Archive for Alan E. Guttmacher

8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Posted in Abortion Funding, Abortion History, Abortion legalization by state, Abortion prior to Roe, Abortion Racism, abortion used as birth control, Abortion Welfare, American Eugenics Society, American Law Institute, Bernard Nathanson, Bush, Bush Family, Cosmo Magazine, Faye Wattleton, Feminism, Guttmacher, Lader, Men and Abortion, Men For Choice, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood President, Population Control, Population Council, Roe V Wade History, Subverted, Supreme Court, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion

The media seems to always equate abortion with “women’s rights” — but many people may be unaware that legalizing abortion in America was actually an idea originally pushed by pro-abortion men, many of whom were concerned about the growth of certain people groups. But beyond this, predatory men have benefited significantly from legalized abortion, which has removed male responsibility from unplanned pregnancy situations, and which is used to cover up sexual abuse. And male abortionists continue to be protected by the abortion industry even when they rapeinjure or kill female patients.

Below are eight things everyone should know about the large role certain men played in liberalizing abortion laws in the U.S.:

1. Pro-eugenics men were the primary people discouraging reproduction among “undesirable” groups

Image: Image: American Eugenics Society document

Image: American Eugenics Society document

2. A pro-population control man led the push for abortion at Planned Parenthood 

Image: PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

Image: Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

3. A misogynistic man influenced the sexual revolution, which primarily benefited predatory males 

  • The sexual revolution of the 1960s pushed by Cosmopolitan Magazine (under direction of Helen Gurley Brown) was inspired by Hugh Hefner, creator of Playboy.
  • Hefner told Hollywood Reporter that Brown approached him for job before joining Cosmo: “She wanted to do a female version of Playboy.
  • The theme of free sex without consequences and no kids, with abortion as a safety net, benefited men.

Cosmo Magazine 1967

Cosmo Magazine 1967

4. Two pro-abortion men hijacked the 1960’s “women’s movement” to legalize abortion 

Image: Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

  • Most outspoken abortion enthusiasts in the 1960s were men, like Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson.
  • Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” dubbed “mother of the women’s movement,” called Lader “the father of the abortion rights movement.”
  • Friedan founded the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966 and in 1967, Lader and Nathanson convinced her to add abortion to NOW’s plank, causing a loss in female NOW membership.
  • Lader admitted in his book that “Abortion never became a feminist plank in the United States among the suffragettes or depression radicals. It was ignored, even boycotted by Planned Parenthood women in those days.”
  • 1969: NARAL was established by Lader, Nathanson, and Friedan, who admitted few women attended. (Nathanson later renounced his pro-abortion stance and worked to expose the lies they told.)
  • 1989: Friedan acknowledged it was certain men who pushed to legalize abortion: “I remember that there were some men… that had been trying to reform these criminal abortion laws. And they got a sense somehow that the women’s movement might make everything different…. They kept nagging at me… to try and do something…. ‘We need some organization to take up… abortion rights.’”
Image: Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

5. Pro-eugenics men founded the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s former research arm 

  • Alan Guttmacher, former Planned Parenthood president and Eugenics Society VP, founded the Center for Family Planning Program Development in 1968, which became the Guttmacher Institute, a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.
  • In 1969, Guttmacher acknowledged funding came from “Kellogg, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations.”

6. Men in favor of population control pushed for taxpayer-funded “family planning,” which aids America’s largest abortion business

  • The Title X federal family planning program allocates tens of millions of tax dollars to Planned Parenthood.
  • 1965: President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) supported taxpayer funded “family planning” and was awarded Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award the following year.
  • 1966: Alan Guttmacher proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to fund birth control for poor.
  • 1968: George N. Lindsay, chairman of Planned Parenthood-World Population, urged President Richard Nixon to federally fund poor people’s “family planning.”
  • 1969: Nixon spoke in favor of “family planning” and the same year, the Senate approved tax funding for it, with the help of Democrat Senator Joseph D. Tydings, a Planned Parenthood supporter granted PPFA’s Margaret Sanger award.
Image: Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

  • 1970: The U.S. House of Representatives authorized federal dollars to pay for family planning services.
  • The chief co-sponsor of the Title X statute was Rep. George H.W. Bush, who later became president. Bush was recruited because his grandfather, Prescott Bush, once sat on a Planned Parenthood board.
  • 1972: Nixon recommended Congress create the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future to study abortion. It was chaired by John D. Rockefeller III, a longtime advocate of population control. The Executive Director was Charles Westoff, a member of the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood’s National Advisory Council.

7. An all-male Supreme Court legalized abortion

  • 1973: U.S. Supreme Court justices, all men, ruled 7 to 2 to vote in the Roe v. Wade case in favor of legalizing abortion on demand.
Image: Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

8. Men pushing eugenics and population control brought the abortion pill to the U.S.

  • The Population Council, founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller III, was led by men concerned about population issues and is credited with bringing abortion pill RU-486 to the U.S.
  • Population Council leaders were connected to the eugenics movement (read more here).
Image: RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

  • 1994: President Bill Clinton’s administration encouraged French pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf to assign US rights of marketing and distribution of RU-486 to the Population Council.
  • Right to distribute handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.
  • 2000: Larry Lader bragged in a press conference he “plotted” to break the law and smuggle the pills into the U.S.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Group that brought abortion pill to US has eugenics history

Posted in Abortion pill, American Eugenics Society, Bernard Berelson, Eugenics, Every Child a Wanted Child, Frank Notestein, Frederick OSborn, Guttmacher, Population Council, RU-486 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

The Population Council has a shocking 65-year history, and it’s nothing to celebrate

(From Live Action News)

John D Rockefeller-founded Population-Council

The Population Council, the eugenics organization credited with bringing the abortion pill RU-486 to the United States, turns 65 this month — but it is nothing to celebrate.

In 1952, John D. Rockefeller III founded the Population Council and served as the organization’s first president.  According to the Rockefeller Foundation, the Population Council, Inc., was incorporated following Rockefeller’s Conference on Population Problems, “…to stimulate, encourage, promote, conduct and support significant activities in the broad field of population.”

Like its founder, the Population Council’s other members were concerned about population issues — and, like other population organizations such as Planned Parenthood, high ranking Population Council leaders were well connected to the eugenics movement.

Frederick Osborn

 

Frederic Osborn followed Rockefeller as Population Council president in 1957. Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in April of 1938. Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan, “Every Child a Wanted Child,” may have originated with Osborn. It is no wonder that Osborn also said that “Birth Control and abortion are turning out to be the great eugenic advances of our time.”

Frank W Notestein

Frank W. Notestein followed Osborn as president in 1959. Like Osborn, he was member of the American Eugenics Society and as the American Philosophical Society, according to a biography published by Princeton University. He was also one of the organization’s original four trustees, according to the Population Council’s 1957 Annual Report.

In 1939, Notestein and Osborn served together on the Medical Advisory Board for Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Federation. By 1967, under Notestein’s leadership, the Population Council released a controversial film, entitled “Family Planning,” which featured Disney’s iconic cartoon figure Donald Duck. It was one of many efforts in the 1960s and ’70s to indoctrinate the culture on the use of birth control.

By 1970, Notestein was serving on the Board of Directors of Planned Parenthood-World Population.

Bernard Berelson

Bernard Berelson took the helm of Population Council in 1968, as its fourth president. A year later, in 1969, Berelson published an article which suggested that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods. The article was published in the journal, “Studies in Family Planning,” published by the Population Council. Berelson was also featured in the Population Council’s first issue of “Population and Development Review.”

 

Alan F. Guttmacher, M.D. sat on the Population Council’s first Medical Advisory Board. Guttmacher, a former Planned Parenthood president, was also vice president of the American Eugenics Society. His ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger, who made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics. Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute, would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.

Alan Guttmacher, president of past Planned Parenthood (screenshot: CBS news)

Thomas Parran, Jr. was on the original Population Council’s board of trustees. On paper, he has a very distinguished career, having been named the nation’s sixth U.S. Surgeon General, building support for the passage of Social Security as well as the establishment of the World Health Organization. His name even appeared on the public health building of the University of Pittsburgh as “one of the giants of 20th-century medicine.”

Thomas Parran (Photo: NIH/NLM)

But according to USA Today, “Parran’s legacy was tainted in 2010, when the U.S. government apologized to Guatemala for the syphilis experiments that exposed 1,308 men, women and children to syphilis without consent from 1946 to 1948. Parran approved of the experiments, conducted by U.S. Public Health Service physician John Cutler.” (Cutler and his wife Eleise contributed to the Population Council and Cutler’s wife admitted that she served on the board of Planned Parenthood.)

Earlier this year, Philly.com reported that Parran was suspected of being the “intellectual inspiration of the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Study”:

Regrettably, Parran’s great work, impressive resume, and proud legacy are besmirched by his ethical violations. The truth of his association with horrendous experiments using impoverished Alabama sharecroppers, federal prison inmates, and an array of vulnerable subjects in Guatemala who were purposefully infected with syphilis were already known. But newly discovered evidence disclosing his role as the architect of the Tuskegee study may have caused his already troubling case to reach the tipping point…

Pitt trustees now must confront evidence showing Parran was more than a distant bureaucrat during the Tuskegee study. New documents disclose that Parran believed the African American population of Macon County, Ala., was perfect for a nontreatment exercise. “If one wished to study the natural history of syphilis in the Negro race uninfluenced by treatment,” Parran wrote in January 1932, “this county would be an ideal location for such a study.”

Eugenics founded Guttmacher praises Eugenics founded Population Council which turned 65

The Rockefeller family has long been connected to eugenics. According to author Rebecca Messall, “Rockefeller money funded eugenic scientists decades before Hitler put eugenic theories into practice.”

Rockefeller eugenics (image: New York Times)

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

Black added, “In May 1926, Rockefeller awarded $250,000 to the German Psychiatric Institute of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, later to become the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Psychiatry. Among the leading psychiatrists at the German Psychiatric Institute was Ernst Rüdin, who became director and eventually an architect of Hitler’s systematic medical repression.” (NOTE: In 1933, Rüdin’s call for racial purity was published in Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Review. According to the documentary film, Maafa21, Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws.)

Rockefeller III once claimed that birth control was “directly related to the matter of meaningful peace.”

In her review of the book, “Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population,” written by Columbia University historian Matthew Connelly, C-Fam author Susan Yoshihara, Ph.D, discovered what led up to Rockefeller’s founding of the Population Council:

John D Rockefeller III (Image: Rockefeller Foundation)

In 1952, at a secret, invitation-only gathering in Colonial Williamsburg, John D. Rockefeller III brought together what would become the modern population control establishment. Setting the agenda for the following decades were the heads of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, National Academy of Sciences, and top scientists “from embryology to economics,” including past and present Nobel Prize winners.

From verbatim transcripts of the “Conference on Population Problems,” just one of the countless number of such meetings the book exposes, Connelly found that what drove them were the questions of how many people the world could hold along with “whether ‘industrial development should be withheld’ from poor, agrarian countries like India.” By decreasing mortality and encouraging “breeding,” development would increase inferior populations and further degrade “the genetic quality of the human race.” They decided radical measures to reduce birthrates were justified in order to save “Western Civilization” from being dragged down by the growing humanitarian demands of Third World countries.

Thus was born the Population Council, which would in turn become the nexus of the entire population control movement, going on to coordinate the work of the United Nations, the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) – founded three weeks later – as well as major pharmaceutical firms.

In 1994, with the encouragement of the Clinton administration, french pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf assigned the US rights of marketing and distribution of abortion pill RU-486 to the Population Council. The right to distribute the harmful drugs were later handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.

In 2015, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report found that from fiscal year 2010 through 2012, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) reported sending about $236 million to six organizations and their affiliates and member associations: Advocates for Youth, Guttmacher Institute, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA), the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), and the Population Council.

Today, abortion remains among the Population Council’s strategic priorities, according to its latest annual report.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Nephew of American Eugenics Society former Vice President leads National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

Posted in Eugenics, Guttmacher, NIH, Planned Parenthood with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 27, 2010 by saynsumthn

Alan E. Guttmacher, nephew to Alan F. Guttmacher a former vice president of the American Eugenics Society, assumed the duties of NICHD Acting Director on December 1, 2009. Now a detailed interview with Alan Guttmacher’s nephew, named after his Uncle, Alan Guttmacher reveals that he has been placed in charge of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Dr. Alan Guttmacher (Jr.), a Harvard-trained geneticist and pediatrician, is the new acting director of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, the federal agency that finances research into child and maternal health. Dr. Guttmacher, 60, previously worked with Francis Collins on the Human Genome Project and then as the deputy director of the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

Asked this by the New York Times:

Q. YOUR UNCLE WAS THE PRESIDENT OF PLANNED PARENTHOOD AND A TOWERING FIGURE IN THE REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS MOVEMENT. HAS THERE BEEN ANY CRITICISM OF APPOINTING ANYONE NAMED ALAN GUTTMACHER TO THIS POST?
Guttmacher (Jr.) replies, ” I have not been aware of any. The name does stand for something. Planned Parenthood was more of a social movement until my uncle said, “If we’re making all these decisions, we need to make sure that it is backed up by good scientific information.” So he started the think tank that became known as the Guttmacher Institute. One finds that people know the name primarily because of that. But people on both sides of the abortion debate tend to use their data as the reliable data. So, to some degree, my appointment has been less controversial than some might think.”

Guttmacher also bragged that in 2009, N.I.C.H.D.’s funding for research on reproductive health totaled more than $254 million.

Guttmacher also uses a term used many times in Eugenics Science, the term “Family Pedigree” – Guttmacher, “When I was fixing up my office, I found these three grocery bags from a previous occupant filled with documents and pedigrees for a Vermont family with HHT. I’d saved them. So my visitor looked over these pedigrees and asked, “Would you be willing to find these people, get their medical histories, examine them, get some blood for DNA and tell us which ones have the disease.” So that’s what we did.”

Guttmacher’s profile on the NIH website states that Guttmacher, also oversees the NIH’s involvement in the U.S. Surgeon General’s Family History Initiative, an effort to encourage all Americans to learn about and use their families’ health histories to promote personal health and prevent disease. ( Hmmm)

Alan E. Guttmacher is a former board member of the Guttmacher Institute the research arm of Planned Parenthood. Planned Parenthood is the nation’s largest abortion provider and according to Guttmacher Institute’s own stats, abortion kills almost 5x’s as many black babies as white ones. Planned Parenthood clinics are set up strategically in black neighborhoods, causing some to claim that it is a deliberate attempt to limit black populations.

A stated goal of The Guttmacher Institute is legal abortion:

The Guttmacher Institute envisions a world in which all women and men have the ability to exercise their rights and responsibilities regarding sexual behavior, reproduction and family formation freely and with dignity. In this world, women and men in every country are able to avoid unwanted pregnancies, prevent and procure treatment for sexually transmitted infections, obtain safe abortions, achieve healthy pregnancies and births, and have satisfying sexual relationships.

Alan E. Guttmacher’s uncle, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher was the Vice President of the American Eugenics Society. Guttmacher was also a former president and board member of Planned Parenthood, the nation’s largest abortion provider. Planned Parenthood’s founder , Margaret Sanger was also a member of the American Eugenics Society and she admittedly gave speeches to the Klan regarding her so-called “important eugenic work”.

From it’s beginning, Guttmacher and Planned Parenthood has been muddied up in eugenics and now abortion has been the tool used to drastically limit the Black and Latino populations.

For more on this troublesome trend watch the film: Maafa21 Black Genocide in 21st Century America (Preview below)

Alan Guttmacher founded the Gutmacher Institute, which is the research arm of Planned Parenthood. In 1966- Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, President of the Planned Parenthood Federation told a symposium at the University of California Medical Center that a sensitive area in the field of birth control was, “the belief that the white middle class was coercing their own poor and people with black and yellow skins to reduce family size because the middle-class whites are frightened of being outnumbered.” … “ The only way the mounting feeling that birth control is a tool of racism can be handled, is to involve knowledgeable leaders from the minority groups who understand and are favorable to the philosophy of birth control. They, in turn, must translate their appreciation of the contribution which birth control can make toward family stability to their own people.” (SOURCE: New York Times: Doctor blames his profession for delays on Family Planning: 1/16/1966)

Blacks rejected Guttmacher and Planned Parenthood’s eugenic birth control push and saw it as Genocide in their community. In another effort to bring Black on board the Eugenic Plan, a A January 28,1966 internal memo from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe, outlines the plan for winning over the Black Community. The memo begins by calling the new plan, a “Community Relations Program.” The “program” is to, “form a liaison between Planned Parenthood and minority organizations.” The plan, according to Planned Parenthood, will emphasize that “all people have the opportunity to make their own choices,” rather than, as the memo states, “exhortation telling them how many children they should have.” One way to get the message is out is to “ get assistance from black organizations like The Urban League and the AME church,” and according to the memo they need to employ, “ more Negro staff members on PP-WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] and Affiliate’s staff, as well as recruit more Negro members for the National Board- at least 5.” Along with this Guttmacher suggests that they initiate cooperation with the National Medical Association [NMA] , a Black medical association, and encourage them to establish a committee on reproduction and family planning. Guttmacher also hoped to “secure at least three Negro physicians for membership on the PP-WP Medical Committee, and he planned to invite NMA leaders to address their convention. Also on the radar was a comprehensive plan to address the Black media by, “specially developed news and feature articles for Negro newspapers.” Guttmacher ends by stating that the above suggestions are “long overdue” but stresses, “we do not need to panic. In fact, if we panic and continue to publicize the “problem”, we may well exacerbate it ( SOURCE: Memo dated: January 28,1966 from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe located in the Planned Parenthood Federation Papers, Black Attitudes from 1962, copied from the Sophie Smith Collection, Sophie Smith College , Box 107/Folder 11:)

A Planned Parenthood memo dated: January 10,1966, reads, “Baker told us that Dr. Guttmacher is correct in feeling that civil rights leaders are beginning to take a hostile position toward population planning on the ground that it is an attempt to halt the growth of the Negro population.” … Baker chastised a speech that Guttmacher made where he admitted some on the Planned Parenthood Board may be there solely for a racist agenda, Dupont’s Public Relations Representative, Mr. Glen Perry writes, [ Baker] was especially critical of Dr. Guttmacher’s admission that there might be some members of Planned Parenthood who had the political objective attributed to the organization by civil rights leaders. Such an admission could easily be taken out of context, and used to the detriment of the organization.”
( SOURCE: January 11,1966, letter from L. Du. P. Copeland to Alan Guttmacher and January 10,1966 letter from Mr. Glen Perry to Lammont Du. P. Copeland Planned Parenthood Federation Papers, Black Attitudes from 1962, copied from the Sophie Smith Collection, Sophie Smith College , Box 107/Folder 11)

But, in 1970, Alan Guttmacher made this stunning statement, “ My own feeling is that we’ve got to pull out all the stops and involve the United Nations…If you’re going to curb population, it’s extremely important not to have it done by the dammed Yankees, but by the UN. Because the thing is, then it’s not considered genocide. If the United States goes to the Black man or the yellow man and says slow down your reproduction rate, we’re immediately suspected of having ulterior motives to keep the white man dominant in the world. If you can send in a colorful UN force, you’ve got much better leverage. ( SOURCE- The Baltimore Magazine: Dr. Guttmacher still optimistic about the population problem, Vol. 63, no. 2: Feb 1970, published, Chamber of Commerce of Metropolitan Baltimore )