Archive for the Margaret Sanger and AES Category

Justice Clarence Thomas: Abortion is tool of modern-day eugenics

Posted in Black Genocide, Eugenics, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger Legacy Society, Supreme Court with tags , , , , , , , , , on May 29, 2019 by saynsumthn

 

Part One of Two.

In deciding the recent case Box v. Planned Parenthood of Indiana and Kentucky Inc., United States Supreme Court Justice sent a warning to the Court, suggesting that states have a “compelling interest in preventing abortion from becoming a tool of modern-day eugenics,” even going as far as to implicate Planned Parenthood’s founder and leaders. In the decision, the Court allowed one provision of an Indiana law requiring the humane burial of aborted children to stand, while denying another provision to bar abortions on the basis of sex, race or disability.

Justice Thomas penned a multi-page response to address the Court’s decision, which began (emphasis added):

I write separately to address the other aspect of Indiana law at issue here—the “Sex Selective and Disability Abortion Ban.”… Each of the immutable characteristics protected by this law can be known relatively early in a pregnancy, and the [Indiana] law prevents them from becoming the sole criterion for deciding whether the child will live or die. Put differently, this law and other laws like it promote a State’s compelling interest in preventing abortion from becoming a tool of modern-day eugenics.

He then pulled no punches, making it plain that Planned Parenthood — the defendant in the case — was founded in eugenics:

The use of abortion to achieve eugenic goals is not merely hypothetical. The foundations for legalizing abortion in America were laid during the early 20th-century birth control movement. That movement developed alongside the American eugenics movement. And significantly, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger recognized the eugenic potential of her cause.

Sanger was a known member of the American Eugenics Society. In addition to speaking at a Ku Klux Klan meeting by invitation, about which she wrote in her autobiography, the Planned Parenthood founder also advocated forced sterilization to rid the planet of those she deemed “unfit.” Despite this involvement, as Live Action News previously documented, Sanger’s namesake is listed on two current Planned Parenthood awards as well as Planned Parenthood facilities and Legacy Societies, with no condemnations from the abortion-friendly media.

Justice Thomas went into great detail, recording for posterity and for the public the truth about Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger. While we will not list all of the comments in detail here, some are more notable:

  • Sanger viewed birth control as a way to reduce the “ever increasing, unceasingly spawning class of human beings who never should have been born at all.”
  • Sanger argued that “Birth Control . . . is really the greatest and most truly eugenic method” of “human generation.”
  • In her view, birth control had been “accepted… as the most constructive and necessary of the means to racial health.”
  • Sanger accepted that eugenics was the best way toward a “solution of racial, political and social problems.”
  • Sanger believed that the imbalance between birth rates of the “fit” and “unfit” was “the greatest present menace to civilization.”
  • Sanger believed in “stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health.”
  • In Sanger’s view, frequent reproduction among “the majority of wage workers” would lead to “the contributing of morons, feeble-minded, insane and various criminal types to the already tremendous social burden constituted by these unfit.”
  • [I]n 1939, Sanger initiated the “Negro Project,” an effort to promote birth control in poor, Southern Black communities.
  • In a report titled “Birth Control and the Negro,” Sanger and her coauthors identified Blacks as “the great problem of the South.”
  • She recruited Black clergy to reassure the Black community on the benefits of controlling their birth rates and to keep them from the idea that Sanger “want[ed] to exterminate the Negro population.”

Justice Thomas correctly points out that Sanger herself did not advocate abortion but regarded “the hundreds of thousands of abortions performed in America each year [as] a disgrace to civilization.” He made it clear that “[…]Sanger’s arguments about the eugenic value of birth control in securing ‘the elimination of the unfit’ apply with even greater force to abortion, making it significantly more effective as a tool of eugenics.”

“Whereas Sanger believed that birth control could prevent “unfit” people from reproducing, abortion can prevent them from being born in the first place,” he said, noting that abortion is a mere extension of Sanger’s eugenic mindset.

For further reading, Live Action News has detailed Planned Parenthood’s eugenic history in articles below:

“This case highlights the fact that abortion is an act rife with the potential for eugenic manipulation,” Thomas wrote.

In part two – we will review the Justice’s view of PP’s former doctor and president, Alan F Guttmacher.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is a longer – edited- version of one also published by Live Action News. 

Eugenics influenced both abortion and Nazi holocaust

Posted in American Eugenics Society, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Eugen Fischer, Eugenics, Eugenics Review, Guttmacher, Henry Fairchild, Hitler, holocaust, John D Rockefeller, Maafa21, Madison Grant, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Nazis, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Nazi, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Rockefeller with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2019 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood remembers Holocaust, ignores founder’s own eugenic views

Holocaust, remember, Planned Parenthood

This weekend as we remembered the horrific human cost suffered under the Nazi Holocaust, the hashtags #NeverAgain and #HolocaustMemorialDay were trending on Twitter. It is estimated that at least six million Jews (and millions of others) were slaughtered during the Holocaust. One post from Planned Parenthood drew some interesting comments, including this one, pictured below:

Image via Twitter

Image via Twitter

Hitler’s ‘bible’ and Margaret Sanger’s connection

Planned Parenthood may claim to remember the Holocaust and mourn bigotry, but the organization’s founder, Margaret Sanger, was a member of the American Eugenics Society (AES) — headed by Madison Grant, whose book, The Passing of the Great Race, was revered by Adolf Hitler himself. According to the eugenics archive, Grant’s book “argued for the preservation of America as a ‘civilization preserve’ for the Nordic race, advocating for immigration only from the founding stock of Anglo-Saxons and other Nordics from north-western Europe…. After becoming Führer, Hitler wrote to Grant; thanking him for his momentous work, stating that the book was ‘his Bible.’” (emphasis added)

The AES was founded in 1926 by Harry Crampton, Harry H. Laughlin, Madison Grant, and Henry Fairfield Osborn “with the express purpose of spearheading the eugenical movement,” according to the American Philosophical Society. The Nazi means of procuring the “perfect race” included eugenic sterilization, which many believe were inspired by American eugenicists. Historian Stefan Kuhl details in his book, The Nazi Connection, that “Hitler’s personal correspondence with American eugenicists reveals both the influence that American eugenicists had on the highest figures of the Nazi regime and the crucial importance that National Socialists placed on garnering support for their policies on foreign scientists.”

The documentary film Maafa21 even notes the possibility that Hitler got the idea for concentration camps while studying the American eugenics movement:

In 1919, the state of Indiana had allocated $300,000 to create a work colony in the city of Butlerville where those who were labeled feebleminded would be incarcerated. Then, in 1932, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger called for the U.S. government to set aside farms and “open spaces” where certain groups of people would be segregated from the rest of society.

Image: Margaret Sanger advocates shipping people to farms and open spaces (Image: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger advocates shipping people to farms and open spaces (Image: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger associated with men who praised (and inspired) Hitler

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger herself spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan and promoted eugenics and forced sterilizations. Although there is no indication that Sanger directly supported Hitler, she did not discriminate against those who did.

Leon Whitney – published by Sanger, praised by Hitler for his book on sterilization

Sanger published writings by Leon F. Whitney, former executive secretary of the American Eugenics Society, in her Birth Control Review. In 1934, Adolf Hitler sent a letter to Whitney complimenting him for a book he authored on sterilization — and Whitney praised Hitler as “one of the greatest statesmen and social planners in the world.”

Eugen Fischer – worked with Sanger at World Population Conference

And in 1927, Nazi sympathizer Eugen Fischer worked with Sanger on her World Population Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. According to a library of eugenics records at Cold Spring Harbor, Hitler read Eugen Fischer’s textbook Principles of Human Heredity and Race Hygiene, and used “eugenical notions to support the ideal of a pure Aryan society in his manifesto, Mein Kampf.” Fischer served on committees that planned the sterilization of Afro-German Blacks and was in charge of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute where racist Nazi programs were developed. In an August 28,1935 New York Times article, Fischer praised Hitler, asking the World Population Congress at that time to “Hail Fuehrer and Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler.”

Image: Eugen Fischer (Image Credit: Archive zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin-Dahlem)

Eugen Fischer (Image Credit: Archive zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin-Dahlem)

According to the DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor, the Rockefeller Foundation, which has long been funding eugenics and abortion organizations including the Population Council, provided funds to construct the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute. Author Edwin Black noted, “The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

Harry Laughlin – published in Sanger’s Birth Control Review

AES founder Harry Laughlin was published by Sanger’s Birth Control Review and signed the Citizen’s Committee on Planned Parenthood. In 1936, according to researcher Paul A. Lombardo, “Laughlin received an honorary degree from the Nazi-controlled University of Heidelberg as “a pioneer in the science of race cleansing.”

Lothrop Stoddard – sat on Sanger’s Birth Control League Board of Directors

Another Sanger cohortLothrop Stoddard, traveled to Germany to observe a Nazi eugenics court. Stoddard, a journalist and author, served on Sanger’s National Council, her ABCL Board of Directors, and the conference committee of the First American Birth Control Conference. Stoddard described this meeting in his book: Into the Darkness: A Sympathetic Report from Hitler’s Wartime Reich.

Image: Image: American Eugenics Society document

Image: American Eugenics Society document

Ernst Rudin – called for racial purity in Sanger’s Birth Control Review, wrote Germany’s eugenic laws

In 1933, Sanger associate Ernst Rudin of Germany published a call for racial purity in Sanger’s Birth Control Review. Later, according to the documentary film, Maafa21, “Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws and, at one point, he personally helped the Gestapo round-up and sterilize several hundred Blacks who they referred to as ‘Rhineland bastards.’ After the war, Rudin would be identified as one of the architects of the barbaric medical experiments that the Nazis carried out in their concentration camps.”

It is documented that Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics ran deep and extended into the late 1960’s. Sanger’s American Birth Control League, and later Planned Parenthood, stacked their boards and events with eugenics leaders. Planned Parenthood’s first physician president, Alan F. Guttmacher, was vice president of the American Eugenics Society. Guttmacher, credited with leading Planned Parenthood to commit abortions, went on to found Planned Parenthood’s former “special affiliate,” the well-known Guttmacher Institute.

Tragically, eugenics philosophy paved the way for genocide under Nazi control of Germany. Today, that same philosophy has led to millions of preborn humans being massacred in the womb through abortion. As we remember what took place in Germany, the words of Rabbi Benjamin Blech ring true today: “We had no idea what was happening needs to be clearly identified as the great lie of the years of Nazi power. The harsh truth is that almost everyone had to know. The numbers negate the possibility for collective ignorance. And still the killings did not stop, the torture did not cease, the concentration camps were not closed, the crematoria continued their barbaric task. The decent people were somehow able to rationalize their silence.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Were programs like Title X started to curb the population of certain people groups?

Posted in Black Genocide, Black Neighborhood, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Ehrlich, Eugenics, Every Child a Wanted Child, Fannie Lou Hamer, Ford, Lader, Malcolm X, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood Free Birth Control, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood Motto, Planned Parenthood Slogan, Planned Parenthood Tax Dollars, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Population Control, Population Council, Richard Nixon, Rockefeller, Samuel Yette, Saves Taxpayers, Tax Payer Funding of Abortion, Title X, Walt Disney with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 12, 2018 by saynsumthn

population, Black, abortion, Planned Parenthood, eugenics

Was there a sinister eugenics agenda behind so-called federally funded “population control” programs like Title X?  The program, which could be seen as a form of classism, is touted as a “family planning”program aimed at “helping” poor and low income Americans in limiting their families. But the question is, what motive was behind this push prior to Title X’s 1970 passage, and who were the key players? In this four part series, Live Action News hopes to answer those questions.

When the push to use government dollars to fund population control programs was introduced, there was heavy opposition from groups that saw the move as racist eugenics. The Population Council and Planned Parenthood, two of the main groups behind this move, were both founded with eugenic philosophies. Planned Parenthood even played a prominent role in recruiting an ideal Republican lawmaker — as readers will learn later in the series — whom they convinced to sponsor what has become known as the federal Title X Family Planning Program, which now funnels $60 million to the organization.

READ: Film documents Planned Parenthood’s history of Black genocide, eugenics

Leading up to this time, many within the Black community viewed government programs of population control as genocidal efforts aimed at limiting the births of Blacks and other minorities. This was not without justification, as detailed by Simone M. Caron’s research, “Birth Control and the Black Community in the 1960’s: Genocide or Power Politics?,” published by the Journal of Social History:

Certain segments of the black community mistrusted the underlying intention of both private and government efforts with respect to contraception. Some blacks in particular became skeptical of the increasing push for contraceptive dispersal in poor urban neighborhoods, accusing contraceptive proponents of promoting nothing less than “black genocide.”…

The incidence of increasing government involvement in contraception at the same time as the civil rights movement gained strength could be interpreted as a planned conspiracy to decrease the numbers of blacks and other racial minorities.

Leaders of the birth control movement even suggested that crime and health disparities within the Black community could be resolved by reducing the Black population. This kind of thinking aroused additional suspicion as calls for public health centers to disseminate birth control pills to the poor began to emerge.

Image: 1942 article urges family planning for Harlem (Image credit New York Times)

1942 article urges family planning for Harlem (Image credit New York Times)

In 1967, Black comedian Dick Gregory joined more than 1,100 Black delegates for the First National Conference on Black Power where he, along with others in the group, adopted a black power manifesto that called for the “refusal to accept birth control programs on the basis that they seek to exterminate Negroes,” among other demands, according to a July 24, 1967, New York Times report. Gregory and others viewed “government programs designed for poor Black folks” which emphasized birth control and abortion as, “designed to limit the black population.”

Image: 1967 First National Conference on Black Power

1967 First National Conference on Black Power

Image: 1967 First National Conference on Black Power refuse birth control

1967 First National Conference on Black Power refuse birth control

Journalist Samuel Yette, himself outspoken about the genocidal aspects of birth control, once wrote about noted civil rights activist Fannie Lou Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….”

Image: Fannie Lou Hamer

Fannie Lou Hamer

In that same article, Yette, one of the first Black journalists to work for Newsweek, wrote, “Instead of seeking ways to feed the hungry, the back stage plan was to get the poor unwittingly to endorse a plan to eliminate from the society those who were hungry.”

Image: Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Maafa21)

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Maafa21)

Yette went on to publish a book, “The Choice,” which exposed high level attempts of Black genocide through birth control, abortion, and additional means. Shortly after the publication, Yette was fired by Newsweek and claimed that his superiors told him that the “Nixon White House” wanted him out of Washington.

“The book dealt with things they did not want people to know about at the time,” Yette told the Tennessee Tribune, which he joined as a columnist, in 1996. “There were those well-placed in our government who were determined to have a final solution for the race issue in this country — not unlike Hitler’s ‘Final Solution’ for Jews 50 years earlier in Germany. I wrote this and documented it. It caused the Nixon White House to say to Newsweek in effect, ‘Don’t come back until you are rid of him.’”

Blacks were highly suspicious of anything that had to do with “control,” radical Black Muslim leader Malcolm X suggested. In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” Memos from the meeting indicated that overpopulation discussions evoked questions on why major efforts to control population were directed toward “colored nations.” The Black Muslim leader asked if Planned Parenthood had anything to do with “birth control” and offered the suggestion that Planned Parenthood would probably be more successful if they used the term “family planning” instead of “birth control.”

His reason for this was simple. He stated that “people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled….”

Image of memo

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

While Caron concludes that the Black community eventually accepted contraception, a look at the organizations behind the push for government funded “family planning” programs reveal that their initial concerns may have been spot on. Behind the scenes, population control groups — some with long ties to the eugenics movement, such as the Population Council, Planned Parenthood, the Hugh Moore Fund, the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, and others  — were seeding the ground and calling for large sums of government money to be spent on so-called “family planning.”

Author Donald T. Critchlow, in his book, “Intended Consequences, Birth Control, Abortion and the Federal Government in Modern America,” notes that the Population Council took the lead, and had an annual budget of over $3 million by 1964. Ford and Rockefeller Foundation money, along with dollars from other eugenics organizations, were flooding the Population Council coffers by the millions.

The Population Council was founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller III, as Live Action News has previously documented. The group’s second president, Frederic Osborn, was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society. Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” He also signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her Birth Control Review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan, “Every Child a Wanted Child,” may have originated with Osborn.

Image: Planned Parenthood Motto

Planned Parenthood Motto

These groups pushed the idea of a worldwide population crisis. The media joined in the fear mongering by publishing articles about the impending population crisis. Images of global starvation resulting in forced euthanasia and cannibalism were depicted in books such a Paul Ehrlich’s now discredited “The Population Bomb.”

Image: Population Bomb threatens world peace

Population Bomb threatens world peace

On-screen gloom and doom propaganda was also being disseminated.

One film, produced by Walt Disney Productions, has been detailed in a previous Live Action News article, and interestingly, the controversial 1967 film, “Family Planning,” was produced in association with the Population Council, a eugenics founded organization.

Larry Lader's book helped redefine Margaret Sanger from her eugenics roots

Walt Disney Production produces FP film with Population Council

The propaganda film featured Disney’s iconic animated character, Donald Duck, who introduces the alleged gloom of having a large family. Children in smaller sized families are “healthy and happy and go to school to gain an education,” the film states, as if children of large families are unhealthy, unhappy, and uneducated. The film indoctrinates its viewers that a “happy family” is one with a modest number of children while large families basically starve with “no money for modern conveniences. […]”

In the 1969 book about the founder of Planned Parenthood, “Margaret Sanger Pioneer of Birth Control,” authors Lawrence Lader, an advocate of population control with ties to the Population Council, and Milton Meltzer reinforced overpopulation fears.

Quoting the book from p. 160-161:

Today the world has caught up with the crucial necessity for population control. Many political leaders consider it second only to the threat of nuclear war as the key issue of our time. World population is now growing at a record speed of seventy million a year. The terrible prophecy is that at the current rate of increase the world may double in population by the year 2000. Yet less than 5 percent of the world’s six hundred-odd million women in the fertile years are using modern contraceptives. To Dr. Harrison Brown, one of the nation’s leading scientists, it means “catastrophe appears a near certainty.”

Latin America, whose growth is faster than any other continent’s, will almost triple its population in the next three decades. And less food is now produced and eaten there per capita than before World War II. India, kept from the edge of famine by wheat shipments from abroad, will add two hundred million more people by 1980.

With this tidal wave of population goes desperate hunger. One half of the world’s population and two thirds of its children go to bed hungry every night. General William H. Draper, head of a presidential study committee, has said that “the stark fact is that if the population continues to increase faster than food production, hundreds of millions will starve in the next decade.”

Image: Larry Lader’s book helped redefine Margaret Sanger from her eugenics roots

Larry Lader’s book helped redefine Margaret Sanger from her eugenics roots

The United States has already added fifty million between 1950 and 1968, and our population may almost double by the year 2000. We may not face famine because of our highly mechanized food production. But the terrible overcrowding in the cities has already brought us the destructive problems of air and water pollution, traffic chaos, shortage of schools and houses, lack of parks and recreation space. The whole quality of American life is being badly damaged.

The authors then summarize the solution:

Almost everyone now realizes that Margaret Sanger’s crusade for population control is the only way to enable living standards to improve substantially. International Planned Parenthood has already shown in many areas that populations can be kept in reasonable balance…. After the government approved legalized abortion in qualified hospitals, along with contraception, the country cut its birth rate more than in half between 1947 and 1961.

The need has become so staggering that IPPF has been joined by new allies. First came the private organizations. The Population Council, headed by John D. Rockefeller III, has spent over thirty-five million dollars since 1952, the Ford Foundation many millions more.

They end the book by making an argument for federal dollars to fund population control:

But the money needed to spread birth control around the world goes far beyond private means. Hugh Moore’s Campaign to Check the Population Explosion and the Population Crisis Committee in Washington soon realized that only vast help from the federal government could meet the crisis. With constant pressure on Congress, they were able to get the government to increase its population programs overseas to fifty million dollars in 1969. Family planning programs in the United States were given ten million dollars. Yet even these sums are only a tiny fraction of what it will take to meet the problem.

And thus, the push for taxpayer-funded population control programs took on a life of its own and consisted of a multitude of characters working behind the scenes, forming coalitions, meeting with political leaders, and spreading eugenics propaganda. By the 1960s the agenda was in full swing, but it would be continually met with opposition from religious leaders and Black leaders who recognized it as a means to control the Black population.

In part two of this series, Live Action News will detail further the population control advocates who pushed for these government funded programs. Additional articles on Title X’s history are included (parts onethree, and four), as well as Planned Parenthood’s Blueprint and George HW Bush’s relationship to Title X and Planned Parenthood.

Editor’s Note, 11/8/18: Links to related articles were added.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood founder’s board member Lothrop Stoddard wanted ‘non-White races’ gone; met with Hitler

Posted in Lothrop Stoddard, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Planned Parenthood Board Member, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Image: Lothrop Stoddard views Nazi eugenics court

Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League (ABCL), which became Planned Parenthoodin 1942, had on her ABCL board a number of controversial directors. Among them was a man named Lothrop Theodore Stoddard, a journalist and author who served on Sanger’s National Council, her ABCL Board of Directors, and the conference committee of the First American Birth Control Conference. He was also published in Sanger’s publication, the Birth Control Review (BCR). Like Sanger, Stoddard was a member of the American Eugenics Society and had connections to the Ku Klux Klan. And, like many within the eugenics movement who helped to found Planned Parenthood, Stoddard had a poor view of minorities and people of color.

                                                          Lathrop Stoddard, ABCL/Planned Parenthood Director

Stoddard is featured in a powerful documentary on the history of Planned Parenthood, which Live Action is screening on social media this week. It is called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America and was produced by Life Dynamics, Inc., based out of Denton, Texas. The term eugenics, according to the film, was coined by Francis Galton, a cousin to Charles Darwin. Eugenicists like Stoddard and Sanger and others within her leadership believed that it was the superior race’s duty to limit the population of those who were seen by them as inferior. The American eugenics movement primarily set their eyes upon limiting the population of the Black race.

                                    Image: American Eugenics Society document

This can be seen fairly clearly in Stoddard’s book, “The Revolt Against Civilization: The Menace of the Under Man,” where he writes in part, “Much more serious is the problem presented by those far more numerous stocks which, while transcending the plane of mere savagery, have stopped at some level of barbarism…. Deceptive veneers of civilization may be acquired, but reversion to congenital barbarism ultimately takes place. To such barbarian stocks belong many of the people of Asia, the American Indians and the African [N]egroes. These congenital barbarians have always been dangerous foes of progress…”

                    Eugenicist Lothrop Stoddard demeans Blacks in book (Image credit: The Revolt Against Civilization)

Maafa21 quotes Stoddard as saying:

“Non-white races must be excluded from America … The red and black races if left to themselves revert to a savage or semi-savage stage in a short time.”

Image:Lothrop Stoddard racist quote (Maafa21)

Lothrop Stoddard racist quote (Maafa21)/ Lothrop Stoddard quote on non White Races (Image credit: Maafa21)

In the late 1920s, Stoddard was asked this question in a lively radio debate with WEB Dubois: “Shall the Negro be encouraged to seek cultural equality? Has the Negro the same intellectual possibilities as other races?”

His answer, “No!”

Chicago Forum Council. One of the greatest debates ever held, 1929. W. E. B. Du Bois Papers (MS 312). Special Collections and University Archives, University of Massachusetts Amherst Libraries

In 1920, Stoddard published his book, “The Rising Tide of Color Against White World Supremacy,” which contained numerous statements that today would be viewed as racist. The book was introduced by another eugenicist leader by the name of Madison Grant, whose own book, “The Passing of the Great Race,” was said to have been viewed as Adolf Hitler’s “bible” of sorts.

According to author Angela Franks, the text in Stoddard’s book contained such inflammatory statements as the following:

“‘Finally perish!’ That is the exact alternative which confronts the white race…. Just as we isolate the bacterial invasions, and starve out the bacteria, by limiting the area and amount of their food supply, so we can compel an inferior race to remain in its native habitat…”

Lothrop Stoddard wrote racist book The Rising Tide of Color, and sat on Margaret Sanger’s board

It was after “The Rising Tide of Color” was published that Sanger invited Stoddard to join her organization. His book was reviewed by Havelock Ellis, a long-time friend of Sanger’s, in a piece called, “The World’s Racial Problem,” published in the October 1920 edition of Sanger’s Birth Control Review. Although the review was, at times, critical of Stoddard, Ellis wrote in part:

Dr. Stoddard possesses, however, all the temperamental optimism and self-confidence of the white Nordic man whose champion he remains throughout…. Since by the prejudice of color, we must mostly be on his side in this matter, we may profitably meditate on the reasonable considerations he brings forward…. The old checks of the increase of population have largely fallen away, that is why we see today the excessive fertility which threatens to drown the whole world in blood. “The real enemy of the dove of peace,” as Stoddard put it, “is not the eagle of pride or the vulture of greed, but the stork.”

Ellis also wrote, “Looking at the matter, as Dr. Stoddard looks at it, from the white and more especially the Nordic standpoint, which is that of England even more than America, the danger that menaces our position is the immediate future, and our very existence on the more remote future is three fold: the peril of arms, the peril of markets and the peril of immigrants.”

According to Maafa21, Stoddard’s book was widely promoted by the Ku Klux Klan. The film also states that in another book, “The Dragon and the Cross,” Stoddard was identified as the Exalted Cyclops of the Massachusetts chapter of the Klan.

                  Lothrop Stoddard (a member of Margaret Sanger’s board) – book used by Klan (Image credit: Maafa21)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger herself once met with members of the Klan and described that meeting in her autobiography, writing in part,  “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.”

Planned Parenthood

Margaret Sanger writes about Klan meeting in Autobiography (Image credit: Maafa21)

In 1921, Sanger’s BCR published the review of Stoddard’s “The Revolt Against Civilization,” which, according to reviewer, Juliet Barrett Rublee, Stoddard gave instructions for “race purification.” Rublee, a staunch birth control activist and friend of Sanger’s, described Stoddard’s book as “courageous, and full of fine enthusiasm and vigor of thought and spirit.”

The first step Stoddard recommended to protect the American population was, according to Rublee, “the prevention of all obvious degenerates from having children.” Another step to be taken, according to Stoddard, was “segregation of defectives, appreciation of racial principles, wise marriage selection, Birth Control: these are the main items in the program of race purification.” The BCR review quoted Stoddard as writing the following:

  • “We have among us, a rebel army, the vast host of unadaptable, the incapable, the morons, the disconnected, filled with instinctive hatred of civilization and progress and ready on the moment to rise in revolt.”
  • “[I]n every civilized country today the superior elements of the population are virtually stationary or actually declining in numbers, while the mediocre elements are rapidly increasing.”
  • “[I]ntelligence is today being steadily bred out of the American population.”
  • “The mere presence of hoards of low-grade men and women, condemned by their very nature to incompetency and failure, automatically engenders poverty, invited exploitation and drags down others just above them in the social scale. Here is the need for action most apparent.”

Stoddard’s racist ideology was totally in line with the founder of Planned Parenthood, Margaret Sanger, according to Dr. Carolyn F. Gerster. Gerster’s research exposing Sanger’s connection to eugenics was published in this 1979 UPI article, where Gerster warned, “There is a… side to Margaret Sanger’s philosophy which must be exposed as it is surfacing in Planned Parenthood’s current policy.”

Margaret Sanger eugenics connection from Carolyn F Gerster (Image: Independent Examiner)

Live Action News has published extensive research on how Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her Planned Parenthood organization.

Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations — leaders identified in the film, Maafa21. In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

                              American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In the aforementioned UPI article, Dr. Gerster noted that Stoddard’s views about the racist Nazi eugenics law of sterilization were very positive. She quoted Stoddard as saying, “The sterilization law is weeding out the worst strains of the Germanic stock is a scientific and truly humanitarian way.”

Maafa21 described Stoddard’s visit to Germany to witness a Nazi eugenics court:

On the 19th of December, 1939, during a four-month stay in Germany, Stoddard was given a personal meeting with both Adolf Hitler and the man who would eventually be in charge of the Nazi holocaust, SS leader Heinrich Himmler. Later, when a course on race was introduced at Halle University in Germany, its instructor stated that it would be modeled on the philosophies of American eugenicists including Lothrop Stoddard. Eventually, Stoddard’s racial views would even be featured in Nazi school textbooks.

                                                     Lothrop Stoddard, on Margaret Sanger board highlighted in Maafa21

Stoddard detailed his observations in witnessing the Nazi eugenics court, in another book, “Into the Darkness: An Uncensored Report from inside the Third Reich at war”:

The first case I saw looked like an excellent candidate for sterilization. A man in his mid-thirties, he was rather ape-like in appearance–receding forehead, flat nose with flaring nostrils, thick lips, and heavy prognathous jaw. Not vicious-looking, but gross and rather dull. His life-history was mildly anti-social–several convictions for minor thefts and one for a homosexual affair with another boy when a lad. In early manhood he had married a Jewess by whom he had three children, none of whom had showed up too well. That marriage had been dissolved under the Nuremberg Laws. He was now seeking to marry a woman who had already been sterilized as a moron. The law forbids a non-sterilized individual to marry a sterilized person; so he was more than willing to be also sterilized. The lower court recommended sterilization…

                       Lothrop Stoddard views Nazi eugenics court (Image credit: Maafa21)

Case Four was a seventeen-year-old girl. The issue was feeble-mindedness. She certainly looked feebleminded as she sat below the bench, hunched in a chair, with dull features and lackluster eyes. Left an orphan at an early age, she had had a haphazard upbringing. The record showed her to have been always shy, backward, and unable to keep up with normal schooling…

I came away convinced that the law was being administered with strict regard for its provisions and that, if anything, judgments were almost too conservative. On the evidence of that one visit, at least, the Sterilization Law is weeding out the worst strains in the Germanic stock in a scientific and truly humanitarian way.

The tragedy of eugenics, of which Sanger and Stoddard were a part, is that it may have influenced Hitler’s Nazi Holocaust, which targeted not only Jews, but the Afro-German community as well as the disabled, and beyond.

Today, in many ways, abortion is doing the exact same thing.

In fact, the same eugenics ideology that laid the groundwork for the Planned Parenthood organization is alive and well in pro-abortion philosophy. Maafa21 presents a compelling case for this connection. The film shows without exception that eugenics, abortion and Planned Parenthood are tied together. So, why do so many remain in denial?

Perhaps the answer to that is seen in the final words of one of the film’s narrators:

You know, when you study the Nazi holocaust, you can see these films of Jews running into ditches to be shot in the head. You can even see films of them actually walking into the gas chambers. And it is tempting to ask yourself why they didn’t fight back. I mean, if you’re going to be killed anyway, what have you got to lose?

Maafa21, Planned Parenthood

Maafa21 host talks about abortion

Perhaps the answer is that they simply could not believe it was really happening. Maybe the normal human mind is just not wired to accept that your fellow man is capable of such senseless brutality on such a scale – even when you see it happening with your own eyes.

As African-Americans, we need to recognize that we are doing the same thing. We need to understand that terms like “pro-choice” and “reproductive rights” and “family planning” are nothing more than marketing slogans. They are just code words that organizations like Planned Parenthood use to hide the fact that we are voluntarily submitting to the will of those who have been trying to exterminate us….

Live Action will be screening Maafa21 live on its social media pages and will be sharing clips of the film throughout the rest of February.

If you would like to order a copy of Maafa21, please visit www.maafa21.com.

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in North Carolina, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Merge ABCL with Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood racist supporter with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 24, 2017 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger spoke to the Ku Klux Klan and supported eugenics. So why does the organization still honor her?

The media seems to be doing an effective job of condemning many people who have an association with the Klu Klux Klan — but one exception to this seems to be Planned Parenthood’s “beloved” founder, Margaret Sanger. Margaret Sanger is usually described as a “birth control pioneer” who founded Planned Parenthood, but she also met with members of the Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.” Sanger wrote about her meeting with the Klan in her autobiography. Yet somehow this fact is made light of, glossed over, or completely ignored by the media.

On page 366 of her autobiography, Sanger described her meeting with the Klan, where she says she received additional invitations to speak with similar groups:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.

What about Sanger’s outspoken support for eugenics?

While some may not be entirely familiar with the meaning of “eugenics,” it’s likely that those same people have seen it in action in various ways. Coined in the mid 1800’s by Francis Galton, the cousin of Charles Darwin, eugenics was a popular movement to create a society in which those who were considered “superior” would reproduce… while those who were deemed “inferior” would be encouraged not to reproduce. Tragically, this movement was credited with forcefully sterilizing many men and women. The targets of these horrendous acts were disproportionately Black and poor, according to many reports.

Screenshot of PP honoring Sanger

Eugenics victim Elaine Riddick speaks in the video below about being “cut up like a hog,” thanks to the philosophy of eugenics. Riddick, like some other Black citizens, was forcibly sterilized in North Carolina in 1968. Her tearful testimony encouraged state lawmakers to vote for reparations for those like her, who were eugenically sterilized.

So how does this relate to Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger? One of the prominent supporters of that horrific eugenics program was Clarence Gamble, and Gamble was a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

In Margaret Sanger’s “Birth Control and Racial Betterment,” the Planned Parenthood founder links the goals of eugenics with her own goals of promoting birth control, writing (emphasis added):

We who advocate Birth Control, on the other hand, lay all our emphasis upon stopping not only the reproduction of the unfit but upon stopping all reproduction when there is not economic means of providing proper care for those who are born in health. …While I personally believe in the sterilization of the feeble-minded, the insane and syphilitic, I have not been able to discover that these measures are more than superficial deterrents when applied to the constantly growing stream of the unfit… Eugenics without Birth Control seems to us a house builded upon the sands. It is at the mercy of the rising stream of the unfit….

Sanger called for unfit to be sent to farms (Image credit Maafa21)

Sanger was highly motivated to stop the procreation by those she deemed “unfit.” In a personal letter to Katharine Dexter McCormick in 1950, Sanger called for “a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people.”

But, Sanger added, “Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately, there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

In 1932, Sanger also called for those who were poor (and those she considered to be “morons and immoral”) to be shipped to colonies where they would live in “Farms and Open Spaces” dedicated to brainwashing these so-called “inferior types” into having what Sanger called better “moral conduct.”  She specifically wanted to keep “immigration closed to the entrance of certain aliens whose condition is known to be detrimental to the stamina of the race.” (“A Plan for Peace,” by Margaret Sanger, published in Birth Control Review (BCR) April 1932, pp. 107-108)

Sanger was more than just a passive observer where eugenics was concerned; she was a member of the American Eugenics Society and even tried to unite her efforts and her publication with the eugenics movement.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

This image below captures a letter entitled, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” written by Sanger.  It was published in the June 1928 edition of her Birth Control Review and it details her meeting (page 188) with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney was the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society (AES) and Sanger published his writings in the Birth Control Review (BCR).

Of interest is that fact that, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him a letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization.

Margaret Sanger to Merge ABCL with Eugenics

Sanger merge w eugenics

The New York Times recorded Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement as well, in an April 1, 1925, article:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger, founder of the American Birth Control League [ABCL], said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis, rather than a eugenic ideal.

Another example where Sanger’s desire to unite with the eugenics movement can be seen is in this ABCL publication from 1935 (below), calling for a resolution that Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later became Planned Parenthood), “unite with the American Eugenics Society.”

Sanger resolution to merge BCR with Eugenics

Sanger made certain that eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization, as Live Action News has previously documented. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders, and members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to Sanger’s connections, Live Action News has documented that many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. (See a partial list here.)

PP’s Margaret Sanger Award

Since the 1960’s, Planned Parenthood has granted its infamous Margaret Sanger Award (calling it their top award) to people who benefit the organization’s cause.

Probably the most well-known recipient of the Margaret Sanger award in more recent times is Hillary Clinton, who said during her acceptance of the award that she “admired Margaret Sanger.” Republicans called her out for her comments, and Clinton responded by making disparaging remarks about Thomas Jefferson instead of repudiating Sanger’s push to eradicate the “unfit.” In the video below, Clinton pays homage to Sanger:

In 2014, then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi accepted the Margaret Sanger award, despite Sanger’s clear support for a hideous eugenic philosophy and associations with the Klan. Pelosi referred to the largest abortion corporation in the nation as an “outstanding organization,” suggesting that Sanger’s philosophy paved the ideology behind Planned Parenthood: “Out of this philosophy and outlook emerged the spirit and driving force of what would become known as the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.” Pelosi added, “To be associated with the great Margaret Sanger is a distinct privilege.”

Nancy Pelosi gets award named after Klan speaker, Margaret Sanger founder of Planned Parenthood

In 2004, the founder of CNN, Ted Turner, received the Margaret Sanger Award. The “honor” was mentioned in Planned Parenthood’s 2004 annual report:

2004 Margaret Sanger award to CNN Founder Ted Turner

Today, Planned Parenthood will defend their founder by pointing to civil rights giants like Martin Luther King, Jr., who also received the Margaret Sanger award. But the full picture and agenda of Sanger and her Planned Parenthood organization were not obvious to many in the Black community at that time, including MLK.

However, despite the suspicious timing of the award to MLK, many Black leaders have since spoken against the birth control and family planning agenda of Planned Parenthood, even calling abortion a form of “black genocide.”

Given this information and much more, when will the media demand recipients of this hideous award return it to Planned Parenthood? And, even more important, when will Congress cut ties with Planned Parenthood and stop sending them half a billion in tax dollars every year?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Yes, Planned Parenthood’s founder spoke to the Klan – but the photo is a fake

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics in Arkansas, Hilda Cornish, Klan, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Klan, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Maggie Awards, Planned Parenthood Margaret Sanger Award with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 22, 2017 by saynsumthn

With the topic of America’s history in racism once again a focus in the news, a fake image of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger speaking to the Klu Klux Klan has been circulating online. While the image is not real, what is quite real is the fact that Sanger, a proponent of eugenics, spoke to a meeting of the women’s branch of KKK in 1926.

The event took place in Silver Lake, New Jersey, and Sanger described in it in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Sanger called that event “one of the weirdest experiences I had in lecturing.”

That being said, the image below, which purports to show Sanger giving that speech before her adoring Klan supporters is not authentic. The image was part of a blogger’s photo contest.

Photo of Margaret Sanger W/ KKK is fake

Sanger and Klan image was part of blog photo contest in 2005 — it is not authentic.

The Sanger/Klan fake was published by the “Margaret Sanger Blog Spot” which held an annual photo contest because, in the blog’s words, “The Big Abortion Industry still holds Margaret Sanger out as an icon. Artwork is one more important ways to promote the truth about Margaret Sanger.”

The blog’s instructions for the contest were to “commemorate Sanger at the Klan rally in unique artistic ways,” including “modern interpretations of Sanger speaking to the Klan.”

But Sanger’s views were so outrageous in and of themselves that there is no need to circulate inaccurate depictions, which could lead to attempts to discredit her meeting with the Klan altogether.

Sanger has a very controversial history as an enthusiastic proponent of eugenics and a member of the American Eugenics Society. This philosophy not only fed her work within the Planned Parenthood movement, but her lesser known advocacy of euthanasia as well. The organizations Sanger founded, such as The American Birth Control League (ABCL) and later, Planned Parenthood, also have ties to many eugenics proponents.

Clarence Cook Little

Clarence C. Little

One of those connections was a man by the name of Clarence Cook Little.

According to a biographical memoir published by the National Academy of Sciences, Little held various distinguished positions. He was the president of the University of Maine and of the University of Michigan, and he was the managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer.

He was named the director of The Jackson Laboratory and later accepted a position as scientific director of the Tobacco Industrial Research Committee. He was also a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences.

Sadly, Little was also president and founding member of The American Eugenics Society, as well as a board member of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League. He was also the Birth Control Federation President, and sat on the previously mentioned American Euthanasia Society board.

Little was also listed on the 1938 Committee for Planned Parenthood.

CC Little ties to Eugenics and Sanger’s ABCL

Little has since been denounced by some in modern society who have called for his name to be removed from the University of Michigan’s science building for his belief in eugenics. An op-ed penned by the daughter of an interracial couple and a student at the University of Michigan published last year by MTV.com shows the disdain for Little:

There is a building (and a bus stop) on the University of Michigan campus named for Clarence Cook (C.C.) Little. He was the University’s president in 1925, and an outspoken “scientific” racist and eugenicist, who believed that “inferior” races should undergo involuntary sterilization. I often sat at the bus stop bearing his name while I waited to go to class. Little would have hated that.

Despite the merit of these denouncements, few have expressed concern over Little’s ties to Planned Parenthood’s history.

Hilda Cornish

Another interesting eugenics connection to both Sanger and Planned Parenthood is a woman by the name of Hilda Kahlert Cornish. Hilda Cornish chaired the Arkansas Eugenics Association. According to a 1986 article in an Arkansas newspaper, Cornish received much of her counsel directly from Margaret Sanger. In fact, the Blytheville Courier Press notes that the sons of the two leaders were roommates at Yale University.

The documentary film on eugenics, Maafa21 (clipped below) details disturbing connections the Arkansas Eugenics Association had to Planned Parenthood:

The film states:

From its beginning, Planned Parenthood always had powerful ties to the American Eugenics community. In fact, in many places they were often one in the same.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.

Later, the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Documents obtained by Live Action News confirm this fact.

A 1945 Planned Parenthood directory reveals that Mrs. Edward Cornish was the director of the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas. Cornish was active with the Democrat Party and married to banker Edward Cornish, according to Arkansas historians.

She is also listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society.

According to the Encyclopedia of Arkansas:

In the summer of 1930, [Cornish] met Margaret Sanger… The two developed a friendship maintained by correspondence and occasional meetings. During that summer, Cornish visited Sanger’s Clinical Research Bureau in New York, and she launched the Arkansas birth control movement later that same year.

At Cornish’s initiative, a group of physicians, business and religious leaders, and women active in civic work formed the Arkansas Eugenics Association (AEA)…. In early 1931, the association opened the Little Rock Birth Control Clinic in the basement of Baptist Hospital…. Cornish also worked with the National Committee on Federal Legislation for Birth Control.

The online historical site added that in 1942, The Arkansas Eugenics Association changed its name… to the Planned Parenthood Association of Arkansas.

Segregated Clinics

Authors of the bookHidden Histories of Women in the New South, noted that the “first report of the Arkansas Eugenics Association stated that the Little Rock clinic registered 161 White women during its first eleven months of service.”

The book concludes that Cornish was more aligned with promoting birth control than the national eugenics movement. (That being said, Sanger herself wanted to merge her publications with the national eugenics organization.)

The book‘s authors reveal that the clinic “directed its efforts towards poor women only,” yet they imply a prejudice against Blacks by writing that “African American women were not invited to the [Arkansas Eugenics] clinic from its start in 1931.”

www.AbortionProcedures.com click here for facts on abortion

The authors add that “until 1937, only white women actually had the opportunity to receive services” and the organization “held separate hours for white and African American women.” The book also notes that “most of [the American Birth Control League’s] clinics were segregated.” The ABCL later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Planned Parenthood’s beloved founder Margaret Sanger reached out to many people who saw Blacks as less than equal, and this includes the Klan and the Eugenics movement.

Today, many believe that Sanger’s racist ideologies have penetrated much of her work. And even without an image to document Sanger’s speech before the Klan, Planned Parenthood knows her history, as revealed in her own autobiography.

Instead of repudiating Sanger, taxpayer-funded Planned Parenthood honors her as a hero, naming their most prestigious award after her. It’s despicable.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Are Sanger’s eugenic efforts still a hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission?

Posted in Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by saynsumthn

From Live Action News |

In celebrating their 100th birthday, Planned Parenthood supporters continue to praise their founder Margaret Sanger (even featuring her on their 100 year website) while simultaneously attempting to distance the organization from her eugenicist beliefs. The problem is that they continue to hold Sanger up as an icon, despite her support of one of the most demeaning ideologies of recent centuries.

planned-parenthood-100-years-features-margaret-sanger

In celebrating their 100 year anniversary, Planned Parenthood says (as pictured above) the organization “was founded on the revolutionary idea that women should have the information and care they need to live strong, healthy lives and fulfill their dreams.” But is this true? Was Planned Parenthood really founded on those ideas? Not quite.

Alexander Sanger (image credit IPPF)

Alexander Sanger (image credit IPPF)

In an interview with Vox, Margaret Sanger’s grandson Alexander Sanger, who is the current Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Council and a former president of Planned Parenthood New York City, tried to gloss over his grandmother’s beliefs by claiming that she only “dabbled in eugenics”:

Now, she also dabbled in eugenics. She was not a full believer in all of eugenics, and disagreed with some of the things eugenicists believe in. But at various points in her life, she was opposed to women who she felt were incapable of being mothers from becoming mothers.

How does being “opposed to women who she felt were incapable of being mothers from becoming mothers” square with the idea that women should have “information” and be able to “fulfill their dreams,” as is advertised on the website graphic above? What if those women dreamed of motherhood? And we are supposed to believe that Sanger was some sort of feminist icon?

If Margaret Sanger was “not a full believer in eugenics” as her grandson suggests, it wasn’t where the so-called “unfit” were concerned. The founder of Planned Parenthood clearly advocated eugenic solutions for that “class of people” she deemed unworthy to have children, even calling for a “license to breed” and the permanent sterilization of those she deemed “feebleminded.” If Sanger differed from rank and file eugenicists, it was that she also supported those she called “fit” to voluntarily limit their children. In her autobiography, Sanger wrote:

Eugenics, which had started long before my time, had once been defined as including free love and prevention of conception. Moses Harman of Chicago, one of its chief early adherents, had run a magazine and gone to jail for it under the Comstock regime. Recently it had cropped up again in the form of selective breeding, and biologists and geneticists such as Clarence C. Little, President of the University of Maine, and C. B. Davenport, Director of the Cold Spring Harbor Station for Experimental Evolution, had popularized their findings under this heading…. I accepted one branch of this philosophy, but eugenics without birth control seemed to me a house built upon sands.

The fact is that despite the claims of Planned Parenthood’s supporters, not only did Sanger have a strong belief in eugenics, she made certain eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders or members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

And here is Margaret Sanger herself, listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society. Hardly a “dabble,” as her grandson has suggested:

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

Margaret was such a strong believer in eugenics that she even attempted to merge her publication with the Eugenics Society (which again doesn’t sound like “dabbling” to me). An April 1, 1925, article in the New York Times documented Sanger’s intentions:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger founder of the American Birth Control League, said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis rather than a eugenic ideal.

nyt1925merge-abcl-eugenics1

mergeabclwitheugenicsThis letter, written by Sanger in June of 1928 and published in her Birth Control Review under the heading, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” Sanger details her meeting with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society in order to “reach[] a wider audience and cover[] a more extended field.” Whitney was the former executive secretary of the American Eugenics Society and Sanger willingly published his writings in her Birth Control Review.

woman-and-the-new-race-eugenics-publishing-company-margaret-sanger2Some of Sanger’s writings, listed below, were even published by the eugenics movement (Source: Margaret Sanger, Pioneer of Birth Control, by Lawrence Lader and Milton Meltzer):

• What Every Mother Should Know, originally published by the Eugenics Publishing Co. in 1916
• What Every Girl Should Know, originally published by the Eugenics Publishing Co. in 1922

Planned Parenthood promoters try to convince the public that Sanger — a member of the American Eugenics Society who, by the way, also advocated for euthanasia — was simply a product of her day. But the facts paint a much different picture. Despite the evidence, Planned Parenthood’s supporters are working overtime to gloss over their founder’s beliefs.

Planned Parenthood Board Member Max Michael

Planned Parenthood Board Member Max Michael

In an op-ed praising abortion giant Planned Parenthood’s work as “health care equity,” Max Michael, MD, a member of the Planned Parenthood Southeast Board of Director, recently wrote:

Like many great organizations, Planned Parenthood is not without its flaws. While Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, was a woman of tremendous achievement, she was also a flawed and imperfect leader. She devoted her life to enabling women to have control over when and whether to have children, yet she also had beliefs, practices, and associations that Planned Parenthood acknowledges, denounces and works to redress.

Michael’s words coincidentally seem to mirror Planned Parenthood’s published talking points.

Planned Parenthood proudly calls Sanger a “reproductive rights trailblazer,” “woman of heroic accomplishments,” and “a true visionary,” while at the same time claiming to denounce her views, even giving Sanger a pass for speaking to the Klu Klux Klan, writing:

However, it is true that Margaret Sanger made a speech on birth control to a women’s auxiliary branch of the Ku Klux Klan in Silver Lake, New Jersey, in 1926. Sanger’s passion to spread and mainstream birth control led her to speak to any group interested in learning how to plan their reproduction. Planned Parenthood strongly disagrees with Sanger’s decision to address an organization that spreads hatred (Sanger, 1938, 366).

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger, 2008

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger, 2008

Planned Parenthood leaves out the fact that Sanger was encouraged by the results of her speech to the Klan, saying, “In the end, through simple illustrations I believe I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.”

As the public learns the truth about Sanger’s beliefs, they tend to become less supportive of Planned Parenthood’s mission. It is this reality that likely prompted an unusual response from a Planned Parenthood spokesperson in 2011, after a member of the Humanist Community Forum in California asked her how she would respond to statements that Margaret Sanger was “such a racist.”

Guadalupe Rodriguez, Director of Public Affairs for Planned Parenthood Mar Monte in Silicon Valley, Alameda and San Mateo Counties, answered (watch the exchange at 37:44):

What we say is that she did make these statements – they were wrong then and they’re wrong now. We’re not standing by anything that she said–we’re not standing by her beliefs. We are a vastly different organization now than we were when she first started the group. We’ve evolved…. What we say is her statements and her beliefs were wrong then and they’re wrong now and we don’t stand with her – we are a different organization.

Planned Parenthood has a strange way of “denouncing” and “disagreeing” and not “standing by” Sanger’s beliefs — they named their most prestigious award after her. Sadly, even though Sanger’s beliefs were despicable, many journalists and politicians alike have accepted the infamous Margaret Sanger Award without hesitation.

Planned Parenthood’s doublespeak regarding Sanger is troubling, to say the least. The organization has called her one of the “greatest heroines,” while simultaneously denouncing her eugenic efforts. Privately, they acknowledge that Sanger’s vision was the foundation of Planned Parenthood’s mission. A 2008 Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains annual report says of Sanger, “Sanger’s early efforts remain the hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission.”