Archive for the Blacks promote abortion Category

How the population control movement recruited a sitting Republican president

Posted in Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks promote abortion, Bush, Bush Family, Eugenics, Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Black president, Planned Parenthood Blueprint, Planned Parenthood Free BC, Planned Parenthood Free Birth Control, Planned Parenthood funded by rich elites, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood President, Planned Parenthood Republican Party, Planned Parenthood Republicans, Planned Parenthood Tax Dollars, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 10, 2018 by saynsumthn

Image: Nixon Signs Commission on Population Growth and the American Future (Image credit: Maafa21)

Live Action News’ series on Title X and the formation of federally funded population control programs has documented that the push for government dollars in the 1960s was derived from a eugenics-based effort to limit the populations of “low income,” impoverished communities. During this time frame, many within the population control community, including Planned Parenthood, were concerned about overpopulation, and some would argue the concern was focused disproportionately on minorities. This concern wasn’t new for Planned Parenthood, which has a history steeped in eugenics, an ideology that manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As Live Action News previously reported, many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion might be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit.”

Part two of the series noted how the Lyndon B. Johnson Administration began touting federally funded “family planning,” a term perceived to be more acceptable than “birth control” (emphasis on “control”) to the Black community. But it was under the Richard Nixon administration that these population control programs grew. Years later, it became public knowledge that President Nixon had made racist statements towards the same population groups these programs were created to “help.”

population control, planned parenthood

Planned Parenthood praised Richard Nixon over creation of Title X (Image credit: Twitter)

In the clip below from the documentary about eugenics, Maafa21, you can hear actual recordings of then-President Richard Nixon discussing the growth of the Black population with members of his staff. These discussions center around the legalization of abortion, but some believe they may also shed light on Nixon’s push for federally funded population control programs.

A partial transcript is below (warning – offensive language):

Nixon: ” … as I told you –  we talked about it earlier –  that a hell of a lot of people want to control all the Negro bastards.”

Nixon: “You know what we are talking about – population control?”

Unidentified Staff: “Sure

Nixon“We’re talking really – and what John Rockefeller really realizes – look, the people in what we call the “our class” control their populations. Sometimes they’ll have a family of six, or seven, or eight, or nine, but it’s an exception.”

Unidentified StaffSure

Nixon: “People who don’t control their families are people in- the people who shouldn’t have kids...”

In her writings from the Pivot of Civilization, Planned Parenthood’s founder, Margaret Sanger, a known member of the American Eugenics movement, states, “Surely it is an amazing and discouraging phenomenon that the very governments that have seen fit to interfere in practically every phase of the normal citizen’s life, dare not attempt to restrain, either by force or persuasion, the moron and the imbecile from producing his large family of feeble-minded offspring.”
population control, planned parenthood

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger a member of the American Eugenics Society (image credit Maafa21)

In her book, “Margaret Sanger’s Eugenic Legacy: The Control of Female Fertility,” author Angela Franks notes:

In America, as early as 1929, Sanger was calling for a federal commission to study population, “both in its qualitative and quantitative aspects” for the purpose of protecting the “purity of our national blood-stream” and preventing the overcrowding of “public institutions with public wards at enormous economic loss.”

Franks and other authors detail those who went on to call for the study of population, leading up to the Nixon administration in the 1970s.

In 1968, George N. Lindsay, chairman of Planned Parenthood-World Population (as it was known then), urged President Richard Nixon to make more federal money available for poor people’s “family planning.” This move was in line with Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” to force the taxpayer to fund population control programs.

READ: Speaker reminds UN population commission: Each of us ‘began as an embryo’

The next year, 1969, the so-called “Planned Parenthood blueprint” was underway, and was referred to as “the ghetto approach” by the New York Times:

Whatever the merits of the argument, the ghetto approach is now the federation’s chief thrust, and it is also the policy of the Federal Government, which since 1966 has undergone a dramatic reversal,  moving from almost no action on birth control to a proposed expenditure in 1969 of $31 million. Last month the Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) recommended the adoption of Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” for supplying free birth control devices to some five million American women below the poverty line.

Image: Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT 02/02/1969)

Guttmacher plan to force taxpayers to fund birth control (Image: NYT 02/02/1969)

Planned Parenthood’s “blueprint” called for an expenditure of about one percent of the nation’s health budget, with an anticipated $78 million from taxpayers in 1970. It also called for an expansion of hospitals’ family planning services as well as programs financed by the federal anti-poverty program.

Then, in a July 1969 speech, President Nixon stated, “It is my view that no American woman should be denied access to family planning assistance because of her economic condition.” He then called upon Congress to “establish as a national goal the provision of adequate family planning services within the next five years to all those who want them but cannot afford them….”
population control, planned parenthood

Richard Nixon

Programs like this raised red flags with members of the Black community, already struggling for power and equal rights. It became increasingly obvious that the Black community was most suspicious of population control programs funded by the government. In September 12, 1968, when the news hit that $500 million in U.S. foreign aid dollars would be used to disseminate birth control, journalist Drew Pearson noted in the Press-Courier, “Many black militants also see the government’s participation in birth control programs as “black genocide.” As one militant put it to this columnist: “Whitey is trying to get us before we’re born.” In some U.S. cities, the government finances clinics where disadvantaged persons get instruction in family planning and are given contraceptives free of charge.”

This clip from the documentary film Maafa21 details additional concerns expressed by those within minority communities:

To quell suspicions of “Black genocide,” Planned Parenthood, which was vying for those federal dollars, began adding African American leaders to its board. This move was described by an insider named Jeannie Rosoff, in an interview she conducted with Rebecca Sharpless in 2001:

There were always some preachers, black preachers, who kind of thought that the practice of family planning would encourage immorality somehow. That was one small strand. And then there were a lot of, I think, activist black men—and some women— who essentially thought, ―The more of us, the better. The way to improve the racial situation is by numbers. So that it’s fine to have all these babies. And when things began to spoil in the late sixties, with the Martin Luther King assassination, the Black Panthers, and the Black Power movement, then it sort of just went from, ―We should have all the babies with guns on the street, to, ―Anybody who tries to stop us from having babies is genocide. So that was another element of the opposition. And it was not easy for a group like Planned Parenthood, a basically all-white group, very upper-middle class, to deal with this and to deal with this and argue at public meetings and essentially say, ―Can it. It‘s not right and it’s not true. Planned Parenthood at that time hired a sort of ambassador to the black community on the assumption that nobody could argue with blacks except blacks. So they had to find somebody black to rebut this. You know, my feeling was that if you feel sure of your ground, then you should be able to argue the case even though it‘s very uncomfortable.

Image: Jeannie Rosoff, CEO Guttmacher Institute

Jeannie Rosoff, CEO Guttmacher Institute

According to a 1968 New York Times article, Planned Parenthood elected its very first Black board chairman Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program, saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: First Black Chairman of Board Jerome Holland elected by Planned Parenthood, 1968

First Black Chairman of Board Jerome Holland elected by Planned Parenthood, 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate who was pushing federally funded “family planning.”

Holland was also added as chairman of the board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood. The Center for Family Planning Program Development, later renamed for Alan Guttmacher, was considered the watchdog agency over federally funded family planning programs, according to the previously mentioned interview by Rosoff.

She stated:

“So foundations wanted to have some kind of watchdog, policy oriented group to ride herd on the process. They did not think Planned Parenthood could be it because it was too self-involved. They also didn’t want to create a new entity because they thought, ―My god, they would have to support it forever. So the compromise was that they would give the money to Planned Parenthood but under the condition that some entity, which eventually became the Alan Guttmacher Institute, be organized within Planned Parenthood. It would have a separate name. It would have a separate address. It would have a separate national advisory board, even though the board of Planned Parenthood would still have the legal authority. And that‘s what existed between maybe 1968 and 1978, when AGI became totally independent…But that is the same group that had both the Planned Parenthood political function, the lobbying function in Washington—I mean writing legislation, lobbying legislation—and the AGI technical assistance function.”

READ: Westerners like Prince William push population control in Africa, but at what cost?

According to a 1971 report by the New York Times, a survey conducted by the Center for Family Planning Program Development alarmed the backers of federal programs when it discovered that just one out of five “medically indigent women of child bearing age was receiving subsidized family planning services in 1969.”

“So we then went for a really brand-new piece of legislation which is what became Title X of the Public Health Services Act. It was totally focused on family planning, with independent funding,” Rosoff said.

The Guttmacher/Planned Parenthood insider then described how the Title X push actually came about — and all indications by her words are that Planned Parenthood, through members of its “special affiliate,” the Guttmacher Institute (founded by the VP of the American Eugenics Society) sought out a political spokesperson to push what would become the Title X Family Planning program. Who was that political spokesperson? Rep. George H.W. Bush, who became president after Ronald Reagan.

Read parts one and two of this series. In part four, Live Action News will show how the creation of the Federal Title X Program was manipulated by people within the Planned Parenthood and Guttmacher organizations. Additional articles on Title X’s history include Planned Parenthood’s Blueprint and George HW Bush’s relationship to Title X and Planned Parenthood.

Editor’s Note, 11/8/18: Related links were added.

Racist to not provide abortion to Blacks says doc honored by Planned Parenthood

Posted in Abortionist, Blacks promote abortion, Willie Parker with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 23, 2015 by saynsumthn

I recently wrote a blog entitled, “Blacks matter to Planned Parenthood if they push abortion.” It details how the introduction of abortion by Planned Parenthood came when they conveniently chose a Black man in their leadership.

Now, a Black abortion doctor is playing the Planned Parenthood patsy by trying to “explain” and dismantle the argument that abortion targets the African American community.

Speaking at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, abortionist Willie Parker, who once called abortion a “sacred decision” said that not providing abortion is racist!

Willie Parker abortionost

Parker traveled to Mississippi from Alabama to do abortions at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization abortion clinics, the last one remaining open in the state.

I had a traditional understanding of religion and spirituality as a fundamentalist Protestant Christian with a born again experience at the age of 15. But, what that meant for me is that I took my religious belief and understanding very seriously. And so, because of that, while I had not had any explicit teaching that abortion was wrong, although it was kind of implied given that, in my community there were many teens and single women who were forced to continue pregnancies where they were ready or able to parent or not. I chose to err on the side of not violating my conscience or understanding by not providing abortions event though I never questioned a woman’s right to make that decision,” Parker tells his audience.

PP 2-2-15-Dreamkeepers-Headers_doers

Planned Parenthood recently “honored” the abortionist during Black History Month 2015 even placing abortionist Willie Parker on their list of Dream Keeper “Doers.

Willie Parker PP Dreamer

Abortionist Willie Parker told his Woodrow Wilson School audience that Mississippi is one of the poorest states in the country and we all know the large Black population there.

Pro-lifers know that abortion targets Black communities and Parker is assisting in that agenda, “Women of color and women living in poverty are two communities that are often synonymous but are not always the same tend to have higher rates of unintended pregnancy…”

That this is the reality befalling Mississippi led me to conclude that the women of Mississippi are amongst the most vulnerable in this country. And hence they are in dire need and very much deserving of my help,” the abortionist boasted.

Willie Parker abortionist2

Abortionist Parker who described himself as “a self described protector of human rights” claims that if he could not make women of color a priority for abortion access, who will?

Parker then goes on to attack those who defend the black unborn child, especially those who are members of the African American pro-life community.

Now don’t misunderstand me,” he said, “This commitment is not a form of subtle tribalism, because I understand all-too-well as Zora Neale Hurston once said, All my skin folk ain’t my kinfolk.

And, what I mean by that is that some of the most ardent opponents who stand in solidarity with those who oppose abortion are, in my opinion, misguided people of color who also vilify women who make the decision to have abortion, and who exaggerate and expound on the fact that those women are poor and women of color. And, they are the ones who also co-sign, what I call the Black Genocide campaigns,” Willie Parker stated.

I guess Parker is also referring to the early members of the civil rights community who also pointed out the genocidal aspects of abortion and birth control as I document here.

FannieLouHamer13

Leaders like, Fannie Lou Hamer, who co-founded the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party and challenged the all white Mississippi delegation for seating at the 1964 Democrat convention in Atlanta City

Hamer once stated, “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders. Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now”.

But…I digress…

2011 CDC abortion ststas 2014

According to the latest figures by the CDC almost 56% of all abortions reported for race were done on minority women. Of the 405,994 abortions even reported for race or ethnicity in that latest report, 150,942 (37.2%) were performed on White women, 146,856 or (36.2%) were reported on Black women. Hispanic women accounted for 79,408 or (19.7%) while 28,363 or (7.0%) of abortions were categorized as other.

Even abortionist Willie Parker cannot dispute the facts as he says himself:

“One of the things I want to say to kind of demonstrate to you how pressing that issue [Black Genocide] is, when I started in Mississippi, as noble as I thought my efforts were, not everyone was happy to see me.”

What allows [pro-life people] to make that allegation [abortion is a tool of Black Genocide] is a misrepresentation of the very real and concrete epidemiological evidence that shows that disproportionately on a proportionate basis the highest rate of abortion occurs to the Black women followed by Latino women…”

Parker goes on to say that White women have the highest number of abortions, “because there are more white women then there are women of color,” he says.

But the real motivation behind Willie Parker’s attempt to disprove the abortion is Black Genocide argument is that it is having an affect within the African American community.

While the legal battle over abortion is occurring at the state and local level as they try and set the stage for overturning Roe – the actual cultural battle for the hearts and minds of the public, is being fought in these ideological wars and framing abortion in ways that are totally misrepresentative over what the issue of abortion is about.”

viacom-ron-english-censorship-billboard

“In this case they’ve decided as a very effective and cynical strategy to frame abortion as Black Genocide. And that campaign has gained traction over the years. There have been major African American Communities where billboards have been purchased to declare that the most dangerous place for a black baby is in the womb of it’s mother…describing Black babies as an endangered species as if they are something other than human in that- as if mothers are totally detached from the pregnancies that they carry.”

anti-abortion-billboard-in-Atlanta

Parker claims that, “Abortion opponents allege that abortion is a genocidal plot by the government, fronted by Planned Parenthood to build abortion clinics in Black communities and to coerce Black women to use contraception and to have abortionists to kill off black babies…to decimate the Black race. They allege that there is a Negro plot that was put into place by the founder of Planned Parenthood – Margaret Sanger and that this is allegedly core to Planned Parenthood’s mission today.”

Let’s say I concede all of these arguments are true,” Willie Parker says, “What does any of that have to do, in 2015, with a woman, no matter what her color is, making the decision to end a pregnancy, that she does not want?”

WILLIE PARKER DISMISSES MARGARET SANGER’S RACISM

Sanger KKK

Parker then dismisses the well documented racism pf Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger, an admitted Klan speaker. This is what Sanger wrote in her autobiography, “I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.” (Margaret Sanger: An Autobiography, P.366)

Willie Parker on Margaret Sanger

Parker, who profits off abortion, works with Planned Parenthood, and has received honors from them, thinks the Black Genocide argument against abortion is ridiculous, “And, with regard to Margaret Sanger’s involvement with the Black Community? Margaret Sanger uh uh started birth control clinics in the African American community in Harlem at the invitation of black leaders of her day.” he said.

Willie Parker completely ignores the documented plot devised behind the scenes by Sanger and her financier, Clarence Gamble, both active in the Eugenics Society to include blacks in their own demise.

This blog has documented this many times, just do a simple search under “eugenics”, “Margaret Sanger” or “Clarence Gamble.”

KlanBrochureSanger

Willie Parker claimed that Sanger’s message would benefit African American women. I wonder if that was the focus of her speech to the Klan- how her ideas would benefit Blacks- really Willie are you that naive?

And. so there was no targeted messaging for the Black community. In fact,” says Willie Parker, “Margaret Sanger in keeping with the rest of her day, her attention was to the White community,” he says.

Can you believe such ignorance? Sanger’s own words make a liar out of Dr. Willie Parker.

As late as 1950 Sanger who openly advocated eugenic sterilization wrote this in a personal letter to Katharine Dexter McCormick, an heir to the International Harvester fortune who used her immense wealth to fund the development of the birth-control pill.

Sanger wrote, “I consider that the world and almost our civilization for the next twenty-five years, is going to depend upon a simple, cheap, safe contraceptive to be used in poverty stricken slums, jungles, and among the most ignorant people. Even this will not be sufficient, because I believe that now, immediately; there should be national sterilization for certain dysgenic types of our population who are being encouraged to breed and would die out were the government not feeding them.”

Years earlier, in 1939, Sanger described the American Birth Control League’s Negro Project in a letter to fellow eugenicist, Clarence Gamble, “The minister’s work is also important and also he should be trained, perhaps by the Federation as to our ideals and the goal that we hope to reach. We do not want the word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population and the minister is the man who can straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellions members.

Parker then calls the Black Genocide argument “noise” and “misleading” and “racial insulting.”

Then, Parker shockingly states that not providing abortion to Black women is the real racism:

“I usually reserve terms like brilliant for a positive thing but it is a dastardly jedi-mind trick,” he said.

“Because it exploits the notion that we, as a society are very uncomfortable with notions of race.And so, you take people who are well-meaning and want to help people who have the greatest need, in this case, disproportionate women of color.And,so the majority of the healthcare system is still White people, mostly white men, although that’s changing with the number of women. So, it really becomes racist NOT to provide this care.” abortionist Willie Parker said.

The abortionist, who slaughters children in the womb, ended his speech by sharing the thoughts he says he visits on a regular basis, “In order for this society to grow great,” he said, “collectively, we must continue to plant trees under which we will never see it sit. What that means for me is – we have to collectively and on an individual basis do things that will not directly benefit us personally – but that they’re the right things to do to make this world the kind of place that we would want to live in.”

Abortionist Willie Parker says that on a pretty consistent basis, he will look into the mirror and repeat that exaltation by, “that wise American sage, Dr. Seuss when he says in the Lorax that unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It’s not.”

May I remind the abortionists that Dr. Suess is a children’s favorite – like- the ones he kills in the womb.

Abortionist Willie Parker, who claims abortion is sacred and that not offering it to Black women is racist is not a historian and has little to no knowledge of the eugenics movement, Margaret Sanger, or Planned Parenthood’s history. Sadly, Willie Parker is merely one of many Black mouthpieces the abortion lobby has paid off to help eliminate their own race.

If you want a clear and well documented history of abortion and the way it targets the black community- watch the powerful film- Maafa21.