Archive for the Margaret Sanger and Klan Category

Margaret Sanger’s statue at the Smithsonian Institute is ‘a slap in the face to Black folks’

Posted in Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger Statue with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2017 by saynsumthn

|  From Live Action News

The controversy around the removal of statues that portray racist historical figures fail to spotlight Margaret Sanger, whose bust is in the Smithsonian and whose name is displayed on a Planned Parenthood building. Sanger was a proponent of eugenics who spoke to the women’s branch of Klan in 1926. She also created the “Negro Project” in which she schemed to use Black ministers in her work because she did not, “[…] want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population.”

Despite acknowledgment that their founder had “flaws,” Planned Parenthood continues to honor her as a “trailblazer.” But, as society learns of Sanger’s eugenic ideology which led to the forced sterilization of minorities, as well as her speech before the Klan, they have become increasingly critical.  This has prompted the abortion corporation, whose history also includes associations with the racist eugenics movement, to allegedly “disavow” Sanger’s racist beliefs.

But, as Live Action News has documented, those words have little meaning when you see that Sanger’s name is prominently displayed on one of their facilities. And worse yet is the fact that the Finger Lake facility is listed as Title X-funded in New York’s 2016 directory. This means that this Planned Parenthood facility receives tax dollars, despite displaying the name of a racist on their building.

Margaret Sanger’s name on Planned Parenthood building

Just as outrageous is the fact that when a local media outlet highlighted this Planned Parenthood they failed to mention Sanger’s past. Instead, the news outlet touted Planned Parenthood’s “services” even though nationally Planned Parenthood is losing patients and decreasing legitimate health services while increasing the number of abortions.  By using half a billion in tax dollars every year, Planned Parenthood has managed to garner over 34 percent of the nation’s abortion market share while skating criticism of their racist history.

In addition to placing her name outside the facility, Planned Parenthood’s centers in two states are named after Sanger:

As a result, the city of New York’s website shows the street in front of Planned Parenthood’s New York facility has been designated “Margaret Sanger Square”..

Margaret Sanger Street

In addition, NYC’s Margaret Sanger Clinic has been designated a National Historic Landmark even though it is not open to the public. But, Margaret Sanger buildings and landmarks are just the tip of the iceberg.

Statues of the Klan speaker also exist and surprisingly have been allowed to remain. According to Halpern Blog, the Old South Meeting House in Boston has a statue of Sanger on display as seen below:

Margaret Sanger Statue Old South Meeting House (image credit Halperns blog)

And the Brooklyn Museum celebrates the eugenicist with a display called, “Margaret Sanger’s plate at The Dinner Party.” They describe the table setting as “painted with bright red glazes that evoke the female reproductive organs and the blood that is involved in the reproductive process, as well as the battle for reproductive freedom.”

Margaret Sanger bust national portrait gallery of Smithsonian

Just as disturbing is the fact that Sanger’s bust is displayed at the Smithsonian Institute next to those of legitimate civil rights heroes. The bronze sculpture is owned by the National Portrait Gallery and is located in the “Struggle for Justice” exhibit. The Gallery’s description of Sanger reads in part:

Adding to her life of controversy is her association with the eugenics movement-which included promotion of forced sterilization for those deemed mentally unfit-a movement that for a time was endorsed by many of the era’s prominent thinkers.

The bust was the gift of Mrs. Cordelia Scaife May an anti-immigration zealot who was a key backer of John Tanton, a former Michigan Planned Parenthood Director who founded anti-immigration groups, such as FAIR.  May was also instrumental in a failed bid to pressure the US Postmaster in 1966 to produce a commemorative stamp in honor of Sanger.

According to a report by the LA Times May was, “a generous supporter of Planned Parenthood, which in its early days supported population control.”

A letter of outrage, written and signed by several prominent Black leaders, called for the removal of the bust. The group asked if the Smithsonian Institute was aware that Sanger supported eugenics, held an elitist attitude toward those she regarded as “the feeble minded,” spoke to Ku Klux Klan supporters, and communicated with Hitler sympathizers:

How can a person like Sanger, who found common cause with the racial agenda of the Ku Klux Klan (“KKK”), be ranked among true champions of ‘justice?’ She was a purveyor of grave injustice against the most vulnerable.

Adding:

Ironically, Sanger’s bust is featured in the NPG’s ‘Struggle for Justice’ exhibit, alongside two of America’s most celebrated and authentic champions of equal rights – Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks. If Sanger had her way, MLK and Rosa Parks would not have been born.

screenshot

At a press conference denouncing Sanger’s bust two years ago, the Rev. Dr. Johnny Hunter, spokesperson for BlackGenocide.org, commented that “Putting that mess up there is not going to help. The last thing we need is a White Supremacist sitting between the bust of Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks. That’s just a slap in the face to Black folks.”

Star Parker, a Black pro-life advocate, also responded, “Margaret Sanger is a racist who wanted to end the black population through birth control and abortion. She founded Planned Parenthood. But the Smithsonian, funded by our tax dollars, celebrates this woman, even mentioning her advocacy of eugenics! They don’t even hide it! It is breathtaking in its idiocy.”

In Fiscal Year 2016, the Smithsonian’s federal appropriation was $840 million and by 2017 it grew to $922 million. Tax dollars make up about 60 percent of their budget (a combination of the congressional appropriation and federal grants and contracts).

Instead of removing Sanger’s bust, the National Portrait Gallery Director Kim Sajet’s response was to diminish Sanger’s racism, by writing, “Her association with the eugenics movement shadowed her achievements in sex education and contraception, making her a figure of controversy, one whose complexities and contradictions mirror her times.” She told the Black leaders, “I […] respectfully decline to remove her portrait [sic] from the museum.”

Apparently, the excuse that a racist was just a product of their time and therefore deserves to be honored holds true only if you are the founder of the largest abortion corporation in the United States.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood not serious about disavowing racist history

Posted in Guttmacher, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Buildings, Planned Parenthood racist supporter, Racist Statute with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on September 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood and its marketing gurus want you to believe that they have disavowed founder Margaret Sanger for her racist beliefs despite Sanger’s name being prominently linked to its facilities and while continuing to praise her online. The fact is that Planned Parenthood often refers to Margaret Sanger as a “hero” and continues to make light of her racist history as well as her associations with the Ku Klux Klan.

As Live Action News has previously detailed, Margaret Sanger was a proponent of eugenics who spoke to the women’s branch of KKK in 1926. She also created the “Negro Project” where she schemed in her letter penned to Clarence Gamble, to use Black ministers because, she said, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,” and if it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Excerpt: Margaret Sanger Letter to Clarence Gamble, Negro Project

In a recent post on Medium.com, Planned Parenthood president, Cecile Richards, tried to sound rational when addressing the current climate of racism in America:

This racism didn’t happen on its own — it was built by white people and white people must take action to dismantle it. People of color have led the fight against racism for generations, but we all have a responsibility to tear out the foundations of racism wherever we find it: in ourselves, our communities and our organizations, including Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s prominent image of founder Margaret Sanger

The fact that Cecile Richards conveniently leaves out is that Planned Parenthood’s founder was tied to the eugenics movement which forcefully sterilized many Blacks and minorities. And Planned Parenthood was even a referral agency to some of those eugenics boards, as the film Maafa21 details:

Planned Parenthood Eugenics Board Robert Webber

In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.  But the system did not always run smoothly.  In 1969, when the number of sterilizations approved by the Iowa State Eugenics Board began to drop, the Board was attacked in the press by the executive director of Planned Parenthood Robert Webber.  He said that he was alarmed by the decline in numbers and that the Eugenics Board should expand its approval criteria.

Board chairman Dr. S.M. Korson responded that the Board’s guidelines were already fairly broad.  He pointed out that approvals were routinely given for young girls for no reason other than the Board’s speculation that they might likely one day engage in immoral behavior without the capacity for being wives and mothers.  At that point, Webber publicly scolded the Board and told them that they should either increase the number of sterilizations or quit.

Watch below:

Now, after years of being exposed by conservatives, pro-lifers, and African American activists, Planned Parenthood must be feeling the heat.

If Planned Parenthood wants to address racism in America, why do they continue to refer to their Klan-speaking founder as “a woman of heroic accomplishments” and a “true visionary”?

Margaret Sanger “hero and trailblazer” according to Planned Parenthood

In a piece written to celebrate its 100th anniversary, Planned Parenthood offered more words of praise for Sanger than criticism or denouncements. It reads in part:

Our founder, Margaret Sanger, was a woman of heroic accomplishments, and like all heroes, she was also complex and imperfect.

[…] While she was a woman of heroic accomplishments, Margaret Sanger had some beliefs, practices, and associations that we acknowledge, denounce, and work to rectify today. Her life story provides a portrait that is bold, fascinating, formidable, human, complicated, and flawed.

While they claim to denounce Sanger’s ties to the Klan, Planned Parenthood waffles about the harm it caused, saying that Sanger was simply motivated by a “deeply held compassion for the women and children.” Planned Parenthood will often claim that Sanger was just a product of her time and apparently, according to Planned Parenthood, so was the KKK, calling that racist movement “mainstream”: 

In the 1920’s, the KKK was a mainstream movement and was considered a legitimate anti-immigration organization with a wide membership that included many state and local officials. At that time, it defined its enemies as Blacks, Catholics and Jews. Planned Parenthood today denounces Sanger’s address to the Ku Klux Klan.

Screen grab from Maafa21

And of the eugenics movement, which forcefully sterilized and stigmatized not only Blacks but other minorities like the disabled, criminals, and immigrants, Planned Parenthood writes:

In the early 20th century, eugenics — the “science” of improving society through planned breeding — was a theory accepted by most American scientists and physicians. Eugenics was embraced across the political spectrum, from conservatives to socialists — so much was it embraced that it was taught in universities.

But despite the false claim that the Planned Parenthood founder sought “voluntary” means of population control, Planned Parenthood acknowledged Sanger’s associations with the Eugenics movement, writing:

We denounce her endorsement of the Buck v. Bell decision as well as her involvement with the American eugenics movement and her adherence to some of its principles and values.

Alan Guttmacher receives Margaret Sanger Award, 1972

However, words are one thing and actions are quite another.

While Planned Parenthood wants you to believe that they have repudiated Sanger’s eugenics connections, they continue to honor her.

First, Planned Parenthood has named their most prestigious award after Sanger. It’s called the Margaret Sanger Award and is issued to those who support Planned Parenthood’s mission.

The first award was issued in 1966, and by 1972, Planned Parenthood “honored” Alan Guttmacher, who was president of Planned Parenthood. Guttmacher was also Vice President of the American Eugenics Society.

Second, Planned Parenthood has renamed one of their centers after Margaret Sanger. Keep in mind that this did not happen in the 1940’s, but after the civil rights struggles had taken over the nation’s streets in 1973. According to its history page, Planned Parenthood New York City’s (PPNYC) Manhattan clinical facility merged with the Margaret Sanger Research Bureau and was renamed the Margaret Sanger Center. It relocated to Bleecker Street in 1997.

Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Center in NYC

Currently, the Margaret Sanger Center is listed by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) as a “resource.”

In fact, the city of New York has designated the street in front of Planned Parenthood’s facility as “Margaret Sanger Square”, according to a city website, which states, “Sanger’s original Manhattan clinic is landmarked, but it is now a private home (located at 17 West 16th Street) and closed to the public.”

Margaret Sanger Center street

The Preservation Commission documented the building’s “contribution to New York City history.”

In 1989, Planned Parenthood of New York City leased the loft building at 26-30 Bleecker Street, moving its offices there after completing a conversion and major interior renovation in 1990-91. Its parent organization, Planned Parenthood of America […] having been founded in 1939 as the Birth Control Federation of America. Among its forerunners was the country’s first birth-control clinic, opened in Brooklyn in 1916 by Margaret Sanger (1879-1966). In 1952, she helped to form the International Planned Parenthood Federation. The intersection of Bleecker and Mott Streets, in front of the Planned Parenthood of New York City offices, has been renamed “Margaret Sanger Square” in her honor.

But lest you think the New York Center is the only Planned Parenthood facility named after the Klan-speaking eugenicist, think again.

In Tucson, Arizona, Planned Parenthood operates another Margaret Sanger Center and displays a picture of Margaret Sanger on their about us page:

 

 

In addition, several Planned Parenthood affiliates offer Societies named after the eugenicist.

For example, Planned Parenthood of Florida boasts about a  “Margaret Sanger Legacy Society” while Planned Parenthood in Minnesota advertises their own “Margaret Sanger Society” as well.

Planned Parenthood Florida Margaret Sanger Legacy Society

Planned Parenthood Minnesota Margaret Sanger Society

And in Massachusetts, Planned Parenthood published donations they received through their “Margaret Sanger Society” via their annual reports:

Planned Parenthood Mass Margaret Sanger Society

Today, despite the organization’s alleged disdain for Sanger’s eugenics collaborations, Planned Parenthood continues to praise her history online, calling her a “hero” on social media and various websites.

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger on FB

 

Planned Parenthood Action Praises Sanger

Margaret Sanger heroine Planned Parenthood

And just as disturbing, there is a Facebook group operated by a Planned Parenthood affiliate in Iowa, called the Margaret Sanger Action Hour, which “is a weekly gathering for Planned Parenthood volunteers, advocates, and supporters in Central Iowa.” It is operated by Planned Parenthood of the Heartland and currently has 104 members.

So much for repudiations and denouncements, right? 

What Sanger stood for is inexcusable and the public is not fooled by faux denouncements. The truth is, as Live Action News has demonstrated numerous times, Planned Parenthood has embraced Sanger’s eugenic roots because Sanger and Planned Parenthood are cut from the exact same cloth.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Yes, Planned Parenthood’s founder spoke to the Klan – but the photo is a fake

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in Arkansas, Hilda Cornish, Klan, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Maggie Awards, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

With the topic of America’s history in racism once again a focus in the news, a fake image of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger speaking to the Klu Klux Klan has been circulating online. While the image is not real, what is quite real is the fact that Sanger, a proponent of eugenics, spoke to a meeting of the women’s branch of KKK in 1926.

The event took place in Silver Lake, New Jersey, and Sanger described in it in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Sanger called that event “one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.”

That being said, the image below, which purports to show Sanger giving that speech before her adoring Klan supporters is not authentic. The image was part of a blogger’s photo contest.

Photo of Margaret Sanger W/ KKK is fake

Sanger and Klan image was part of blog photo contest in 2005 — it is not authentic.

The Sanger/Klan fake was published by the “Margaret Sanger Blog Spot” which held an annual photo contest because, in the blog’s words, “The Big Abortion Industry still holds Margaret Sanger out as an icon. Artwork is one more important ways to promote the truth about Margaret Sanger.”

The blog’s instructions for the contest were to “commemorate Sanger at the Klan rally in unique artistic ways,” including “modern interpretations of Sanger speaking to the Klan.”

But Sanger’s views were so outrageous in and of themselves that there is no need to circulate inaccurate depictions, which could lead to attempts to discredit her meeting with the Klan altogether.

Sanger has a very controversial history as an enthusiastic proponent of eugenics and a member of the American Eugenics Society. This philosophy not only fed her work within the Planned Parenthood movement, but her lesser known advocacy of euthanasia as well. The organizations Sanger founded, such as The American Birth Control League (ABCL) and later, Planned Parenthood, also have ties to many eugenics proponents.

Clarence Cook Little

Clarence C. Little

One of those connections was a man by the name of Clarence Cook Little.

According to a biographical memoir published by the National Academy of Sciences, Little held various distinguished positions. He was the president of the University of Maine and of the University of Michigan, and he was the managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

He was named the director of The Jackson Laboratory and later accepted a position as scientific director of the Tobacco Industrial Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sadly, Little was also president and founding member of The American Eugenics Society, as well as a board member of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. He was also the Birth Control Federation President, and sat on the previously mentioned American Euthanasia Society board.

Little was also listed on the 1938 Committee for Planned Parenthood.

CC Little ties to Eugenics and Sanger’s ABCL

Little has since been denounced by some in modern society who have called for his name to be removed from the University of Michigan’s science building for his belief in eugenics. An op-ed penned by the daughter of an interracial couple and a student at the University of Michigan published last year by MTV.com shows the disdain for Little:

There is a building (and a bus stop) on the University of Michigan campus named for Clarence Cook (C.C.) Little. He was the University’s president in 1925, and an outspoken “scientific” racist and eugenicist, who believed that “inferior” races should undergo involuntary sterilization. I often sat at the bus stop bearing his name while I waited to go to class. Little would have hated that.

Despite the merit of these denouncements, few have expressed concern over Little’s ties to Planned Parenthood’s history.

Hilda Cornish

Another interesting eugenics connection to both Sanger and Planned Parenthood is a woman by the name of Hilda Kahlert Cornish. Hilda Cornish chaired the Arkansas Eugenics Association. According to a 1986 article in an Arkansas newspaper, Cornish received much of her counsel directly from Margaret Sanger. In fact, the Blytheville Courier Press notes that the sons of the two leaders were roommates at Yale University.

The documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21 (clipped below) details disturbing connections the Arkansas Eugenics Association had to Planned Parenthood:

The film states:

From its beginning, Planned Parenthood always had powerful ties to the American Eugenics community. In fact, in many places they were often one in the same.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.

Later, the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Documents obtained by Live Action News confirm this fact.

A 1945 Planned Parenthood directory reveals that Mrs. Edward Cornish was the director of the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas. Cornish was active with the Democrat Party and married to banker Edward Cornish, according to Arkansas historians.

She is also listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

According to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas:

In the summer of 1930, [Cornish] met Margaret Sanger… The two developed a friendship maintained by correspondence and occasional meetings. During that summer, Cornish visited Sanger’s Clinical Research Bureau in New York, and she launched the Arkansas birth control movement later that same year.

At Cornish’s initiative, a group of physicians, business and religious leaders, and women active in civic work formed the Arkansas Eugenics Association (AEA)…. In early 1931, the association opened the Little Rock Birth Control Clinic in the basement of Baptist Hospital…. Cornish also worked with the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control.

The online historical site added that in 1942, The Arkansas Eugenics Association changed its name… to the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas.

Segregated Clinics

Authors of the bookHidden Histories of Women in the New South, noted that the “first report of the Arkansas Eugenics Association stated that the Little Rock clinic registered 161 White women during its first eleven months of service.”

The book concludes that Cornish was more aligned with promoting birth control than the national eugenics movement. (That being said, Sanger herself wanted to merge her publications with the national eugenics organization.)

The book‘s authors reveal that the clinic “directed its efforts towards poor women only,” yet they imply a prejudice against Blacks by writing that “African American women were not invited to the [Arkansas Eugenics] clinic from its start in 1931.”

www.AbortionProcedures.com click here for facts on abortion

The authors add that “until 1937, only white women actually had the opportunity to receive services” and the organization “held separate hours for white and African American women.” The book also notes that “most of [the American Birth Control League’s] clinics were segregated.” The ABCL later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s beloved founder Margaret Sanger reached out to many people who saw Blacks as less than equal, and this includes the Klan and the Eugenics movement.

Today, many believe that Sanger’s racist ideologies have penetrated much of her work. And even without an image to document Sanger’s speech before the Klan, Planned Parenthood knows her history, as revealed in her own autobiography.

Instead of repudiating Sanger, taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood honors her as a hero, naming their most prestigious award after her. It’s despicable.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.