Archive for the Margaret Sanger and AES Category

Are Sanger’s eugenic efforts still a hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission?

Posted in Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood Eugenics Connections with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by saynsumthn

From Live Action News |

In celebrating their 100th birthday, Planned Parenthood supporters continue to praise their founder Margaret Sanger (even featuring her on their 100 year website) while simultaneously attempting to distance the organization from her eugenicist beliefs. The problem is that they continue to hold Sanger up as an icon, despite her support of one of the most demeaning ideologies of recent centuries.

planned-parenthood-100-years-features-margaret-sanger

In celebrating their 100 year anniversary, Planned Parenthood says (as pictured above) the organization “was founded on the revolutionary idea that women should have the information and care they need to live strong, healthy lives and fulfill their dreams.” But is this true? Was Planned Parenthood really founded on those ideas? Not quite.

Alexander Sanger (image credit IPPF)

Alexander Sanger (image credit IPPF)

In an interview with Vox, Margaret Sanger’s grandson Alexander Sanger, who is the current Chair of the International Planned Parenthood Council and a former president of Planned Parenthood New York City, tried to gloss over his grandmother’s beliefs by claiming that she only “dabbled in eugenics”:

Now, she also dabbled in eugenics. She was not a full believer in all of eugenics, and disagreed with some of the things eugenicists believe in. But at various points in her life, she was opposed to women who she felt were incapable of being mothers from becoming mothers.

How does being “opposed to women who she felt were incapable of being mothers from becoming mothers” square with the idea that women should have “information” and be able to “fulfill their dreams,” as is advertised on the website graphic above? What if those women dreamed of motherhood? And we are supposed to believe that Sanger was some sort of feminist icon?

If Margaret Sanger was “not a full believer in eugenics” as her grandson suggests, it wasn’t where the so-called “unfit” were concerned. The founder of Planned Parenthood clearly advocated eugenic solutions for that “class of people” she deemed unworthy to have children, even calling for a “license to breed” and the permanent sterilization of those she deemed “feebleminded.” If Sanger differed from rank and file eugenicists, it was that she also supported those she called “fit” to voluntarily limit their children. In her autobiography, Sanger wrote:

Eugenics, which had started long before my time, had once been defined as including free love and prevention of conception. Moses Harman of Chicago, one of its chief early adherents, had run a magazine and gone to jail for it under the Comstock regime. Recently it had cropped up again in the form of selective breeding, and biologists and geneticists such as Clarence C. Little, President of the University of Maine, and C. B. Davenport, Director of the Cold Spring Harbor Station for Experimental Evolution, had popularized their findings under this heading…. I accepted one branch of this philosophy, but eugenics without birth control seemed to me a house built upon sands.

The fact is that despite the claims of Planned Parenthood’s supporters, not only did Sanger have a strong belief in eugenics, she made certain eugenics movers and shakers were deeply embedded in her organization. Below is a sample list of American Eugenics Society founders, leaders or members who were a part of Margaret Sanger’s board or organizations:

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger's Board (image credit Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society members on Margaret Sanger’s Board (Image credit: Maafa21)

And here is Margaret Sanger herself, listed as a member of the American Eugenics Society. Hardly a “dabble,” as her grandson has suggested:

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

Margaret was such a strong believer in eugenics that she even attempted to merge her publication with the Eugenics Society (which again doesn’t sound like “dabbling” to me). An April 1, 1925, article in the New York Times documented Sanger’s intentions:

Mrs. Margaret Sanger founder of the American Birth Control League, said that the league was ready to unite with the eugenic movement whenever the eugenists were able to present a definite program of standards for parenthood on a eugenic basis rather than a eugenic ideal.

nyt1925merge-abcl-eugenics1

mergeabclwitheugenicsThis letter, written by Sanger in June of 1928 and published in her Birth Control Review under the heading, “Shall the Birth Control Review be combined with a Eugenics Magazine?” Sanger details her meeting with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society in order to “reach[] a wider audience and cover[] a more extended field.” Whitney was the former executive secretary of the American Eugenics Society and Sanger willingly published his writings in her Birth Control Review.

woman-and-the-new-race-eugenics-publishing-company-margaret-sanger2Some of Sanger’s writings, listed below, were even published by the eugenics movement (Source: Margaret Sanger, Pioneer of Birth Control, by Lawrence Lader and Milton Meltzer):

• What Every Mother Should Know, originally published by the Eugenics Publishing Co. in 1916
• What Every Girl Should Know, originally published by the Eugenics Publishing Co. in 1922

Planned Parenthood promoters try to convince the public that Sanger — a member of the American Eugenics Society who, by the way, also advocated for euthanasia — was simply a product of her day. But the facts paint a much different picture. Despite the evidence, Planned Parenthood’s supporters are working overtime to gloss over their founder’s beliefs.

Planned Parenthood Board Member Max Michael

Planned Parenthood Board Member Max Michael

In an op-ed praising abortion giant Planned Parenthood’s work as “health care equity,” Max Michael, MD, a member of the Planned Parenthood Southeast Board of Director, recently wrote:

Like many great organizations, Planned Parenthood is not without its flaws. While Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, was a woman of tremendous achievement, she was also a flawed and imperfect leader. She devoted her life to enabling women to have control over when and whether to have children, yet she also had beliefs, practices, and associations that Planned Parenthood acknowledges, denounces and works to redress.

Michael’s words coincidentally seem to mirror Planned Parenthood’s published talking points.

Planned Parenthood proudly calls Sanger a “reproductive rights trailblazer,” “woman of heroic accomplishments,” and “a true visionary,” while at the same time claiming to denounce her views, even giving Sanger a pass for speaking to the Klu Klux Klan, writing:

However, it is true that Margaret Sanger made a speech on birth control to a women’s auxiliary branch of the Ku Klux Klan in Silver Lake, New Jersey, in 1926. Sanger’s passion to spread and mainstream birth control led her to speak to any group interested in learning how to plan their reproduction. Planned Parenthood strongly disagrees with Sanger’s decision to address an organization that spreads hatred (Sanger, 1938, 366).

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger, 2008

Planned Parenthood praises Margaret Sanger, 2008

Planned Parenthood leaves out the fact that Sanger was encouraged by the results of her speech to the Klan, saying, “In the end, through simple illustrations I believe I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.”

As the public learns the truth about Sanger’s beliefs, they tend to become less supportive of Planned Parenthood’s mission. It is this reality that likely prompted an unusual response from a Planned Parenthood spokesperson in 2011, after a member of the Humanist Community Forum in California asked her how she would respond to statements that Margaret Sanger was “such a racist.”

Guadalupe Rodriguez, Director of Public Affairs for Planned Parenthood Mar Monte in Silicon Valley, Alameda and San Mateo Counties, answered (watch the exchange at 37:44):

What we say is that she did make these statements – they were wrong then and they’re wrong now. We’re not standing by anything that she said–we’re not standing by her beliefs. We are a vastly different organization now than we were when she first started the group. We’ve evolved…. What we say is her statements and her beliefs were wrong then and they’re wrong now and we don’t stand with her – we are a different organization.

Planned Parenthood has a strange way of “denouncing” and “disagreeing” and not “standing by” Sanger’s beliefs — they named their most prestigious award after her. Sadly, even though Sanger’s beliefs were despicable, many journalists and politicians alike have accepted the infamous Margaret Sanger Award without hesitation.

Planned Parenthood’s doublespeak regarding Sanger is troubling, to say the least. The organization has called her one of the “greatest heroines,” while simultaneously denouncing her eugenic efforts. Privately, they acknowledge that Sanger’s vision was the foundation of Planned Parenthood’s mission. A 2008 Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains annual report says of Sanger, “Sanger’s early efforts remain the hallmark of Planned Parenthood’s mission.”

 

Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go far beyond Margaret Sanger

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics Quarterly, Eugenics Review, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 9, 2017 by saynsumthn

From Live Action News

One of the more frustrating things pro-lifers hear from abortion supporters is the claim that Planned Parenthood has never been about eugenics. It is simply intellectually dishonest as well as a total denial of history to make such a claim. Such was the case recently when MSNBC’s Joy Reid defended Planned Parenthood and cut off a guest who criticized Hillary Clinton because she once admitted that she admired Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger.

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger

According to author George Grant in his book Grand Illusions: The Legacy of Planned Parenthood:

[Sanger] began to build the work of the American Birth Control League, and ultimately, of Planned Parenthood. Margaret relied heavily on the men, women, ideas, and resources of the Eugenics movement. Virtually all of the organization’s board members were Eugenicists. Financing for the early projects from the opening of the birth control clinics to the publishing of the revolutionary literature – came from Eugenicists. The speakers at the conferences, the authors of the literature and the providers of the services were almost without exception avid Eugenicists. And the international work of Planned Parenthood were originally housed in the offices of the Eugenics Society while the organizations themselves were institutionally intertwined for years.

Sanger was an avowed eugenicist and a member of the American Eugenics Society, and she also proudly spoke to the Ku Klux Klan, something she described in her autobiography…

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered. (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger writes about her speech with the Klan

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger writes about her speech with the Klan

But, as abortion supporters who view Sanger as a heroine often do, they make the claim that Sanger is dead and therefore we are to simply ignore her Klan interactions, eugenics connections, rants about immigrants, push for forced sterilization and her failed goal of merging with the Eugenics Society.

Today, we are told that Sanger was a product of her day and that her attempt to have the “unfit” sterilized, the “feebleminded” shipped off, or her radical suggestion that couples be forced to get a permit from the state to have children (she wrote“No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood“) had no lasting impact on the organization she founded, namely, Planned Parenthood.

The fact is that despite the claims of their supporters, not only does Planned Parenthood have a connection to eugenics separate from their founder, but many of Planned Parenthood’s officials were members or leaders of the American Eugenics Society. The following is a very abbreviated list of examples:

Henry P. Fairchild was vice president of Planned Parenthood and (surprise!) he was also a past president of the American Eugenics Society. According to the American Sociological Association, “One of Fairchild’s most famous contributions was the development of the Planned Parenthood of America Federation, called the Birth Control Federation of America until 1942. There he served on the Board of Directors in 1932 and later the Vice President from 1939-1948.”

Samuel W. Anderson was a member of the American Eugenics Society and served on Planned Parenthood Federation of America’s Board of Directors.

CP Blacker was Secretary to the Eugenics Society and Vice Chairman of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF).

Mrs. Dorothy Brush was involved with the American Eugenics Society as well as the International Planned Parenthood Federation. In 1948, The Brush Foundation provided seed money to help establish the International Committee on Planned Parenthood (ICPP). In 1952, the organization opened its headquarters in London, England.

C. Lalor Burdick was a member of the American Eugenics Society and served on the Board of Directors for Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) and PPFA’s World Population Emergency Campaign.

Arkansas Eugenics Assoc. becomes state Planned Parenthood affiliate. (Image screen from Maafa21)

Arkansas Eugenics Society becomes state Planned Parenthood affiliate. (Image screen from Maafa21)

Mrs. Edward (Hilda) Cornish was not only a member of the American Eugenics Society, she was also an officer of the Arkansas Eugenics Association (later the Arkansas Eugenics Association, which would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood). Despite her direct connection to eugenics organizations, Cornish was named Arkansas Planned Parenthood’s executive director.

Robert L. Dickinson was a Vice President of Planned Parenthood and served on their Board of Directors. However, his eugenics ties were as deep as Sanger’s. In fact, he was a member of the American Eugenics Society as well as a committee chairman for Eugenics Research Associationevent.

Dr. Haven Emerson was on the Board of Directors for the American Eugenics Society and served as a Chairman of Planned Parenthood Federation of America. Emerson was also a member of their National Medical Council.

In addition to those who officially served as leaders of Planned Parenthood who had direct ties to eugenics (too many to name here), there were others who were accepted with open arms despite their eugenics history.

Professor Frank Lorimer was part of the Eugenics Research Association and served on the editorial board of the Eugenics Quartlerly. Despite his eugenics connections, he represented the Planned Parenthood Federation of America at various meetings.

Dr. Charles F. Dight was the president of the Minnesota Eugenics Society when he wrote a letter to Adolf Hitler in 1933, wishing him success in “stamping out mental inferiority among the German people,” noting the Nazi leader’s efforts would “advance the eugenics movement in other nations as well as in Germany.”

In the 1930s, Dight joined the Minnesota Birth Control League, the forerunner of Planned Parenthood of Minnesota.

Charles F Dight letter to Hitler ( Image from document provided by the Minnesota Historical Society)

Charles F Dight letter to Hitler ( Image from document provided by the Minnesota Historical Society)

Frederic Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

Planned Parenthood invites Eugenics officer to speak to their lunch

Planned Parenthood invites Eugenics officer to speak to their lunch

In 1958, Planned Parenthood was still cozy with eugenics leaders. In the article pictured right, we learn that the Director of the American Eugenics Society, Robert Carter Cook, was invited by Planned Parenthood to speak at their lunch in 1958.

In addition to Planned Parenthood leaders who had connections to eugenics, the International Committee on Planned Parenthood (ICPP) maintained by PPFA among others, received free rent from the Eugenics Society, according to the Eugenics Review. ICPP was replaced by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) in 1952.

Does this sound like an organization that wanted to distance themselves from eugenics?

Wait… there’s more.

From their Review (and repeated here):

In conclusion, a unanimous vote of thanks was moved to the Eugenics Society, which has continued during the past year to make available, rent free, accommodation to the International Committee on Planned Parenthood.

This was confirmed by former Planned Parenthood chairman CP Blacker MD, who told an audience at the Fourth Conference at the International Planned Parenthood Federation in 1964, that while he was secretary of the Eugenics Society they gave Planned Parenthood office accommodations rent free.

Let’s stop and consider the intentional blindness to truth that Joy Reid and others would have to have to claim that Planned Parenthood is not a eugenic organization. The fact is that Planned Parenthood was so supportive of the evil eugenics ideology that they advertised in eugenics journals. For Reid and others who doubt this fact, I provide some examples below (notice that their goals and beliefs go far beyond “reproductive rights”):

1968:

1968 advertisement by Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

1968 advertisement by Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

The Eugenics Society’s honorary secretary even encouraged funding IPPF, saying, “The Society’s activities in crypto-eugenics should be pursued vigorously, and specifically that the Society should increase its monetary support of the FPA and the IPPF [International Planned Parenthood Federation]…”

1963:

1963 Advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review Quarterly

1963 Advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review Quarterly

1961:

1961 advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

1961 advertisement from Planned Parenthood in the Eugenics Review

In summary, it is evident that from its inception, Sanger founded and nurtured Planned Parenthood in eugenics — and denying what is plain to see will never change that fact.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Planned Parenthood to NAACP Margaret Sanger’s eugenics statements were wrong

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Eugenics Quarterly, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger Award, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics with tags , , , , , , , , , on September 18, 2014 by saynsumthn

RadianceFoundation

Since February 2013, the nation’s oldest civil rights group, the NAACP, has spent over half a million suing the black organization, The Radiance Foundation and Life News founder, Steven Ertelt, for what it charges as “trademark infringement, confusion and dilution.” This so-called infringement included The Radiance Foundation’s news articles that detailed the NAACP pro-abortion actions and the NAACP’s ties to Planned Parenthood.

Read those details here !

So…it was a little surprising to me to discover that among other clear ties, in 2012, Planned Parenthood gave the NAACP $25,000

PP Gives to NAACP 2012 LG

It was also interesting to learn that Planned Parenthood sent an open letter to the NAACP to attack pro-lifers who tied the abortion giant to eugenics. In that letter, Planned Parenthood admits that their founder, Margaret Sanger’s eugenics belief were wrong.

NAACP letter from PP

In a letter published in a 2011 NAACP Newsletter, Jessica Bearden Laurenz, the Director of Public Policy for Planned Parenthood Health Systems, attacks pro-lifers for exposing the racist agenda of abortion and writes, “In recent years, instead of working with reproductive health advocates to address these inequalities, individuals and organizations opposed to legal abortion have resorted to divisive messages based on race to further their agenda.”

billboardMostDangerous

Laurenz continues, “The most widely publicized effort is the “Black Children are an Endangered Species” billboards put up in Atlanta last year. Most recently, billboards appeared in New York with the message “The most dangerous place for an African-American child is in the womb.” These messages suggest that comparatively higher abortion rates in African-American communities are the result of insidious targeting by providers like Planned Parenthood. That’s completely inaccurate. Planned Parenthood health centers provide affordable health care to every woman who comes to us, regardless of her race or ethnic background. Planned Parenthood views these billboards as a reprehensible attack on the right of African-American women to make deeply personal medical decisions based on the advice of doctors in consultation with loved ones and in accordance with their faith. They obscure black women’s agency and trivialize the very real violence and discrimination that threatens African- American children in the United States.

Sanger KKK

She goes on to say that the eugenics statements of Margaret Sanger, Planned Parenthood’s founder, was wrong and then attempts to convince the Black organization that Planned Parenthood never had anything to do with eugenics, “I do want to be clear: Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger, did make statements nearly a century ago on the issue of eugenics that were wrong then and are still wrong today. These ideas have never been part of Planned Parenthood’s mission or the care it offers to women of every community. The abhorrent history of eugenics, when women—many of whom were African-American—were forcibly sterilized and robbed of their ability to have children, is a stark reminder that real reproductive freedom is not just about abortion, but about the ability to decide when and if to become a parent, [abortion] and the right to parent your children when you choose to have them. In South Carolina, there is much work left to do to make reproductive freedom [abortion] a reality.”

She goes on to state, “When the South Carolina legislature addresses reproductive health issues, it is
usually only to launch divisive attacks on access to abortion care. We’re committed to partnering with the NAACP to change the conversation in South Carolina…We look forward to increasing collaboration between our two organizations and engaging in a dialogue on how to achieve better reproductive health outcomes for all South Carolinians.”

2011 Newsletter NAACP  PP

Research conducted by Ryan Bomberger of the Radiance Foundation which was sued by the NAACP seems to contradict the claim that Margaret Sanger’s eugenics agenda was never a part of Planned Parenthood.

In addition a powerful documentary produced by the Texas group, Life Dynamics, entitled, Maafa21 Black Genocide in 21st Century America clearly ties Sanger’s views to Planned Parenthood. The 2.5 hour film has gained traction in the Black Community and it would seem that the NAACP was not going to allow a black man like Ryan to continue to point this out.

SANGERKKK2

Sanger was an admitted Klan speaker. This is what Sanger wrote in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366 Read it here http://library.lifedynamics.com//Autobiography/Chapter%2029.pdf)

In addition, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger was an active member of the American Eugenics Society:

Sanger AES

Below you will see that the Jan 1942 Eugenics Review sends congrats to Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League which later became known as Planned Parenthood

Eugenics Review Congrats ABCL Jan 1942

In fact, Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) as well as her Birth Control Federation used to embrace the Eugenics label. Below is an article clearly showing that the media knew their agenda at this time:

ABCL Group is a Eugenics Group

But, what about Planned Parenthood?

Research this blog has conducted clearly proves that Planned Parenthood was deeply soaked in eugenics.

Even the Planned Parenthood “Every Child a Wanted Child” slogan may originate from Eugenics Society founder, Frederic Osborn, who once stated that, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Read more on that here.

____________________________________________

It was also clear that as the ABCL morphed into Planned Parenthood they also embraced Eugenics.

Here is a Director of the American Eugenics Society, Robert Carter Cook, being invited by Planned Parenthood to speak at their lunch:

Robert Cook AES Speaks to PP

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Here is Henry P. Fairchild a past president of the American Eugenics Society, a VP of Planned Parenthood;

Henry Fairchild PP AES

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Vice President of the American Eugenics Society Dr. Alan Guttmacher is also president of Planned Parenthood

Guttmacher VP AES article

_____________________________________________________

For Rent PP AES
In fact, Planned Parenthood received FREE RENT from the American Eugenics Society

Eugenics S Rent Free to IPPF
Document shows International #Planned Parenthood received rent free space from #Eugenics Society. Full here http://tinyurl.com/k8zhhxg

Jan1961 PP Ad
Above: Planned Parenthood ad inside the Eugenics Review Volume 52(4); January 1961

Eugenics Review  Sept 1968 PP
ABOVE: International Planned Parenthood add in Eugenics Review Volume 60(3); September 1968

In conclusion- even if you are to take Planned Parenthood’s words in any way seriously, why is it that their top award is named after Margaret Sanger? Why do they continue to prop up the very person they say was wrong and others say was extremely racist? And given that, why does the NAACP continue to allow it?

Blacks sterilized by eugenics program funded by Margaret Sanger supporter

Posted in Clarence Gamble, Elaine Riddick, Eugenics in North Carolina, Eugenics Review, Life Dynamics, Margaret Sanger and AES, North Carolina Eugenics with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on April 11, 2014 by saynsumthn

Maafa21 logo by Life Dynamics originally published here

Apr 11, 2014 10:57:00 AM

Eugenic sterilization programs existed in America in at least 31 states. Many of the women forced or coerced into sterilization were black.

From 1929 to 1974, the state of North Carolina forcibly sterilized thousands of people who were deemed to be mentally handicapped, promiscuous or unfit to have children.

Life Dynamics has documented the history of the American Eugenics Society including North Carolina’s forced sterilization program in their film, Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America.

Eugenics Society member, Margaret Sanger, who later founded Planned Parenthood, also advocated sterilization of the so-called unfit.

In 1950 Sanger advocated eugenic sterilization in a personal letter she wrote to Katharine Dexter McCormick, an heir to the International Harvester fortune who used her immense wealth to fund the development of the birth-control pill.

Sanger wrote, “I consider that the world and almost our civilization for the next twenty-five years, is going to depend upon a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people. Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately; there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

Sanger I Consider

Sanger’s connections to eugenics was nothing new. She had long praised their ideologies and published several articles on the topic in her Birth Control Review.

In 1935, Sanger’s American Birth Control League published a resolution to unite with the American Eugenics Society.

Sanger 1935abcl-eugenics

Mark Crutcher, President of Life Dynamics elaborates, “These ties between eugenics and Planned Parenthood’s founder were so well established that Sanger, who was a long standing member of the American Eugenics Society, once pursued a plan to merge the American Birth Control League, or Planned Parenthood as it was later called, with the American Eugenics Society. However, despite Sanger’s strong support for the merger, it would eventually be rejected by the leadership of the American Eugenics Society. Sanger then pushed a proposal that would have combined the publications of the two organizations into one magazine. But again, that idea was also rejected by the American Eugenics Society.”

In 1939, Sanger described the American Birth Control League’s Negro Project in a letter to fellow eugenicist, Clarence Gamble, “The minister’s work is also important and also he should be trained, perhaps by the Federation as to our ideals and the goal that we hope to reach. We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

SangerNegroQuote

Gamble was a heir to the Proctor and Gamble fortune and a major financial backer of Sanger’s.

Gamble was also a director of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League, which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood.

Gamble Sterilization EU

In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s State’s sterilization program saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.

Research from North Carolina’s Winston-Salem Journal reveals a long history of abuses in the N.C. sterilization program — abuses that Gamble consistently glossed over. According to the Journal, “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

But merely wanting the sterilizations to happen was not enough for this Margaret Sanger supporter. Clarence Gamble put his money where his eugenics views were and actually funded the North Carolina Eugenics Board that sterilized many blacks, including 14 year old Elaine Riddick.

This is her story excerpted from Life Dynamics’ film: Maafa21:

Shortly after this interview in Maafa21, Elaine Riddick testified before the North Carolina State Legislature in a successful effort to receive compensation for the sterilization.

They cut me open like I was a hog,” Elaine Riddick testified tearfully, “I didn’t even know nothing about this stuff.”

Riddick told the lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, BLACK, and from a bad home environment.

North Carolina was not the only state whose eugenics programs were influenced by friends of Sanger or Planned Parenthood. In some parts of the country, Planned Parenthood was closely associated with these state eugenics boards and was often a referral agency for them.
PP Eugenics Tree
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In fact, documents from eugenics publications reveal that ‪later, as Sanger’s American Birth Control League morphed into Planned Parenthood they received rent free space from ‪the Eugenics Society.

A fact which is rarely reported is that, in many places, Planned Parenthood was one and the same as the Eugenics Society.

For example, when the first birth control clinic was opened in Arkansas, it was operated by the Arkansas Eugenics Association and overseen by a woman named Hilda Cornish.
Hilda Cornish ARK eugenics Society letter

Later the Arkansas Eugenics Association would become the Arkansas State Affiliate of Planned Parenthood and Cornish would be named its executive director.

Planned Parenthood ARK eugenics society

Supporters and directors of Margaret Sanger were, like her, entrenched in eugenics. Sanger’s backers knew that they were promoting views that would limit the population of a certain group or race of people, primarily African Americans. Their eugenics agenda reached into the lives of innocent and unsuspecting victims like Elaine Riddick with programs of coerced sterilization. But Elaine represents merely a fraction of the black women affected by eugenics.

Over the years the names of these organizations may have changed but their eugenics agenda remains the same and are targeting more unsuspecting people today.

Elaine Riddick

Euphemisms and sterilization target code words, for example, “feebleminded”, were used to describe Black women like me, Elaine Riddick. I was forcibly sterilized at the age of 14 years under North Carolina’s inhumane forced sterilization policy. A policy that was derived from Margaret Sanger’s Planned Parenthood population control handbook, which spread across the United States by her loyal band of eugenicists and lobbying our elected officials,” Elaine Riddick wrote recently.

For more on the forced sterilization of Black women and the eugenics movement, watch Maafa21.

For more on Life Dynamics go here http://www.lifedynamics.com

Planned Parenthood knee deep in Eugenics movement

Posted in Eugenics, Eugenics Review, Guttmacher, Henry Fairchild, Margaret Sanger and AES, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Robert C Cook with tags , , , , , , , on October 15, 2013 by saynsumthn

PP Eugenics Tree

Planned Parenthood the nation’s largest abortion provider time and again claims they are not connected to Eugenics. Planned Parenthood received their official name in 1942, but it came as a name change from American Birth Control League, founded by Margaret Sanger. Sanger was a member of the American Eugenics Society and pushed Population Control. In any respect, both the American Birth Control League and Planned Parenthood were knee deep in Eugenics.

Even the Planned Parenthood “Every Child a Wanted Child” slogan may originate from Eugenics Society founder, Frederic Osborn, who once stated that, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Read more on that here.

In fact, Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) as well as her Birth Control Federation used to embrace the Eugenics label. Below is an article clearly showing that the media knew their agenda at this time:

ABCL Group is a Eugenics Group

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It was also clear that as the ABCL morphed into Planned Parenthood they also embraced Eugenics.

Here is a Director of the American Eugenics Society, Robert Carter Cook, being invited by Planned Parenthood to speak at their lunch:

Robert Cook AES Speaks to PP

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Here is Henry P. Fairchild a past president of the American Eugenics Society, a VP of Planned Parenthood;

Henry Fairchild PP AES

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Vice President of the American Eugenics Society Dr. Alan Guttmacher is also president of Planned Parenthood

Guttmacher VP AES article

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For Rent PP AES
In fact, Planned Parenthood received FREE RENT from the American Eugenics Society

Eugenics S Rent Free to IPPF
Document shows International #Planned Parenthood received rent free space from #Eugenics Society. Full here http://tinyurl.com/k8zhhxg

Jan1961 PP Ad
Above: Planned Parenthood ad inside the Eugenics Review Volume 52(4); January 1961

Eugenics Review  Sept 1968 PP
ABOVE: International Planned Parenthood add in Eugenics Review Volume 60(3); September 1968

Eugenics Review Congrats ABCL Jan 1942
ABOVE The Jan 1942 Eugenics Review sends congrats to Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League which later became known as Planned Parenthood

Watch Maafa21 to learn how the Eugenics movement was connected to Planned Parenthood http://www.maafa21.com

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger was an active member of the American Eugenics Society:

Sanger AES

This letter written by Margaret Sanger was published in her Birth Control Review and details her meeting with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney, the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society was a colleague of Sanger’s and she published his writings in the Birth Control Review. Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization. SangerMergeABCLwithEugenics

One example of the American Birth Control League passing resolutions to join forces with the American Eugenics Society.

SangerABCL Eugenics

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Here is Margaret Sanger in 1925 attempting to merge the two groups:

NYT1925Merge ABCL Eugenics

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According to an article published in the Hartford Courant in 1935 covering a meeting of Planned Parenthood’s founder ( Margaret Sanger’s) American Birth Control League….Statistics concerning families on relief compiled by the Connecticut Birth Control League…The same resolution was adopted at the annual meeting of the League, which was held recently in Chicago and at the annual lunch held in New York…the Resolution reads:

Whereas the cost of public relief is now over 125 million dollars a month, and

“Whereas scientific research has shown that families on relief have about 50 per cent more children then similar families not on relief. and,

“Where as these children add to the burdens both of their already overburdened parents and of the taxpayers,

“Therefore be it resolved that the American Birth Control League unite with the American Eugenics Society in formulating and securing the adoption of the most effective plans for providing that as a matter of routine, all families on relief shall be informed where they may best obtain medical advice in a strictly legal manner as to the limitation of families by methods in accordance with their religious convictions. ”

(Source: Birth Rate in Families on Relief , The Hartford Courant, 2/15/1935 p.6)