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New cases show child sexual abusers use Planned Parenthood to cover crimes

Posted in child predator, Planned Parenthood Complicit Machine covering sexual abuse, Planned Parenthood fails to report rape with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 9, 2018 by saynsumthn
planned parenthood, woman, sexual abuse

Planned Parenthood covers for child sexual predators by failing to report suspicion of sexual abuse when a minor is taken to them for birth control services or abortions. This can be seen in Live Action’s newest docuseries, Aiding Abusers:

In January of 2017, Live Action News published a state by state list of criminal cases where Planned Parenthood failed to report these abuses. Part one demonstrated Planned Parenthood’s failure to report child sexual abuse in Alabama, Arizona, and California. Part two added Colorado, Connecticut, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington. Another egregious case was found in Washington State. Below are more cases:

Alaska – Dana Ray Thompson 

Image: Dana Ray Thompson

Dana Ray Thompson

In Alaska, where Planned Parenthood abortionists have stated that they believe all abortions are “medically necessary,” Dana Ray Thompson was convicted of multiple counts of first and second degree sexual abuse of a minor, plus multiple counts of exploitation of a minor and possession of child pornography following his sexual abuse of a teen victim — which included at least one trip to Planned Parenthood for birth control pills.

According to the court document, Thompson was in his mid-forties when he began a sexual relationship with his victim, referred to as “J.C.” The victim was 13 years old when Thompson began grooming her, telling her that “she had grown up,” asking about her bra size, and mentioning to J.C. that he wanted a sex slave.

According to the report, when J.C. turned 14, Thompson began talking to his victim about pornography and master-slave relationships, he then showed J.C. adult pornography. In 2005, Thompson began his sexual encounters with J.C. She was just 14 years old. Thompson then began engaging in more sexual activity with J.C., such as taking nude and sexually suggestive photographs of the young victim.

The court document states that when J.C. turned 15 years old, Thompson took her to Planned Parenthood “so that J.C. could obtain birth control,” after which, the predator and victim engaged in “multiple types of sexual intercourse.”

Given this timeline, it seems obvious from the court record that Planned Parenthood did not report suspicion of abuse. The abuse did not become public until the summer of 2008, three years after Thompson began his sexual assaults on the victim and at least two years after he took her to Planned Parenthood. According to the court document, the abuse became public when “J.C. spoke with a childhood friend who described being molested by an older man.” J.C. eventually told her mother who called the police. By this time, J.C. was 18, and had suffered additional abuse due to Planned Parenthood’s neglect.

Image: Court document shows sexual abuse became public years after visit to Planned Parenthood

Court document shows sexual abuse became public years after visit to Planned Parenthood

Image: Court document shows sexual abuse became public years after visit to Planned Parenthood

Court document shows sexual abuse became public years after visit to Planned Parenthood

Court document shows sexual abuse became public years after visit to Planned Parenthood

Thompson is now registered with the state as a child sex offender and child kidnapper.

Arizona – Mark Joseph Tovar

Image: Mark Tovar

Mark Tovar

According to the Puma County Attorney’s Office, Mark Joseph Tovar began his deviant molestation and sexual assault against his step-daughter when she was about seven years old. He intentionally and maliciously abused her for her entire childhood, grooming her by his gradual sexual advances over a period of about 14 years. According to a court document, when the victim, referred to as “M.G.,” was just 15 years old, Tovar impregnated her. As a result, M.G.’s mother arranged for an abortion in July of 2004, and the documents states that “Tovar knew about M.G.’s pregnancy and abortion.”

Image: Sexual abuse victim taken for abortion

Sexual abuse victim taken for abortion

The court record indicates that a total of two abortions took place and they both occurred at Planned Parenthood. The second abortion took place after the victim had turned nineteen. In total, the documents indicates that, after Planned Parenthood obviously failed to report suspicion of abuse in the first instance, the victim became pregnant two other times, and kept the baby in one of the instances.

Image: Sexual abuse victim taken for abortion at Planned Parenthood

Sexual abuse victim taken for abortion at Planned Parenthood

The sexual abuse wasn’t revealed to police until the victim was 22, nearly seven years after she was taken to Planned Parenthood at the age of 15.

ImageSexual abuse victim taken for abortion at Planned Parenthood

Sexual abuse victim taken for abortion at Planned Parenthood

Tovar was convicted of two counts of child molestation, three counts of sexual conduct with a minor under the age of fifteen, and four counts of sexual conduct with a minor. In March of 2014, the trial court imposed two life sentences and multiple presumptive terms totaling seventy-four years’ imprisonment, all to be served consecutively.

Illinois – Kenneth Mitchell

Image: Kenneth Mitchell

Kenneth Mitchell

Kenneth Mitchell was arrested by the Chicago Police Department on January 14, 2016, and was charged with sexual assault of a minor less than 13 years of age and sexual assault of a family member under 18. According to the Chicago Tribune, Mitchell sexually assaulted one of his victims from 1999 to 2002. The girl was eight years old when the attacks started, according to Assistant State’s Attorney April Gonzales. The report states, “The victim told a Planned Parenthood counselor of the assaults at some point in 2006 or 2007, Gonzales said. Prosecutors and court record information did not indicate whether the counselor reported the incidents to authorities.” However, the allegations were not reported to police until the fall of 2015, many years after the victim claims she told Planned Parenthood, leaving questions as to whether Planned Parenthood filed a report.

Indiana – Christopher Jewell 

Christopher Jewell was the stepfather to a young victim who is referred to as “T.S.” in court documents.

According to the court record, he engaged in a sexual relationship with T.S. from March 25, 2004, through June 30, 2007, while she was between the ages of thirteen and sixteen. The activity included fondling, oral sex, and sexual intercourse. While only six counts were filed against Jewell by the State in this case, the victim testified that he sexually assaulted her over thirty times and maybe as many as fifty times over the three-year period.

The court document states that during the course of the abuse, Jewell took the victim to Planned Parenthood to get her birth control pills without her mother’s knowledge. No other details were mentioned, but this shows that young teens are being taken to Planned Parenthood by their abusers to cover their crimes.

Image: Christopher Jewell took sexual abuse victim to Planned Parenthood

Christopher Jewell took sexual abuse victim to Planned Parenthood

Jewell was not arrested as a result of his visit to Planned Parenthood.

Instead, Jewell was arrested in August 2008, after taking the minor for a tattoo. It was while he was in jail for the charge of aiding or abetting the tattooing of a minor that the victim finally went public about the sexual abuse and revealed to her boyfriend and mother that Jewell sexually abused her. The disclosures were then relayed to authorities.

Image: Sexual predator used Planned Parenthood to cover abuse

Sexual predator used Planned Parenthood to cover abuse

The State charged Jewell with two counts of Class B felony sexual misconduct with a minor, one count of Class C felony child molesting, one count of Class C felony sexual misconduct with a minor, and two counts of Class D felony child seduction. A jury found Jewell guilty on all six counts, and he was sentenced to an aggregate 40-year term for six counts of sexual misconduct and child molesting.

Texas – James Aaron Lenox 

Image:  James Aaron Lenox (Image credit: Lone Star Fugitive Task Force)

James Aaron Lenox (Image credit: Lone Star Fugitive Task Force)

51-year-old James Aaron Lenox took his victim to Planned Parenthood in Austin because she had never been to a doctor. He was arrested in early 2017 by the Texas’ Lone Star Fugitive Task Force, according to a report by KXAN. The article states that Lenox is accused of sex trafficking the 16-year-old.

According to reports, Lenox allegedly “gained guardianship over the girl, removed her from school, vowed to marry her and at one point threatened to kill her family.”

At the time of his arrest, police found nude pictures of the victim, with documents saying Lenox was the victim’s “uncle.” According to MySanAntonio.com:

After Lenox consented to a vehicle search, deputies found a briefcase containing separate folders. In one folder with a girl’s name on it, the deputies found several nude photos, documents state…. Lenox also allegedly took the girl to Planned Parenthood to get an IUD implanted, the documents said… the girl… was sexually assaulted by him…. Lenox is a registered sex offender who was convicted of indecency with a child via sexual contact in January 1989. The girl he molested was 8 years old.

KXAN reported Lenox told police that “he took the victim to Planned Parenthood in Austin because she had never been to a doctor. He told investigators the victim was worried about having some kind of disease. In an interview, the victim told police she had sexual encounters with Lenox.”

There was no indication in the article that Planned Parenthood contacted police. But whether they did or they did not, this tragic story illustrates how predators use Planned Parenthood, boldly taking their victims to the organization.

The article also notes that Lenox has been charged with trafficking a child — causing the child to engage in sexual conduct, a first degree felony.

Utah – Jose Cazares-Montalvo

Image: Utah sex predator takes teen to Planned Parenthood

Utah sex predator takes teen to Planned Parenthood

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, a 34-year-old man has been charged with 12 counts of rape, after sexually abusing a 15-year-old teen and allegedly taking the child to three Planned Parenthood facilities to attempt to obtain an abortion after he impregnated her.

The only roadblock this male sex predator received from Planned Parenthood was that it was required by state law to obtain parental consent for the abortion. When the predator was told that a parent or guardian must sign for the procedure, he took matters into his own hands, by allegedly giving the teen “a drink to induce a miscarriage.”

The paper did not name the perpetrator (though a second media outlet published the name as Jose Casares-Montalvo), but indicated that the call to police originated not from Planned Parenthood, but from the victim’s mother after she “found a plastic bottle of the liquid mixture in the teen’s room,” telling police that “she suspected her daughter had been raped, according to court documents.”

According to the media report, the predator admitted to police that he took the victim to Planned Parenthood, and “other documents accuse the man of trying to get the abortion ‘to hide what he had done.’”

Live Action News has previously documented cases in which Planned Parenthood staffers were accused of sexual abuse or harassment, as well as cases documenting what happens when sex trafficking victims are taken to abortion and Planned Parenthood facilities. A 2014 report from the Annals of Health Law, “Health Consequences of Sex Trafficking,” quotes one victim claiming that the reason she was taken to Planned Parenthood was because “Planned Parenthood didn’t ask any questions.”

Live Action previously released its own child sexual abuse investigation, which found that eight Planned Parenthood facilities in six different states were willing to cover up sexual abuse, including disregarding mandatory reporting laws of suspected statutory rape.

In addition, another undercover investigation by Live Action caught Planned Parenthood staffers willing to aid undercover investigators, posing as sex traffickers. Below is a compilation reel of that investigation:

Today, Planned Parenthood receives half a billion in tax dollars annually, thanks to Congress, which continues to fund the organization despite its known abuses and despite regulations showing that government dollars can be removed when providers of Title X Family Planning funds fail to report child abuse. And, just like the Harvey Weinsteins of the world, Planned Parenthood has its own complicity machine made up in part by the media and politicians who give them cover while they aid in the continued abuse of children.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Did Planned Parenthood appoint Black leaders to quell suspicion of Black genocide?

Posted in Black Genocide, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Planned Parenthood CEO, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood, Black genocide

Despite the fact that Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger promoted eugenics, it was actually under another eugenicist leader, Alan F. Guttmacher, that Planned Parenthood began referring for and eventually committing abortions. At the exact same time that abortion was being pushed publicly, the organization elected a Black chairman to roll out this agenda. All of this transpired in the late 1960s, a time when America was in conflict over the struggle for the civil rights of Black Americans.

During this time frame, many of the organization’s leaders were concerned about overpopulation. The organization’s history is steeped in eugenics, and this ideology manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As laws about these eugenics courts began to be challenged, a new tool of eugenics was making its way across the land: abortion.

Even though many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion would be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit,” Guttmacher, by now a Planned Parenthood president, was able to convince his friends that abortion, at first in perhaps a voluntary way, would be a better solution. However, there was a slight problem, because Black citizens and other minority groups were already suspicious of birth control efforts aimed at them. How would they feel about abortion?

Image: article Blacks Charge Black Genocide from Planned Parenthood

The solution for Planned Parenthood was to bring Black leaders to the organization’s board, in an effort to convince Black Americans that Planned Parenthood’s efforts were not genocidal. This strategy was not a new one; Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger — who gave a talk for the Ku Klux Klan — had already implemented the so-called “Negro Project” to accomplish the exact same thing. Memos between Planned Parenthood staffers and leadership indicated a great concern over how the Black community viewed their efforts. In response, Planned Parenthood’s public relations machine also reached out to Black publications, as they had already done with push for birth control.

Image: Guttmacher article on Birth Control

Alan Guttmacher Birth Control Article (Image: Ebony Mag April 1962)

In 1967,  the Pittsburgh Branch of the NAACP had criticized the swarming of Planned Parenthood facilities into minority neighborhoods. Other leaders like H. Rap Brown and Fannie Lou Hamer had called abortion “Black genocide.” And, as late as 1973, a study published by the American Journal of Public Health,”Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans as Related to Age, Sex, and Region,” found that Black men and women had a level of unease about “family planning.” Researchers Castellano Turner, Ph.D., and William A. Darity, Ph.D., concluded that Blacks were more suspicious when “family planning” was under the control of Whites. “It is noteworthy that the greatest degree of agreement is found where the issue of black control of family planning (as against white control) is at issue,” they said.

Graph: Black Genocide Fears

Study on how Blacks feared family planning – Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans 1973 study Castellano Turner, Ph.D. and William A. Darity, Ph.D.

After dialoguing internally about the unease of the Black community, the suggestion was made to add Black members to Planned Parenthood’s board; this took place at the same time that Planned Parenthood was calling for the decriminalization of abortion. According to a New York Times article from November 14, 1968, the first time that Planned Parenthood went on record calling for abortion, they also elected their very first Black board chairman to roll out the new agenda — Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: Jerome Holland of PPFA

Planned Parenthood names first Black Chairman to push abortion – First Black Chairman of Board elected by Planned Parenthood 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate.

Holland was also added as chairman of the Board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood.

But Holland’s post as chairman of the board of Planned Parenthood was short lived.

In 1970, Holland was named ambassador to Sweden by President Richard Nixon; however, the headlines of the first Black chairman of Planned Parenthood had seemingly done their job. Holland was openly endorsing abortion as a “health matter” between the woman and her doctor.

Image: PPFA article

Black chairman Jerome Holland lauds Planned Parenthood eugenics

The same year Planned Parenthood elected its first Black chairman of the board, Frederick Osborn, a founding Eugenics Society officer connected to Planned Parenthood, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

A few years later, a new Black leader would emerge to reinforce the push for abortion within Planned Parenthood: Faye Wattleton.

After 62 years as an organization, why did Planned Parenthood wait until 1978 to elect the very first Black female as president? Like Holland,  Wattleton was not a novice where abortion was concerned. She had been with Planned Parenthood for a while, serving as a volunteer in the early 1970s and eventually serving as director of the Dayton affiliate.

Article about Faye Wattleton elected to PPFA

Faye Wattleton elected first Black Planned Parenthood president

At a press conference held in February of 1978, then president-elect of Planned Parenthood Wattleton told the media that she was “putting the world on notice” that the organization was going to be much more aggressive on abortion rights. “What has happened is that we have allowed them [right-to-lifers] to have center stage,” Wattelton said, “I’d like to say those days are over.”

Wattleton then vowed to restore — “to the poor” — access of abortion under Medicaid.

Wattleton was asked if her leadership of Planned Parenthood as a Black woman would alleviate suspicions within the Black community linking abortion and her organization to Black genocide. Wattleton responded, “I don’t think a lot of people are yelling genocide anymore, because I’m Black. I’m in a watchdog position on these issues and no one should assume I’ve been co-opted. What better way is there to guard against those types of abuses?”

Wattleton then said that the Black community should be more concerned about quality of life than “increasing our numbers.”

Image: Faye Wattleton

Faye Wattleton first Black president Planned Parenthood

Wattleton served as president of the abortion corporation for 14 years, where, among other radical abortion advances, she helped to legalize the sale of the RU-486 abortion pill in the United States. Under Wattleton’s leadership, Planned Parenthood’s budget grew from $90 million in 1978 to $384 million in 1990. For her service and dedication to the eugenics-minded organization, in 1992, Wattleton received Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award. Despite Sanger’s known eugenics and Klan connections, Wattleton once referred to her as “[t]he great heroine of our time,” telling Hubbard News in 1979 that Sanger would be proud of Planned Parenthood’s progress.

But the idea that Blacks would no longer be targeted for eugenics because a Black woman was at the helm of a eugenics organization was short-lived. During Wattleton’s tenure at Planned Parenthood, she stated that supporters of Planned Parenthood contributed to the abortion giant to “keep the Black population down.” On CNN, in a debate with Bob Dornan, an outspoken pro-life member of the US House of Representatives, at that time, Wattleton, admitted, “As a matter of fact… we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all Black women to stop having children.”

And also clipped in the documentary film, Maafa21, below:

Wattleton went on to help form the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, she has been described by some in the media as “a pioneer, a crusader, a media star and a rebel of sorts.”

Today, many within the Black community still see abortion as a tool of eugenics, and the abortion statistics show that it has become a leading cause of death of Blacks in the nation. Margaret Sanger’s vision of limiting births among certain races may not have begun with abortion, but it appears to have led to abortion.

Tragically, today, as a result of Guttmacher continuing Sanger’s eugenics agenda by introducing abortion to Planned Parenthood, over 800 preborn children of all races die there every day from abortion.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Four Black pro-life women who spoke against abortion as ‘Black genocide

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  Republished from Live Action News

Image: Mildred Jefferson pro-life leader

Black pro-life leader Mildred Jefferson

In the early 1960s and 70s, organizations seeking to liberalize abortion laws, like the National Organization for Women (NOW), attempted to convince the nation that women wanted legalized abortion on demand. Many women actually opposed liberalized abortion laws, and those women’s voices were silenced by NOW (who was influenced by men seeking to profit from abortion) and NOW’s friends in the (at that time, majority male-led) media.

During that time, many pro-life women spoke out against the liberalization of abortion laws, including many women in the Black community, who saw abortion as “Black genocide.” Four of them are listed below:

Fannie Lou Hamer 

Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped to found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964, she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer pro-life women

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne said Hamer called abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition…. There she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. ‘I didn’t come to talk about birth control,’ she protested. ‘I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?’”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she ‘regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.’”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as saying, “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders. Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Dr. Mildred F. Jefferson

Mildred Jefferson pro-life, women

Mildred Jefferson (Image: Schlesinger Library)

Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and the first woman employed as a general surgeon at Boston University Medical Center. She was ardently pro-life, and was the co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) and Massachusetts Citizens for Life. She served as NRLC president from 1975-1978.

Dr. Jefferson was committed to defending human life from, as she described it, “conception to natural death.”

She first became active in 1970 when, as she recalled to the New York Times, “the American Medical Association first considered bending its founding principles in such a way that a doctor would not be considered unethical” if he or she committed an abortion.

She once described why she became a physician, “I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.”

Dr. Jefferson also warned that abortion would target the Black community, and in 1977, she stated, “Blacks suffer more from abortion because what looks like help is actually striking against them. Blacks are fewer. They will disappear sooner….” She insisted that “[a]bortion is class war against the poor,” and told the Pittsburgh Press in 1977, “Abortionists argue, ‘Let the poor have abortions like the rich can.’ Then abortionists should make a list of the other things rich women have that they’re going to give to poor women.”

Mildred Jefferson abortion Black genocide pro-life women

Mildred Jefferson: Abortion is Black genocide

At a press conference in 1989, Dr. Jefferson noted how the abortion lobby uses the poor to maintain abortion access. At that press conference, Dr. Jefferson joined with other pro-life women to release a declaration supporting life, stating that abortion is “not only genocide” but “national suicide.”

“It implies a fascist solution that now they call ‘liberal,’ to keep down the costs of caring for the poor. They get rid of those who are going to run up the costs,” she stated, adding:

Every women’s organization in this country has got to deal with these issues a little more forthrightly than has been possible in the past.  Because, for most of the organizations, of the general women’s organizations that support that point of view [abortion] there has never been any kind of real in depth discussion of such issues…

We have an idea that N.O.W., the National Organization of Some Women, in alliance with the other alphabet organizations — ACLU, PP, NARAL — are in deadly collusion to obtain the private right to kill all having the direct objective of establishing a socialist order, to replace our Democratic Republic.”

In a 1976 article with the New York Times, Dr. Jefferson summarized efforts of the pro-life movement as “dedication.” She went on to say, “It’s a simple matter that our people believe if they fail, other people will die. Today the unborn, tomorrow the elderly.”

READ: Bishops and pastors gather at Missouri Planned Parenthood to condemn Black genocide

Iowa Rep. June Franklin

Rep. June Franklin was one of many Black women who opposed abortion.

Rep. June Franklin (Image: Maafa21)

In 1971, one of the most convincing arguments against legalizing abortion in Iowa came from a Black female representative in the State’s legislature: June Franklin. According to a report published by the Burlington Hawk Eye, Rep. A. June Franklin, a Democrat from Des Moines, was joined in her opposition to abortion by another female Congresswoman, Hallie Sargisson, (D-Salix).

Rep. Franklin was the only African-American representative in the Iowa legislature, and saw liberalized abortion as a way to target the Black community. “Proponents… have argued this bill is for Blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all,” Franklin said. “Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of Blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either Blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

In July of 1972, she defended her vote to the Des Moines Register, saying, “Most of the people I’ve heard from are strongly opposed to legalizing abortion, and most of these people are not Catholics.”

The Des Moines Register later quoted the female lawmaker as being proud that her vote overturned the measure. “It would have led to genocide and euthanasia. God gave us life and only God can take it away,” Franklin said.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Clardy Craven was one of several Black women who opposed abortion.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Craven served on the board of the National Right to Life Committee and NRLC’s state affiliate, Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life. She was also a social human rights activist and chairman of the Minnesota Human Rights Commission and African-Americans Against Abortion.

In 1972, just prior to the Roe v. Wade decision, Craven wrote a piece titled “Abortion, Poverty and Black Genocide– Gifts to the poor?” and called abortion Black genocide:

Throughout the course of American history, the quality of human life has always been improved at the expense of the weak and oppressed…. It takes little imagination to see that the unborn Black baby is the real object of many abortionists….

The quality of life for the poor, the Black and the oppressed will not be served by destroying their children….

[T]he womb of the poor Black woman is seen as the latest battleground for oppression. In times past the Blacks couldn’t grow kids fast enough for their “masters” to harvest; now that power is near, the “masters” want us to call a moratorium on having babies. When looked at in context, this whole mess adds up to blatant genocide….

Government family planning programs designed for poor Blacks will emphasize birth control and abortion with the intent of limiting the Black population is genocide. The deliberate killing of Black babies in abortion is genocide- perhaps the most overt form of all…. The prevalent Black attitude toward birth control and abortion is distinctly in opposition!

Craven pointed to two studies showing that Blacks — and specifically, Black women — opposed abortion:

In a study conducted by the Bowman Gray Medical School on poverty-level Blacks, 79% of 776 poverty-level Black females, 86% of 500 of their sex partners, and 70% of 215 low-middle-income Black females were found to be “not in favor of abortions under any circumstances.”  Similarly, when 990 urban Black females were studied, 77% were found to be opposed to abortion under any circumstances, and this opposition was found to be manifest in their actions of carrying their children to term…”

In 1975, Craven told a Pennsylvania federal panel that abortion amounted to a “wholesale marketing of human flesh.”

In 1985, Craven described why she opposed abortion. “Having served women on welfare, I feel that the pro-choice movement is a male cop out,” she said. “I vowed on my dear grandmother’s grave that as long as there is breath in my body I shall fight for the right of the Black child to exist.”

Hamer, Jefferson, Franklin, and Craven were adamant in their belief that abortion was being used by those in power to cull the Black population. Planned Parenthood’s own founder, Margaret Sanger, was a eugenicist whose “Negro Project” had the goal of reducing population growth in the Black community. Even today, Planned Parenthood has been caught in controversy, as an undercover Live Action investigation found the organization willing to accept donations to abort specifically Black babies:

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News

Planned Parentrhood’s “Blueprint” to force taxpayers to pay for birth control began under Guttmacher

Posted in Birth Control and Eugenics, Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Bush, Bush Family, Fred Jaffe, Guttmacher, Jaffe Memo, Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood Free BC, Planned Parenthood Free Birth Control, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood President, Planned Parenthood Tax Dollars, Saves Taxpayers, Tax Payer Funding of Abortion, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood has always been about making sure fewer poor people actually become parents — and here’s proof

In 1966, Planned Parenthood‘s medical director, Alan Guttmacher (a former VP for the American Eugenics Society and founder of the Guttmacher Institute), proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to pay for birth control access for the poor. Elected to Planned Parenthood’s national board in 1962, Guttmacher believed (as did many eugenicists) that the poor needed access to birth control.

But while publicly, the messaging was one of empowering others to make “choices,” the real motivation was population control. Guttmacher once told the New York Times, “The main goal of our program is not just to limit population, but to give everyone the same opportunity for quality medical care.” Note that Guttmacher acknowledged population control as one of the goals, but clothed it in the same type of messaging used by modern-day Planned Parenthood: the language of access to “health care” or “medical care.”

Image: Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT Birth Control Group Offers Plan For Free Services to Millions 02/10/1966)

Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT Birth Control Group Offers Plan For Free Services to Millions 02/10/1966)

Planned Parenthood’s ultimate goal was to convince the public that taxpayer-funded “family planning” — directed at preventing births among the poor — would save the taxpayer money. And, just like today, the nation’s largest abortion provider accomplished this goal with the help of politicians on both sides of the aisle.

In 1965, President Lyndon Johnson lent his support to taxpayer funded “family planning” efforts, stating in a speech that for every five dollars spent on population control, more than a hundred would be invested in economic growth. The scheme to promote the use of taxpayer dollars as a way to “reduce costs” was detailed in the film Maafa21:

The “plan” — described by a 1966 NYT article as a “partnership of public and private agencies” — was to make birth control services “freely available to every American by 1970” in an effort to prevent about 250,000 pregnancies every year. It was presented at Planned Parenthood’s New York headquarters by the organization’s then-president, George N. Lindsay, who called it the “best bargain in health services that money could buy.”

Planned Parenthood president George N Lindsay (image credit: NYT)

“We have the technological know-how — pills and intrauterine devices,” Lindsay is quoted as saying. “We have the support of Government. President Johnson has called for increased birth control services in the past two State of the Union messages. And now we have devised a methodology for solving a huge problem in five years.”

That same year, President Johnson accepted Planned Parenthood’s highest award (the Margaret Sanger Award) for his policies pushing family planning for foreign countries. The founder of Planned Parenthood, Sanger’s work in the eugenics movement has been highly criticized by many modern African-American leaders. Sanger, who gave at least one speech to the Ku Klux Klan and stacked Planned Parenthood’s boards with eugenicists, advocated the sterilization of the so-called “unfit.”

Today, despite her involvement in the eugenics movement, Planned Parenthood labels Sanger a heroine and has positioned her name in a place of honor on at least one of its centers.

Margaret Sanger’s name on Planned Parenthood building

By 1969, the so-called “Planned Parenthood blueprint” to force taxpayers to fund birth control was underway, as recounted by the New York Times:

Whatever the merits of the argument, the ghetto approach is now the federation’s chief thrust, and it is also the policy of the Federal Government, which since 1966 has undergone a dramatic reversal,  moving from almost no action on birth control to a proposed expenditure in 1969 of $31 million. Last month the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) recommended the adoption of Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” for supplying free birth control device to some five million American women below the poverty line.

Image: Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT 02/02/1969)

Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT 02/02/1969)

The “plan” was highly criticized by the Black community, which saw the move as a means of racist Black genocide.  “Among other things, this policy has brought the Planned Parenthood Federation under attack from black militants who see ‘family planning’ as a euphemism for race genocide,” the NYT reported.

To prove the genocidal fear had merit among minority groups, the paper published statistics that supported “the suspicion that Black people are taking the brunt of the ‘planning.’” Black birth rates fell in several cities:

  • Lincoln Parish, LA: 32% (1966-67)
  • Washington, DC : 24% (three years)
  • Baltimore, MD: 36% (since 1965)

A 1966 internal memo from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe outlined a new “community relations program” for winning over the Black community by “form[ing] a liaison between Planned Parenthood and minority organizations.” The plan, according to Planned Parenthood, was to emphasize that “all people have the opportunity to make their own choices,” rather than, as the memo states, exhortation telling them how many children they should have.”

Guttmacher said at the time that the plan was “long overdue” but stressed, “we do not need to panic. In fact, if we panic and continue to publicize the ‘problem’, we may well exacerbate it.”

Also in 1966, Planned Parenthood gave its Margaret Sanger Award to Martin Luther King, Jr. Whatever Planned Parenthood was trying to accomplish, it worked. By 1969, then Congressman George H.W. Bush (R-Texas) chaired the Republican Task Force on Population and Earth Resources, created in part to ascertain the resistance to family planning among “certain groups.” He determined that “[s]o far, it looks like opposition from religious groups and the Black militants isn’t too serious.”

Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” called for an expenditure of about one percent of the nation’s health budget, with an anticipated $78 million from taxpayers in 1970. It also called for an expansion of hospitals’ family planning services as well as programs financed by the federal anti-poverty program. By 1970, the United States House of Representatives voted 298 to 32 to approve the Family Planning Services and Population Research Act, Title X of the Public Health Service Act, authorizing federal dollars to pay for family planning services for low-income women. This legislation would become known as the Title X statute, which today allocates millions of federal tax dollars to Planned Parenthood and other family planning organizations.

In 1971, Congress allocated $6,000,000 for the Title X program. The following year, funding was increased to ten times as much: $61,815,000. Title X funding peaked in 2010 with a high of $317,491,000 and dropped to $286,479,000 for fiscal year 2017. President Trump’s FY2018 budget request includes $286.5 million for Title X, the same as the FY2017 enacted level.

TitleX Funding History CBO

Although Federal law prohibits the use of Title X funds in programs where abortion is a method of family planning, recipients of the dollars can be abortion providers. The reason for this is that Title X requirements allow recipients of these federal dollars to discuss abortion with patients under the term “options counseling,” telling providers that they must offer pregnant women the opportunity to receive information and counseling on each of the following options:

  • prenatal care and delivery
  • infant care, foster care, or adoption
  • pregnancy termination

In other words, Planned Parenthood can use the same rooms within the same facilities to commit abortions as they do to perform “options counseling,” during which they can refer for abortions as well as provide tax-funded family planning services under Title X.

Live Action investigations have already documented the abysmal way that Planned Parenthood handles inquiries from pregnant women seeking prenatal care at their facilities. With few exceptions, abortion is the only option Planned Parenthood offers pregnant women:

Research conducted by the Congressional Research Service (CRS) reveals that Planned Parenthood affiliates participating in Title X spent $64.35 million in taxpayer dollars in 2012.

Despite deceptive marketing from politicians who claim that defunding the abortion corporation would hurt women, studies show that women do not need Planned Parenthood to get contraception care. Despite Planned Parenthood’s desperate attempt to reinvent itself as a health care provider, it is the number one provider of abortions in the United States, claiming 35 percent of the abortion market share nationwide. The organization has millions of dollars in excess revenue each year (despite its being classified as a nonprofit organization), and has recently boasted of the private donations flooding into its coffers.

In addition, actual health care services at Planned Parenthood are dwindling while abortions are increasing. In addition, Planned Parenthood is not a trusted recipient of tax dollars, with its history of fraud and abuse and its failure to report suspected child abuse (which Live Action News reported about here and here) — a reason that alone should result in the organization losing taxpayer dollars under Title X.

Planned Parenthood’s free birth control scheme has resulted in millions upon millions in taxpayer funding each year. Instead of those dollars doing good for women, they are aiding an abortion corporation which ends the lives of hundreds of thousands of innocent preborn babies every year. That is not a blueprint that anyone should follow.

Live Action News has written additional articles on this topic that include the history of Title X (Parts onetwothree, and four) as well as George HW Bush’s relationship to TitleX and Planned Parenthood.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Former Planned Parenthood president: forced birth control would be ‘desirable’

Posted in American Eugenics Society, Eugenics, forced abortion, Forced Population Control, Forced Sterilization, Guttmacher, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger License to Breed, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood President, Population Control with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2017 by saynsumthn

A former Planned Parenthood president and vice president of the American Eugenics Society once advocated that if families did not limit births to just two children, then compulsory methods of population control could be necessary.  The idea, proposed by Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, a well-known eugenicist and one-time president of Planned Parenthood who established the Guttmacher Institute, came on the heels of radical proposals by Planned Parenthood board members and others that immediate compulsory means should be used to curtail population growth.

In 1970, Guttmacher addressed a group concerned about the so-called “population explosion.” Lee McCall, a reporter for the Sarasota Herald Tribune, attended the conference and noted that Guttmacher, as president of Planned Parenthood World Population “for the past eight years,” was invited to speak under the sponsorship of Planned Parenthood of Sarasota County, Inc.

McCall spoke with Guttmacher about “discussions” that had been floating around to limit children within families to “2 or 3.”

McCall wrote:

There has been discussion of limiting families to 2.2 children.

Dr. Guttmacher feels it inadvisable for Planned Parenthood to boldly vocalize such a plan.

‘It would be difficult,’ he said, ‘In the first place it would probably split the organization. Also we would have trouble with minority groups accepting this.’

Despite his apparent hesitancy towards coercion, McCall goes on to quote Guttmacher as admitting that such a “plan” of compulsory population control would be “desirable.”

“So even though the plan may be desirable and would make us a stronger nation, a less polluted nation, I feel it would be strategically unwise at this time,” the former Planned Parenthood president told the reporter.

Keep in mind, this is the very organization which allegedly claims it was founded on freedom of choice. And Guttmacher was attempting to dispel the theory that abortion and birth control were racist efforts of genocide aimed to limit the birth rate of the Black community.

Racism seen as denting Birth Control 1966

This admission was profound and came shortly after the New York Times attempted to paint Guttmacher as a wanting “volunteer” birth control measures only.

In its 1969 article entitled, “Dr. Guttmacher is the Evangelist of Birth Control,” the New York Times was forced to acknowledge that many leaders sitting on Planned Parenthood’s board were in favor of coercive measures of population control. While painting the picture of an agency which was pushing birth control on the “ghetto” rather than the “middle-class” who were having more than the optimal amount of children, the paper noted that a “sizable” number of Planned Parenthood’s board was made up of “preponderantly white and well-to-do” people. They then quoted a Planned Parenthood board member who admitted the racist attitude of the organization, when he stated:

What it all comes down to is that we want the poor to stop breeding while we retain our freedom to have large families. It’s strictly a class point of view.

However, despite the majority of Planned Parenthood’s board holding a “class” point of view regarding who should be “encouraged” to use contraception, if Guttmacher was for “voluntary measures” of population control, compulsory measures were never ruled out.  Because, as the Planned Parenthood president saw it, if “voluntary measures” did not work, then force would be necessary.

This point of view can clearly be seen in a 1969 article from Medical World News Reports, in which Guttmacher floated the possibility that coercion could be used. His shocking statement was published by the Sarasota Herald Tribune where it quoted Guttmacher as suggesting that, “Each country will have to decide its own form of coercion, and determine when and how it should be employed.”

Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

The following year (1970) Guttmacher told an audience at New Mexico State University that, “[…] if by 1990, the population is still growing at a rate of 2% then we must go to some kind of compulsory birth control.” (emphasis added).

Earlier in 1966, Guttmacher compared the world population with the threat of nuclear war and told the Washington Post that governments may have to act officially to limit families saying, “It may be taken out of the voluntary category.”

In his 1959 book, “Babies by Choice or By Chance”, Guttmacher described the atomic bomb as “more merciless to our generation” and “more kinder to future generations” than “the explosion of the population bomb.” He bemoaned the fact that death rates were lowering, while birth rates were on the rise, writing, “Therefore if we want to decelerate the rate of population growth, it must be done by conception control.”

Babies by Choice or By Chance, by Alan F Guttmacher

This idea of temporary volunteerism was also noted by author Angela Franks, who wrote in her book, “Margaret Sanger’s Eugenic Legacy: The Control of Female Fertility”, that, “in the late 1960’s, Guttmacher put a limit on volunteerism: if we don’t see a population decline by 1980, he said, ‘we’ll have to get tough.’”

The fact is that Guttmacher’s ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. After all, they were both members of the very racist American Eugenics Society, with Guttmacher serving as the group’s vice-president. As Live Action News has documented in the past, Sanger made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics.

But, rarely reported by contemporary media is the fact that Sanger once suggested that parents should be required to have a “license” to even be allowed to have children at all.

License to Breed Margaret Sanger

In her “A License for Mothers to Have Babies” with the subtitle, “A code to stop the overproduction of children.” Sanger outlined her plan article by article, which read in part (emphasis mine):

A marriage license shall in itself give husband and wife only the right to a common household and not the right to parenthood.

Article 4. No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood.

Article 5. Permits for parenthood shall be issued upon application by city, county, or State authorities to married couples , providing the parents are financially able to support the expected child, have the qualifications needed for proper rearing of the child, have no transmissible diseases, and on the woman’s part, no medical indication that maternity is likely to result in death or permanent injury to health.

Article 6No permit for parenthood shall be valid for more than one birth.

While Sanger’s plan may have been viewed as extreme in her day, and the idea of coercion may have been chided as evoking a potential backlash against Planned Parenthood, my colleague, Kelli wisely observed that the “two-child idea” advocated by Guttmacher was just as eugenic. In a recent Live Action News report, Kelli noted that the, “[…] view of ‘two children and no more’ has its roots in the eugenics movement, and at the heart of the eugenics movement lies Planned Parenthood. Margaret Sanger and her friends advocated population control for the ‘unfit’, while today’s eugenicists tend to couch their beliefs about family size in terms of environmental concerns.

Despite that fact that Guttmacher and Sanger were both (as eugenicists) concerned that the world population was a threat, it was under Guttmacher’s leadership that Planned Parenthood first vocalized abortion as part of the answer to “over-population.”

He noted this approval in the 1970 interview where he stated:

If we could get the abortion law liberalized, most of the 750,000 unwanted pregnancies would not lead to babies – rejected children, battered baby syndrome and illegal abortions.

And, in that same year, Guttmacher admitted to a 1970 Cornell Symposium, (according to an April 7, 1970 article published by the Cedar Rapids Gazette), that although he did not know when life began, he believed that “unlimited abortion” was the only way to reduce population growth saying:

There is no question that the most effective way of reducing population growth is by unlimited abortion.

Today, Alan Guttmacher is painted by some as a hero of “reproductive rights” despite his promotion of coerced population control and abortion.  And, Guttmacher was correct about one thing, and that is that abortion has been an effective tool in the limitation of births. This was recently acknowledged by pro-abortion Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who said, “I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”

It is no surprise that Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.  After all, on their website, his Institute describes Guttmacher by saying, “No one was better able to unite the Planned Parenthood organization or summon it to carry out its historic mission.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Yes, Planned Parenthood’s founder spoke to the Klan – but the photo is a fake

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in Arkansas, Hilda Cornish, Klan, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Maggie Awards, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

With the topic of America’s history in racism once again a focus in the news, a fake image of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger speaking to the Klu Klux Klan has been circulating online. While the image is not real, what is quite real is the fact that Sanger, a proponent of eugenics, spoke to a meeting of the women’s branch of KKK in 1926.

The event took place in Silver Lake, New Jersey, and Sanger described in it in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Sanger called that event “one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.”

That being said, the image below, which purports to show Sanger giving that speech before her adoring Klan supporters is not authentic. The image was part of a blogger’s photo contest.

Photo of Margaret Sanger W/ KKK is fake

Sanger and Klan image was part of blog photo contest in 2005 — it is not authentic.

The Sanger/Klan fake was published by the “Margaret Sanger Blog Spot” which held an annual photo contest because, in the blog’s words, “The Big Abortion Industry still holds Margaret Sanger out as an icon. Artwork is one more important ways to promote the truth about Margaret Sanger.”

The blog’s instructions for the contest were to “commemorate Sanger at the Klan rally in unique artistic ways,” including “modern interpretations of Sanger speaking to the Klan.”

But Sanger’s views were so outrageous in and of themselves that there is no need to circulate inaccurate depictions, which could lead to attempts to discredit her meeting with the Klan altogether.

Sanger has a very controversial history as an enthusiastic proponent of eugenics and a member of the American Eugenics Society. This philosophy not only fed her work within the Planned Parenthood movement, but her lesser known advocacy of euthanasia as well. The organizations Sanger founded, such as The American Birth Control League (ABCL) and later, Planned Parenthood, also have ties to many eugenics proponents.

Clarence Cook Little

Clarence C. Little

One of those connections was a man by the name of Clarence Cook Little.

According to a biographical memoir published by the National Academy of Sciences, Little held various distinguished positions. He was the president of the University of Maine and of the University of Michigan, and he was the managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

He was named the director of The Jackson Laboratory and later accepted a position as scientific director of the Tobacco Industrial Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sadly, Little was also president and founding member of The American Eugenics Society, as well as a board member of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. He was also the Birth Control Federation President, and sat on the previously mentioned American Euthanasia Society board.

Little was also listed on the 1938 Committee for Planned Parenthood.

CC Little ties to Eugenics and Sanger’s ABCL

Little has since been denounced by some in modern society who have called for his name to be removed from the University of Michigan’s science building for his belief in eugenics. An op-ed penned by the daughter of an interracial couple and a student at the University of Michigan published last year by MTV.com shows the disdain for Little:

There is a building (and a bus stop) on the University of Michigan campus named for Clarence Cook (C.C.) Little. He was the University’s president in 1925, and an outspoken “scientific” racist and eugenicist, who believed that “inferior” races should undergo involuntary sterilization. I often sat at the bus stop bearing his name while I waited to go to class. Little would have hated that.

Despite the merit of these denouncements, few have expressed concern over Little’s ties to Planned Parenthood’s history.

Hilda Cornish

Another interesting eugenics connection to both Sanger and Planned Parenthood is a woman by the name of Hilda Kahlert Cornish. Hilda Cornish chaired the Arkansas Eugenics Association. According to a 1986 article in an Arkansas newspaper, Cornish received much of her counsel directly from Margaret Sanger. In fact, the Blytheville Courier Press notes that the sons of the two leaders were roommates at Yale University.

The documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21 (clipped below) details disturbing connections the Arkansas Eugenics Association had to Planned Parenthood:

The film states:

From its beginning, Planned Parenthood always had powerful ties to the American Eugenics community. In fact, in many places they were often one in the same.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.

Later, the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Documents obtained by Live Action News confirm this fact.

A 1945 Planned Parenthood directory reveals that Mrs. Edward Cornish was the director of the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas. Cornish was active with the Democrat Party and married to banker Edward Cornish, according to Arkansas historians.

She is also listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

According to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas:

In the summer of 1930, [Cornish] met Margaret Sanger… The two developed a friendship maintained by correspondence and occasional meetings. During that summer, Cornish visited Sanger’s Clinical Research Bureau in New York, and she launched the Arkansas birth control movement later that same year.

At Cornish’s initiative, a group of physicians, business and religious leaders, and women active in civic work formed the Arkansas Eugenics Association (AEA)…. In early 1931, the association opened the Little Rock Birth Control Clinic in the basement of Baptist Hospital…. Cornish also worked with the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control.

The online historical site added that in 1942, The Arkansas Eugenics Association changed its name… to the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas.

Segregated Clinics

Authors of the bookHidden Histories of Women in the New South, noted that the “first report of the Arkansas Eugenics Association stated that the Little Rock clinic registered 161 White women during its first eleven months of service.”

The book concludes that Cornish was more aligned with promoting birth control than the national eugenics movement. (That being said, Sanger herself wanted to merge her publications with the national eugenics organization.)

The book‘s authors reveal that the clinic “directed its efforts towards poor women only,” yet they imply a prejudice against Blacks by writing that “African American women were not invited to the [Arkansas Eugenics] clinic from its start in 1931.”

www.AbortionProcedures.com click here for facts on abortion

The authors add that “until 1937, only white women actually had the opportunity to receive services” and the organization “held separate hours for white and African American women.” The book also notes that “most of [the American Birth Control League’s] clinics were segregated.” The ABCL later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s beloved founder Margaret Sanger reached out to many people who saw Blacks as less than equal, and this includes the Klan and the Eugenics movement.

Today, many believe that Sanger’s racist ideologies have penetrated much of her work. And even without an image to document Sanger’s speech before the Klan, Planned Parenthood knows her history, as revealed in her own autobiography.

Instead of repudiating Sanger, taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood honors her as a hero, naming their most prestigious award after her. It’s despicable.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Federal Health Centers (FQHCs) can handle Planned Parenthood patients if defunded

Posted in FQHC, HRSA, Planned Parenthood abortion stats, Planned Parenthood and FQHC with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 3, 2017 by saynsumthn

Could Federally Qualified Health Centers handle Planned Parenthood’s patient load? The data says yes.

Despite the fact that Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHC) provide comprehensive health services to women, the media continues to prop up Planned Parenthood as if it is the only provider of women’s reproductive healthcare. While Planned Parenthood continues to receive over half a billion dollars in annual taxpayer funding, its patient load and services continues to decrease, year after year.

If major media outlets would analyze Planned Parenthood’s own reports (as Live Action has done), perhaps they would notice that while the organization has increased its abortion market share, its other services — like Pap tests, breast exams, and even contraception services — have decreased significantly.

Ignoring these facts, the prevailing claim by the media – often quoting the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s former research arm and “special affiliate” – is that if Planned Parenthood is defunded, women will have no place to go to receive health services.

This claim is patently false and was previously dismantled by the defenders of ObamaCare:

study on the effects of the Affordable Care Act, conducted by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and health care company Athenahealth, which gathered data from 15,700 of Athenahealth’s clients, found that new patient visits to primary care physicians only increased slightly. It was anticipated that uninsured patients now gaining insurance might have unmet medical needs, and their demand for services might overwhelm the capacity of primary care doctors. But according to the study, this idea proved false. Kathy Hempstead, director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, told USA Today that the study “suggests that, even though there’s been a big increase in coverage, it’s a relatively small part of the market and the delivery system is able to handle the demand.”

In other words, yes, FQHCs can handle Planned Parenthood’s patient load. After all, Planned Parenthood has lost more than half a million patients (600,000) since 2011, while taxpayer-funded health centers, as identified by the federal Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), saw a 2 million patient increase by 2015, providing care to 24,295,946 patients.

Additional data shows:

  • In 2015, federal health centers performed mammograms on over 521,000 patients – an increase from 470,000 in 2014. Planned Parenthood performed zero, because Planned Parenthood facilities do not have mammogram machines.
  • In 2015, Planned Parenthood breast exams dropped 12 percent from 2014. Stunningly, from 2005 to 2015, breast exams declined by more that 62 percent (842,399 to 321,700).
  • In 2015, federal health centers administered over 1.8 million Pap tests to patients — an increase from 1.7 million in 2014Planned Parenthood‘s 2015 report reveals that between 2005 (1,116,681) and 2015 (293,799), Pap tests (tests for detecting cervical cancer) at Planned Parenthood declined nearly 74 percent (73.68%).
  • The most recent figures show that cancer screenings continue to decline at Planned Parenthood. From 2005 (2,009,835) to 2015 (665,234), cancer screenings plummeted nearly 67 percent (66.90%).
  • In 2015, federal health centers cared for a total of 552,000 prenatal patients — an increase from 528,000 prenatal patients in 2014; yet Planned Parenthood’s prenatal services were nearly cut in half in the last year (17,419 in 2014 to 9,419 in 2015) a trend that has continued for years. From 2005 (13,261) to 2015 (9419), prenatal care dropped nearly 29 percent (28.97%) .
  • Recently released Planned Parenthood numbers reveal that in 2015, contraception services at the abortion corporation decreased 4.6 percent from the previous year. In the past ten years (2005 vs. 2015), contraception services at Planned Parenthood decreased by 25 percent to their lowest in years.

Knowing that this data comes directly from Planned Parenthood, keep in mind where the media got its idea about FQHCs being unable to handle Planned Parenthood’s patient influx. It comes from a study conducted by Guttmacher, which compared the 2015 contraception care services at Planned Parenthood centers (PP), Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) sites, and Title X facilities.

However, a review of that study shows that the claim that defunding Planned Parenthood would leave women with no place to go is far-reaching and deceptive. Remember: Guttmacher is a former special affiliate to Planned Parenthood, and Guttmacher also receives taxpayer funding. It has also received funding from Planned Parenthood, so it has good incentive to keep these tax dollars flowing. As I noted in a previous article:

Ryan Bomberger of The Radiance Foundation also found evidence that indeed, in its 2007 tax filing, Planned Parenthood still listed Guttmacher as an “independent affiliated organization” which was receiving money from the abortion giant. Bomberger wrote, “Planned Parenthood… gave $2,142,076 of our tax dollars to their ‘research’ arm, Guttmacher….”

The money flowed both ways:

… [W]hile Planned Parenthood… was funneling money into Guttmacher,  Guttmacher was also receiving taxpayer dollars – and funneling a significant amount of money back to Planned Parenthood…. Guttmacher’s payouts to Planned Parenthood total around $40 million.

Guttmacher tax funding 2015 and 2016

In addition, this particular study’s focus was just contraceptive care, not on all the services offered by FQHCs.

In a May 2017 article, Guttmacher states:

In 2015, out of the over 9,600 total FQHC sites in the 50 states and the District of Columbia, 5,830 of them (60%) reported offering contraceptive care to at least 10 women each year; this subset of sites are counted among the nation’s 10,700 safety-net family planning centers.

If we break this down, we see that there are 9600 FQHC sites (which offer a vast array of health care services) while according to Guttmacher, only 60 percent offered contraception services to ten or more clients. That still leaves 5,830 sites.

But what about Planned Parenthood? Today, the organization’s website shows 600 facilities across the US – a decrease from the 800 it operated just ten years ago.

To compare, 600 Planned Parenthoods offer contraception services while almost 6,000 (5,830 according to Guttmacher) FQHCs offer those services. I’m just not seeing the problem here, even though Guttmacher says Planned Parenthood serves slightly more contraception clients than FQHCs do.

Even Guttmacher was forced to admit that “FQHCs now operate many more individual family planning sites than do Planned Parenthood affiliates” and that “Planned Parenthood health centers account for just 6% of all safety-net family planning providers.” Therefore, if Planned Parenthood is defunded, FQHCs could likely accommodate the influx of contraception patients. After all, it is possible that many of Planned Parenthood’s clients are already using FQHCs for primary care services not available at Planned Parenthood. And if that is the case, an influx of Planned Parenthood’s clients to FQHCs may not be nearly as large as their supporters claim. FQHC sites outnumber Planned Parenthoods in counties that provide contraception care in every state except Connecticut, Minnesota and the District of Columbia (table 1/page 1).

While politicians continue to force taxpayers to send Planned Parenthood half a billion dollars each year, the organization’s private donations have increased by 26 percent, swelling by an additional $92 million in 2015-2016. (The total private donations in 2015-2016 were $445.8 million.) This cash flow enabled Planned Parenthood to end its year with an excess of $77.5 million in 2015, an increase of nearly 39 percent from 2005 when they netted $55.8 million. Planned Parenthood has been netting a profit for many years, with yearly surpluses ranging from $12.2 million in 2001 to a high of $155.5 million in 2010).

At the same time, Planned Parenthood has lost over half a million patients, but has succeeded in cornering nearly 35 percent of the abortion market in the US, committing more than 320,000 abortions annually – 900 per day, one every 96 seconds.

American women do not need Planned Parenthood, and the taxpayers should no longer be forced to fund the largest abortion corporation in the nation..

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.