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Planned Parenthood founder’s board member Lothrop Stoddard wanted ‘non-White races’ gone; met with Hitler

Posted in Lothrop Stoddard, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Image: Lothrop Stoddard views Nazi eugenics court

Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League (ABCL), which became Planned Parenthoodin 1942, had on her ABCL board a number of controversial directors. Among them was a man named Lothrop Theodore Stoddard, a journalist and author who served on Sanger’s National Council, her ABCL Board of Directors, and the conference committee of the First American Birth Control Conference. He was also published in Sanger’s publication, the Birth Control Review (BCR). Like Sanger, Stoddard was a member of the American Eugenics Society and had connections to the Ku Klux Klan. And, like many within the eugenics movement who helped to found Planned Parenthood, Stoddard had a poor view of minorities and people of color.

                                                          Lathrop Stoddard, ABCL/Planned Parenthood Director

Stoddard is featured in a powerful documentary on the history of Planned Parenthood, which Live Action is screening on social media this week. It is called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America and was produced by Life Dynamics, Inc., based out of Denton, Texas. The term eugenics, according to the film, was coined by Francis Galton, a cousin to Charles Darwin. Eugenicists like Stoddard and Sanger and others within her leadership believed that it was the superior race’s duty to limit the population of those who were seen by them as inferior. The American eugenics movement primarily set their eyes upon limiting the population of the Black race.

                                    Image: American Eugenics Society document

This can be seen fairly clearly in Stoddard’s book, “The Revolt Against Civilization: The Menace of the Under Man,” where he writes in part, “Much more serious is the problem presented by those far more numerous stocks which, while transcending the plane of mere savagery, have stopped at some level of barbarism…. Deceptive veneers of civilization may be acquired, but reversion to congenital barbarism ultimately takes place. To such barbarian stocks belong many of the people of Asia, the American Indians and the African [N]egroes. These congenital barbarians have always been dangerous foes of progress…”

                    Eugenicist Lothrop Stoddard demeans Blacks in book (Image credit: The Revolt Against Civilization)

Maafa21 quotes Stoddard as saying:

“Non-white races must be excluded from America … The red and black races if left to themselves revert to a savage or semi-savage stage in a short time.”

Image:Lothrop Stoddard racist quote (Maafa21)

Lothrop Stoddard racist quote (Maafa21)/ Lothrop Stoddard quote on non White Races (Image credit: Maafa21)

In the late 1920s, Stoddard was asked this question in a lively radio debate with WEB Dubois: “Shall the Negro be encouraged to seek cultural equality? Has the Negro the same intellectual possibilities as other races?”

His answer, “No!”

Chicago Forum Council. One of the greatest debates ever held, 1929. W. E. B. Du Bois Papers (MS 312). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

In 1920, Stoddard published his book, “The Rising Tide of Color Against White World Supremacy,” which contained numerous statements that today would be viewed as racist. The book was introduced by another eugenicist leader by the name of Madison Grant, whose own book, “The Passing of the Great Race,” was said to have been viewed as Adolf Hitler’s “bible” of sorts.

According to author Angela Franks, the text in Stoddard’s book contained such inflammatory statements as the following:

“‘Finally perish!’ That is the exact alternative which confronts the white race…. Just as we isolate the bacterial invasions, and starve out the bacteria, by limiting the area and amount of their food supply, so we can compel an inferior race to remain in its native habitat…”

Lothrop Stoddard wrote racist book The Rising Tide of Color, and sat on Margaret Sanger’s board

It was after “The Rising Tide of Color” was published that Sanger invited Stoddard to join her organization. His book was reviewed by Havelock Ellis, a long-time friend of Sanger’s, in a piece called, “The World’s Racial Problem,” published in the October 1920 edition of Sanger’s Birth Control Review. Although the review was, at times, critical of Stoddard, Ellis wrote in part:

Dr. Stoddard possesses, however, all the temperamental optimism and self-confidence of the white Nordic man whose champion he remains throughout…. Since by the prejudice of color, we must mostly be on his side in this matter, we may profitably meditate on the reasonable considerations he brings forward…. The old checks of the increase of population have largely fallen away, that is why we see today the excessive fertility which threatens to drown the whole world in blood. “The real enemy of the dove of peace,” as Stoddard put it, “is not the eagle of pride or the vulture of greed, but the stork.”

Ellis also wrote, “Looking at the matter, as Dr. Stoddard looks at it, from the white and more especially the Nordic standpoint, which is that of England even more than America, the danger that menaces our position is the immediate future, and our very existence on the more remote future is three fold: the peril of arms, the peril of markets and the peril of immigrants.”

According to Maafa21, Stoddard’s book was widely promoted by the Ku Klux Klan. The film also states that in another book, “The Dragon and the Cross,” Stoddard was identified as the Exalted Cyclops of the Massachusetts chapter of the Klan.

                  Lothrop Stoddard (a member of Margaret Sanger’s board) – book used by Klan (Image credit: Maafa21)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger herself once met with members of the Klan and described that meeting in her autobiography, writing in part,  “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.”

Planned Parenthood

Margaret Sanger writes about Klan meeting in Autobiography (Image credit: Maafa21)

In 1921, Sanger’s BCR published the review of Stoddard’s “The Revolt Against Civilization,” which, according to reviewer, Juliet Barrett Rublee, Stoddard gave instructions for “race purification.” Rublee, a staunch birth control activist and friend of Sanger’s, described Stoddard’s book as “courageous, and full of fine enthusiasm and vigor of thought and spirit.”

The first step Stoddard recommended to protect the American population was, according to Rublee, “the prevention of all obvious degenerates from having children.” Another step to be taken, according to Stoddard, was “segregation of defectives, appreciation of racial principles, wise marriage selection, Birth Control: these are the main items in the program of race purification.” The BCR review quoted Stoddard as writing the following:

  • “We have among us, a rebel army, the vast host of unadaptable, the incapable, the morons, the disconnected, filled with instinctive hatred of civilization and progress and ready on the moment to rise in revolt.”
  • “[I]n every civilized country today the superior elements of the population are virtually stationary or actually declining in numbers, while the mediocre elements are rapidly increasing.”
  • “[I]ntelligence is today being steadily bred out of the American population.”
  • “The mere presence of hoards of low-grade men and women, condemned by their very nature to incompetency and failure, automatically engenders poverty, invited exploitation and drags down others just above them in the social scale. Here is the need for action most apparent.”

Stoddard’s racist ideology was totally in line with the founder of Planned Parenthood, Margaret Sanger, according to Dr. Carolyn F. Gerster. Gerster’s research exposing Sanger’s connection to eugenics was published in this 1979 UPI article, where Gerster warned, “There is a… side to Margaret Sanger’s philosophy which must be exposed as it is surfacing in Planned Parenthood’s current policy.”

Margaret Sanger eugenics connection from Carolyn F Gerster (Image: Independent Examiner)

Live Action News has published extensive research on how Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her Planned Parenthood organization.

Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations — leaders identified in the film, Maafa21. In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

                              American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In the aforementioned UPI article, Dr. Gerster noted that Stoddard’s views about the racist Nazi eugenics law of sterilization were very positive. She quoted Stoddard as saying, “The sterilization law is weeding out the worst strains of the Germanic stock is a scientific and truly humanitarian way.”

Maafa21 described Stoddard’s visit to Germany to witness a Nazi eugenics court:

On the 19th of December, 1939, during a four-month stay in Germany, Stoddard was given a personal meeting with both Adolf Hitler and the man who would eventually be in charge of the Nazi holocaust, SS leader Heinrich Himmler. Later, when a course on race was introduced at Halle University in Germany, its instructor stated that it would be modeled on the philosophies of American eugenicists including Lothrop Stoddard. Eventually, Stoddard’s racial views would even be featured in Nazi school textbooks.

                                                     Lothrop Stoddard, on Margaret Sanger board highlighted in Maafa21

Stoddard detailed his observations in witnessing the Nazi eugenics court, in another book, “Into the Darkness: An Uncensored Report from inside the Third Reich at war”:

The first case I saw looked like an excellent candidate for sterilization. A man in his mid-thirties, he was rather ape-like in appearance–receding forehead, flat nose with flaring nostrils, thick lips, and heavy prognathous jaw. Not vicious-looking, but gross and rather dull. His life-history was mildly anti-social–several convictions for minor thefts and one for a homosexual affair with another boy when a lad. In early manhood he had married a Jewess by whom he had three children, none of whom had showed up too well. That marriage had been dissolved under the Nuremberg Laws. He was now seeking to marry a woman who had already been sterilized as a moron. The law forbids a non-sterilized individual to marry a sterilized person; so he was more than willing to be also sterilized. The lower court recommended sterilization…

                       Lothrop Stoddard views Nazi eugenics court (Image credit: Maafa21)

Case Four was a seventeen-year-old girl. The issue was feeble-mindedness. She certainly looked feebleminded as she sat below the bench, hunched in a chair, with dull features and lackluster eyes. Left an orphan at an early age, she had had a haphazard upbringing. The record showed her to have been always shy, backward, and unable to keep up with normal schooling…

I came away convinced that the law was being administered with strict regard for its provisions and that, if anything, judgments were almost too conservative. On the evidence of that one visit, at least, the Sterilization Law is weeding out the worst strains in the Germanic stock in a scientific and truly humanitarian way.

The tragedy of eugenics, of which Sanger and Stoddard were a part, is that it may have influenced Hitler’s Nazi Holocaust, which targeted not only Jews, but the Afro-German community as well as the disabled, and beyond.

Today, in many ways, abortion is doing the exact same thing.

In fact, the same eugenics ideology that laid the groundwork for the Planned Parenthood organization is alive and well in pro-abortion philosophy. Maafa21 presents a compelling case for this connection. The film shows without exception that eugenics, abortion and Planned Parenthood are tied together. So, why do so many remain in denial?

Perhaps the answer to that is seen in the final words of one of the film’s narrators:

You know, when you study the Nazi holocaust, you can see these films of Jews running into ditches to be shot in the head. You can even see films of them actually walking into the gas chambers. And it is tempting to ask yourself why they didn’t fight back. I mean, if you’re going to be killed anyway, what have you got to lose?

Maafa21, Planned Parenthood

Maafa21 host talks about abortion

Perhaps the answer is that they simply could not believe it was really happening. Maybe the normal human mind is just not wired to accept that your fellow man is capable of such senseless brutality on such a scale – even when you see it happening with your own eyes.

As African-Americans, we need to recognize that we are doing the same thing. We need to understand that terms like “pro-choice” and “reproductive rights” and “family planning” are nothing more than marketing slogans. They are just code words that organizations like Planned Parenthood use to hide the fact that we are voluntarily submitting to the will of those who have been trying to exterminate us….

Live Action will be screening Maafa21 live on its social media pages and will be sharing clips of the film throughout the rest of February.

If you would like to order a copy of Maafa21, please visit www.maafa21.com.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Black woman sterilized due to eugenic agenda of Planned Parenthood board member

Posted in Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Clarence Gamble, Eugenics by State, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

At the age of 14, after becoming pregnant from a violent rape, the eugenics board of the State of Nort

North Carolina decided Elaine Riddick should not have any more children and sterilized her without consent. Riddick claims the reason she was sterilized without her knowledge or approval was because the state of North Carolina had ruled her “feebleminded,” a degrading term commonly used in eugenics. She recently told her emotional story in the powerful documentary film, produced by Life Dynamics, Inc., called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America, which Live Action is screening on social media this month. North Carolina’s eugenics program was funded in part by a member of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s Board of Directors and close friend of the Federation — Clarence Gamble. Gamble sat on the boardof Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) as well asPlanned Parenthood, and was also a financier of Sanger’s birth control crusade. In addition, he helped to fund the North Carolina Eugenics program.

Sanger, an established member of the American Eugenics Society, stacked her organization with like-minded men and women. In 1942, the ABCL changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Image: ABCL Directors

Clarence Gamble, a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League

Elaine Riddick was kidnapped, molested, and became pregnant as a result of rape at 13 years of age. At the time, Riddick was living with her grandmother, Maggie Woodard, known as “Miss Peaches,” when a social worker with the State discovered her pregnancy. Her name was Sue L. Casebolt, and she referred Elaine’s case to the state’s Eugenics Board. Casebolt had been installed as the Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Eugenics Board in 1961.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick speaks about eugenic sterilization in Maafa21

According to Maafa21:

At a board meeting held three weeks later, she stated that she intended to keep a file on every child whose name reached her desk so that they could be picked up as soon as they reached childbearing age. Casebolt was still on the board in 1968 when it approved the sterilization of Elaine Riddick.

Sue Casebolt board that sterilized Black woman funded by Planned Parenthood member/ Sue Casebolt on eugenics board that sterilized Elaine Riddick (Image credit: Maafa21)

Riddick said that her grandmother was illiterate and did not understand what she was signing. Knowing this, the social worker pressured her to sign with an “X,” threatening to send Elaine to an orphanage, and remove her grandmother’s government aid for food if she did not. Unfortunately, the document her grandmother was pressured to sign was not a medical consent form for the birth, but a consent to have Elaine sterilized after she gave birth to her son Tony, now a successful businessman.

“I did not find out that they had sterilized me until I was nineteen years old,” Riddick says in Maafa21, adding:

I asked the State of North Carolina why they did this to me and they said that [they did it] because I was feebleminded. That I would not be able to take care of myself…. That I was incompetent…. They were saying that feeblmindness is hereditary. So, they sterilized me so I would not produce my kind. Mind you, I am not illiterate nor am I feebleminded…. They sterilized kids, my understanding…-as young as eight years of age. I don’t know what an eight year-old can do that could cause them to do this to them? The only reason I can give myself is that [it’s] because they’re Black.”

Riddick’s powerful testimony and nearly 40-year battle for justice secured millions of dollars for surviving victims in North Carolina. As a result of Riddick’s willingness to tell her story, North Carolina also agreed to make its eugenics records public.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

North Carolina Eugenics Program document

North Carolina’s sterilization program began with the passage of the North Carolina Sterilization Act in 1929. In 1933, according to the North Carolina History Project online, the act was declared unconstitutional on the grounds that it “did not allow an appeals process. In the same year, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a law allowing an appeal process and created the Board of Eugenics to oversee sterilizations.”

“Between 1929 and 1974, more than 7,600 North Carolinians were sterilized,” reports the Winston-Salem Journal, which wrote extensively on this tragedy, “many of them against their will. Young girls who had gotten pregnant, some by rape or incest, were frequently the targets. Some were flagged because faulty intelligence tests labeled them “feeble-minded,” others simply because they were epileptic. Many were young, poor and black.”

“It’s a very paternalistic model,” author and researcher Johanna Schoen said. “(Women) certainly weren’t supposed to choose when to use birth control or when not to use birth control, or when to be sterilized or when not to be sterilized. The model was, the physician knows best.”

Schoen writes in his book, “Choice & Coercion: Birth Control, Sterilization, and Abortion in Public”:

[M]any philanthropists and health officials believed that African Americans lacked the intellectual  capacity to use any form of birth control. Elsie Wulkop, a social worker who collaborated with [Clarence] Gamble to establish small contraceptive field trials, commented on the attempt to educate African Americans on birth control, “It impresses me as being like trying to get sheer animals to conform.”

Schoen continues, “Sources indicate that some health officials might have found birth control programs appealing as a form of population control.”

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick

Riddick is also understandably outspoken against Planned Parenthood, as the abortion corporation’s founder was  financially supported by Clarence Gamble, the man who also helped fund the very eugenics program that sterilized Riddick. “Euphemisms and sterilization target code words, for example, “feebleminded”, were used to describe Black women like me,” Riddick wrote in an op-ed:

“I was forcibly sterilized at the age of 14 years under North Carolina’s inhumane forced sterilization policy. A policy that was derived from Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood population control handbook, which spread across the United States by her loyal band of eugenicists and lobbying our elected officials.”

Despite Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s ties to the horrors of eugenics, many laud her as a hero, including modern-day Planned Parenthood itself. But, as Mary Senander explains in the Star Tribune, Sanger was anything but a heroine:

Contemporary liberal social planners have elevated Sanger to sainthood, protesting that her birth control campaign was nothing more than a vehicle for economic betterment and health for the masses. But Sanger’s own well-documented words, publications and associations indicate a deeper and darker motivation. Sanger began publishing the Birth Control Review in 1917 and served as its editor until 1938. The May 1919 Review proclaimed, “More children for the fit, less for the unfit.” By unfit, Sanger meant the mentally retarded or physically handicapped; later her definition expanded.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Birth Control to Create a Race of Thoroughbreds, by Margaret Sanger (Image Birth Control Review)

In November 1921 the review issued a clarion call: “Birth control, to create a race of thoroughbreds.” Sanger suggested that parents should “apply for babies as immigrants have to apply for visas.” By 1925, she was a true convert to eugenics, setting up birth control clinics in poor neighborhoods populated by “Latins” and “Slavs” (both groups heavily Catholic) and “Hebrews” – groups she had targeted as threats because of their increasing numbers. She spoke of those who were “irresponsible and reckless,” among them those “whose religious scruples prevent their exercising control over their numbers”…

In the October 1926 Review, Sanger announced her idea for eugenic sterilization: “There is only one reply to a request for a higher birthrate among the intelligent, and that is to ask the government to first take off the burdens of the insane and the feeble-minded from your backs.” Eugenicists like Sanger concluded that the poor were both stupid and immoral, fueling campaigns for sterilization during the Depression. (By 1932, 27 states had compulsory sterilization laws.)

Sanger supporter Clarence Gamble was a graduate of Harvard Medical School graduate, the heir to the Procter & Gamble fortune, and a teacher at the University of Pennsylvania. He was also a medical consultant for the Human Betterment League of North Carolina, another organization with ties to eugenics.

                                                            Eugenics pamphlet from Human Betterment League Association

                                                        Eugenics pamphlet from Human Betterment League Association

According to the book, “Intended Consequences,” in 1933, Gamble was elected president of the Pennsylvania Birth Control Federation, an organization affiliated with Sanger. And, according to researcher James A. Miller:

In December 1937, Gamble was appointed ‘Medical Field Director’ of Sanger’s Birth Control Clinical Research Bureau and at the same time became a member of the editorial advisory board of the Bureau’s Journal of Contraception, a propaganda vehicle for Sanger’s birth control and eugenics agenda…When the North Carolina plan was launched, there were just three (private) birth control clinics in the state; by the end of 1938, with Gamble’s backing, the state had created 56. At that time, with less than 3 percent of the country’s population, North Carolina had 13 percent of the nation’s birth control clinics. By mid-1939 the number of birth control clinics in North Carolina had risen to 62, second only to New York.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Margaret Sanger letter to Clarence Gamble (image credit: Maafa21)

By 1939, Gamble joined others in funding Sanger’s Committee on Planned Parenthood. And, according to Senander’s article, “Eugenics part of Sanger legacy”:

 Dr. Clarence J. Gamble, previously a director of the ABCL, was elected the BCFA regional director in the South. Almost immediately, he drew up a memorandum for his plans for the “Negro Project.” Gamble’s plan included placing black leaders in positions where it would appear that they were in charge (in order to counter the perception by black leaders who might regard birth control as an extermination plot). Sanger agreed: “We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population, and the minister is the man who can straighten that idea out if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Sanger’s 1939 letter to Gamble, about the infamous “Negro Project,” can be seen excerpted in the image below:

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

Gamble referred to eugenic sterilization as “preventative medicine,” writing in the North Carolina Medical Journal in 1951:

One method of preventive medicine, the sterilization of the insane, the feeblemided and the epileptic, is supervised by the Eugenics Board of North Carolina…. Petitions for the sterilization of a mentally diseased, feebleminded, or epileptic person may be initiated by a county superintendent of welfare, or the head of a state institution. If the Board finds that the operation is for the best mental, moral or physical improvement of the patient, or for the public good, it may authorize the procedure…. Of those sterilized under the law, 23 per cent were Negro. That this figure is lower than the proportion of Negroes in the population of the state-approximately one-third-is due partly to the fact that the state hospital caring for the Negro insane and feebleminded has not had sufficient surgical services to perform many of these operations.

Then, by the early 1960’s, Gamble co-authored a booklet on family planning with Planned Parenthood’s president, Alan F. Guttmacher. It was published by Pathfinder Fund, an organization Gamble helped to found. The book was  entitled, “Family planning: a challenge to health workers of every nation.”

Guttmacher, a former vice-president of the American Eugenics Society, had been a longtime advocate of abortion and a strong proponent of government funded “family planning.” Author Angela Franks notes in her book on Sanger:

As both Sanger and Gamble had foreseen, once government got involved, Planned Parenthood [PPFA] and Gamble’s Pathfinder Fund would be able to spend great sums of money carrying out their original eugenic and population control mandates, and with people like Gamble and PPFA’s Alan Guttmacher directing the organizational bureaucracy, the continued influence of eugenics was inevitable.

Research from the Winston-Salem Journal discovered that “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

According to the film, Maafa21, “In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s State’s sterilization program saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.”

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Clarence Gamble calls for eugenics sterilizations (Image: Maafa21)

Gamble had been promoting birth control since the late 1930s…” writes the Winston-Salem Journal. In addition:

Gamble was sure that eugenic sterilization was a good idea, but after World War II few states were willing to consider the kind of aggressive program that he wanted. Gamble contributed time, money and a keen public-relations sense to the Human Betterment League. He also paid for most of the sterilizations in Orange County during one year, and he paid for the research that went into the book Sterilization in North Carolina, written by researcher Moya Woodside.

According to Maafa21, “North Carolina was not the only state whose eugenics programs were influenced by friends of Sanger or Planned Parenthood. In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.” You can watch Maafa21 on Live Action’s Facebook page.

Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Elaine Riddick embraces her son (Image credit: Maafa21 blog)

In her quest to get justice for eugenics victims, Elaine Riddick testified tearfully:

I was a victim of rape…I was a victim of child abuse… I have to get out what the state of North Carolina did to me. I am not feeble minded. I’ve never been feeble minded. They slandered me. They ridiculed and harassed me….

They cut me open like I was a hog… at the same time they gave me a cesarean birth and took my child and when they did that – they sterilized me. What do you think I’m worth?

Riddick told the lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment.

Between 1929 and 1974, nearly 7,600 documented males and females were sterilized by choice, force or coercion under the authority the NC Eugenics Board program. The youngest victims were ten years of age.

  • 85% of victims were female.
  • 40% of victims were minorities, including African Americans and Native Americans.

In 2010, the Justice for Sterilization Victims Foundation was established as a Division of the NC Department of Administration to compensate victims who were forcibly sterilized by the State. The exact number of victims alive today is unknown. However, the State Center for Health Statistics estimates that 2,944 victims may have still been alive as of 2010. It is more realistically estimated by the State Center that 1,500 to 2,000 victims may still be alive.

In 2013, the NC state legislature included $10 million in the budget to be divvied among verified victims.

Eugenics is an evil ideology that tragically remains alive today. As Live Action News has previously documented, the philosophy of eugenics continues to morph under different terms such as abortion and euthanasia. Today, abortion disproportionately targets the African American community — and the main promoter of abortion is Planned Parenthood.

Although Planned Parenthood was founded by Margaret Sanger, an eugenics enthusiast, the organization has yet to denounce her. That is because Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics run just as deep as their founder’s — and that evil root, which claims to decide who is worthy to live or to die, exists to this day.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood not serious about disavowing racist history

Posted in Guttmacher, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Buildings, Planned Parenthood racist supporter, Racist Statute with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood and its marketing gurus want you to believe that they have disavowed founder Margaret Sanger for her racist beliefs despite Sanger’s name being prominently linked to its facilities and while continuing to praise her online. The fact is that Planned Parenthood often refers to Margaret Sanger as a “hero” and continues to make light of her racist history as well as her associations with the Ku Klux Klan.

As Live Action News has previously detailed, Margaret Sanger was a proponent of eugenics who spoke to the women’s branch of KKK in 1926. She also created the “Negro Project” where she schemed in her letter penned to Clarence Gamble, to use Black ministers because, she said, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,” and if it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

In a recent post on Medium.com, Planned Parenthood president, Cecile Richards, tried to sound rational when addressing the current climate of racism in America:

This racism didn’t happen on its own — it was built by white people and white people must take action to dismantle it. People of color have led the fight against racism for generations, but we all have a responsibility to tear out the foundations of racism wherever we find it: in ourselves, our communities and our organizations, including Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s prominent image of founder Margaret Sanger

The fact that Cecile Richards conveniently leaves out is that Planned Parenthood’s founder was tied to the eugenics movement which forcefully sterilized many Blacks and minorities. And Planned Parenthood was even a referral agency to some of those eugenics boards, as the film Maafa21 details:

Planned Parenthood Eugenics Board Robert Webber

In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.  But the system did not always run smoothly.  In 1969, when the number of sterilizations approved by the Iowa State Eugenics Board began to drop, the Board was attacked in the press by the executive director of Planned Parenthood Robert Webber.  He said that he was alarmed by the decline in numbers and that the Eugenics Board should expand its approval criteria.

Board chairman Dr. S.M. Korson responded that the Board’s guidelines were already fairly broad.  He pointed out that approvals were routinely given for young girls for no reason other than the Board’s speculation that they might likely one day engage in immoral behavior without the capacity for being wives and mothers.  At that point, Webber publicly scolded the Board and told them that they should either increase the number of sterilizations or quit.

Watch below:

Now, after years of being exposed by conservatives, pro-lifers, and African American activists, Planned Parenthood must be feeling the heat.

If Planned Parenthood wants to address racism in America, why do they continue to refer to their Klan-speaking founder as “a woman of heroic accomplishments” and a “true visionary”?

Margaret Sanger “hero and trailblazer” according to Planned Parenthood

In a piece written to celebrate its 100th anniversary, Planned Parenthood offered more words of praise for Sanger than criticism or denouncements. It reads in part:

Our founder, Margaret Sanger, was a woman of heroic accomplishments, and like all heroes, she was also complex and imperfect.

[…] While she was a woman of heroic accomplishments, Margaret Sanger had some beliefs, practices, and associations that we acknowledge, denounce, and work to rectify today. Her life story provides a portrait that is bold, fascinating, formidable, human, complicated, and flawed.

While they claim to denounce Sanger’s ties to the Klan, Planned Parenthood waffles about the harm it caused, saying that Sanger was simply motivated by a “deeply held compassion for the women and children.” Planned Parenthood will often claim that Sanger was just a product of her time and apparently, according to Planned Parenthood, so was the KKK, calling that racist movement “mainstream”: 

In the 1920’s, the KKK was a mainstream movement and was considered a legitimate anti-immigration organization with a wide membership that included many state and local officials. At that time, it defined its enemies as Blacks, Catholics and Jews. Planned Parenthood today denounces Sanger’s address to the Ku Klux Klan.

Screen grab from Maafa21

And of the eugenics movement, which forcefully sterilized and stigmatized not only Blacks but other minorities like the disabled, criminals, and immigrants, Planned Parenthood writes:

In the early 20th century, eugenics — the “science” of improving society through planned breeding — was a theory accepted by most American scientists and physicians. Eugenics was embraced across the political spectrum, from conservatives to socialists — so much was it embraced that it was taught in universities.

But despite the false claim that the Planned Parenthood founder sought “voluntary” means of population control, Planned Parenthood acknowledged Sanger’s associations with the Eugenics movement, writing:

We denounce her endorsement of the Buck v. Bell decision as well as her involvement with the American eugenics movement and her adherence to some of its principles and values.

Alan Guttmacher receives Margaret Sanger Award, 1972

However, words are one thing and actions are quite another.

While Planned Parenthood wants you to believe that they have repudiated Sanger’s eugenics connections, they continue to honor her.

First, Planned Parenthood has named their most prestigious award after Sanger. It’s called the Margaret Sanger Award and is issued to those who support Planned Parenthood’s mission.

The first award was issued in 1966, and by 1972, Planned Parenthood “honored” Alan Guttmacher, who was president of Planned Parenthood. Guttmacher was also Vice President of the American Eugenics Society.

Second, Planned Parenthood has renamed one of their centers after Margaret Sanger. Keep in mind that this did not happen in the 1940’s, but after the civil rights struggles had taken over the nation’s streets in 1973. According to its history page, Planned Parenthood New York City’s (PPNYC) Manhattan clinical facility merged with the Margaret Sanger Research Bureau and was renamed the Margaret Sanger Center. It relocated to Bleecker Street in 1997.

Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Center in NYC

Currently, the Margaret Sanger Center is listed by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as a “resource.”

In fact, the city of New York has designated the street in front of Planned Parenthood’s facility as “Margaret Sanger Square”, according to a city website, which states, “Sanger’s original Manhattan clinic is landmarked, but it is now a private home (located at 17 West 16th Street) and closed to the public.”

Margaret Sanger Center street

The Preservation Commission documented the building’s “contribution to New York City history.”

In 1989, Planned Parenthood of New York City leased the loft building at 26-30 Bleecker Street, moving its offices there after completing a conversion and major interior renovation in 1990-91. Its parent organization, Planned Parenthood of America […] having been founded in 1939 as the Birth Control Federation of America. Among its forerunners was the country’s first birth-control clinic, opened in Brooklyn in 1916 by Margaret Sanger (1879-1966). In 1952, she helped to form the International Planned Parenthood Federation. The intersection of Bleecker and Mott Streets, in front of the Planned Parenthood of New York City offices, has been renamed “Margaret Sanger Square” in her honor.

But lest you think the New York Center is the only Planned Parenthood facility named after the Klan-speaking eugenicist, think again.

In Tucson, Arizona, Planned Parenthood operates another Margaret Sanger Center and displays a picture of Margaret Sanger on their about us page:

 

 

In addition, several Planned Parenthood affiliates offer Societies named after the eugenicist.

For example, Planned Parenthood of Florida boasts about a  “Margaret Sanger Legacy Society” while Planned Parenthood in Minnesota advertises their own “Margaret Sanger Society” as well.

Planned Parenthood Florida Margaret Sanger Legacy Society

Planned Parenthood Minnesota Margaret Sanger Society

And in Massachusetts, Planned Parenthood published donations they received through their “Margaret Sanger Society” via their annual reports:

Planned Parenthood Mass Margaret Sanger Society

Today, despite the organization’s alleged disdain for Sanger’s eugenics collaborations, Planned Parenthood continues to praise her history online, calling her a “hero” on social media and various websites.

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger on FB

 

Planned Parenthood Action Praises Sanger

Margaret Sanger heroine Planned Parenthood

And just as disturbing, there is a Facebook group operated by a Planned Parenthood affiliate in Iowa, called the Margaret Sanger Action Hour, which “is a weekly gathering for Planned Parenthood volunteers, advocates, and supporters in Central Iowa.” It is operated by Planned Parenthood of the Heartland and currently has 104 members.

So much for repudiations and denouncements, right? 

What Sanger stood for is inexcusable and the public is not fooled by faux denouncements. The truth is, as Live Action News has demonstrated numerous times, Planned Parenthood has embraced Sanger’s eugenic roots because Sanger and Planned Parenthood are cut from the exact same cloth.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Merge ABCL with Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Ku Klux Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

The media seems to be doing an effective job of condemning many people who have an association with the Klu Klux Klan — but one exception to this seems to be Planned Parenthood’s “beloved” founder, Margaret Sanger. Margaret Sanger is usually described as a “birth control pioneer” who founded Planned Parenthood, but she also met with members of the Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.” Sanger wrote about her meeting with the Klan in her autobiography. Yet somehow this fact is made light of, glossed over, or completely ignored by the media.

On page 366 of her autobiography, Sanger described her meeting with the Klan, where she says she received additional invitations to speak with similar groups:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.

What about Sanger’s outspoken support for eugenics?

While some may not be entirely familiar with the meaning of “eugenics,” it’s likely that those same people have seen it in action in various ways. Coined in the mid 1800’s by Francis Galton, the cousin of Charles Darwin, eugenics was a popular movement to create a society in which those who were considered “superior” would reproduce… while those who were deemed “inferior” would be encouraged not to reproduce. Tragically, this movement was credited with forcefully sterilizing many men and women. The targets of these horrendous acts were disproportionately Black and poor, according to many reports.

Screenshot of PP honoring Sanger

Eugenics victim Elaine Riddick speaks in the video below about being “cut up like a hog,” thanks to the philosophy of eugenics. Riddick, like some other Black citizens, was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. Her tearful testimony encouraged state lawmakers to vote for reparations for those like her, who were eugenically sterilized.

So how does this relate to Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger? One of the prominent supporters of that horrific eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, and Gamble was a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

In Margaret Sanger’s “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” the Planned Parenthood founder links the goals of eugenics with her own goals of promoting birth control, writing (emphasis added):

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health. …While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfit… Eugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit….

Sanger called for unfit to be sent to farms (Image credit Maafa21)

Sanger was highly motivated to stop the procreation by those she deemed “unfit.” In a personal letter to Katharine Dexter McCormick in 1950, Sanger called for “a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people.”

But, Sanger added, “Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

In 1932, Sanger also called for those who were poor (and those she considered to be “morons and immoral”) to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called better “moral conduct.”  She specifically wanted to keep “immigration closed to the entrance of certain aliens whose condition is known to be detrimental to the stamina of the race.” (“A Plan for Peace,” by Margaret Sanger, published in Birth Control Review (BCR) April 1932, pp. 107-108)

Sanger was more than just a passive observer where eugenics was concerned; she was a member of the American Eugenics Society and even tried to unite her efforts and her publication with the eugenics movement.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

This image below captures a letter entitled, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” written by Sanger.  It was published in the June 1928 edition of her Birth Control Review and it details her meeting (page 188) with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney was the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society (AES) and Sanger published his writings in the Birth Control Review (BCR).

Of interest is that fact that, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him a letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization.

Margaret Sanger to Merge ABCL with Eugenics

Sanger merge w eugenics

The New York Times recorded Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement as well, in an April 1, 1925, article:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League [ABCL], said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis, rather than a eugenic ideal.

Another example where Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement can be seen is in this ABCL publication from 1935 (below), calling for a resolution that Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later became Planned Parenthood), “unite with the American Eugenics Society.”

Sanger resolution to merge BCR with Eugenics

Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization, as Live Action News has previously documented. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

PP’s Margaret Sanger Award

Since the 1960’s, Planned Parenthood has granted its infamous Margaret Sanger Award (calling it their top award) to people who benefit the organization’s cause.

Probably the most well-known recipient of the Margaret Sanger award in more recent times is Hillary Clinton, who said during her acceptance of the award that she “admired Margaret Sanger.” Republicans called her out for her comments, and Clinton responded by making disparaging remarks about Thomas Jefferson instead of repudiating Sanger’s push to eradicate the “unfit.” In the video below, Clinton pays homage to Sanger:

In 2014, then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accepted the Margaret Sanger award, despite Sanger’s clear support for a hideous eugenic philosophy and associations with the Klan. Pelosi referred to the largest abortion corporation in the nation as an “outstanding organization,” suggesting that Sanger’s philosophy paved the ideology behind Planned Parenthood: “Out of this philosophy and outlook emerged the spirit and driving force of what would become known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.” Pelosi added, “To be associated with the great Margaret Sanger is a distinct privilege.”

Nancy Pelosi gets award named after Klan speaker, Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood

In 2004, the founder of CNN, Ted Turner, received the Margaret Sanger Award. The “honor” was mentioned in Planned Parenthood’s 2004 annual report:

2004 Margaret Sanger award to CNN Founder Ted Turner

Today, Planned Parenthood will defend their founder by pointing to civil rights giants like Martin Luther King, Jr., who also received the Margaret Sanger award. But the full picture and agenda of Sanger and her Planned Parenthood organization were not obvious to many in the Black community at that time, including MLK.

However, despite the suspicious timing of the award to MLK, many Black leaders have since spoken against the birth control and family planning agenda of Planned Parenthood, even calling abortion a form of “black genocide.”

Given this information and much more, when will the media demand recipients of this hideous award return it to Planned Parenthood? And, even more important, when will Congress cut ties with Planned Parenthood and stop sending them half a billion in tax dollars every year?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood prez admits receiving racist donations others confirm abortion for genocide

Posted in Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 24, 2014 by saynsumthn

A family planning advocate admitted that some view abortion for black genocide. The head of the National Family Planning Forum, Russell Richardson, told a population control convention in 1973 that a “small group” of family planning counselors advocate GENOCIDE for blacks:

Russell Richardson

_________________________________________________________________________________________

guttmachrDuring a speech in Philadelphia in January of 1966, Planned Parenthood President, Alan Guttmacher, stated that some of his colleagues appeared to have racial motives for their involvement with the organization. Not surprisingly, one of Guttmacher’s acquaintances later warned him that, in the future, he should not be making comments like that in public. The person who gave that warning obviously understood that Planned Parenthood’s racial agendas and attitudes are best kept out of the public. And that has been a philosophy that Planned Parenthood has embraced for many years.

_____________________________________________________________________
In 2007, a team of college students from California decided to find out what Planned Parenthood would say to someone who wanted to donate money to the organization for purely racial reasons. The following clips are from the actual recordings of those conversations.

Partial transcripts from Ohio and Idaho calls to Planned Parenthood Development offices:

Ohio Representative: Lisa Hutton, Administrative Assistant

Ohio Donor: There’s definitely way too many Black people in Ohio, so I am just trying to do my part.

PP Rep: OK, whatever.

Ohio Donor: Well, Blacks especially need abortions, so that’s what I’m trying to do.

PP Rep: For whatever reason, we’ll accept the money.

Ohio Donor: OK. Great, thank you.

Idaho Representative: Autumn Kersey, Director of Development

Idaho Donor: The abortion—I can give money specifically for a black baby, that would be the purpose?

PP Rep: Absolutely. If you wanted to designate that your gift be used to help an African-American woman in need, then we would certainly make sure that the gift was earmarked for that purpose.

Idaho Donor: Great, because I really faced trouble with affirmative action, and I don’t want my kids to be disadvantaged against black kids. I just had a baby; I want to put it in his name.

PP Rep: Yes, absolutely.

Idaho Donor: And we don’t, you know we just think, the less black kids out there the better.

PP Rep: Understandable, understandable.

Idaho Donor: Right. I want to protect my son, so he can get into college

PP Rep: Alright. Excuse my hesitation, this is the first time I’ve had a donor call and make this kind of request, so I’m excited, and want to make sure I don’t leave anything out.

Wattleton

_________________________________________________________________________

When this material was released to the public, Planned Parenthood’s defense was to claim that the employees who made these statements were not reflecting Planned Parenthood’s corporate policy. But in 1986, Planned Parenthood’s national president, Faye Wattleton, said the following during an interview on CNN.

Faye Wattleton, former president of Planned Parenthood said, “ As a matter of fact Mr. Dornan, if I may finish, we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all black women to stop having children.”

Go to .50 in this section from the documentary film Maafa21

Pro-abortion computer game to encourage Mexican women to abort themselves

Posted in Eugenics, Frederick OSborn, Guttmacher, Hispanic, IPAS, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood and Hispanics, Planned Parenthood racist supporter, Population Council with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 4, 2012 by saynsumthn

notebaja

Abortion Game Encourages Women to self abort.

¿No Te Baja? which translates as Missed Your Period? is a “Choose Your Own Adventure”-style game that schools Mexican Women on how to terminate a pregnancy using Misoprostol or other abortion pills. Abortion is illegal in parts of Mexico.

According to the radically pro-abortion RH Reality Check, No Te Baja is thorough, relateable, and easy to use:
Users of No Te Baja, through the actions of Claudia and her boyfriend, go through each detailed step of the process of self-administering a medication abortion: from the initial pregnancy test to the decision whether or not to involve the partner; the signs and symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy to calculating gestational age to indicate whether or not use of Misoprostol will be effective-and if it will be safe to self-administer.
The game advises that Misoprostol can be purchased in most pharmacies and that it may be sold under various other commercial names including Cytotec, Cyrox, and Tomispral. Users receive detailed information on how to administer Misoprostol through the mouth or the vagina, noting that, in the event of having to seek medical attention, medical personnel would likely be able to detect the remnants of the pills inside the vagina- important information for women living in areas where they can be prosecuted for inducing an abortion.

notebaja ipas

The computer game designed by Ipas Mexico . According to IPAS:

The game, When prevention fails: How to terminate a pregnancy with drugs, is available only in Spanish and presents the story of Claudia and Pedro, a young couple facing an unwanted pregnancy. Through their narrative, the game poses questions that lead users to information about pregnancy identification, estimating gestational age, and pregnancy options including the use of misoprostol for abortion. This interactive tool was developed by and for young people and caters to the preference youth often have for confidential and private information related to sexuality and pregnancy.

“We had guidance material about medical abortion that was geared toward health-care workers, but we still needed material for youth that explained in non-technical terms how to use misoprostol,” explains Maria Elena Collado, Ipas Mexico community access associate. “This is why we decided to use new technologies to develop information specifically for and with young people.” Ipas has disseminated the game as a CD-ROM.

While first-trimester abortion has been legal in Mexico City since April 2007, it is still highly restricted in the country’s 31 states, putting young women between 15 and 29 years of age—who comprise the largest age group seeking abortion services—at increased risk of unsafe abortion. Misoprostol is widely available in pharmacies across Mexico, and women know it can be used to safely terminate a pregnancy, but many pharmacy workers lack knowledge of the correct dosing regimens and don’t have the time or skills to advise women on how to use the drug correctly. Without a source of reliable information, women are in danger of buying the wrong pills (counterfeit pills are widespread), taking the wrong dose, or not knowing when to seek medical assistance or follow-up care.

How the “Game” works:

As users answer questions, they are prompted with further questions and led through various scenarios depending on their decisions at each juncture. First, the game helps women identify their stage of pregnancy. If they are nine weeks pregnant or less, then they are able to choose between options including medical abortion and other pregnancy termination services. If a woman chooses medical abortion, she is then provided accurate dosage information and instructions on how to use misoprostol.

IPAS’s board is made up of a Hodge podge of left-wing pro-abortion minded people including Deborah De Witt who is a member of the board of directors for the Guttmacher Institute , the research arm of Planned Parenthood. Jemima Dennis-Antwi, also on the board, serves as technical adviser for the Population Council.

Alan Guttmacher , who was also a Vice President for the American Eugenics Society, VP of Planned Parenthood and President and Founder of the Guttmacher Institute said this in 1967- “… I would abort mothers already carrying three or more children…I would abort women who desire abortion who are drug addicts or severe alcoholics…I would abort women with sub-normal mentality incapable of providing satisfactory parental care…”
(Source; “Abortion: The Issues”, Dr. Alan Guttmacher – President, Planned Parenthood, December 4, 1967, Harvard Law School Forum)

In 1969, Alan Guttmacher as then President of Planned Parenthood-World Population, said this: “ I would like to give our voluntary means of population control full opportunity in the next 10 to 12 years. Then , if these don’t succeed, we may have to go into some kind of coercion, not worldwide, but possibly in such places as India, Pakistan, and Indonesia, where pressures are the greatest…There is no question that birth rates can be reduced all over the world if legal abortion is introduced…” ( SOURCE: Family Planning: The needa and the Methods, by: Alan F. Guttmacher; The American Journal of Nursing, Vol. 69, No. 6. (June, 1969) PP. 1229-1234)

And in February of 1970 Alan Guttmacher was interviewed by the Baltimore Magazine and said this
“ Our birth rate has come down since we last talked.. I think we’ve hit a plateau- the figure’s not likely to drop much more unless there is more legal abortion. , or abortion on request as we call it…My own feeling is that we’ve got to pull out all the stops and involve the United Nations…If you’re going to curb population, it’s extremely important not to have it done by the dammed Yankees, but by the UN. Because the thing is, then it’s not considered genocide. If the United States goes to the Black man or the yellow man and says slow down your reproduction rate, we’re immediately suspected of having ulterior motives to keep the white man dominant in the world. If you can send in a colorful UN force, you’ve got much better leverage.

Read More here: WE’VE BEEN GUTTMACHER’d! A look at how Planned Parenthood’s research arm is soaked in Eugenics

The Population Council, was founded by Frederic Osborn who was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society In 1969, the Population Council’s President, Bernard Berelson, published an article suggesting that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods.

READ: Planned Parenthood and Pathfinder – two eugenics organizations pushing for global abortions

Racist Planned Parenthood supporter calls Black protesters the N Word

Posted in Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2012 by saynsumthn

Black Pro-Lifers Stand Up to Pro-Abortion “War on Women” Rally
8/21/12

The huge pro-abortion rally that was supposed to bring tens of thousands of abortion advocates to Washington to stand up to the supposed “War on Women” pro-life groups, Republicans and Mitt Romney are supposedly waging on women didn’t materialize.

However, pro-life advocates stood their ground in a counter protest against the hardcore abortion backers who did show up.

The pro-abortion community was stunned by the presence of African American pro-life prayer supporters. Pro-life leaders on the ground were encouraged by the gathering of prayerful prolife supporters who wore t-shirts announcing the injustice of the death of Tonya Reaves; a Black woman who was killed in a botched abortion recently at a Chicago Planned Parenthood.

In contrast to the National March for Life which is held every January to lament the passage of Roe vs Wade and the court decision that made the killing of over 50 million unborn babies legal; the “We are Women” effort drew around 600 participants, where the March for Life draws hundreds of thousands of marchers every year. As a group of peaceful prayer supporters wearing prolife t-shirts circulated among the pro-abortion camp, one Planned Parenthood supporter shouted out in protest, calling one of the African American men praying for life a “ni-g-r.” The prayer team was undaunted and continued to speak the truth and pray in love, according to pro-lifers from Priests for Life.

Read Rest at Life News

Recently- Racist abortion doctor and DEMOCRAT SUPPORTER Ashutosh Ron Virmani told pro-lifers they should “Adopt those UGLY BLACK BABIES”

Planned Parenthood still has not explained how they allowed 24 Year-Old African American women, Tonya Reaves to bleed to death for over 5 hours after her abortion at their Chicago Abortion clinic.

Planned Parenthood is known for their racist foundings and many within the Black Pro-life movement are speaking out against them

Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger, was a member in good standing with the racist American Eugenics Society. Sanger had board members who were known for their racist writing and Sanger published many of those in her publications. Sanger called for parents to have a QUOTE: LICENSE TO BREED controlled by people who believed in her eugenic philosophy. She wanted all would be parents to go before her eugenic boards to request a “PERMIT TO BREED“.

Margaret Sanger once said, “More children from the fit, less from the unfit — that is the chief aim of birth control.” Birth Control Review, May 1919, p. 12

In Margaret Sanger’s, “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” Feb 1919. Birth Control Review , Library of Congress Microfilm 131:0099B .
Sanger states, “Before eugenists and others who are laboring for racial betterment can succeed, they must first clear the way for Birth Control. Like the advocates of Birth Control, the eugenists, for instance, are seeking to assist the race toward the elimination of the unfit. Both are seeking a single end but they lay emphasis upon different methods.

Eugenists emphasize the mating of healthy couples for the conscious purpose of producing healthy children, the sterilization of the unfit to prevent their populating the world with their kind and they may, perhaps, agree with us that contraception is a necessary measure among the masses of the workers, where wages do not keep pace with the growth of the family and its necessities in the way of food, clothing, housing, medical attention, education and the like.

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health.While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfitEugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit…

Sanger also called for those who were poor and what she considered to be “morons and immoral‘ , to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called, “Better moral conduct”.

I consider that the world and almost our civilization for the next twenty-five years, is going to depend upon a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people. Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.
Planned Parenthood Founder, Margaret Sanger, 1950

In addition, Planned Parenthood’s top award is called the Margaret Sanger Award, despite the fact that Sanger was an admitted Klan speaker. This is what Sanger wrote in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366 Read it here http://library.lifedynamics.com//Autobiography/Chapter%2029.pdf)

Who are the UNFIT which Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger was talking about? Find out in the powerful documentary Maafa21 in exposing the 21st Century Black Genocide (Clip below)


The Eugenics links to Sanger and Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood invites the Director of the American Eugenics Society to speak at it’s luncheon. Robert C. Cook was invited to speak at the meeting. The meeting was held to discuss the objectives of Planned Parenthood…but…don’t take my word for it: Read the article yourself here:

(Source:Schenectady Gazette – Oct 20, 1958)

Professor Henry P. Fairchild: Former Past President of the American Eugenics Society was also a Vice President of Planned Parenthood….but…don’t take my word for it: Read the article yourself – here
( SOURCE: Schenectady Gazette – Dec 5, 1951)

Vice Chairman of the American Birth Control League brags that birth control was accepted by the “most distinguished” of the Eugenics Society- here
(SOURCE: The Miami News – Nov 21, 1921)

(LBJ) Lyndon B. Johnson accepts the Margaret Sanger Award and it is mentioned that Dwight D. Eisenhower and Harry S. Truman are co-chairs of a Planned Parenthood honorary council- here
( SOURCE: Lodi News-Sentinel – Oct 10, 1966)

1947- Margaret Sanger says that women should stop having babies because there won’t be enough food to feed them otherwise. ( Have we heard that recently?) well -that was in 1947 and women continued to pro-create…did we all starve? Just checking?
Read article here

(SOURCE: The Evening Independent – Jul 2, 1947)

NAACP – accused Planned Parenthood clinics of “genocide’ – here
( SOURCE: The Pittsburgh Press – Dec 14, 1967)

And here

There is some suspicion in a New England black community surveyed that family planning programs are forms of black genocide, a team of researchers from the University of Massachusetts found. (SOURCE: Genocide Fears of Blacks Found in Birth Plan Study 4/11/1971)

Margaret Sanger helped Bermuda set up birth control clinics when they discovered there was a huge increase in the Negro Population – ( Times Daily – Jun 16, 1937) here

Margaret Sanger concerned that the Well-to-do is using Birth Control while the “feeble minded” are not. She urges that birth control gets legalized so that these “unskilled” , “sub-normal” and “feeble minded” will not out-number the “intellectuals” (The Pittsburgh Press – Dec 30, 1928) Here

In 1962, Vice President of the American Eugenics Society at the time, Dr. Alan Guttmacher wants abortion laws patterned after Sweden and other nations. One reason they list to allow abortions is :EUGENIC ! Also- Guttmacher at this point says he does NOT BELIEVE that abortion should be left up to the patient or their doctor, rather it should be up to “Special Board” to approve the abortion. (Eugenic Board, perhaps?) ( The Miami News – Aug 12, 1962) Read Here ( Alan Guttmacher is a former Vice President of The American Eugenics Society and a Former President of Planned Parenthood)

For more on Margaret Sanger and Planned Parenthood’s attitude toward eugenics and race- watch Maafa21