Archive for the Planned Parenthood Republicans Category

How the population control movement recruited a sitting Republican president

Posted in Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks promote abortion, Bush, Bush Family, Eugenics, Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Black president, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood Free BC, Planned Parenthood Free Birth Control, Planned Parenthood funded by rich elites, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood President, Planned Parenthood Republican Party, Planned Parenthood Republicans, Planned Parenthood Tax Dollars, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2018 by saynsumthn

Image: Nixon Signs Commission on Population Growth and the American Future (Image credit: Maafa21)

Live Action News’ series on Title X and the formation of federally funded population control programs has documented that the push for government dollars in the 1960s was derived from a eugenics-based effort to limit the populations of “low income,” impoverished communities. During this time frame, many within the population control community, including Planned Parenthood, were concerned about overpopulation, and some would argue the concern was focused disproportionately on minorities. This concern wasn’t new for Planned Parenthood, which has a history steeped in eugenics, an ideology that manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As Live Action News previously reported, many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion might be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit.”

Part two of the series noted how the Lyndon B. Johnson Administration began touting federally funded “family planning,” a term perceived to be more acceptable than “birth control” (emphasis on “control”) to the Black community. But it was under the Richard Nixon administration that these population control programs grew. Years later, it became public knowledge that President Nixon had made racist statements towards the same population groups these programs were created to “help.”

population control, planned parenthood

Planned Parenthood praised Richard Nixon over creation of Title X (Image credit: Twitter)

In the clip below from the documentary about eugenics, Maafa21, you can hear actual recordings of then-President Richard Nixon discussing the growth of the Black population with members of his staff. These discussions center around the legalization of abortion, but some believe they may also shed light on Nixon’s push for federally funded population control programs.

A partial transcript is below (warning – offensive language):

Nixon: ” … as I told you –  we talked about it earlier –  that a hell of a lot of people want to control all the Negro bastards.”

Nixon: “You know what we are talking about – population control?”

Unidentified Staff: “Sure

Nixon“We’re talking really – and what John Rockefeller really realizes – look, the people in what we call the “our class” control their populations. Sometimes they’ll have a family of six, or seven, or eight, or nine, but it’s an exception.”

Unidentified StaffSure

Nixon: “People who don’t control their families are people in- the people who shouldn’t have kids...”

In her writings from the Pivot of Civilization, Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, a known member of the American Eugenics movement, states, “Surely it is an amazing and discouraging phenomenon that the very governments that have seen fit to interfere in practically every phase of the normal citizen’s life, dare not attempt to restrain, either by force or persuasion, the moron and the imbecile from producing his large family of feeble-minded offspring.”
population control, planned parenthood

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

In her book, “Margaret Sanger’s Eugenic Legacy: The Control of Female Fertility,” author Angela Franks notes:

In America, as early as 1929, Sanger was calling for a federal commission to study population, “both in its qualitative and quantitative aspects” for the purpose of protecting the “purity of our national blood-stream” and preventing the overcrowding of “public institutions with public wards at enormous economic loss.”

Franks and other authors detail those who went on to call for the study of population, leading up to the Nixon administration in the 1970s.

In 1968, George N. Lindsay, chairman of Planned Parenthood-World Population (as it was known then), urged President Richard Nixon to make more federal money available for poor people’s “family planning.” This move was in line with Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” to force the taxpayer to fund population control programs.

READ: Speaker reminds UN population commission: Each of us ‘began as an embryo’

The next year, 1969, the so-called “Planned Parenthood blueprint” was underway, and was referred to as “the ghetto approach” by the New York Times:

Whatever the merits of the argument, the ghetto approach is now the federation’s chief thrust, and it is also the policy of the Federal Government, which since 1966 has undergone a dramatic reversal,  moving from almost no action on birth control to a proposed expenditure in 1969 of $31 million. Last month the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) recommended the adoption of Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” for supplying free birth control devices to some five million American women below the poverty line.

Image: Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT 02/02/1969)

Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT 02/02/1969)

Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” called for an expenditure of about one percent of the nation’s health budget, with an anticipated $78 million from taxpayers in 1970. It also called for an expansion of hospitals’ family planning services as well as programs financed by the federal anti-poverty program.

Then, in a July 1969 speech, President Nixon stated, “It is my view that no American woman should be denied access to family planning assistance because of her economic condition.” He then called upon Congress to “establish as a national goal the provision of adequate family planning services within the next five years to all those who want them but cannot afford them….”
population control, planned parenthood

Richard Nixon

Programs like this raised red flags with members of the Black community, already struggling for power and equal rights. It became increasingly obvious that the Black community was most suspicious of population control programs funded by the government. In September 12, 1968, when the news hit that $500 million in U.S. foreign aid dollars would be used to disseminate birth control, journalist Drew Pearson noted in the Press-Courier, “Many black militants also see the government’s participation in birth control programs as “black genocide.” As one militant put it to this columnist: “Whitey is trying to get us before we’re born.” In some U.S. cities, the government finances clinics where disadvantaged persons get instruction in family planning and are given contraceptives free of charge.”

This clip from the documentary film Maafa21 details additional concerns expressed by those within minority communities:

To quell suspicions of “Black genocide,” Planned Parenthood, which was vying for those federal dollars, began adding African American leaders to its board. This move was described by an insider named Jeannie Rosoff, in an interview she conducted with Rebecca Sharpless in 2001:

There were always some preachers, black preachers, who kind of thought that the practice of family planning would encourage immorality somehow. That was one small strand. And then there were a lot of, I think, activist black men—and some women— who essentially thought, ―The more of us, the better. The way to improve the racial situation is by numbers. So that it’s fine to have all these babies. And when things began to spoil in the late sixties, with the Martin Luther King assassination, the Black Panthers, and the Black Power movement, then it sort of just went from, ―We should have all the babies with guns on the street, to, ―Anybody who tries to stop us from having babies is genocide. So that was another element of the opposition. And it was not easy for a group like Planned Parenthood, a basically all-white group, very upper-middle class, to deal with this and to deal with this and argue at public meetings and essentially say, ―Can it. It‘s not right and it’s not true. Planned Parenthood at that time hired a sort of ambassador to the black community on the assumption that nobody could argue with blacks except blacks. So they had to find somebody black to rebut this. You know, my feeling was that if you feel sure of your ground, then you should be able to argue the case even though it‘s very uncomfortable.

Image: Jeannie Rosoff, CEO Guttmacher Institute

Jeannie Rosoff, CEO Guttmacher Institute

According to a 1968 New York Times article, Planned Parenthood elected its very first Black board chairman Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program, saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: First Black Chairman of Board Jerome Holland elected by Planned Parenthood, 1968

First Black Chairman of Board Jerome Holland elected by Planned Parenthood, 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate who was pushing federally funded “family planning.”

Holland was also added as chairman of the board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood. The Center for Family Planning Program Development, later renamed for Alan Guttmacher, was considered the watchdog agency over federally funded family planning programs, according to the previously mentioned interview by Rosoff.

She stated:

“So foundations wanted to have some kind of watchdog, policy oriented group to ride herd on the process. They did not think Planned Parenthood could be it because it was too self-involved. They also didn’t want to create a new entity because they thought, ―My god, they would have to support it forever. So the compromise was that they would give the money to Planned Parenthood but under the condition that some entity, which eventually became the Alan Guttmacher Institute, be organized within Planned Parenthood. It would have a separate name. It would have a separate address. It would have a separate national advisory board, even though the board of Planned Parenthood would still have the legal authority. And that‘s what existed between maybe 1968 and 1978, when AGI became totally independent…But that is the same group that had both the Planned Parenthood political function, the lobbying function in Washington—I mean writing legislation, lobbying legislation—and the AGI technical assistance function.”

READ: Westerners like Prince William push population control in Africa, but at what cost?

According to a 1971 report by the New York Times, a survey conducted by the Center for Family Planning Program Development alarmed the backers of federal programs when it discovered that just one out of five “medically indigent women of child bearing age was receiving subsidized family planning services in 1969.”

“So we then went for a really brand-new piece of legislation which is what became Title X of the Public Health Services Act. It was totally focused on family planning, with independent funding,” Rosoff said.

The Guttmacher/Planned Parenthood insider then described how the Title X push actually came about — and all indications by her words are that Planned Parenthood, through members of its “special affiliate,” the Guttmacher Institute (founded by the VP of the American Eugenics Society) sought out a political spokesperson to push what would become the Title X Family Planning program. Who was that political spokesperson? Rep. George H.W. Bush, who became president after Ronald Reagan.

Read parts one and two of this series. In part four, Live Action News will show how the creation of the Federal Title X Program was manipulated by people within the Planned Parenthood and Guttmacher organizations. Additional articles on Title X’s history include Planned Parenthood’s Blueprint and George HW Bush’s relationship to Title X and Planned Parenthood.

Editor’s Note, 11/8/18: Related links were added.

Nixon, George H.W. Bush helped Planned Parenthood push U.S. ‘family planning’ programs

Posted in Bernard Berelson, birth control, Birth Control and Eugenics, Birth Control for Population Control, birth control in water, Black Adoption, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Genocide, Bush, Bush Family, Forced Population Control, Fred Jaffe, Guttmacher, Guttmacher Staffer, Jesse Jackson, Planned Parenthood abortion plank, Planned Parenthood and Black Leaders, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood Free Birth Control, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood in Black Neighborhoods, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood opposed by Blacks, Planned Parenthood politicians, Planned Parenthood President, Planned Parenthood racist supporter, Planned Parenthood Republican Party, Planned Parenthood Republicans, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Population Control, Population Council, Racism, Richard Nixon, Sterilizing agents in Drinking Water, Title X, Zero Population Growth with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2018 by saynsumthn
Image: George and Barbara Bush 1966

George and Barbara Bush 1966

As is often said, when it comes to unraveling the agendas behind most questionable objectives, follow the money — and, I might add, the motivation. In the 1960s and early 1970s as the government began to push for federal dollars to fund population control programs, this did not occur in a vacuum. In fact, as Live Action News has documented in this series on Title X, it was concocted by movers and shakers within eugenics-based organizations, most notably the Population Council and Planned Parenthood. The previous segment in this series documented how the Nixon Administration — which showed concern over the increase in the Black population at the time — ushered in huge increases in government dollars for so-called “family planning.” In this article, Live Action News will show how the creation of the Federal Title X Program targeting poor families was manipulated by people within the Planned Parenthood and Guttmacher organizations.

The move came at a pivotal moment on the eugenics timeline, because the Black community was quickly gaining traction in the realm of civil rights. Many outspoken Black leaders felt government funded birth control and abortion programs were designed to limit Black births. In a July 1969 speech given by Alan F. Guttmacher (a former Planned Parenthood president and VP of the American Eugenics Society who masterminded the push for legal abortion and is credited with opening the flood gates of abortion within Planned Parenthood), he acknowledged this suspicion, saying:

“In addition, we must take full cognizance of the fact that our work among some militant minority groups is considered genocidal. They charge that what we are doing is not really trying to give a better family life to the less privileged segments of the community but trying to retard the numerical growth of ethnic minorities.”

In that same speech, Guttmacher also acknowledged that funding for the Institute came from grants “from the Kellogg, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations as well as several other lesser foundations.” Some of these same organizations had been funding eugenics for years. A 1970 article published by the New York Times also acknowledged minorities’ fears:

Thus the government’s concentration on the procreative proclivities of the poor is often viewed with suspicion. For instance, “Muhammad Speaks,” the organ of the Black Muslim Movement, has charged that “black people are the target of birth control not because the ruling politicians like them and care about their economic equality, but because they hate them and can no longer use them plantations and other cheap labor conditions.

Just one year earlier, President Richard Nixon recommended that Congress create a Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, noting, “it is clear that the domestic family planning services supported by the Federal Government should be expanded and better integrated.”

Image: Nixon Signs Commission on Population Growth and the American Future (Image credit: Maafa21)

Nixon Signs Commission on Population Growth and the American Future (Image credit: Maafa21)

The commission was chaired by John D. Rockefeller III, a longtime advocate of population control. The Executive Director of the project was to be Dr. Charles F. Westoff, a member of both the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood’s National Advisory Council.

Image: Nixon Commission on Population chaired by eugenics members

Nixon Commission on Population chaired by eugenics members

Nixon’s commission was applauded by former Planned Parenthood VP Fredrick Jaffe. In 1968, Jaffe founded the PPFA Center for Family Planning Program Development, which later became the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s research arm. The organization is named after Alan F. Guttmacher (previously mentioned). At the time this memo was created, coercive population control measures were being considered — such as poisoning water supplies with birth control chemicals without consumers’ consent or knowledge. If there was resistance to voluntary methods, “involuntary control must be imposed.”  (Read Jaffe’s disturbing memo outlining this here).

Image: Eugenics leaders led the Nixon Commission on Population, (Image credit: Maafa21)

Eugenics leaders led the Nixon Commission on Population, (Image credit: Maafa21)

As previously documented, one of the chief co-sponsors of the Title X statute, which allocates millions of federal tax dollars to Planned Parenthood, was Rep. George H.W. Bush (R-Texas), who later became our nation’s 41st president. Additional information has surfaced indicating that the push for federal population control dollars by Congressman Bush was actually initiated by Planned Parenthood and its “special affiliate,” the Guttmacher Institute.

Image: George HW Bush elected to Congress 1966 with wife Barbara (Image credit: Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

George HW Bush elected to Congress 1966 with wife Barbara (Image credit: Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

This information comes from a Planned Parenthood insider by the name of Jeannie Isabelle Rosoff.

In the book, “A Tradition of Choice,” Planned Parenthood describes Rosoff as the lobbyist (alongside director Frederick S. Jaffe) of the “first Washington office of PPFA.” That office was called the Center for Family Planning Program Development, which later became the Guttmacher Institute.

Image: Jeannie Rosoff, director Planned Parenthood Washington Office

Jeannie Rosoff, director Planned Parenthood Washington Office

In an interview she conducted in 2001 with Rebecca Sharpless, published by Baylor University Institute for Oral History, Rosoff described the affiliate’s move to the nation’s capital:

Ostensibly, therefore, the reason for Planned Parenthood‘s opening an office in Washington was that federal grants were going to be made out of Washington and therefore one should be there to kind of seize the opportunity and guide the direction of this new national program… the whole imperative there is not to refinance Planned Parenthood services but to expand services nationwide… This is where AGI [ Alan Guttmacher Institute] began, really, because to do that, you would really have to go proselytize at the local level…So Fred Jaffe went to the Ford Foundation and got a large grant essentially for the Washington office to create a technical assistance program….

According to the Lancet, Rosoff served two decades “as President and CEO of the Guttmacher Institute” after being recruited by PPFA and hired by Frederick Jaffe. She had first-hand knowledge of the behind-the-scenes dealings regarding the passage of the Title X program. In her interview, Rosoff seems to indicate that the plan rested on her ability to choose the right person to sponsor the legislation.

One of the requisites for the chief Republican was that it had to be somebody who had a decent record on civil rights. We did not want any hint of coercion or excessive concern for saving welfare dollars. And Pierre du Pont of Delaware at that time was in Congress… And he pointed us toward George Bush. And George Bush was serving on the Ways and Means committee as a new congressman from Houston… [O]ne day, Alan Guttmacher was testifying. I could see that he was asking questions and seemed very supportive. So I went to see him and I said, ―You know, this is what we‘re thinking of, and would you be interested in it? And he said, ―Yeah. So he began to organize colleagues, do all the things that you do in terms of getting legislation, getting some cosponsors.

During this same time, coercive population control measures were being bantered around by people within the Planned Parenthood movement, as acknowledged in a 1969 article published by the New York Times.

Image: Planned Parenthood members consider coercive population control measures (Image credit: New York Times)

Planned Parenthood members consider coercive population control measures (Image credit: New York Times)

The paper noted that many leaders sitting on Planned Parenthood’s board were in favor of coercive measures of population control. While painting the picture of an agency which was pushing birth control on the “ghetto” rather than the “middle-class” who were having more than the optimal amount of children, the paper noted that a “sizable” number of Planned Parenthood’s board was made up of “preponderantly white and well-to-do” people. The paper quoted a Planned Parenthood board member who admitted the classist attitude of the organization when he stated, “What it all comes down to is that we want the poor to stop breeding while we retain our freedom to have large families. It’s strictly a class point of view.”

Image: Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

Guttmacher suggested to the paper that they were not trying to take away anyone’s rights, but trying to “show ghetto families how to space their children and avoid having children they don’t want.” But he did not rule out coercion, as the paper noted.

“Admittedly Guttmacher is buying time,” writes the New York Times in that 1969 report. “He thinks the voluntary movement should set a deadline of 1980. If world population growth has not dropped below 1.5 percent by then, he says, ‘we’ll have to get tough.’” That same year, the Population Council’s president, Bernard Berelson, published an article suggesting that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods.

By all indications, Congressman George H.W. Bush may have been targeted by Rosoff for another reason, namely that his grandfather, Prescott Bush, once sat on the board of Planned Parenthood.

Image: Prescott Bush sat on Board of Planned Parenthood

Prescott Bush sat on Board of Planned Parenthood

In a foreword to a book on population control, the former president wrote that his father’s (Prescott Bush) involvement with Planned Parenthood motivated his views:

My own first awareness of birth control as a public policy issue came with a jolt in 1950 when my father was running for the United States Senate. Drew Pearson, on the Sunday before Election Day, “revealed” that my father was involved with Planned Parenthood…

Image: Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

And, like his father, George H. W. Bush became a vocal advocate for Planned Parenthood’s agenda while serving as a U. S. Congressman from Texas. He created the National Center for Population and Family Planning in the Department of Health Education and Welfare (HEW).

Congressman Bush seemed dismissive of critics of population control who viewed government programs as a means of Black genocide. He said, “We need to make population and family planning household words. We need to take sensationalism out of this topic so that it can no longer be used by militants who have no real knowledge of the voluntary nature of the program but rather are using it as a political steppingstone. If family planning is anything, it is a public health matter.”

Recruiting members of the Black community to help push the agenda was a priority for Planned Parenthood groups. As documented many times, founder Margaret Sanger showed Planned Parenthood how to masquerade the true eugenics agenda when she implemented her so-called “Negro Project.”

Sanger penned in a letter to eugenicist Clarence Gamble regarding her desire to use Black ministers in furthering her organization’s agenda, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population.” If it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

planned parenthood

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Planned Parenthood understood that recruiting Black support for government funded population control programs was key, and Rosoff was just the person to make it happen. In the previously mentioned interview, the former Guttmacher staffer explains:

One thing which I thought was very important was to get the House black caucus absolutely on board on these issues, which nobody thought could be done because everybody—because of genocide issue brewing at the time….The entire black caucus signed on as cosponsors. So that meant that all Democrats didn’t have to worry about protecting their backs. And George Bush organized a lot of the Republicans.

For her efforts, in 1986, Planned Parenthood granted Rosoff their infamous Margaret Sanger Award.

As a result of Rosoff’s recruitment of Rep. Bush, in 1970, the United States House of Representatives voted 298 to 32 to approve the Family Planning Services and Population Research Act, Title X of the Public Health Service Act, authorizing federal dollars to pay for family planning services for low-income women. The Senate had previously approved the legislation, with the help of Democrat Senator Joseph D. Tydings, a Planned Parenthood supporter who was granted PPFA’s infamous Margaret Sanger award that same year.

These moves did not silence Black leaders. The following year, on June 22, 1971, civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, then national director of SCLC Operation Breadbasket, told Nixon’s Population Commission:

Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove (and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives, will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation. Those who we could not get rid of in the rice paddies of Vietnam we now propose to exterminate, if necessary, eliminate if possible, in the OB wards and gynecology clinics of our urban hospitals. The direct extension of the old “man-in-the-house” rule against public aid recipients can be detected in the drive for birth control…

(Source: Statements at public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future as quoted in: Genocide? Birth Control and the Black American by Robert G. Weisbord, Greenwoor Press, 1972; P. 165)

planned parenthood, birth control, family planning

Rev. Jesse Jackson opposed abortion and birth control as Black Genocide

Famed comedian Dick Gregory wrote in Ebony Magazine, “There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population,” adding:

For years they told us where to sit, where to eat, and where to live. Now they want to dictate our bedroom habits. First the white man tells me to sit in the back of the bus. Now it looks like he wants me to sleep under the bed. Back in the days of slavery, black folks couldn’t grow kids fast enough for white folks to harvest. Now that we’ve got a little taste of power, white folks want us to call a moratorium on having children.

Image: Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion is Genocide

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion is Genocide

Naomi Gray, a former VP of Planned Parenthood World Population and a Black family planning consultant, told the U.S. population commission that many Blacks felt talk of zero population growth was genocide aimed at them. “To many blacks the zero sounds like zero Black children,” Gray said. “White interests in this question have ranged, in my experience, from a desire to have the charge refuted, all the way to finding out if blacks are really smart enough to figure out that whites would like to get rid of them in some polite way.”

Even though Gray herself was an advocate of these programs, she admitted, “It could then legitimately be said that some white interests are more concerned with causing certain black babies not to get born than they are with survival of those already born.”

According to research published by the Institute of Medicine, in 1972, Congress made additional funding for family planning services for low-income available through Medicaid.

In March of 1972, the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future,which Nixon had created three years earlier, began calling for the nationwide legalization of abortion.

planned parenthood

Nixon’s Commission on Population and the American Future (Image credit: Maafa21)

Today, proponents of programs like Title X claim they are helping the poor by providing them with contraceptives. As a result of these kinds of government funded population control programs, the birthrate of women of reproductive age within the U.S. has dropped to its lowest point in 30 years. Some might hail this a victory, but it is just more evidence that, as Sanger suggested in 1919 and the minority community warned in the 60s and 70s, “birth control” may have indeed cleared “the way for eugenics.”

Read the series here: Part OnePart TwoPart Three. Additional articles on Title X’s history include Planned Parenthood’s Blueprint and George HW Bush’s relationship to Title X and Planned Parenthood.

Editor’s Note, 11/8/18: Related links added.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood, TitleX, eugenics, racism and Richard Nixon

Posted in Bush, Bush Family, Planned Parenthood Republicans, Richard Nixon, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2015 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood recently sent out a tweet that reads, “#TitleX, the nation’s 46-year old family planning program was created by Republican Pres. Nixon. It’s not controversial, it’s common sense.

PP Tweets Title X Richard Nixon

They appear to be upset because House GOP lawmakers have prioritized the elimination of all Title X funding, i.e. tax funded “family planning,” because they believe that limiting births saves the US taxpayer millions of dollars.

PP TitleX Saves Taxpayers

But, this blog post is not about the specifics of Title X or if it saves taxpayers with it’s eugenics ideas. It is about the things Planned Parenthood’s hero for family planning, Richard Nixon, believed in.

Just what was Nixon’s views on abortion and family planning?

Nixon was enthusiastic about a federal family planning initiative for low-income women that he declared it a “national goal” in 1969 before signing Title X into law.

It is my view that no American woman should be denied access to family planning assistance because of her economic condition. I believe, therefore that we should establish as a national goal the provision of adequate family planning services within the next five years to all those who want them but cannot afford them. This we have the capacity to do.
~
President Richard Nixon, 1969

george-h-w-bushGeorge Bush Senior created the National Center for Population and Family Planning in the Department of Health Education and Welfare also know as HEW. “Population Control and Family Planning is to important to giggle about now“, said Bush Sr. in 1969. Bush Sr’s interest in family planning started with his activity with Planned Parenthood in Houston.

Bush once stated:

    “We need to make population and
    family planning household words.
    We need to take sensationalism out
    of this topic so that it can no longer
    be used by militants who have no
    real knowledge of the voluntary
    nature of the program but, rather
    are using it as a political
    steppingstone. If family planning is
    anything, it is a public health matte
    r

.”
~ Congressman George H.W. Bush, 1969

Planned Parenthood fundraising letter of January 8, 1947, lists George H Bush’s father, Prescott S. Bush as treasurer of Margaret Sanger’s first national fundraising drive. In 1950, during Prescott’s first race for the U.S. Senate, the syndicated columnist Drew Pearson accused Bush of being a member of Planned Parenthood. Bush lost and accused Pearson of spreading the lie that cost him elected office. This fund-raising letter proved Pearson right.

PrescottBushSanger

Like his father, Prescott, George H. W. Bush became a vocal advocate for Planned Parenthood’s agenda while he served as a U. S. Congressman from Texas. He wrote a constituent in 1970: “I introduced legislation earlier this year which would provide federal funds for research in family planning devices and increased services to people who need them but cannot afford them. We must help our young people become aware of the fact that families can be planned and that there are benefits economically and socially to be derived from small families.” (George Bush to Mrs. Jim Hunter, Jr., Oct. 23, 1970 [Virginia B. Whitehill Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University].)

Nixon stressed that under “no circumstances” would birth control activities be allowed to “infringe upon the religious or personal wishes and freedom of any individual.

Nixon Birth COntrol Religious Title X Nixon Birth COntrol Religious Title X Guttmacher

Yet today, Under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and specifically the “birth control” mandate put in place by President Obama with the support of Planned Parenthood we are witnessing just that religious infringement.

Nixon then recommended a “Commission on Population Growth and the American Future“.

The bill authorizing this new initiative had been passed with overwhelming support from Congressional Democrats and was chaired by John Rockefeller. The Executive Director of the project was to be Dr. Charles F. Westoff who was also a member of both the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood’s National Advisory Council.

According to the documentary film Maafa21, Nixon would label birth control a national priority and sign legislation to make it available as a service of the U.S. government.

Nixon signs Commission on Popualtion Growth American Future eugenics maafa21

Then in March of 1972, the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future which Nixon had created three years earlier began calling for the nationwide legalization of abortion.

Commission-on-Poulation-Growth-and-teh-American-future-Maafa21

This Commission and move was headed by John D. Rockefeller and applauded by former Planned Parenthood vice president Fredrick Jaffe.

Commission on Poulation Growth Beasley Westoff Rockfeller

In 1968, Jaffe founded the PPFA Center for Family Planning Program Development, which later became the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s research arm. Alan F. Guttmacher, for whom the institute is named, was the president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and a leader in the International Planned Parenthood Federation in the 1960s and early 1970s. At the time this memo was created, there was talk of poisoning water supplies with birth control chemicals without the consent or knowledge of consumers – to the point that upon resistance, “involuntary control must be imposed.” ( Read Jaffe’s Memo advocating this here)

Charles Westoff PP and AES Commission on Population

It was also led by Charles Westoff a member of Planned Parenthood World Population’s board as well as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

Jesse Jackson

In 1971, during public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, the Rev.Jesse Jackson warned that, “Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove ( and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives, will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation. Those who we could not get rid of in the rice paddies of Viet-Nam we now propose to exterminate, if necessary, eliminate if possible, in the OB wards and gynecology clinics of our urban hospitals. The direct extension of the old “man-in-the-house” rule against public aid recipients can be detected in the drive for birth control…” ( Source: Statements at public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future as quoted in: Genocide? Birth Control and the Black American by Robert G. Weisbord, Greenwoor Press, 1972 ; P. 165)

NIXON’S RACIST ABORTION STATEMENTS:


Previously released Nixon tapes show Nixon wanted abortion for Racist reasons ( From the documentary on Black Genocide: Maafa21.
)

Although the quality of the recordings are poor, Nixon and an aide held a conversation recorded on January 23, 1973, discussing that day’s Supreme Court’s decisions in Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton.

NIXON Tape #697-29

Nixon: “A majority of people in Colorado voted for abortion, I think a majority of people in Michigan are for abortion, I think in both cases, well, certainly in Michigan they will vote for it because they think that what’s going to be aborted generally are the little black bastards.”

nixon

NIXON TAPE 700-10

Nixon: ” … as I told you and we talked about it earlier, that a hell of a lot of people want to control all the Negro bastards.”

nixon2

Unidentified Staff: “Yeah

Nixon: “Isn’t that really true?

Nixon: “You know what we are talking about – Population Control?”

Unidentified Staff: “Sure

Nixon: “We’re talking really – and what John Rockefeller really realizes – look, the people in what we call the “our class” control their populations. Sometimes they’ll have a family of six, or seven, or eight, or nine, but it’s an exception.”

Unidentified Staff: Sure

Nixon: “People who don’t control their families are people in- the people who shouldn’t have kids.”

nIXON ABORTIO N BIRACIAL bLACK wHITE

Here Nixon says that abortion is needed in some cases: like when you have a “Black and a White”

I know that there are times when abortions are necessary. I know that,” Nixon tells an aide, then adding, “When you have a black and a white.”

The aide interrupts, “or for rape,” to which Nixon quickly responds, “or rape.”

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More on Planned Parenthood’s Republican cronies here.

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Blacks Recognized the racism of family planning and abortion early on and it threatened Republican Richard Nixon:

Even though Black reporter, Samuel Yette was also one of the first and very distinguished Black journalists to work for Newsweek, after he published his book, The Choice” which exposed high level attempts of Black Genocide through birth control , abortion, and additional means , he was fired by Newsweek. Yette claims his superiors told him that the “Nixon Whitehouse” wanted him out of Washington.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

In One chapter on Birth Control

Yette exposes President Nixon’s White House Conference on Food and Nutrition of December 2-4, 1969. In Mr. Yette’s words it, “was worse than a farce.” President Nixon opened the conference with 3 recommendations designed to reduce the number of hungry people! He suggested no measures for the relief of hunger in America.

1. He wanted everyone to have a guaranteed minimum income of $1,600 a year. (This is less than welfare was paying at that time.)
2. A supposed expansion of the food stamp program that would be tied into and compliment the welfare reform package in #1. (His plan would have actually reduced the amount of food stamps. Less money + less food =more hunger.)
3. Provide family planning services to at minimum 5 million women in low-income families.

This last proposal was part of a plan formulated by Dr. Charles Lowe of the National Institute of Health. The plan recommended Congress pass a law that:

1. Made birth control information and devices available to any and all girls over the age of 13 with or without parental consent.
2. Allowed mandatory abortions for unmarried girls within the 1st three months of pregnancy.
3. Mandatory sterilization for any unmarried girl giving birth out of wedlock for the 2nd time.

In that book, Yette describes how civil rights activist, Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer was at that Conference on hunger. When she heard about the birth control proposals she grabbed about a dozen young black men, walked into the room, and demanded to be heard. She spoke about ten minutes on the evil results of this plan and the conference dropped it from consideration.

THE COVER BLOWN:

According to Samuel Yette, Black Civil Right Advocate Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamerhad a passion for her people and her interest and understanding of how powerful the political process was in America led her and others to create the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party to challenge the Credential Committee in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1964 to be seated rather than the regular Democrats who they exclaimed were “illegally elected” based on discriminatory practices against blacks statewide. “We Will Not Accept The Compromise”, stated Mrs. Hamer.

Below are exerts of an eye opening incident Ms. Hamer experienced in the realm of Black Genocide written by journalist Samuel Yette :

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer was Tough Fighter The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977 By Samuel Yette

YetteArticleFannieLouHamer

” It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…For these and other reasons the recent death of Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer …was noted here and across the nation not only with personal sadness, but also with stern political reflection.

When the charades of Richard Nixon included a White House Conference on hunger in 1969, Mrs. Hamer was among the hundreds of authentic grass-roots persons brought here to confir with the highly paid experts.

But the conference (whose name was changed from a conference on hunger to a conference on “Food and Nutrition”) was in reality, one great fraud against the poor.

Instead of seeking ways to feed the hungry, the back stage plan was to get the poor unwittingly to endorse a plan to eliminate from the society those who were hungry.

For example, a panel of medical experts pretended to be studying was to insure proper nourishment for babies and pregnant women. Instead it adopted-in the name of the poor at the conference- a resolution providing for:

– Birth Control devices for young girls, free, and with or without parental approval;

– Required abortions of unmarried girls discovered during the first three months of pregnancy; and

– Forced sterilization of any such girl giving birth out of wedlock a second time.

Only one black person-a nurse-was a member of that panel.

Yette continues, In my reportorial role, I found Mrs. Hamer for a reaction to the newly passed resolution.

She responded with shock and outrage at the deception, “I didn’t come to talk about birth control, ” she protested, ” I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people, Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

Hearing the location of the panel, she gamely pulled herself up on a cane, and made her way to the panel’s meeting room. Along the way she beckoned several black men, who followed seriously intent on doing her will.

She went straight to the front of the room and demanded to be heard.

With the power and conviction of personal tragedy, she told how she, herself, had once been sterilized under the guise of an unrelated surgical procedure. She told how such tools as their resolution in the hands of racist medical personnel would mean tragedy for the black and poor.

Finally, with several large black men at her side, Mrs. Hamer demanded that the resolution be reconsidered. It was, and voted down. But she could not stand and watch forever.

Though she saw the deception and illuminated the society’s most immoral contradictions , she, like the hope and moral vigor of he 1960’s ran out…

The author of the tribute above, Mr. Samuel Yette also suffered persecution for exposing the sinister plot to exterminate blacks with population control methods.

Samuel Yette’s stand is documented in a powerful documentary called Maafa21. this film is carrying on the message Mr. Yette began- that there are Elite efforts to exterminate the Black race in America. Below is the trailer for Maafa21, order the full 2.5 hour DVD here.

After watching Maafa21 and learning just how racist Planned Parenthood is you will see why they would say that what Richard Nixon stood for is NOT controversial.

Bush and Planned Parenthood

Posted in Bush, Bush Family, Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood Republicans, Population Control, Population Council with tags , , , , , , , , , on December 18, 2012 by saynsumthn

“We need to make population and
family planning household words.
We need to take sensationalism out
of this topic so that it can no longer
be used by militants who have no
real knowledge of the voluntary
nature of the program but, rather
are using it as a political
steppingstone. If family planning is
anything, it is a public health matter.”
~ Congressman George H.W. Bush, 1969

Bush Senior created the National Center for Population and Family Planning in the Department of Health Education and Welfare also know as HEW. “Population Control and Family Planning is to important to giggle about now“, said Bush Sr. in 1969. Bush Sr’s interest in family planning started with his activity with Planned Parenthood in Houston.

Planned Parenthood fundraising letter of January 8, 1947, lists George H Bush’s father, Prescott S. Bush as treasurer of Margaret Sanger’s first national fundraising drive. In 1950, during Prescott’s first race for the U.S. Senate, the syndicated columnist Drew Pearson accused Bush of being a member of Planned Parenthood. Bush lost and accused Pearson of spreading the lie that cost him elected office. This fund-raising letter proved Pearson right.

PrescottBushSanger

Like his father, Prescott, George H. W. Bush became a vocal advocate for Planned Parenthood’s agenda while he served as a U. S. Congressman from Texas. He wrote a constituent in 1970: “I introduced legislation earlier this year which would provide federal funds for research in family planning devices and increased services to people who need them but cannot afford them. We must help our young people become aware of the fact that families can be planned and that there are benefits economically and socially to be derived from small families.” (George Bush to Mrs. Jim Hunter, Jr., Oct. 23, 1970 [Virginia B. Whitehill Papers, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University].)

After the extremely divisive presidential election in 1968, a conservative president, his conservative vice president and a divided Congress continued the War on Poverty by passing the laws that would create Title X: dedicated funding for family planning, so that the most vulnerable in our country could receive services to plan their families. In 1969, President Richard M. Nixon said: “It is my view that no American woman should be denied access to family planning assistance because of her economic condition.… This we have the capacity to do”.1 The chief sponsor of the Title X statute, George H.W. Bush, then a US Representative, said even more powerfully: “We need to make population and family planning household words. We need to take sensationalism out of this topic so that it can no longer be used by militants who have no real knowledge of the voluntary nature of the program but, rather are using it as a political stepping stone. If family planning is anything, it is a public health matter”.2

george-h-w-bush

In a forward written by George H. Bush Sr. as a representative to the United Nations for The World Population Crisis , Bush makes these stunning statements about Planned Parenthood and other Population Control Agencies:

gEORGEbUSH

then:

gEORGEbUSH2

Then:

gEORGEbUSH3

then:

gEORGEbUSH4

Here is George Bush congratulating former Planned Parenthood VP Alan Guttmacher:
Bush Guttmacher

Planned Parenthood’s history is seeped in Eugenics – Watch Maafa21 (clip below)

( More on Planned Parenthood’s Republicans) here

Former Planned Parenthood consultant loses Republican bid for House in Pennsylvania

Posted in Planned Parenthood elected, Planned Parenthood Republicans with tags , , , , , , on April 26, 2012 by saynsumthn

In Pennsylvania’s 31st House district, former Planned Parenthood CEO and board member, Republican Helen Bosley, lost in the primary to a pro-life Republican woman, Anne Chapman.

Anne Chapman now faces off with incumbent Democratic state Rep. Steve Santarsiero in November, according to unofficial election results.

Bosley, a Republican candidate in the state’s 31st legislative district race, was identified in published reports last year as the “interim CEO” of the association that provides reproductive and sexual health care, education and advocacy to county residents.Helen Bosley readily admits that she did consulting work for Planned Parenthood Association of Bucks County in 2011.

But the consultant, who owns and operates Corporate Financial Management, Inc., said she never actually held that title. “I was not an employed individual for them,” Bosley, a Lower Makefield resident, said Thursday.

Bosley served as a consultant for the agency in 2011. She also sat on Planned Parenthood’s board of directors for several years in the 1990s. Bosley said during the campaign that her ties to the nation’s largest abortion giant Planned Parenthood should not be an issue.