings reveal that fears of genocide were present among Blacks as late as 1984 and today those fears are a reality !

Maafa21 : New film exposes Eugenics and Black Genocide from Abortion

On June 11,1970, The Black Caucus issued a statement of withdraw from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment, It read: “ The Black Caucus has withdrawn from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment because of unmistakably clear evidence that the purpose of this conference is to use these delegates invited to legitimize a preconceived vicious plan of extermination. This plan is one of systematic reduction of a specific population, namely Blacks, other non-whites, the American poor and certain non-white and ethnic immigrants.” The statement was presented to a Press Conference by Felton Alexander, National Urban League and chairman of the Black Caucus and Dr. Alyce Gullattee, Psychiatrist from Washington D.C. ( SOURCE: Black Caucus Statement in withdrawing from the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment : June 11,1970, located in the Planned Parenthood Federation Papers, Black Attitudes from 1962, copied from the Sophie Smith Collection, Sophie Smith College , Box 107/Folder 11:)

Read more from Jet Magazine here

The birth control pill was introduced at a time when scientists such as Arthur Jensen and William Shockley were promoting genetic explanations of racial differences in intelligence-test scores. During the 1960s and 1970s, thousands of poor black women were coercively sterilized under federally funded programs. Women were threatened with termination of welfare benefits or denial of medical care if they didn’t “consent” to the procedure. Southern blacks claimed that black women were routinely sterilized without their consent and for no valid medical reason—a practice so widespread it was called a “Mississippi appendectomy.” Teaching hospitals in the North also performed unnecessary hysterectomies on poor black women as practice for their medical residents. During this period, state legislators considered a rash of punitive sterilization bills aimed at the growing number of blacks receiving public assistance. .. Black concerns about family planning had arisen decades earlier during Margaret Sanger’s crusade for birth control. As Sanger allied herself with the burgeoning eugenics movement, the call for birth control veered away from its radical, feminist origins to include programs to regulate the poor, immigrants and blacks, based on theories of genetic inferiority and social degeneracy. Some blacks of the period, including the nationalist leader Marcus Garvey, opposed birth control as a form of “race suicide.” ( SOURCE: Alan Guttmacher, Family Planning Perspectives, Volume 32, Number 2, March/April 2000 :Forum: Black Women and the Pill, By Dorothy Roberts )

Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger admitted in her autobiography of giving a speech to enthusiastic to the KLAN that she received an addition dozen invitations to speak to the, Sanger was a member of the RACIST American Eugenics Society, she hung around racists, allowed them to be published in her Birth Control Review – and today Planned Parenthood names their TOP AWARD after Margaret Sanger-the racist….the NAACP, has NEVER called for Planned Parenthood to remove Sanger from that organization. Today Planned Parenthood abortion clinics kill more black children than all other top causes of death combined !

Dr. Alan Frank Guttmacher, president of the ‘Planned Parenthood World Population Federation’, and former VP of the American Eugenics Society attended the session on the family and specified the real differential between white and non-white fertility rates. He made what appears to be a flippant comment that nevertheless, reflected his worries about the ‘wrong’ people having too many children: “You can’t make a person take contraception. Unfortunately.” (SOURCE: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 1 ( Mar., 1998) pp. 259-282, The 1966 White House Conference on Civil Rights, by Kevin L. Yuill, quoting transcript records of the WHCCR)

1965– At the White House Conference on Civil Rights sponsored by Lyndon Johnson, Cecil Moore made this attack on population control, “ And I have noticed that every time that we talk about population and planned parenthood, the only country I find that wants to limit poverty by limiting the poor- they always want to do it in Africa and South America and Asia , but I never heard them talk about doing it in Paris or England. Then I hope I am not belaboring the point, but don’t take that away from Negroes because we don’t have much else.” ( SOURCE: The Historical Journal, Vol. 41, No. 1 ( Mar., 1998) pp. 259-282, The 1966 White House Conference on Civil Rights, by Kevin L. Yuill, quoting transcript records of the WHCCR)

1968– William “Bouie” Haden and other Negro militants have accused the [ Planned Parenthood] clinic of propagating “black genocide.” It is operated by Planned Parenthood, a nonprofit international family planning agency…”The idea,” says Dr. Charles E. Greenlee, a Negro physician and a member of Haden’s group, “is to make less niggers so they won’t have to build houses for them.” Greenlee is chairman of the Health Committee is the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP On December 4th of Last Year, He and Pittsburgh NAACP President, Byrd Brown , a Negro attorney, charged at a news conference that Planned Parenthood was keeping the Negro birth rate down. Greenlee and Brown also charged that the clinics were a not sanitary and lacked privacy. They said the agency was soliciting Negro women to take the Pill. Planned Parenthood denied the charges. ( SOURCE: The Problem of Black Birth Control THE TITUSVILLE HERALD, TITUSVILLE, PENNA, PAGE SEVEN: OCTOBER 7,1968)

1970– Julian Bond, in a commencement speech at Syracuse University. Bond had become the director of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, which he helped found. At the time of the speech, he was a member of the Board of Trustees of the Southern Conference Education Fund, of the Advisory Board of the proposed Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Library, and of the Executive Committee of the Atlanta NAACP. Bond suggested that the intense interest in the ‘population bomb” could lead to genocide of black Americans and other poor people. Bond begins, ”If Mother Nature don’t get you, then Father Time will.” Now Dr. Ehrlich hastens to assure us that in spite of the fact that some of the white people who are talking up population control do mean population control of blacks, or the poor, or the Indians, like most racist plots this one is incompetent. …Do we, as black people, have legitimate cause for alarm? Has genocide ever been tried before? Yes it has. Has the United States government demonstrated its commitment to the defense of the interests of Black people? It has not. Do we have legitimate cause for alarm? I believe we do.” ( SOURCE: Transcript, Commencement address delivered at Syracuse University by Julian Bond on June 6,1970)

MORE:

Contraceptives will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation.” Jesse Jackson, 1971

Under the cover of an alleged campaign to ‘alleviate poverty,’ white supremacist Americans and their dupes are pushing an all-out drive to put rigid birth control measures into every black home. No such drive exists within the white American world.” Black Unity Party, 1968

Proponents…have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.” Iowa State Rep. June Franklin, Democrat 1971.

The abortion law, hides behind the guise of helping women, when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people.” Brenda Hyson, New York chapter, Black Panther Party, 1971

A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.Detroit chapter, Black Panther Party, 1970

How the hell is getting the pill? The Mexican and the Negro. Do you want to wipe us out?Caesar Chavez, 1967

It is strange that they choose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.” Jesse Jackson, 1977

NAACP Crisis on “Genocide” from Planned Parenthood

The Crisis NAACP March 1970

“There is division within the Negro community how best to face this challenge. There are those of us who condemn the idea of birth control as a sinister “Genocide” conspiracy which white folk , fearful of steadily increasing Negro population, seek to foist upon the black community…Let those Negro men and women who despair of the future and turn their back on parenthood remember what their forbearers endured with faith and courage and dedication. Let them dig deep into the history of the black race in this country and realize what their ancestors were able to overcome. Let them not shrink from their duty to the future of their race in America. Let them be assured that there is hope for both the race and the country.”

The NAACP Crisis July 1995:

Rev. Dee Davis, pastoral care minister of the Harvest Church International, an African American Church in Landover, Maryland, strongly supports abstinence.
Ardent foes of Planned Parenthood , she and her congregation believe the birth control agency “has plans to bring genocide” to African Americans, citing Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood in 1929, as conceiving the plan.

Jet Magazine, November 1971

“An opponent of birth control [Dick] Gregory contends that “planned parenthood’ campaigns actually represent a conspiracy by whites to perpetrate genocide on blacks.”

Black Panthers Speak: Black Panther Party, 1969,

Shrewdly, cunningly, he starts to do you in. Genocide.
Planned Parenthood
Birth Control
Vietnamese War
Prostitution
Venereal Disease
Pigs, Punks, and Tricky Dicky Nixon.
Genocide. Dig it black man.”

Jet Magazine, Father George Clements , Feb 15, 1973
“People don’t go around saying there are to many white children being born, but there are many who talk about the overpopulation in the Black COmmunities. There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the US in the black or ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up , whereas in the white communities or suburbs fertility centers are being established.”

More interesting reading:

Ebony Magazine, My Answer to Genocide, by Dick Gregory – here

In a recent New York Times interview , Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg told Emily Bazelon that, “...I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.

The “Populations” Ginsburg referred to in that interview is clearly defined in, Maafa21.

The above is just a clip of a powerfully documented film- showing how Planned Parenthood is linked to Black Genocide. Planned Parenthood receives a million dollars a day from the US Tax payer and government funding. Where is the NAACP ?

The film is called: Maafa21 order here

Listen to this interview from the documentary Maafa21 of Dr. Levon Yuille telling how the NAACP is in bed with the eugenics Planned Parenthood

2006-

African Americans and Abortion

Posted in Abortion, Black Babies, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black Pastor, Black Women, Clenard Childress, Maafa21, Planned Parenthood with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on July 6, 2010 by saynsumthn

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Pastor Clenard Childress of LEARN (BlackGenocide.org) is featured in the documentary: Maafa21