Archive for 1993

1993: Clinton signs fetal tissue research law

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on July 20, 2015 by saynsumthn

President Bill Clinton was a supporter of fetal tissue research.

Bill CLinton signs fetal tissue research 1993 x

A 1994 scholarly article entitled, “Issues of Property, Ethics and Consent in the Transplantation of Fetal Reproductive Tissue” authored by Heather J. Meeker gives some background:

1. The Federal Moratorium
The federal government currently controls the extent of fetal tissue transplantation solely through its allocation of research funding. Federal law explicitly defers regulation of the use of fetal tissue to the states. However, in 1988, the Reagan administration injected its anti-abortion political philosophy into the field of science funding by taking a stand against fetal tissue implantation. In that year, the National Institutes of Health (“NIH”) began a voluntary moratorium, banning the use of tissue from elective abortions in fetal tissue research. It did so with the explicit intention of delaying further research pending discussion of the legal and ethical issues involved. In September of the same year, an NIH Advisory Committee voted unanimously to recommend that the moratorium be lifted. However, the moratorium remained in place, despite the Advisory Committee’s recommendation.60 President Bush never lifted the ban while he was in office. Although the Reagan/Bush moratorium was a lightning rod for controversy, it did not halt all fetal tissue research. Because the moratorium only applied to federally funded research, private research could-and did-continue during the moratorium. In addition, an exception to the moratorium that permitted funding for fundamental scientific research allowed the NIH to spend $45 million on fetal tissue research while the moratorium was in place. Also, the moratorium did not affect research in Europe and Britain-where Gosden’s team developed its new procedure.

Bill CLinton signs fetal tissue research 1993 x2
In January 1993, on his second day in office, President Clinton lifted the moratorium on federally funded fetal tissue research.

Listen to his speech on the here.

Congressional hearings on the regulation of fetal tissue research soon followed.In March 1993, Congress passed the National Institutes of Health Revitalization Act. This Act amended the Public Health Service Act to authorize research on human fetal tissue transplantation without regard to whether the tissue is obtained from a spontaneous or induced abortion. It is unlikely that the debate concerning federal funding of fetal tissue transplants is over. The current administration has merely sidestepped the issue by lifting the NIH moratorium. States are still free to legislate against the use of fetal tissue, and, as demonstrated by the federal moratorium, NIH funding of fetal tissue research may be only as healthy as the tenure of the current administration. The influence of politics on federal funding of research addressing human reproduction was underscored quite recently. On December 3, 1994, in the wake of a resounding Democratic electoral defeat, President Clinton ruled out using federal money to support work on human embryos specifically created for research purposes. The President, citing “profound ethical and moral questions” associated with the subject, refused to follow the contrary recommendation of a National Institutes of Health panel.69 Nevertheless, the President’s order did not specifically bar federal support for research carried out on left-over embryos from IVF clinics.

Clinton signs fetal tissue research bill

1993 Clinton signs fetal tissue research bill

Bill Clinton fetal research aborted baby body

Clinton agrees Planned Parenthood fgetal tissue

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Bill Clinton was the most radically pro-abortion president at the time he served his two terms in office.

Bill CLinton lifts several bans on abortion 1993

Listen to his speech here.

In fact one of his first acts as President was to lift several bans on abortion through executive order on the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion on demand in the United States.

Bill CLinton lifts abortion restrictions Executive Orders Jan 22 1993

Bill CLinton Executive Orders abortion

Bill Clinton vetoed pro-life measures like a ban on the horrific partial birth abortion procedure which allows an abortionist to partially deliver the unborn child before stabbing the baby in the neck and sucking out their brains:

Clinton Vetoes Partial Birth Abortion BIll 1996

Bill Clinton approved the abortion drug: RU486:

Bill Clinton RU486 abortion

And did even more to open the flood gates of abortion:

Abortion Clinic Access Bill Clinton 1994

Abortion Gag rule pulled Clinton 1993

Clinto eases laws abortion

Read more.

1993: Bill Clinton signs ( RFRA) Religious Freedom Restoration Act

Posted in Clinton, Harry Reid, Religion, Religious Freedom, RFRA with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 1, 2015 by saynsumthn

The Federal Religious Freedom Restoration Act was signed into law in 1993 by Democrat president Bill Clinton and supported by many Democrats including Chuck Schumer and Al Gore who called it important legislation.

1993 RFRA1993 RFRA pg 21993 RFRA pg 3

Read act here.

Bill Clinton signs RFRA Religious Freedom Restoration Act 3

The following is the speech President Bill Clinton delivered at the signing of the RFRA

    Thank you very much, Mr. Vice President, for those fine remarks and to the Members of Congress, the chaplains of the House and the Senate, and to all of you who worked so hard to help this day become a reality. Let me especially thank the Coalition for the Free Exercise of Religion for the central role they played in drafting this legislation and working so hard for its passage.

    It is interesting to note, as the Vice President said, what a broad coalition of Americans came together to make this bill a reality; interesting to note that that coalition produced a 97-to3 vote in the United States Senate and a bill that had such broad support it was adopted on a voice vote in the House. I’m told that, as many of the people in the coalition worked together across ideological and religious lines, some new friendships were formed and some new trust was established, which shows, I suppose, that the power of God is such that even in the legislative process miracles can happen. [Laughter]

    We all have a shared desire here to protect perhaps the most precious of all American liberties, religious freedom. Usually the signing of legislation by a President is a ministerial act, often a quiet ending to a turbulent legislative process. Today this event assumes a more majestic quality because of our ability together to affirm the historic role that people of faith have played in the history of this country and the constitutional protections those who profess and express their faith have always demanded and cherished.

    The power to reverse legislation by legislation, a decision of the United States Supreme Court, is a power that is rightly hesitantly and infrequently exercised by the United States Congress. But this is an issue in which that extraordinary measure was clearly called for. As the Vice President said, this act reverses the Supreme Court’s decision Employment Division against Smith and reestablishes a standard that better protects all Americans of all faiths in the exercise of their religion in a way that I am convinced is far more consistent with the intent of the Founders of this Nation than the Supreme Court decision.

    More than 50 cases have been decided against individuals making religious claims against Government action since that decision was handed down. This act will help to reverse that trend by honoring the principle that our laws and institutions should not impede or hinder but rather should protect and preserve fundamental religious liberties.

    The free exercise of religion has been called the first freedom, that which originally sparked the development of the full range of the Bill of Rights. Our Founders cared a lot about religion. And one of the reasons they worked so hard to get the first amendment into the Bill of Rights at the head of the class is that they well understood what could happen to this country, how both religion and Government could be perverted if there were not some space created and some protection provided. They knew that religion helps to give our people the character without which a democracy cannot survive. They knew that there needed to be a space of freedom between Government and people of faith that otherwise Government might usurp.

    They have seen now, all of us, that religion and religious institutions have brought forth faith and discipline, community and responsibility over two centuries for ourselves and enabled us to live together in ways that I believe would not have been possible. We are, after all, the oldest democracy now in history and probably the most truly multiethnic society on the face of the Earth. And I am convinced that neither one of those things would be true today had it not been for the importance of the first amendment and the fact that we have kept faith with it for 200 years.

    What this law basically says is that the Government should be held to a very high level of proof before it interferes with someone’s free exercise of religion. This judgment is shared by the people of the United States as well as by the Congress. We believe strongly that we can never, we can never be too vigilant in this work.

    Let me make one other comment if I might before I close and sit down and sign this bill. There is a great debate now abroad in the land which finds itself injected into several political races about the extent to which people of faith can seek to do God’s will as political actors. I would like to come down on the side of encouraging everybody to act on what they believe is the right thing to do. There are many people in this country who strenuously disagree with me on what they believe are the strongest grounds of their faiths. I encourage them to speak out. I encourage all Americans to reach deep inside to try to determine what it is that drives their lives most deeply.

    As many of you know, I have been quite moved by Stephen Carter’s book, “The Culture of Disbelief.” He makes a compelling case that today Americans of all political persuasions and all regions have created a climate in this country in which some people believe that they are embarrassed to say that they advocate a course of action simply because they believe it is the right thing to do, because they believe it is dictated by their faith, by what they discern to be, with their best efforts, the will of God.

    I submit to you today, my fellow Americans, that we can stand that kind of debate in this country. We are living in a country where the most central institution of our society, the family, has been under assault for 30 years. We are living in a country in which 160,000 schoolchildren don’t go to school every day because they’re afraid someone will shoot them or beat them up or knife them. We are living in a country now where gunshots are the single leading cause of death among teenage boys. We are living in a country where people can find themselves shot in the crossfire of teenagers who are often better armed than the police who are trying to protect other people from illegal conduct. It is high time we had an open and honest reaffirmation of the role of American citizens of faith, not so that we can agree but so that we can argue and discourse and seek the truth and seek to heal this troubled land.

    So today I ask you to also think of that. We are a people of faith. We have been so secure in that faith that we have enshrined in our Constitution protection for people who profess no faith. And good for us for doing so. That is what the first amendment is all about. But let us never believe that the freedom of religion imposes on any of us some responsibility to run from our convictions. Let us instead respect one another’s faiths, fight to the death to preserve the right of every American to practice whatever convictions he or she has, but bring our values back to the table of American discourse to heal our troubled land.

    Thank you very much.

Harry Reid Religious Freedom restoration Act RFRA

Ted Kenned RFRA

During Congressional debates, liberal Democrat Ted Kennedy read from Matthew – and Harry Reid also moved to support RFRA you can listen to that here:

http://static.c-span.org/assets/swf/CSPANPlayer.1427210424.swf?clipid=4533035

Bill CLinton signs RFRA Religious Freedom Restoration Act

According to the NY Times, Clinton’s sentiments were echoed by many other members of an unusual coalition of liberal, conservative and religious groups that had pressed for the new law. The coalition included the National Association of Evangelicals, the Southern Baptist Convention, the National Council of Churches, the American Jewish Congress, the National Conference of Catholic Bishops, the Mormon Church, the Traditional Values Coalition and the American Civil Liberties Union.

In the Senate, where the bill was approved 97 to 3 on Oct. 27, it was sponsored by Senators Edward M. Kennedy, Democrat of Massachusetts, and Orrin G. Hatch, Republican of Utah. In the House, which passed the bill last May by a voice vote without objection, it was sponsored by Representative Charles E. Schumer, Democrat of Brooklyn, and Representative Christopher C. Cox, Republican of California.

Bill Clinton signs RFRA Religious Freedom Restoration Act 2

The President spoke at 9:15 a.m. on the South Lawn at the White House.

H.R. 1308, approved November 16, 1993 and was assigned Public Law No. 103-141.

According to the Washington Times, “So far the Religious Freedom Restoration Act has never worked as a defense for Christian bakers embroiled in lawsuits over gay weddings, but for a handful of Apache, Muslim and Sikh plaintiffs, it’s been a godsend.”