Archive for the NAACP Category

These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Jesse Jackson, NAACP, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Samuel Yette with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action screened the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Image: Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

Image: article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Omage: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

 

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

 

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

 

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

Article on abortion (Pamela Carr and Faye Wattleton) published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

 

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Blacks protest NAACP over abortion say every child has a right to life

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Pastor, Clenard Childress, NAACP with tags , , , , , on August 28, 2015 by saynsumthn

NAACP asked if evil done to Blacks (Confederate Flag) or by Black leaders (thru Abortion Ailence) is worse

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Pastor, Clenard Childress, NAACP with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 20, 2015 by saynsumthn

REPUBLISHED FROM LIFE DYNAMICS BLOG

GuestClenard Childress Black abortion NAACP COnfederate Flag

Black leaders protested outside the NAACP conference in Philadelphia decrying the group’s refusal to speak out against abortion which kills a majority of Blacks.

Clenard CHildress

Rev. Clenard Childress, Jr. director of the largest Black pro-life organization the country, LEARN, told Life Dynamics that his “All Black Life” project visited the NAACP convention for days with a team of African Americans holding signs relating to Black Genocide.

Ab Savage act of violence 2912951881766_n

He said that the group’s basic message at the NAACP event was that, “ALL Black Life Matters.”

“It is a gross injustice of the NAACP board and members to ignore the genocide of the African American community and the health ramifications that are resulting from abortions upon African American women,” he said.

Childress also spoke to OneNewsNow from the convention calling the NAACP hypocritical for not speaking out against Black Genocide form abortion.

Right now I think the African-American community is quite hypocritical and short-sighted when it comes to being in an uproar about the Confederate flag and totally ignore the 1,786 African-American children who are killed each day in the womb,” he told the media outlet.

A controversial sign that Rev. Chilidress and his group showed to the 3,000- 5,000 attendees the 106th Annual NAACP Convention, was the image of a Confederate Flag alongside a dead aborted child.

Guest11707901_10204675926557557_5867172324804053705_o

Under the flag were the words: “Evil done to us?”

The words under the aborted baby were: “Evil done by us?

Black confederate flag abortion 791718708639_n

The imagery was powerful,” wrote one columnist who spoke to Childress after the event.

Rev. Childress said that the sign hit home and most of the delegates the group talked to, “were connecting the dots and the conversations were extremely fruitful.”

They stared at the signs for a while and walked off shaking their head but saying , that’s right, that’s right, its wrong,” he stated.

This connects the dots better than the others,” he pointed out.

In addition to the Confederate sign, another sign held by the Black pro-life group read: Abortion Suppresses the Black Vote.

Abortion Surpresses the Black vote 1800222921023362_n

Others addressed the recent killings of Black men by police showing the barbaric way Black babies are butchered inside the womb by abortion doctors.

Abortion Surpresses the Black Vote 73028160483091916_n

A person believed we were from the NAACP,” Rev. Childress reported.

He walked up to us and said, ” well brother you voted for this didn’t you? When you voted for Obama you voted for abortion,” he added.

“We then got into a great discussion and I was able to tell them who we were.”

I Cant Breathe 87898772904711_n

The most popular sign was the confederate sign, everyone stopped to talk and look at the comparison,” Childress stated.

“One person was so frustrated that he had no retort to the sign he said well you might as well put the American flag up there also cause its happening not under the confederate flag but the American flag.Yes, I said, but this flag stands for liberty and justice for all… We refuse to apply it to everyone..,” he said.

Childress said that in addition to holding the signs, they handed NAACP members hundreds of copies the documentary film, Maafa21.

Maafa21 Logo 2

The film, which features the Black leader, details the eugenics agenda of abortion by diving back into the history of Planned Parenthood and their racist founder, Margaret Sanger.

Fully titled, Maafa21 Black Genocide in 21st Century America, and has been screened hundreds of time in public venues nationwide and can be viewed online here.

In addition to Maafa21, Life Dynamics has published a brochure challenging the NAACP’s silence in the abortion related death of a Black women.

Tonya Reaves brochure small

Life Dynamics contents that 24-year-old Tonya Reaves was murdered after Planned Parenthood doctors left her bleeding inside their Chicago abortion facility in July of 2009.

When the leadership of the NAACP decided to look the other way at the killing of Tonya Reaves, they totally shredded whatever credibility they had left,” the Life Dynamics brochure reads.

NAACP Prochoice statement

All together Rev. Childress said their group handed out over 6,500 pieces of material exposing abortion and Black Genocide over the three days.

Rev. Childress sent Life Dynamics a few of the reactions he received from various NAACP members:

    I am going to bring this display to my city.
    You have opened my mind to the facts we will have to talk more once I get back home.
    I never looked at abortion this way before, I am from Detroit and all people ever say is that there are too many Black babies. Children having children but a heart is beating at 18 days?
    ( weeping) I am a minister and it happened a long time ago< I never resolved this in my heart till today, I feel free, thank you for praying and speaking with me
    Are those statistic accurate, that cant be true.

When we begin to really look at the facts, we’ll recognize that our leadership is more about their own power and their own political progress than they are the plight of African-Americans,” Childress said.

Cecile Richards tries to link racist founded Planned Parenthood with NAACP and civil rights movement

Posted in Cecile Richards, NAACP, Planned Parenthood and NAACP with tags , , , , , , , , , on July 7, 2015 by saynsumthn

Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America spoke at a post press conference at the 2015 HKonJ.

Planned Parenthood was founded by Margaret Sanger an avowed racist member of the American Eugenics Society who gave Klan speeches.

Planned Parenthood has NEVER denounced Sanger or her racist views.

The NAACP, on the other hand, has had a cozy relationship with Planned Parenthood lately, even contributing to their Maryland office, although this was not always the case.

NAACP 2012 Planned Parenthood 25K

Sadly, the NAACP and their North Carolina HKonJ leader, the Rev. William Barber support the abortion giant despite their history of racist eugenics.

Cecile Richards NAACP 2015

Richards began by thanking Rev. Barber, who has been granted awards from Planned Parenthood, for,”Preaching to us this morning- Taking us to church.”

The eugenics founded organization’s prez then thanks the NAACP, “Because our history at Planned Parenthood – we go back 99 years. And a lot of it started with some the same struggles. I mean Planned Parenthood was started because women were dying – we didn’t have a right to plan our own families. A right to health care if they need it. So, I feel that our links with the NAACP with the civil rights movement go back a long way,” she said.

She then quotes Martin Luther King, “An injustice to one is an injustice to all,” the organization that admittedly murders over 300K unborn babies in the womb as well as some of their mothers said.

Richards, is quite eloquent at rewriting history, but, thankfully, the real agenda and motivation behind the founding of Planned Parenthood has been thoroughly documented and the word RACISM and EUGENICS comes to mind when you investigate it. Just watch the film, Maafa21, available for free at www.maafa21.com for all the proof you will need.

While NAACP defends Rachel Dolezal they ignored death of real Black woman

Posted in Black Women, NAACP, Planned Parenthood and NAACP, Planned Parenthood death of patient with tags , , , , , , , , , , on June 17, 2015 by saynsumthn

In all the hoopla over now Ex-NAACP leader Rachel Dolezal’s weird obsession and alleged identify as black – it seems that the NAACP has more problems protecting real Black men and women.

Ryan_Scott_Bomberger_2 My BLACK friend Ryan Bomberger writes:

    Fresh off a stinging courtroom defeat, the national NAACP leadership reveals how little it considers its legacy. They sued an actual black (biracial) man for “harming” its reputation for accurately calling them out on their radical support for abortion. But a white woman pretending to be black, who generated hate and bitterness over false “hate crimes” reports, who stole a full scholarship meant for an actual black American, who pretended to be a mother, who pretended to have a black father, who lied about nearly everything about herself was worth an immediate defense by the NAACP. According to their press release: “The NAACP Alaska-Oregon-Washington State Conference stands behind Ms. Dolezal’s advocacy record.”

I blog more about the NAACP’s lawsuit against Ryan here.

Rachel Dolezal NAACP TOnya Reaves

Now, the group Life Dynamics has published a post about how the NAACP has ignored the death of a REAL BLACK WOMAN, which I am republishing below!

MURDERED is what the front cover states and inside the death of a young Black woman is detailed. So, why has the NAACP remained silent on her death?

Her name was Tonya Reaves:

Tonya Reaves from Brochure

July 20, 2012 …

    24-year-old Tonya Reaves walks into to a Planned Parenthood facility in Chicago for an abortion.

    During the procedure, the abortionist rips a hole in her uterus and she begins to bleed out.

    More than five hours later, an ambulance is called – but it was too late.

    Later, an autopsy finds that Tonya had lost approximately one-third of the blood in her body.

It is not unusual for a woman’s uterus to be torn during an abortion.

However, these injuries are not always fatal and, in this case, if emergency treatment had not been withheld for more than five hours, it is almost certain that Tonya could have survived.

But the staff at this Planned Parenthood abortion clinic knew that it is bad public relations for one of their customers to be wheeled out on a stretcher.

So they [Planned Parenthood] let her bleed to death.

Why is NAACP In bed with Planned Parenthood

A Scandal of Silence

When the leadership of the NAACP decided to look the other way at the killing of Tonya Reaves, they totally shredded whatever credibility they had left.

These people can complain all they want about the growing view that they are irrelevant, but the truth is … that is the reputation they earned.

For years, they have been both a political and financial accomplice of Planned Parenthood – despite knowing that this multi-national corporation has a well-documented eugenic and genocidal plan to control the U.S. Black population.

pp-gives-to-naacp-2012-lg

The fact is, the NAACP is owned by this corrupt organization and that is why they are willing to help them sweep this young woman’s dead body under the rug.

A Cold Reality NAACP


We Cannot Let Them Get Away With This

Planned Parenthood would like for us to just blow-off the killing of Tonya Reaves like it was an accident or medical malpractice.

It was neither.

The fact is, this killing fits perfectly within the scope of an Illinois law called:

“Depraved Indifference Murder”

If Tonya had been killed by the Klan, we would be in the streets demanding justice.

She doesn’t deserve less just because she was killed by Planned Parenthood.

Call the NAACP and make it clear that you expect them to start pushing the authorities in Illinois to launch a criminal investigation into this young woman’s death.

NAACP Baltimore Headquarters

Call today and call often!

NAACP National Headquarters
Baltimore, Maryland
(410) 580-5777

Learn more about BLACK GENOCIDE in modern America at

Maafa21.com or KlanParenthood.com

Tell others by sharing this blog post and passing out the Tonya Reaves brochure.

TonyaReavesMurder Cover

Order here.

End Life Dynamics.

My readers might be interested to know just how many political cronies the Planned Parenthood center where Tonya Reaves was left bleeding had.

Read that eye-opening report here.

NAACP lawsuit against pro-life group followed one against LDF

Posted in NAACP with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 23, 2015 by saynsumthn

This week, the NAACP lost a trademark infringement lawsuit against a community organization which used the NAACP’s acronym in a parody to describe their support for abortion and Planned Parenthood.

The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) lawsuit was filed after The Radiance Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to educating people about social issues from a Christian perspective and co-founded by Ryan Bomberger, published an article at the website LifeNews.com online entitled “NAACP: National Association for the Abortion of Colored People” which criticized the NAACP’s stance on abortion.

Life News Ryan NAACP story

Apparently, to the NAACP, using their acronym in political satire rises to the level of trademark infringement.

Ryan_Scott_Bomberger_2

This lawsuit should be shocking to any American who values truth and the First Amendment,” said Bomberger at the time the lawsuit was filed.

The irony is painful. The NAACP is suing me—a black man—for exercising my Constitutionally-guaranteed right to free speech.

But, Bomberger did not stand alone in being on the receiving end of an NAACP trademark infringement lawsuit.

You might be interested to know, that the NAACP once sued their sister organization under the same claim of trademark infringement.

In 1985, The NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Inc., won a court case against the National Association for Colored People (NAACP) for trademark infringement, according to a Federal Court of Appeals. The case overruled the decision of a federal judge in 1983.

The court found that the NAACP began the Legal Defense Fund using the initials NAACP since 1939 but the organization had become too dependent over the years. That was where they went wrong.

NAACP trademark NAACP legal

Apparently, the NAACP created a monster and when tensions emerged in the 1960’s they went to court, charging their own created wing of trademark infringement.

As they always say, follow the money and what the NAACP said the Defense Fund did was infringe on their fund-raising.

The United States Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit reversed a District Court decision and ruled that the two organizations, like quarreling family members, must continue to share the NAACP initials with which they were born. The suit was later dismissed.

RadianceFoundation

Anyone see a pattern here?

Thankfully, in the Radiance Foundation case, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals found that the NAACP did not have actionable claims for trademark infringement and Radiance’s use of the NAACP’s marks to criticize their abortion support falls squarely within the exceptions to trademark dilution specifically included in the Lanham Act to avoid encroaching on free speech rights.

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In the context of trademark infringement, the Lanham Act’s purpose, as noted, is to protect consumers from misleading uses of marks by competitors,” the decision states.

The decision also points out that a trademark “only gives the right to prohibit the use of it so far as to protect the owner’s good will against the sale of another’s product as his.

NAACP had held that because Radiance had a donate button on their website they were using the image for goods and services.

But, the appeals court wrote, “When the “use of the trademark does not imply sponsorship or endorsement of the product because the mark is used only to describe the thing, rather than to identify its source,” restricting speech does not serve the purpose of the Lanham Act.

“Indeed, criticism or parody of a mark holder would be difficult indeed without using the mark. Trademark protections exist neither to allow companies to protect themselves from criticism nor to permit them to “control language.”

Black pro-lifer wins lawsuit against NAACP over abortion support

Posted in NAACP, Ryan Bomberger with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 22, 2015 by saynsumthn

REPUBLISHING from the Life Dynamics Blog –

An appeals court has ruled in favor of a Black pro-life organization which parodied the NAACP to expose their stance on abortion.

WE WIN!!!!” those are the words of Ryan Bomberger founder of the Radiance Foundation regarding his free speech lawsuit filed by the NAACP.

Ryan Bomberger wins NAACP lawsuit

4th Circuit Court of Appeals rules, unanimously, in our favor! This is a huge win for the First Amendment. The NAACP tried to crush our right to free speech but truth and justice prevailed,” Bomberger posted today.

The lawsuit, initially filed by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, better known by its acronym “NAACP” against Bomberger began after The Radiance Foundation, an organization Bomberger co-founded, published an article online entitled “NAACP: National Association for the Abortion of Colored People” which criticized the NAACP’s stance on abortion.

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The Radiance Foundation is a nonprofit organization focused on educating and influencing the public about issues impacting society. Radiance addresses social issues from a Christian perspective. It uses as its platform two websites, TheRadianceFoundation.org and TooManyAborted.com, where it posts articles on topics such as race relations, diversity, fatherlessness, and the impact of abortion on the black community.

The article, “NAACP: National Association for the Abortion of Colored People,” was posted by Radiance, and then picked up by Life News, exposing the NAACP’s ties to Planned Parenthood.

Shortly after the NAACP began to receive criticism for its position on abortion.

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Though the NAACP has often claimed to be neutral on abortion, Radiance maintains that the NAACP’s actions actually demonstrate support for the practice.

According to Life News, following the piece, the NAACP sent Bomberger, the Chief Creative Officer of the Radiance Foundation, and LifeNews a threatening letter claiming infringement on its name and logo for including it in the opinion column.

The letter, accused Bomberger and the Radiance Foundation, of “trademark infringement” and stated that while “you are certainly entitled to express your viewpoint, you cannot do so in connection with a name that infringes on the NAACP’s rights.

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A court then ruled that The Radiance Foundation engaged in trademark infringement after doing nothing more than posting an article online that parodied the NAACP’s name.

The Radiance Foundation, represented by Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) , then filed a declaratory judgment action in federal court, and in return, the NAACP filed counter-claims of “trademark infringement, dilution and confusion” for parodying the organization’s name in what the group describes as, “the NAACP’s documented pro-abortion position and actions.”

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After a bench trial, the district court found for the NAACP on all counterclaims and denied declaratory relief to Radiance. The district court issued a permanent injunction “against any use [by Radiance] of ‘National Association for the Abortion of Colored People’ that creates a likelihood of confusion or dilution. However, it declined to award any damages or attorney’s fees, as it found the NAACP had failed to make the case that they were warranted.

In the latest decision, the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals found that the NAACP does not have actionable claims for trademark infringement here, and Radiance’s use of the NAACP’s marks falls squarely within the exceptions to trademark dilution specifically included in the Lanham Act to avoid encroaching on free speech rights.

In the context of trademark infringement, the Lanham Act’s purpose, as noted, is to protect consumers from misleading uses of marks by competitors,” the decision states.

The decision also points out that a trademark “only gives the right to prohibit the use of it so far as to protect the owner’s good
will against the sale of another’s product as his.

NAACP had held that because Radiance had a donate button on their website they were using the image for goods and services.

But, the appeals court wrote, “When the “use of the trademark does not imply sponsorship or endorsement of the product because the mark is used only to describe the thing, rather than to identify its source,” restricting speech does not serve the purpose of the Lanham Act.

“Indeed, criticism or parody of a mark holder would be difficult indeed without using the mark. Trademark protections exist neither to allow companies to protect themselves from criticism nor to permit them to “control language.”

Get a free prolife pin

In finding that Radiance’s use of the NAACP’s marks was “in connection with” goods or services, the appeals court ruled that the district court erred in several respects, pointing out that Radiance used the NAACP’s marks only in the title and body of an article criticizing the NAACP.

The Appeals Court Wrote:

    Although present on the article page, the Donate button was off to the side and did not itself use the NAACP’s marks in any way. The billboard campaign was displayed on a different page altogether. A visitor likely would not perceive the use of the NAACP’s marks in the article as being in connection with those transactional components of the website. It is important not to lose perspective. The article was just one piece of each Radiance website’s content, which was comprised of articles, videos, and multimedia advocacy materials. That the protected marks appear somewhere in the content of a website that includes transactional components is not alone enough to satisfy the “in connection with” element. To say it was would come too close to an absolute rule that any social issues commentary with any transactional component in the neighborhood enhanced the commentator’s risk of Lanham Act liability.

The court addressed the issue of “confusion” that the Radiance parody of the NAACP caused as one over policy and not over goods, when it wrote, “trademark infringement is not designed to protect mark holders from consumer confusion about their positions on political or social issues. The evidence of “actual confusion” relied on by the district court consisted of phone calls to the NAACP by people who took issue with the NAACP supporting abortion. “[I]ndignation is not confusion,” at least not as pertains to trademark infringement, and at best the calls demonstrated confusion as to the NAACP’s policy positions rather than any good or service. Policy stances are neither goods nor services, though the means of conveying them may be.

The appeals court continued, “it is not immediately apparent how someone would confuse an article which is strongly critical of an organization with the organization itself. The mark in this case was used primarily to identify the NAACP as the object of Radiance’s criticism, resembling a descriptive or nominative fair use albeit by employing a modified version of the name.

As for the free speech aspects of Radiance’s parody of the NAACP the court writes:

    Whatever the label affixed to the article, Radiance’s twist on the famous moniker follows in the same vein as articles that refer to the NRA as the “National Republican Association” or the ACLU as the “Anti-Christian Lawyers Union.”

    Radiance’s ploy was nonetheless effective at conveying sharply what it was that Radiance wished to say. The implications for the likelihood of confusion factors are thus obvious: parody or satire or critical opinion generally may be more effective if the mark is strong and the satirical or critical version is similar to the original. The critical message conveyed by the satirical mark itself and in the commentary that follows ensures that no confusion about the source of the commentary will last, if in fact it is generated at all.

    In this case, the title related to and conveyed the subject of the article: the NAACP and Radiance’s views of its alleged stance on abortion. The use of the satirical modification of the true NAACP name was designed, as many titles are, to be eye-catching and provocative in a manner that induces the reader to continue on. We cannot find that use of the NAACP marks in the title of the Radiance article created a likelihood of confusion as to the piece’s authorship or affiliation.

The court then ruled in favor of Radiance writing, “In sum, and for the aforementioned reasons, the plaintiff’s expression in no way infringed upon or diluted defendant’s trademark rights. We hereby vacate the district court’s injunction and remand with directions that the defendant’s Lanham Act counterclaims be dismissed.”

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Ryan Bomberger says that now that the legal wranglings are over, he plans to continue to call the NAACP out on their stance regarding abortion.

“What an upside down world,” Ryan Bomberger told Life Dynamics in response to the decision.

In 2015 it’s radical to believe that every human life has purpose, and that we’re all equal. Along the way, the NAACP stopped believing this which would explain why they would spend over half a million suing us for accurately parodying their name: The National Association for the Abortion of Colored People. The U.S. 4th Circuit stopped that assault of the First Amendment and ruled in our favor. Not only will we continue to parody the NAACP’s name, we’ll continue relentlessly calling them out for supporting the violence of abortion and (the abject failure of) liberalism.”

Read the decision here.

We are incredibly grateful to ADF and our attorney, Chuck Allen, for defending what the NAACP claims to protect: our most basic civil rights,” Bomberger added.

In the documentary film, Maafa21, Life Dynamics also discusses the NAACP’s attitudes on abortion detailing how the organization tried to hide and prevent their convention goers from hearing about the abortion connection to black genocide.

One witness interviewed in the film states that ironically, the NAACP even went to the extent of using buses to block their demonstrations about black genocide in front of Cobal Hall.

Watch Maafa21 here.