Archive for bacteria

Abortion Bacteria Parody names Planned Parenthood STAPH member of the year

Posted in New Wave Feminists with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 9, 2015 by saynsumthn

Another brilliant Planned Parenthood spoof from New Wave Feminists parodies an undercover video released by the Center for Medical Progress.

The eighth video centers on a conversation with CEO Cate Dyer a major buyer of fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood through her company, Stem Express.

Cate Fyer Rampant bacteria abortion clinics planned parenthood CMP

In addition to her admission of procuring intact fetuses, Dyer says that there are bacterial problems inside many clinics.

    I’ve seen really rampant – Rampant problems with bacteria in certain clinics. Some where you’re kind of like in question of really should they, really you know.

    “I’ve seen staff in certain clinics. I mean I’ve seen all sorts of things come out of clinics,” she said.

Watch the real video here.

Enter New Wave Feminists a pro-life feminist group producing satirical videos mocking the tone of Planned Parenthood’s president Cecile Richards and comparing Planned Parenthood’s grisly experiments on aborted babies to Mengele.

In the most recent NWF vid, actors, Destiny Herndon-De La Rosa founder of NWF and VP Kristen Hatten mock the bacterial dangers of Planned Parenthood.

NWF Destiny

It begins with a close up of the mock clinic’s staff member Lilith.

The badge title reads “Staph Member” a spoof against Planned Parenthood’s procurement company Stem Express who stated that there was rampant bacteria inside abortion clinics.

NEw Wave Feminists rapmant bacteria Planned Parenthood

“Hi, welcome to exclusively violent choices for women,” Lilith says in the mock vid.

Lauren Planned Parenthood NWF

“Welcome to free bleedings are us….welcome to Planned Parenthood how can I help you?”

The humor may be over-the-top to many who cannot stomach it but the reality is it helps expose how a Planned Parenthood procurement company admitted to dangerous bacterial issues at the abortion clinics they service. To the many women who end up at these centers, it is no joking matter.

Watch below:

Rampant bacteria + staff problems in abortion clinics says StemExpress CEO calling Planned Parenthood a “volume institution” in baby parts harvesting

Posted in Aborted Baby Body Parts, Cecile Richards, Center for Medical Progress, Planned Parenthood sells aborted baby parts, stem Express with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 25, 2015 by saynsumthn

The Center for Medical Progress’ eighth video centers on a conversation they have in a public place with Stem Express CEO Cate Dyer. The company was originally operated out of Dyer’s home in rural El Dorado County until she grew it into a very lucrative a multi-million dollar company located in a 19,000-square-foot building in downtown Placerville.

Cate Dyer StemExpress Planned Parenthood CMP

I got really comfortable with tissue and organs,” Dyer once said.

The fetal tissue procurement company tried unsuccessfully to get a restraining order against the pro-life group to censor their first amendment right to release this footage.

On August 21, a California judge lifted a temporary restraining order, and today CMP showed what it had.

In this video release, the CEO of StemExpress expresses an interest in fetal livers which she claims they get a lot of requests for.

    “Specifically liver tissue because that’s such an area of demand for us,” Dyer says.

Cate Dyer STem Express Fetal Liver Planned Parenthood

According to CMP, StemExpress, LLC, is a major buyer of fetal tissue from Planned Parenthood which tells the actors that she gets a lot of requests for baby livers. This is reflective in what StemExpress advertises on their website and in a Stem Express catalog that has since been removed.

But, a cached version still exists. For that reason, the screen grabs will look a little distorted than if the actual PDF was available.

Strem Express Catalogue

In the 2013-2014 Stem Express Catalog, owner Cate Dyer, CEO brags that they are the largest provider of fetal tissue globally:

A current (2015) screen grab off the Stem Express fetal liver order page on their website shows how lucrative the selling of human baby livers can be:

Stem Express Fetal Liver costs 2015

More on this here.

Ironically, when Dyer was asked by CMP what amount of fetal body parts would keep her lab happy she responded, “another 50 livers a week” would not be enough.

Cate Dyer volume for us abortion fetal liver PLanned Parenthood CMP

    “I mean it’s you know volume for us,” Dyer points out.

    “We’re working with almost like triple digit number clinics. So it’s a lot of volume – and we still need more…it’s a lot. So I don’t think you’re going to hit capacity with us anytime in the next ten years,” she added.

She later notes, “Planned Parenthood has volume, because they are a volume institution.”

PLANNED PARENTHOOD SUPPORT:

Cecile RIchards Planned Parenthood ABC

Stem Express said they terminated their relationship with Planned Parenthood after CMP began exposing the depraved baby parts operation weeks ago. However, in this conversation with StemExpress CEO Cate Dyer, Vice President of Corporate Development and Legal Affairs Kevin Cooksy, and Procurement Manager Megan Barr they admit getting lots of support from Planned Parenthood.

Asked if they feel supported from Planned Parenthood prez Cecile Richards and Planned Parenthood Federation of America Senior Director of Medical Services, Dr. Deborah Nucatola who once admitted she would “crush above” or “crush below” the unborn child to protect the specific baby organ she wanted to procure, Dyer responded, “Oh yeah everyone at PPFA [Planned Parenthood Federation of America] and the affiliates.”

INTACT FETUSES
Cate Dyer intact cases fetal Planned Parenthood Stem Express

As shocking as it should sound, Dyer admits the company gets “a lot” of intact fetuses.

    “Oh yeah, I mean if you had intact cases, which we’ve done a lot. We sometimes ship those back to our lab in its entirety…So, that would also be great if you have those. Because, again the procurement for us I mean it can go really sideways depending on the facility and then our samples are destroyed and we’re like “really?” This was all so much work and then just to have them be destroyed is awful.”

STAFF AND BACTERIA IN CLINICS:

Cate Fyer Rampant bacteria abortion clinics planned parenthood CMP

In addition to her admission of procuring intact fetuses which implied the baby might have been aborted alive, and allowed to die a violation of federal law, Dyer says that there are bacterial problems inside many clinics.

    I’ve seen really rampant – Rampant problems with bacteria in certain clinics. Some where you’re kind of like in question of really should they, really you know.

    “I’ve seen staff in certain clinics. I mean I’ve seen all sorts of things come out of clinics,” she said.

FINANCIALLY BENEFICIAL

Stem Express financial profit Planned Parenthood

Dyer also agrees that payments to abortion clinics for fetal body parts should be financially beneficial to them. It is a violation of federal law to sell human fetal baby parts for profit.

The Stem Express CEO asks CMP who she thinks are buyers for a Biotech firm, if they think there are [abortion] clinics out that have been burned, or feel like they’re doing work for research and that isn’t profitable for them.

And then she responds, “I don’t see that either…I haven’t seen that.”

Stem Express financial benefit Planned Parenthood 1

StemExpress publishes a flyer for Planned Parenthood clinics that promises “Financial Profits” and “fiscal rewards” for clinics that supply aborted fetal tissue. It is endorsed by Planned Parenthood Mar Monte Chief Medical Officer Dr. Dorothy Furgerson.

CHOPPING UP BABIES NOT FOR EVERYONE:

Dyer also reveals that the aborted baby body parts industry is not for everyone:

“So many physicians are like, ‘Oh I can totally procure tissue,’ and they can’t,” she tells CMP, seeming to indicate that abortion doctors must do the procedure in a special way to obtain useable fetal parts. Federal law requires that no alteration in the timing or method of abortion be done for the purposes of fetal tissue collection (42 U.S.C. 289g-1).

ACADEMIC LABS FREAK OUT ABOUT FETAL BODY PARTS:

StemExPress CSU abortion tissue fetal

In the video, Dyer notes that many academic labs do not like to get fetal body parts because they look like babies.

    It’s almost like they don’t want to know where it comes from,” she tells CMP.

    “Where they’re like, we need limbs but no hands and feet need to be attached.”

    “They want you to take it all off, like, ‘make it so that we don’t know what it is,’ ” she said.

    “But, we know what it is,
    ” she said nervously giggling.

    And, they’re lab techs freak out and have meltdowns,

The Stem Express head points out that many of the lab techs at Universities get into other areas of research do they don’t have to publish papers admitting they used fetal tissue.

SHIPPING ISSUES FOR FETAL TISSUE BODY PARTS

Center-for-medical-progress-planned-parenthood-_4074235482570710431_n

Dyer notes that fetal tissue is very fragile calling it “insanely fragile.”

“It’s the hardest thing in the world to ship
,” she says.

In speaking about intact fetal heads, Dyer jokes, “Tell the lab it’s coming so they don’t open the box and go Oh God!”

StemExpress is a for-profit biotech supply company that has been partnered with Planned Parenthood clinics across the country to purchase human fetal parts since its founding in 2010. StemExpress’ Medical Director, Dr. Ronald Berman, is an abortion doctor for Planned Parenthood Mar Monte.

The sale or purchase of human fetal tissue is a federal felony punishable by up to 10 years in prison or a fine of up to $500,000 (42 U.S.C. 289g-2). The Sacramento Business Journal reported in June that StemExpress has an annual revenue of $4.5 million.

The video is the eighth released by The Center for Medical Progress in its investigative journalism study of Planned Parenthood’s sale of aborted baby parts.

A response to the video published by Planned Parenthood on Twitter claims the claims are fake:

Planned Parenthood responds to StemEXpress CMP Vid

“StemExpress is the ‘weakest link’ that unravels Planned Parenthood’s baby parts chain–they readily admit the profit-motive that Planned Parenthood and their proxies have in supplying aborted baby parts,” notes David Daleiden, Project Lead for CMP.

Congress and law enforcement should immediately seize all fetal tissue files from StemExpress and all communications and contracts with Planned Parenthood. The evidence that Planned Parenthood profits from the sale of aborted baby parts is now overwhelming, and not one more dime of taxpayer money should go to their corrupt and fraudulent criminal enterprise.”

Stem Express responded to the video by issuing a statement which reads in part:

    STem Express   signIn a “preview” video released immediately following the court’s ruling, the criminal defendants claim StemExpress “admitted” to receiving “intact fetuses” from Planned Parenthood. However, a cursory review of the unedited video or transcript reveals that the entire conversation was unequivocally discussing “intact” fetal livers, which are used by StemExpress for the development of isolated cells that are urgently needed by scientists and medical researchers working to cure cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. In fact, CMP itself has previously acknowledged that this portion of the conversation refers solely to fetal livers, but nonetheless continues to lodge unsupported false accusations at StemExpress.

    StemExpress’s CEO, Cate Dyer, added the following personal response to these latest allegations:

    Cate Fyer of Stem Express fetal body parts Consistent with the company’s prior public statements, StemExpress has never requested, received or provided to a researcher an ‘intact fetus.’ CMP’s and Daleiden’s continued lies reflect a sad attempt to malign StemExpress and me personally. As anyone can see and read, the entire discussion was, in fact, about ‘intact livers,’ which are used by StemExpress to develop and purify isolated cells used by our customers to support their critical scientific research. My use of the term ‘intact cases’ is a medical term of art that refers solely to ‘intact livers,’ as there was absolutely no mention of ‘intact fetuses’ at any point in over two hours of illegally recorded video.”

StemExpress vows to pursue a claim of damages against CMP and David Daleiden for what they describe as, “their illegal conduct.”

U.S. Marshals seize ultrasound gel containing dangerous levels of bacteria

Posted in FDA with tags , , , , , , , , on April 20, 2012 by saynsumthn

H/T

The FDA in July raised concerns over cleanliness and sterilization during an inspection at a New Jersey company which had a batch of its ultrasound gel seized by federal agents Wednesday because the FDA says tests showed it was tainted with dangerous levels of bacteria and which may have infected babies in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

In a warning letter in September, FDA investigators said that Pharmaceutical Innovations did not test product adequately to ensure it was sterile and did not make sure equipment used to sterilize the product was properly maintained and calibrated.

The letter also says Pharmaceutical Innovations did not thoroughly investigate a complaint that babies in a NICU were infected by Pseudomonas. “The hospital’s investigation led to culturing your ultrasound 8 oz bottles and 5 liter gel which tested positive for the Pseudomonas organism.” The company told the FDA the hospital had not properly used the product but failed to establish a procedure to make sure that same thing didn’t happen again.

U.S. Marshals seized all lots of Other-Sonic Generic Ultrasound Transmission Gel manufactured by the Newark, NJ, company Wednesday that are believed to contain dangerous levels of bacteria.

The FDA says that 16 patients on whom the gel was used during surgery have gotten sick. In an email today, FDA spokeswoman Sarah Clark-Lynn said the 16 patients were at a hospital in Michigan. They developed colonization or infection with the bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa after undergoing cardiovascular surgery. As a result of the ongoing investigation, the hospital tested both open and closed ultrasound gel. Testing by the hospital confirmed Pseudomonas aeruginosa in both opened and unopened bottles.

The FDA was contacted on Feb. 15 by the State Department of Health, where the infections occurred. There was also a MedSun Adverse Event Report submission on March 2, she said.

Tests on the product in February revealed unsafe levels of two bacteria: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella oxytoca, the FDA says, citing a filing in the U.S. District Court in New Jersey.

The product, manufactured by Pharmaceutical Innovations, was seized at the company’s operations in Newark and has been embargoed by the New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services at FDA’s request.

“This ultrasound gel presented serious health risks to patients, particularly vulnerable ones,” said Dara A. Corrigan, the FDA’s associate commissioner for regulatory affairs, in the release. “Therefore, FDA, with the assistance of our state partner, is taking aggressive enforcement action to protect the public health.”

Gilbert Buchalter, president of the company, initially played dumb when asked about the raid, and then said he had no comment. An office worker, who declined to be identified, acknowledged agents had been to the facility.

The affected gel products include 250 milliliter and 5 liter containers of Other-Sonic Generic Ultrasound Transmission Gel manufactured from June 2011 through December 2011.

Aspartame exposed – GM Bacteria used to create deadly sweetener , Monsanto named

Posted in Alex Jones, Food Safety, Genetically Modified Food with tags , , , , , , , , on January 5, 2011 by saynsumthn

(NaturalNews) The manufacturers of the most prevalent sweetener in the world have a secret, and it`s not a sweet one.

Aspartame, an artificial sweetener found in thousands of products worldwide, has been found to be created using genetically modified (GM) bacteria. What`s even more shocking is how long this information has been known.

A 1999 article by The Independent was the first to expose the abominable process in which aspartame was created. Ironically, the discovery was made around the same time as rich leaders around the globe met at the G8 Summit to discuss the safety of GM foods.

Read rest here : http://www.naturalnews.com/030918_aspartame_GM_bacteria.html#ixzz1AB0qR5BB

The Independent reported in 1999, ”

As the G8 summit of rich country leaders decided last night to launch an inquiry into the safety of genetically modified (GM) food, an investigation by the Independent on Sunday revealed that Monsanto, the pioneering GM food giant which makes aspartame, often uses genetically engineered bacteria to produce the sweetener at its US production plants.

We have two strains of bacteria – one is traditionally modified and one is genetically modified,” said one Monsanto source. “It’s got a modified enzyme. It has one amino acid different.”

The use of genetic engineering to make aspartame has stayed secret until now because there is no modified DNA in the finished product. Monsanto insists that it is completely safe.

According to The Independent, in 1999, a Monsanto spokeswoman confirmed that aspartame for the US market is made using genetic engineering.

Increasingly, chemical companies are using genetically engineered bacteria in their manufacturing process without telling the public,” said Dr Erik Millstone, of Sussex University and the National Food Alliance.

Watch the film: Food Inc.

NDM-1: Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Moving From South Asia to U.S.

Posted in Antibiotic Resistant, NDM1 with tags , , , , , , on August 13, 2010 by saynsumthn

New York Times, By DONALD G. McNEIL Jr.

A dangerous new mutation that makes some bacteria resistant to almost all antibiotics has become increasingly common in India and Pakistan and is being found in patients in Britain and the United States who got medical care in those countries, according to new studies.

Experts in antibiotic resistance called the gene mutation, named NDM-1, “worrying” and “ominous,” and they said they feared it would spread globally.

But they also put it in perspective: there are numerous strains of antibiotic-resistant germs, and although they have killed many patients in hospitals and nursing homes, none have yet lived up to the “superbug” and “flesh-eating bacteria” hyperbole that greets the discovery of each new one.

“They’re all bad,” said Dr. Martin J. Blaser, chairman of medicine at New York University Langone Medical Center. “Is NDM-1 more worrisome than MRSA? It’s too early to judge.”

(MRSA, or methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus, is a hard-to-treat bacterium that used to cause problems only in hospitals but is now found in gyms, prisons and nurseries, and is occasionally picked up by healthy people through cuts and scrapes.)

Bacteria with the NDM-1 gene are resistant even to the antibiotics called carbapenems, used as a last resort when common antibiotics have failed. The mutation has been found in E. coli and in Klebsiella pneumoniae, a frequent culprit in respiratory and urinary infections.

“I would not like to be working at a hospital where this was introduced,” said Dr. William Schaffner, chairman of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University. “It could take months before you got rid of it, and treating individual patients with it could be very difficult.”

A study tracking the spread of the mutation from India and Pakistan to Britain was published online on Tuesday in the journal Lancet.

In June, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention noted the first three cases of NDM-1 resistance in this country and advised doctors to watch for it in patients who had received medical care in South Asia. The initials stand for New Delhi metallo-beta-lactamase.

“Medical tourism” to India for many surgeries — cosmetic, dental and even organ transplants — is becoming more common as experienced surgeons and first-class hospitals offer care at a fraction of Western prices. Tourists and people visiting family are also sometimes hospitalized. The Lancet researchers found dozens of samples of bacteria with the NDM-1 resistance gene in two Indian cities they surveyed, which they said “suggests a serious problem.”

Also worrying was that the gene was found on plasmids — bits of mobile DNA that can jump easily from one bacteria strain to another. And it is found in gram-negative bacteria, for which not many new antibiotics are being developed. (MRSA, by contrast, is a gram-positive bacteria, and there are more drug candidates in the works.)

Dr. Alexander J. Kallen, an expert in antibiotic resistance at the C.D.C., called it “one of a number of very serious bugs we’re tracking.”

But he noted that a decade ago, New York City hospitals were the epicenter of infections with other bacteria resistant to carbapenem antibiotics. Those bacteria, which had a different mutation, were troubling, but did not explode into a public health emergency.

Drug-resistant bacteria like those with the NDM-1 mutation are usually a bigger threat in hospitals, where many patients are on broad-spectrum antibiotics that wipe out the normal bacteria that can hold antibiotic-resistant ones in check.

Also, hospital patients generally have weaker immune systems and more wounds to infect, and are examined with more scopes and catheters that can let bacteria in.

More Here

LANCET: Emergence of a new antibiotic resistance mechanism in India, Pakistan, and the UK: a molecular, biological, and epidemiological study

Summary
Background
Gram-negative Enterobacteriaceae with resistance to carbapenem conferred by New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) are potentially a major global health problem. We investigated the prevalence of NDM-1, in multidrug-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in India, Pakistan, and the UK.
Methods
Enterobacteriaceae isolates were studied from two major centres in India—Chennai (south India), Haryana (north India)—and those referred to the UK’s national reference laboratory. Antibiotic susceptibilities were assessed, and the presence of the carbapenem resistance gene blaNDM-1 was established by PCR. Isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of XbaI-restricted genomic DNA. Plasmids were analysed by S1 nuclease digestion and PCR typing. Case data for UK patients were reviewed for evidence of travel and recent admission to hospitals in India or Pakistan.
Findings
We identified 44 isolates with NDM-1 in Chennai, 26 in Haryana, 37 in the UK, and 73 in other sites in India and Pakistan. NDM-1 was mostly found among Escherichia coli (36) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (111), which were highly resistant to all antibiotics except to tigecycline and colistin. K pneumoniae isolates from Haryana were clonal but NDM-1 producers from the UK and Chennai were clonally diverse. Most isolates carried the NDM-1 gene on plasmids: those from UK and Chennai were readily transferable whereas those from Haryana were not conjugative. Many of the UK NDM-1 positive patients had travelled to India or Pakistan within the past year, or had links with these countries.
Interpretation
The potential of NDM-1 to be a worldwide public health problem is great, and co-ordinated international surveillance is needed.
Funding
European Union, Wellcome Trust, and Wyeth.

Health Solution to Killer Superbug Found in Norway

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on January 3, 2010 by saynsumthn

AP
OSLO, Norway (Dec. 30) — Aker University Hospital is a dingy place to heal. The floors are streaked and scratched. A light layer of dust coats the blood pressure monitors. A faint stench of urine and bleach wafts from a pile of soiled bedsheets dropped in a corner.

Look closer, however, at a microscopic level, and this place is pristine. There is no sign of a dangerous and contagious staph infection that killed tens of thousands of patients in the most sophisticated hospitals of Europe, North America and Asia this year, soaring virtually unchecked.

The reason: Norwegians stopped taking so many drugs.

Twenty-five years ago, Norwegians were also losing their lives to this bacteria. But Norway’s public health system fought back with an aggressive program that made it the most infection-free country in the world. A key part of that program was cutting back severely on the use of antibiotics.

Now a spate of new studies from around the world prove that Norway’s model can be replicated with extraordinary success, and public health experts are saying these deaths — 19,000 in the U.S. each year alone, more than from AIDS — are unnecessary.

“It’s a very sad situation that in some places so many are dying from this, because we have shown here in Norway that Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be controlled, and with not too much effort,” said Jan Hendrik-Binder, Oslo’s MRSA medical adviser. “But you have to take it seriously, you have to give it attention, and you must not give up.”

The World Health Organization says antibiotic resistance is one of the leading public health threats on the planet. A six-month investigation by The Associated Press found overuse and misuse of medicines has led to mutations in once curable diseases like tuberculosis and malaria, making them harder and in some cases impossible to treat.

Now, in Norway’s simple solution, there’s a glimmer of hope.

Dr. John Birger Haug shuffles down Aker’s scuffed corridors, patting the pocket of his baggy white scrubs. “My bible,” the infectious disease specialist says, pulling out a little red Antibiotic Guide that details this country’s impressive MRSA solution.

It’s what’s missing from this book — an array of antibiotics — that makes it so remarkable.

“There are times I must show these golden rules to our doctors and tell them they cannot prescribe something, but our patients do not suffer more and our nation, as a result, is mostly infection free,” he says.

Norway’s model is surprisingly straightforward.

— Norwegian doctors prescribe fewer antibiotics than any other country, so people do not have a chance to develop resistance to them.

— Patients with MRSA are isolated, and medical staff who test positive stay at home.

— Doctors track each case of MRSA by its individual strain, interviewing patients about where they’ve been and who they’ve been with, testing anyone who has been in contact with them.

Haug unlocks the dispensary, a small room lined with boxes of pills, bottles of syrups and tubes of ointment. What’s here? Medicines considered obsolete in many developed countries. What’s not? Some of the newest, most expensive antibiotics, which aren’t even registered for use in Norway, “because if we have them here, doctors will use them,” he says.

He points to an antibiotic. “If I treated someone with an infection in Spain with this penicillin, I would probably be thrown in jail,” he says, “and rightly so, because it’s useless there.”

Norwegians are sanguine about their coughs and colds, toughing it out through low-grade infections.

“We don’t throw antibiotics at every person with a fever. We tell them to hang on, wait and see, and we give them a Tylenol to feel better,” Haug says.

Convenience stores in downtown Oslo are stocked with an amazing and colorful array — 42 different brands at one downtown 7-Eleven — of soothing, but non-medicated, lozenges, sprays and tablets. All workers are paid on days they, or their children, stay home sick. And drug makers aren’t allowed to advertise, reducing patient demands for prescription drugs.

In fact, most marketing here sends the opposite message: “Penicillin is not a cough medicine,” says the tissue packet on the desk of Norway’s MRSA control director, Dr. Petter Elstrom.

He recognizes his country is “unique in the world and best in the world” when it comes to MRSA. Less than 1 percent of health care providers are positive carriers of MRSA staph.

But Elstrom worries about the bacteria slipping in through other countries. Last year almost every diagnosed case in Norway came from someone who had been abroad.

“So far we’ve managed to contain it, but if we lose this, it will be a huge problem,” he said. “To be very depressing about it, we might in some years be in a situation where MRSA is so endemic that we have to stop doing advanced surgeries, things like organ transplants, if we can’t prevent infections. In the worst-case scenario, we are back to 1913, before we had antibiotics.”

Forty years ago, a new spectrum of antibiotics enchanted public health officials, quickly quelling one infection after another. In wealthier countries that could afford them, patients and providers came to depend on antibiotics. Trouble was, the more antibiotics are consumed, the more resistant bacteria develop.

Norway responded swiftly to initial MRSA outbreaks in the 1980s by cutting antibiotic use. Thus while they got ahead of the infection, the rest of the world fell behind.

In Norway, MRSA has accounted for less than 1 percent of staph infections for years. That compares to 80 percent in Japan, the world leader in MRSA; 44 percent in Israel; and 38 percent in Greece.

In the U.S., cases have soared and MRSA cost $6 billion last year. Rates have gone up from 2 percent in 1974 to 63 percent in 2004. And in the United Kingdom, they rose from about 2 percent in the early 1990s to about 45 percent, although an aggressive control program is now starting to work.

About 1 percent of people in developed countries carry MRSA on their skin. Usually harmless, the bacteria can be deadly when they enter a body, often through a scratch. MRSA spreads rapidly in hospitals where sick people are more vulnerable, but there have been outbreaks in prisons, gyms, even on beaches. When dormant, the bacteria are easily detected by a quick nasal swab and destroyed by antibiotics.

Dr. John Jernigan at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said they incorporate some of Norway’s solutions in varying degrees, and his agency “requires hospitals to move the needle, to show improvement, and if they don’t show improvement, they need to do more.”

And if they don’t?

“Nobody is accountable to our recommendations,” he said, “but I assume hospitals and institutions are interested in doing the right thing.”

Dr. Barry Farr, a retired epidemiologist who watched a successful MRSA control program launched 30 years ago at the University of Virginia’s hospitals, blamed the CDC for clinging to past beliefs that hand washing is the best way to stop the spread of infections like MRSA. He says it’s time to add screening and isolation methods to their controls.

The CDC needs to “eat a little crow and say, ‘Yeah, it does work,'” he said. “There’s example after example. We don’t need another study. We need somebody to just do the right thing.”

But can Norway’s program really work elsewhere?

The answer lies in the busy laboratory of an aging little public hospital about 100 miles outside of London. It’s here that microbiologist Dr. Lynne Liebowitz got tired of seeing the stunningly low Nordic MRSA rates while facing her own burgeoning cases.

So she turned Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Kings Lynn into a petri dish, asking doctors to almost completely stop using two antibiotics known for provoking MRSA infections.

One month later, the results were in: MRSA rates were tumbling. And they’ve continued to plummet. Five years ago, the hospital had 47 MRSA bloodstream infections. This year they’ve had one.

“I was shocked, shocked,” Liebowitz says, bouncing onto her toes and grinning as colleagues nearby drip blood onto slides and peer through microscopes in the hospital laboratory.

When word spread of her success, Liebowitz’s phone began to ring. So far she has replicated her experiment at four other hospitals, all with the same dramatic results.

“It’s really very upsetting that some patients are dying from infections which could be prevented,” she says. “It’s wrong.”

Around the world, various medical providers have also successfully adapted Norway’s program with encouraging results. A medical center in Billings, Mont., cut MRSA infections by 89 percent by increasing screening, isolating patients and making all staff — not just doctors — responsible for increasing hygiene.

In Japan, with its cutting-edge technology and modern hospitals, about 17,000 people die from MRSA every year.

Dr. Satoshi Hori, chief infection control doctor at Juntendo University Hospital in Tokyo, says doctors overprescribe antibiotics because they are given financial incentives to push drugs on patients.

Hori now limits antibiotics only to patients who really need them and screens and isolates high-risk patients. So far his hospital has cut the number of MRSA cases by two-thirds.

In 2001, the CDC approached a Veterans Affairs hospital in Pittsburgh about conducting a small test program. It started in one unit, and within four years, the entire hospital was screening everyone who came through the door for MRSA. The result: an 80 percent decrease in MRSA infections. The program has now been expanded to all 153 VA hospitals, resulting in a 50 percent drop in MRSA bloodstream infections, said Dr. Robert Muder, chief of infectious diseases at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System.

“It’s kind of a no-brainer,” he said. “You save people pain, you save people the work of taking care of them, you save money, you save lives, and you can export what you learn to other hospital-acquired infections.”

Pittsburgh’s program has prompted all other major hospital-acquired infections to plummet as well, saving roughly $1 million a year.

“So, how do you pay for it?” Muder asked. “Well, we just don’t pay for MRSA infections, that’s all.”

Beth Reimer of Batavia, Ill., became an advocate for MRSA precautions after her 5-week-old daughter Madeline caught a cold that took a fatal turn. One day her beautiful baby had the sniffles. The next?

“She wasn’t breathing. She was limp,” the mother recalled. “Something was terribly wrong.”

MRSA had invaded her little lungs. The antibiotics were useless. Maddie struggled to breathe, swallow, survive, for two weeks.

“For me to sit and watch Madeline pass away from such an aggressive form of something, to watch her fight for her little life — it was too much,” Reimer said.

Since Madeline’s death, Reimer has become outspoken about the need for better precautions, pushing for methods successfully used in Norway. She’s stunned, she said, that anyone disputes the need for change.

“Why are they fighting for this not to take place?” she said.