Archive for the Blacks oppose Birth Control Category

These Black leaders in history viewed abortion as Black genocide

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Birth Rates, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Population Demographics, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Blacks sued by Planned Parenthood, Jesse Jackson, NAACP, Planned Parenthood using blacks, Samuel Yette with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 26, 2018 by saynsumthn

abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action screened the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Image: Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornley

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

Image: article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Omage: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

 

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

 

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

 

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

Article on abortion (Pamela Carr and Faye Wattleton) published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

 

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Abortion is a tool of “Black Genocide” say Black leaders in history

Posted in Birth Control and Eugenics, Birth Control Federation, Black Babies, Black Caucus, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black leaders on abortion, Black Panthers, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Black History Month with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn
abortion, pregnancy, pregnant

Is abortion a tool of promoters of eugenics and Black genocide? This is the burning question addressed in the powerful documentary called Maafa21: Black Genocide in 21st Century America. This Black History Month, Live Action is screening the film — produced by Texas-based pro-life group Life Dynamics, Inc., — on social media. The documentary meticulously details the racist roots of abortion and Planned Parenthood.

In order to protect Planned Parenthood, which had deep ties to the eugenics movement beginning with their founder Margaret Sanger, abortion advocates have claimed that the idea of abortion as a “eugenics tool of Black Genocide” was imagined by pro-life advocates, but nothing could be further from the truth. As Maafa21 demonstrates, it was actually early Black leaders which first decried the genocidal effects of abortion and population control within their community. Author and researcher Robert G. Weisbord explains:

During the 1960’s and continuing into the 1970’s, the charge that birth control and abortion are integral elements of a white genocidal conspiracy directed at African-Americans has been heard with increasing frequency and stridency in black communities. The genocide theory finds greatest acceptance among spokesmen for black nationalist and black revolutionary groups, but suspicion of family planning programs is not limited to them…. The black debate over the desirability of population is traced back approximately fifty years.

Article: Abortion is Black Genocide

Abortion is Black Genocide- Article: Birth Control is Overt Racism

Some of these Black leaders are listed below.

Dr. Paul Cornely

In 1968, when radical abortion advocates such as Larry Lader were pushing their abortion agenda, civil rights leader Dr. Paul Cornely (then president-elect of the American Public Health Association (APHA) and African American chairman of the Department of Community Health Practice at Howard University) was opposing abortion as a way to “help the poor.” He told the Charleston Gazette that the way to “change existing social conditions is not through marketing abortion available to the poor. We need to find a better way for people to live. We have to look at the total problem – social, economic-education, housing employment….”

Image: Paul B Conely opposed abortion

Paul B Cornely opposed abortion and pointed out that abortion, sterilization, and birth control programs have been looked at as forms of racism.

Prof. Norman Rice

Fordham professor Norman Rice perhaps said it best in 1969, when he was quoted in the Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise as saying, “The idea seems to be to eliminate poverty by eliminating the poor. Of course, this is a form of genocide, perhaps more appropriately called pooricide.”

IMAGE: Abortion is Pooricide article

Article: Abortion a form of “Pooricide” (Image credit: Saranac Lake Adirondack Daily Enterprise)

Comedian Dick Gregory

Live Action News has previously published statements from notable Black leaders like Fannie Lou Hamer, Dr. Mildred Jefferson, Iowa Rep. June Franklin and Erma Clardy Craven, all of whom viewed abortion and population control as genocide targeted toward their communities. In the early 1970s, comedian Dick Gregory wrote an extensive article, “My Answer to Genocide,” published in Ebony Magazine, where he made similar claims:

Of course, one of the definitions of genocide is, “imposing measures to prevent births within the group” – that is, forcing birth control measures upon Black folks. There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

Image" Dick Gregory in Ebony from Maafa21

Dick Gregory decries abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In addition to abortion, early Black leaders were also skeptical about birth control being pushed in their community. After all, the concept originated from Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known member of the eugenics community who spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan.

Image: Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK from Maafa21

Margaret Sanger spoke to KKK (Image credit: Maafa21)

Author Simone M. Caron’s research, published by the Journal of Social History, lays the groundwork for why Black citizens were so suspicious:

Several events in the late 1960s heightened suspicions of genocide.

The Pittsburgh Courier, a nationally circulated Black newspaper, reported that “a long series of incidents which are covertly building up a phobia among Negroes about racial genocide attempt” took place in 1967 and 1968….

The Black Panther party considered contraception only one part of a larger government scheme of genocide. Drugs, venereal disease, prostitution, coercive sterilization bills, restrictive welfare legislation, inhuman living conditions, “police murders,” rat bites, malnutrition, lead poisoning, frequent fires and accidents in run-down houses, and black over-representation in Vietnam combat forces all contributed to the malicious plan to annihilate the black race…

In the summer of 1967 the… Black Power Conference in Newark, New Jersey, passed an anti-birth-control resolution that contained the key phrase, birth control equals “black genocide.”

Black Caucus

In 1970, according to Maafa 21, the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Image from Maafa21

Black Caucus walks out of Population Conference (Image credit: Maafa21)

Black Panther Party

They were not the only Black groups suspicious of abortion. As mentioned earlier, the Black Panthers were as well. In 1971, a Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion, according to Maafa21. At the time the party proclaimed, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.”

Image from Maafa21

Black Panther Party Quote on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Jet magazine quoted from the [Black] Panther newspaper in 1973:

The abortion law hides behind the guise of helping women when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people. How long do you think it will take for voluntary abortions to turn into involuntary abortion, into compulsory sterilization? Black people are aware that laws made supposedly to ensure our well-being are often put into practice in such a way that they ensure our deaths.

Article on abortion and Black Genocide

Black Panthers see abortion as Black Genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine March 22, 1973)

Various Black clergy

Black clergy were also outspoken against abortion as genocide. Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements, told Jet Magazine in that same 1973 edition, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

Image from Maafa21

Black priest sees abortion as Black genocide (Image credit: Maafa21)

In a February edition of the magazine, Fr. Clements pointed out, “There is a grave contradiction being practiced in the U.S. In the Black or Ghetto areas Planned Parenthood or birth control clinics are set up, whereas, in the white communities or suburbs, fertility centers are being established.”

The Progressive National Baptist Convention also denounced abortion, according to this July 28, 1973, Jet Magazine article seen below:

Article on Black abortions

Black religious leaders – see abortion as Black Genocide Black religious leaders abortion is genocide (Image credit: Jet Magazine July 26, 1973)

Rev. Jesse Jackson

In a separate 1973 Jet Magazine article, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, a known civil rights leader of his day, also called abortion “genocide.” Then, two years later, Rev. Jackson joined with anti-abortion organizations and endorsed a Constitutional Amendment banning abortion.

Article on Black genocide from abortion

Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory see abortion as genocide/ Jesse Jackson and Dick Gregory part of Right to Life anti-abortion (Image credits: Ebony)Magazine

And, in 1977, Jackson observed, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

Image from Maafa21

Jesse Jackson on abortion (Image credit: Maafa21)

Sadly, in the mid-1980s, Jackson changed his position and became pro-abortion.

Journalist Samuel Yette

Black journalist, Samuel Yette, also saw abortion and birth control as a means of genocide in the African American community. Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine and, by 1968, according to Maafa21, “he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.”

Samuel Yette and his book The Choice (Image credit Saynsumthn blog)

Yette’s book, “The Choice: The Issue of Black Survival in America,” describes how government solutions for the poor stressed the necessity for birth control as the best means of alleviating hunger. Yette documented that mandatory abortions for unwed mothers were recommended at a 1969 White House Conference on the topic. The effort, he notes, was blocked by Black activist Fannie Lou Hamer, who denounced abortion as “legalized murder” and called it a plot to exterminate the Black population. In almost a sarcastic tone, Yette once pointed out the irony in how easy it was for Blacks to obtain free abortions but not free medical care, writing, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…”

In 1985, Yette told supporters:

Any public policy that condones, encourages, or participates in the taking of life on the pre-birth side of the womb, anticipates and works toward the policies and practices and the same rationales that destroy life on the after birth-side of the womb.

Given the history of the genocidal practices and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.

Dr. Mildred Jefferson

In the 1970’s the largest anti-abortion organization in the nation was led by Black doctor, Mildred Jefferson:

Image: Mildred Jefferson

Black pro-life doctor Mildred Jefferson/ Black doctor Mildred Jefferson leads national Right to Life antiabortion group (Image credit: Ebony Magazine)

According to Ebony Magazine, “One reason for Dr. Jefferson’s alignment with the anti-abortion movement is her belief that this country’s one million annual abortions can mean genocide for Black Americans.”

NAACP

Members of a Pittsburgh chapter of the NAACP, which charged that Planned Parenthood facilities in Black neighborhoods were paramount with genocide. According to the New York Times, “The N.A.A.C.P. contended in its statement that Planned Parenthood clinics here were operated ‘without moral responsibility to the Black race and become an instrument of genocide to the black people.’” Dr. Charles Greenlee, a black physician, along with NAACP president Byrd Brown, charged that Planned Parenthood facilities were keeping the birth rate down.

Article: NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood

NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood/ NAACP opposed Planned Parenthood (Image credit: Jet Magazine Jan. 11, 1968)

Although Dr. Greenlee eventually walked back the term “genocide,” the group noted how Planned Parenthood was strategically placing its facilities in neighborhoods with high Black populations, something today’s African American leaders also point out.

Article: NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood

NAACP group opposes Planned Parenthood/ NAACP leader accuses Planned Parenthood of genocide (Image Credit: New York Times Dec 17, 1967)

***

Soon, even Planned Parenthood was taking note of the opposition facing them. They actually exchanged internal memos about this fear that abortion and Planned Parenthood was seen as Black genocide. They would query members of the Black community to ascertain how they were being viewed.

In 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood, and Mrs. Marian Hernandez, director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Black militant leader, Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning.” The memo to Guttmacher described the encounter: “In trying to ascertain Malcolm X’s knowledge and understanding of the Planned Parenthood organization, he responded in a positive way to the name by saying, that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control, and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reasons for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled.”

Image: Planned Parenthood meets with Malcolm X

Planned Parenthood meets with Malcolm X/ Planned Parenthood memo with Malcolm X

Planned Parenthood’s own national director of community relations, Douglas Stewart, once acknowledged the friction their organization had with Black women, telling Ebony Magazine, “Many Negro women have told our workers, there are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us… and the one for us causes sterilization.”  To lessen these fears, Planned Parenthood added individuals from the Black community to their board. “It is my opinion as director of community relations,” Stewart went on to tell Ebony, that “birth control programs might fare better in large cities if more black people and members of minority groups were represented on planning boards of clinics in their neighborhoods.”

But after New York decriminalized abortion and an abortion facility opened in Harlem, a member from Harlem’s Hospital staff told the NYT that they “were met with opposition from the community…. The militant movement was pretty strong, and they thought it was genocide.”

In the early 1970s, a report by Black researcher Dr. William A. Dariety concluded, according to the NYT, that the idea of abortion as Black genocide had “large support in the Negro community.”

“In one New England city,” writes the NYT, “Dr. Dariety found that 88 percent of the black males under 30 were opposed to abortion and almost half of them felt that encouragement of the use of birth control ‘is comparable with trying to eliminate [blacks] from society.’”

                                                                     1971 Article The fear that birth control may mean genocide

In 1990, Pervis L. Edward wrote this to Ebony Magazine:

The fact that genocide in the form of abortions is being considered as a possible solution to problems within the Black community is testimony to the fact that we as a people are suffering from chronic amnesia. Black Americans have forgotten once again that they have an adversary determined to enslave, destroy and ultimately eliminate them from the face of the planet. For this reason we must unite and meet this assault at its point of contact and defend the lives of our unborn children, for therein lies our future.

Edward was responding to an article published previously by Ebony, which featured Pamela Carr of Black Americans for Life and Faye Wattleton, Planned Parenthood’s first Black president. Carr wrote that abortion was not a solution for Black problems.

                                                         Article on abortion published in Ebony Magazine October 1989

“No, abortion is not a solution,” Carr states, “because it undermines the very ideals previous Black leaders stood for – the belief that each life is valuable and has something to contribute; whether Black or White, born or unborn…. Abortion is offered as a solution to help young Blacks to forge forward to overcome present hindrances and strive for brighter tomorrows…. By allowing 400,000 Black babies to be systematically killed every year, we as African Americans have strayed from the path of the leaders who fought so hard for our freedom. They would be alarmed today at how we forfeit the lives of our children, and, as a result, our future.”

COGIC Black Pastors and Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

As the Reverend Johnny Hunter states at the end of Maafa21:

The point is not that killing a Black child is worse than killing a white child. It’s not. Regardless of the victim’s skin color, eye color, or hair color, legalized abortion is a crime against all of humanity…. The time has come, for us to wake up. The time has come for us to realize that our people are no longer being illegally lynched one or two at a time, at the end of a dirt road.  It’s time to for us to realize that our people are being womb-lynched!

It is time to realize that they are being legally ripped to shreds by millions in air conditioned rooms with sweet soft elevator music playing in the background. It is time for us to realize that we are in a war. We are in a war that if we don’t become involved and we try and look the other way, it’s going to wipe us out – it is called Black genocide. It’s time to realize that we have found the weapon of mass destruction and the weapon of mass destruction is the suction machine in Planned Parenthood. Knowing what we know now, we can no longer look the other way.

Today, armed with the tragic statistics showing how abortion is decimating the Black community, Black men and women alike continue to speak out against Planned Parenthood and abortion. Black leaders across the nation have organized to educate their communities on the Black genocide of abortion and Planned Parenthood. Groups like LEARN (a.k.a. BlackGenocide.org), the National Black Pro-life CoalitionRestoration ProjectThe Frederick Douglass FoundationBlack Americans for LifeCivil Rights for the Unborn, the African American Outreach of Priests for Life, The Radiance FoundationProtecting Black LifeMissouri Blacks for LifeIssues for Life, Church of God in Christ’s (COGICFamily Life Campaign and many more are outspoken about abortion within their community.

Image: Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Black leaders compare Planned Parenthood to the Klan

Their efforts have not gone unnoticed by Planned Parenthood, which views Black pro-life leaders as a legitimate threat to their eugenics agenda. In response, abortion advocates across the nation are systematically calling for the abortion corporation to replace Cecile Richards — who announced her intentions to resign earlier this year — with a Black CEO. They seem to believe that simply placing a Black American at the helm of the organization will erase years of eugenics history along with volumes of documentation proving the organization’s eugenics ideology goes well beyond founder Margaret Sanger.

The reality is that films like Maafa21 are helping to awaken the Black community to connect the dots from slavery, to evolution, to eugenics, to abortion, and to Planned Parenthood as part of a continuum of terrible suffering, racism, and targeting that they have endured for years. Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., points out in Maafa21, “We need to pay attention to the fact that in the 1960s when we as African Americans begin to demand our civil rights, for the first time in American history, there began a widespread cry in our government for legalized abortion. Was that a coincidence, too? Or, could it be that when we said we would no longer sit on the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic?”

Image: Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Dr. Alveda King in Maafa21

Today, rather than acknowledge this growing group of Black activists opposing Planned Parenthood, the media demeans their voice and censors their message, a tactic successfully used to keep Black people oppressed in the past.

The only problem for the media is that this time, it’s not working.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Did Planned Parenthood appoint Black leaders to quell suspicion of Black genocide?

Posted in Black Genocide, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Planned Parenthood CEO, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood uses blacks, Planned Parenthood using blacks with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 28, 2018 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood, Black genocide

Despite the fact that Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger promoted eugenics, it was actually under another eugenicist leader, Alan F. Guttmacher, that Planned Parenthood began referring for and eventually committing abortions. At the exact same time that abortion was being pushed publicly, the organization elected a Black chairman to roll out this agenda. All of this transpired in the late 1960s, a time when America was in conflict over the struggle for the civil rights of Black Americans.

During this time frame, many of the organization’s leaders were concerned about overpopulation. The organization’s history is steeped in eugenics, and this ideology manifested itself in many ways, including the forced sterilization of many Black citizens. As laws about these eugenics courts began to be challenged, a new tool of eugenics was making its way across the land: abortion.

Even though many within Planned Parenthood’s organization and other population control groups thought coercion would be needed to stem the growth of people groups they deemed “unfit,” Guttmacher, by now a Planned Parenthood president, was able to convince his friends that abortion, at first in perhaps a voluntary way, would be a better solution. However, there was a slight problem, because Black citizens and other minority groups were already suspicious of birth control efforts aimed at them. How would they feel about abortion?

Image: article Blacks Charge Black Genocide from Planned Parenthood

The solution for Planned Parenthood was to bring Black leaders to the organization’s board, in an effort to convince Black Americans that Planned Parenthood’s efforts were not genocidal. This strategy was not a new one; Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger — who gave a talk for the Ku Klux Klan — had already implemented the so-called “Negro Project” to accomplish the exact same thing. Memos between Planned Parenthood staffers and leadership indicated a great concern over how the Black community viewed their efforts. In response, Planned Parenthood’s public relations machine also reached out to Black publications, as they had already done with push for birth control.

Image: Guttmacher article on Birth Control

Alan Guttmacher Birth Control Article (Image: Ebony Mag April 1962)

In 1967,  the Pittsburgh Branch of the NAACP had criticized the swarming of Planned Parenthood facilities into minority neighborhoods. Other leaders like H. Rap Brown and Fannie Lou Hamer had called abortion “Black genocide.” And, as late as 1973, a study published by the American Journal of Public Health,”Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans as Related to Age, Sex, and Region,” found that Black men and women had a level of unease about “family planning.” Researchers Castellano Turner, Ph.D., and William A. Darity, Ph.D., concluded that Blacks were more suspicious when “family planning” was under the control of Whites. “It is noteworthy that the greatest degree of agreement is found where the issue of black control of family planning (as against white control) is at issue,” they said.

Graph: Black Genocide Fears

Study on how Blacks feared family planning – Fears of Genocide Among Black Americans 1973 study Castellano Turner, Ph.D. and William A. Darity, Ph.D.

After dialoguing internally about the unease of the Black community, the suggestion was made to add Black members to Planned Parenthood’s board; this took place at the same time that Planned Parenthood was calling for the decriminalization of abortion. According to a New York Times article from November 14, 1968, the first time that Planned Parenthood went on record calling for abortion, they also elected their very first Black board chairman to roll out the new agenda — Dr. Jerome H. Holland, who, according to media reports, “pledged his support for the group’s program saying that those who call birth control a form of genocide are ‘not aware of the real meaning of family planning and its uses.’”

Image: Jerome Holland of PPFA

Planned Parenthood names first Black Chairman to push abortion – First Black Chairman of Board elected by Planned Parenthood 1968

Holland was no stranger to Planned Parenthood. He had been on the general board of directors for some time, serving on the executive committee of Planned Parenthood-World Population by 1963. He served as vice-chairman in 1967, where he presented Planned Parenthood’s infamous Margaret Sanger award to John D. Rockefeller III, also a population control advocate.

Holland was also added as chairman of the Board of Guttmacher’s newly formed Center for Family Planning, which would later be named the Guttmacher Institute and become a “special affiliate” to Planned Parenthood.

But Holland’s post as chairman of the board of Planned Parenthood was short lived.

In 1970, Holland was named ambassador to Sweden by President Richard Nixon; however, the headlines of the first Black chairman of Planned Parenthood had seemingly done their job. Holland was openly endorsing abortion as a “health matter” between the woman and her doctor.

Image: PPFA article

Black chairman Jerome Holland lauds Planned Parenthood eugenics

The same year Planned Parenthood elected its first Black chairman of the board, Frederick Osborn, a founding Eugenics Society officer connected to Planned Parenthood, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics.” Osborn signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in her review in April of 1938. Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan “Every Child a Wanted Child” may have originated with Osborn.

A few years later, a new Black leader would emerge to reinforce the push for abortion within Planned Parenthood: Faye Wattleton.

After 62 years as an organization, why did Planned Parenthood wait until 1978 to elect the very first Black female as president? Like Holland,  Wattleton was not a novice where abortion was concerned. She had been with Planned Parenthood for a while, serving as a volunteer in the early 1970s and eventually serving as director of the Dayton affiliate.

Article about Faye Wattleton elected to PPFA

Faye Wattleton elected first Black Planned Parenthood president

At a press conference held in February of 1978, then president-elect of Planned Parenthood Wattleton told the media that she was “putting the world on notice” that the organization was going to be much more aggressive on abortion rights. “What has happened is that we have allowed them [right-to-lifers] to have center stage,” Wattelton said, “I’d like to say those days are over.”

Wattleton then vowed to restore — “to the poor” — access of abortion under Medicaid.

Wattleton was asked if her leadership of Planned Parenthood as a Black woman would alleviate suspicions within the Black community linking abortion and her organization to Black genocide. Wattleton responded, “I don’t think a lot of people are yelling genocide anymore, because I’m Black. I’m in a watchdog position on these issues and no one should assume I’ve been co-opted. What better way is there to guard against those types of abuses?”

Wattleton then said that the Black community should be more concerned about quality of life than “increasing our numbers.”

Image: Faye Wattleton

Faye Wattleton first Black president Planned Parenthood

Wattleton served as president of the abortion corporation for 14 years, where, among other radical abortion advances, she helped to legalize the sale of the RU-486 abortion pill in the United States. Under Wattleton’s leadership, Planned Parenthood’s budget grew from $90 million in 1978 to $384 million in 1990. For her service and dedication to the eugenics-minded organization, in 1992, Wattleton received Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award. Despite Sanger’s known eugenics and Klan connections, Wattleton once referred to her as “[t]he great heroine of our time,” telling Hubbard News in 1979 that Sanger would be proud of Planned Parenthood’s progress.

But the idea that Blacks would no longer be targeted for eugenics because a Black woman was at the helm of a eugenics organization was short-lived. During Wattleton’s tenure at Planned Parenthood, she stated that supporters of Planned Parenthood contributed to the abortion giant to “keep the Black population down.” On CNN, in a debate with Bob Dornan, an outspoken pro-life member of the US House of Representatives, at that time, Wattleton, admitted, “As a matter of fact… we have received contributions from people who want to support us because they want all welfare mothers and all Black women to stop having children.”

And also clipped in the documentary film, Maafa21, below:

Wattleton went on to help form the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, she has been described by some in the media as “a pioneer, a crusader, a media star and a rebel of sorts.”

Today, many within the Black community still see abortion as a tool of eugenics, and the abortion statistics show that it has become a leading cause of death of Blacks in the nation. Margaret Sanger’s vision of limiting births among certain races may not have begun with abortion, but it appears to have led to abortion.

Tragically, today, as a result of Guttmacher continuing Sanger’s eugenics agenda by introducing abortion to Planned Parenthood, over 800 preborn children of all races die there every day from abortion.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Conservative, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Media Bias with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

These 15 women prove that being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Michael Harriot, commentator for The Root,recently claimed that being a Black pro-life woman and seeking the protection of innocent Black babies in the womb is “rare.” But is it?

Harriott was writing in response to an interaction between Rep. Steve Cohen (D – Tenn.) and Star Parker, a pro-life Black woman, in which Cohen called Parker “ignorant” after she pointed out the devastation that abortion has wrought in the Black community.

Dem Congressman calls Black women Star Parker “ignorant”

“Since Roe v. Wade was legalized 20 million humans have been killed inside the womb of Black women. And then, on Halloween, Planned Parenthood tweets out that Black women are safest if they abort their child rather than bring it to term,” Parker said during a hearing on the Heartbeat Bill.

Planned Parenthood tweet tells Black women abortion is safer than birth

Parker also exposed the eugenic beliefs of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known eugenicist who once gave a speech before the Ku Klux Klan. She also compared the Dred Scott decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court declared that Black slaves in America were not citizens, to that of Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in the entire country (essentially declaring that preborn humans are not persons and have no standing as such under the law).

Watch the interaction below:

Shockingly, Michael Harriot, who is also Black, chose to criticize Parker for her comments rather than research her claims about Planned Parenthood’s eugenicist beginnings. Instead, Harriot discounted Parker and other Black pro-life women, claiming that they are “rare”:

Star Parker, founder of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and a community activist, was asked to testify before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice.

Hold up, I think I made a mistake in that previous paragraph. What I meant to type was: Star Parker was asked to testify before the House subcommittee because she is one of the rare black female Republican anti-abortion-rights activists. (No, I will not use the GOP marketing phrase “pro-life.” Who’s not for people living?)

Harriot then echoed Rep. Cohen’s derogatory remarks, saying, “People were shocked to hear him go after a black woman publicly like this, but here is the thing: She is kinda ignorant, though.” (Side note: Imagine for one moment what would happen if Parker were pro-choice and… oh, I don’t know… a white Republican male had called her “ignorant.” Media and social media — and likely Harriot himself — would explode with outrage.)

But Harriot’s claim about the rarity of pro-life Black females is simply wrong. The following Black pro-life women (in both the past and the present) are worth noting (and they weren’t all Republicans, Mr. Harriot):

1) Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and was co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee. She once stated:

I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxefrRccsbI

2) Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964 she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne quoted Hamer as calling abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition… there she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means  of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. “I didn’t come to talk about birth control,” she protested. “I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she “regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as being vehemently against abortion. “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders,” Hamer said. “Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Elaine Riddick

3) Elaine Riddick is a staunch pro-life advocate and vocal critic of Planned Parenthood. She was a victim of eugenic sterilization who led a successful crusade in North Carolina to gain reparations for the men and women (mostly Black) who were forcefully sterilized.

That NC eugenics program was supported by Margaret Sanger’s financier, Clarence Gamble, a director of Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood).

In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s state sterilization program, saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.

Research from North Carolina’s Winston-Salem Journal reveals a long history of abuses in that state’s sterilization program — abuses that Gamble consistently glossed over. According to the Journal, “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

Riddick testified before the North Carolina State Legislature about her experience, tearfully saying, “They cut me open like I was a hog.” She told lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment. Riddick’s horrific story was recounted in the documentary Maafa21, which chronicles the history of eugenics and the founding of Planned Parenthood:

4) Dr. Alveda King is the niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., and Director of Civil Rights for the Unborn for Priests for Life:

5) LaVern Tolbert is a former Board member of Planned Parenthood who now opposes their agenda:

7) Day Gardner is president of the National Black Pro-Life Union:

8) Judge Cheryl Allen is a Superior Court judge for the state of Pennsylvania. She has said, “Most people tend to believe that Planned Parenthood is in the African American Community to help, but they are not there to help, they are there to make abortion more accessible to black people….” (Source: Interview on His Place TV)

Judge Cheryl Lynn Allen

9) Rep. Mia Love is the first Black Republican female elected to the U.S. Congress from the state of Utah:

10)Barbara Howard is the Florida State chairwoman for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). She has stated,.  “Recently, some black preachers finally came out not against abortion per se, but merely against the location of Planned Parenthood centers in black communities. It seems the murder of blacks is only a consideration for black preachers or other leaders when they are killed by white or Hispanic cops…. So who will stop the cold-blooded murder of millions of unborn black children?”

Barbara Howard

11) Rep. June Franklin (D-Iowa) is the only African American representative in the Iowa legislature, and said in 1971, “Proponents… have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

Rep. June Franklin (image Maafa21)

12) Dr Ashley Harrell of Black People Against Abortion:

13) Catherine Davis is a founding member of the National Black Prolife Coalition:

14) Dr. Freda M. Bush is an OBGYN and president of the Medical Institute for Sexual Health:

15) Obianuju Ekeocha, founder and president of Culture of Life Africa:

All the Black pro-life women from both political parties would make an exceedingly long list — and the truth is that the pro-abortion media makes little effort to highlight them.

Tragically, the real “ignorance” here is not found in those who denounce abortion’s impact on the Black community. It is found among members of the media who imply that Black pro-life women are “rare.” It just simply is not true.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

African American community reignites its stand against Planned Parenthood

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Babies, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black Panthers, Black Pastor, Black Victims, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Maafa21 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 21, 2014 by saynsumthn

“Into the black community stepped Planned Parenthood; only when they came into the black community they’ve become Planned-Black-Genocide.” ~ Black civil rights activist, William Bouie Haden

When we said we would no longer sit at the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic.” ~ Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

PPKKK

Today, Life Dynamics, Inc. a national pro-life organization located in Denton, Texas says that since the production of their powerful film on abortion and black genocide, Maafa21, the African American community has reignited its stand against Planned Parenthood.

maafa-cover

Produced in 2009 by Life Dynamics, Inc. and shown in theaters, community centers, university campuses, and churches nationwide, Maafa21 documents how, in the early 1960’s and 1970’s the Black Civil Rights Community began to see that there was an organized effort to limit the black population with abortion and birth control.

According to Maafa21, a growing number of 1960s civil-rights activists had recognized that “family planning” was a code word for abortion and birth control and that it was being pushed by the government as a way to avoid putting money into the black community.

In 1965, the President of the Philadelphia Chapter, Cecil Moore, observed, “I have noticed that every time that we talk about population and Planned Parenthood, the only country I find that wants to limit poverty by limiting the poor–they always want to do it in Africa and South America and Asia, but I never heard them talk about doing it in Paris or England.”

In June of 1970 the Black Caucus walked out of the First National Congress on Optimum Population and Environment being held in Chicago, according to the film. Felton Alexander of the National Urban League and the Chairman of the Black Caucus said the action was taken because of clear and unmistakable evidence that the purpose of the conference was to legitimize the extermination of the black population.

Black Caucus walks out of pop conf

In 1971, the Detroit Chapter of the Black Panther Party, expelled one of its leaders from the organization for simply asking where she could obtain an abortion. At the time the party proclaimed that, “A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.

BlackPantherParty Quote

Also in 1971, Black civil rights activist, William Bouie Haden, observed, “Into the black community stepped Planned Parenthood; only when they came into the black community they’ve become Planned-Black-Genocide. Planned Parenthood for whites, birth control for blacks.”

Haden into blk cmmty Planned Parenthood Maafa21

In 1971, Comedian, Dick Gregory, wrote an article entitled, My Answer to Genocide, which was published in Ebony Magazine.

Dick Gregory Maafa21

In that article, Gregory wrote, “There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.”

In 1973, Black Catholic Priest, Father George Clements told Jet Magazine, “I believe the entire question of abortions is just one more in the continuous series of events to eliminate the Black population.”

George Clements

African-American physician Dr. Charles Greenlee who had been a staunch supporter of Planned Parenthood became suspicious of the organization after noticing that black neighborhoods in his city were, as he described it, “saturated” with Planned Parenthood facilities, while nearby white neighborhoods that were just as poor did not have a single one.

Greenlee PlannedParenthood Maafa21

In 1975, Jesse Jackson called for the ban of abortion through a Constitutional Amendment, and in an interview in Jet Magazine he referred to abortion as genocide.

Then, in 1977, Jackson made this observation, “It is strange that they chose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.”

JJ It is Strange

In 1968, Samuel Yette became the first African-American reporter hired by Newsweek Magazine where he quickly rose to the position of Washington D.C. bureau correspondent. Three years later, he wrote a book in which he documented that there were high-level plans within the United States to use birth control and abortion as genocide against African-Americans. Immediately after his book was released to the public, Mr. Yette was fired.
SamuelleYetteBookArticle

In 1985, Yette, told the Afro American, that “Given the history of the genocidal practices, and public policies impacted on black people in the society, it is barely believable that any significant number of black people at all could condone, much less demand, public policies and financing the destruction of human life on either side of the womb.”

Today African American leaders are once again awakening to the tragedy of abortion and Planned Parenthood in their community.

CHarity1

EXAMPLES:

Walter MossI am not ashamed to say I am a black pro-life pastor and that the African-American church is guilty of not taking the lead on issues like abortion,” said the Rev. Walter Moss of Foursquare Church in Canton. “As pastors, we need to be able to come together and have a civil conversation about how abortion is affecting us and we need to be equipped with the information to help our people deal with it.

catherine-019 “Something is wrong, when those elected to protect the interests of their constituents turn a blind eye to the horrific impact that abortion is wreaking on the black community!”~ Catherine Davis, founder of the Restoration Project.

walterhoyeES “Let’s be clear. Funding Planned Parenthood with U.S. taxpayer dollars is equivalent to justifying the use of tax dollars to help the Ku Klux Klan buy rope so they can secure their victims in the backs of their wagons.” ~ Walter Hoye of the Issues4Life Foundation

wrglaze3The sad thing is that most African Americans don’t know that abortion is the leading cause of death within the African American Community and when we get a chance to show this video to them with them, they’re shocked…Personally I’m on a crusade and the crusade that I’m on is to make African American leaders, especially pastors aware of this Black Genocide. One of the things we did, we invited influential members of the African American Community and showed them clips of Maafa21 and talked about it, almost to a person, they said ‘we didn’t know this was going on’, and Pastors began to see how they could show Maafa21 to their congregations other people were going to address it at other levels, so personally I want to see more and more people become aware of this and we’re planning another luncheon to invite more Pastors and leaders to expose them to this genocide that’s taking place.” ~ Dr. William R. Glaze, Sr. Pastor, Bethany Baptist Church in Pittsburg.

ceasar “Reciting facts such as ‘abortion is the leading cause of death in the black community,’ and ‘black women are three times more likely to be sold an abortion than her white counterpart’ didn’t seem adequate to break through the veneer that covered the eyes of black liberals and caused them to view abortion as more a basic right than an instrument of racist evil. To be honest, I began to give up hope that anything we could present would ever be enough to break through the deep-rooted skepticism that was manifesting itself in illogical political alliances between perpetrators and victims in defense of legalized abortion. Until I saw Maafa21.” ~ Reverend Ceasar I. LeFlore III

Studies of the shift in the abortion demographics from 1974 until 2004, and the purposeful location of abortion clinics in minority communities, corroborate Maafa21’s claims that black babies are a target of black genocide.” ~ Pastor James Leak III, MA, Executive Pastor New Harvester International Ministries (N.H.I.M).

DeaconHaroldBuirkeSilvers “Planned Parenthood is encouraging behavior that many of us find offensive. Their ‘ultimate goal is abortion’ and a ‘black genocide’ is taking place because of the organization’s national strategy of targeting certain urban areas in doing abortions.” ~ Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, Catholic Archdiocese of Portland

JudgeCherylLynnAllen “Most people tend to believe that Planned Parenthood is in the African American Community to help, but they are not there to help, they are there to make abortion more accessible to black people…The African American population in this country is roughly 12% and yet 37,38% of all of the abortions performed in this country are performed on African American Women…I think Planned Parenthood, if you look at its history; this [eugenics/black genocide] has been their goal from the beginning. It was the American Eugenics movement; it changed its name to Planned Parenthood …” Judge Cheryl Allen, Pennsylvania, 2010.

BishopJohnLawsonI call it womb lynching, they used to lynch us from the tree, but they found a more efficient way to get rid of us from the womb…Planned Parenthood is killing millions of black babies; they are reducing the black population in America because Margaret Sanger felt that black people were subhuman and they didn’t deserve to live; you know she was a favorite speaker of the Klu klux Klan and the Klu Klux Klan was lynching black people from trees and she thought it would be better if you could lynch them from the womb.” Bishop John Lawson, Dallas, Texas.

Demetrius49524_701973479813123_1742329858_nPlanned Parenthood, they set up their facilities and organization, they are funded by tax payer money. They set up all around America in minority neighborhoods, black neighborhoods. They target Blacks, Latinos…it is wrong…and America we must turn away from this, we must Defund Planned Parenthood. It is evil….we’re taking a stand, just like Rosa Parks TOOK A STAND, just like Dr. King TOOK A STAND, we’re taking a stand for righteousness, this is wrong. How can America continue to be blessed by God if we’re going to slaughter babies at the altar of Baal?” ~ Demetrius in a YouTube video.

BrianWalker20131231_113635 “EndBlackGenocide2014,” ~ Rev. Brian Walker, Pro-life Action Ministries

Johnny HunterBrothers and sisters, it is time for us to be in the streets over this issue. When we look the other way while our smallest brothers and sisters are being lynched in the womb, we lose all right to be outraged about the fact that we were once lynched by the Klan.” ~ Rev. Johnny Hunter, Maafa21

alvedamaafaquoteWhen we said we would no longer sit at the back of the bus, a place was being reserved for us down at the abortion clinic.” ~ Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in Maafa21.

Maafa21 was produced by Mark Crutcher at Life Dynamics and researched by Carole Novielli.

Watch Maafa21 here

Racial Targeting tumblr_m0s2oqfoKO1r85k4s
Read Life Dynamics Racial Targeting Report here

From “control” to “planning” how Planned Parenthood targeted blacks

Posted in Birth Control and Eugenics, Black Genocide, Black Students, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Guttmacher, Planned Parenthood and Black Leaders, Planned Parenthood and Black Women, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and NAACP, Planned Parenthood Employee, Planned Parenthood in Black Neighborhoods, Planned Parenthood in minority community, Planned Parenthood's black spokespeople with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 6, 2013 by saynsumthn

malcolmxIn 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood and Mrs. Marian Hernandez director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning”. They described the Black Muslims as a Negro nationalist group who recruit mainly “low income Negroes”.

A June 19, 1962 memo from Eugenics Society Vice President and one time Planned Parenthood president, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, describes the meeting, “[ Malcom X] responded in a positive way to the name [ Planned Parenthood] by saying that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reason for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled…Throughout the interview it was apparent that Malcom X looked more favorably on the Maternal-Child Health approach and economic reasons for Negroes using our services. The mention of overpopulation reasons evoked questions on why major efforts to control population are directed toward colored nations , therefore this aspect was played down.”

Malcolm X PP

On December 16,1965 a letter was sent to Rev. Andrew J. Young of the Southern Christian Leadership Council, to engage his support in the birth control / planned parenthood movement.

The letter is written on the University of Wisconsin Letterhead by an associate professor who begins by telling Young that his father was a sociologist in India aiding in population planning as a consultant with the Ford Foundation.

The professor also admits to Young that his mother and mother-in-law are “ardent workers for Planned Parenthood.”

He expressed to Young a, “fond hope for a marriage between the experts in birth control and the experts in the civil rights movement,” and sells it as, “one program that the civil rights movement would not have to finance.”

He expresses one hurdle to Mr. Young that would be the Negroes themselves, “ many Negroes will be justifiably suspicious of white organizations, white physicians, and white social workers that seek to “limit the Negro population.” It smacks of racism and can offend people who are understandebly sensitive on the matter. Planned Parenthood is itself relunctant to take any initiative for fear of the reaction from the Negro population as a whole as well as from civil rights leaders in particular.” He ends by suggesting that, “ it is crucial that Negro leaders in the movement introduce the project to their Negro followers so that whites are not in the mis-perceived position of racist aggression.”

guttmachr

In 1966, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, President of the Planned Parenthood Federation told a symposium at the University of California Medical Center that a sensitive area in the field of birth control was, “the belief that the white middle class was coercing their own poor and people with black and yellow skins to reduce family size because the middle-class whites are frightened of being outnumbered.

The only way the mounting feeling that birth control is a tool of racism can be handled, is to involve knowledgeable leaders from the minority groups who understand and are favorable to the philosophy of birth control. They, in turn, must translate their appreciation of the contribution which birth control can make toward family stability to their own people.”

A January 28, 1966 internal memo from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe, outlines the plan for winning over the Black Community. The memo begins by calling the new plan, a “Community Relations Program.” The “program” is to, “form a liaison between Planned Parenthood and minority organizations.”

The plan, according to Planned Parenthood, will emphasize that “all people have the opportunity to make their own choices,” rather than, as the memo states, “exhortation telling them how many children they should have.”

One way to get the message is out is to “ get assistance from black organizations like The Urban League and the AME church,” and according to the memo they need to employ, “ more Negro staff members on PP-WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] and Affiliate’s staff, as well as recruit more Negro members for the National Board- at least 5.”

Along with this Guttmacher suggests that they initiate cooperation with the National Medical Association [NMA], a Black medical association, and encourage them to establish a committee on reproduction and family planning.

Guttmacher also hoped to “secure at least three Negro physicians for membership on the PP-WP Medical Committee, and he planned to invite NMA leaders to address their convention. Also on the radar was a comprehensive plan to address the Black media by, “specially developed news and feature articles for Negro newspapers.”

Guttmacher ends by stating that the above suggestions are “long overdue” but stresses, “we do not need to panic. In fact, if we panic and continue to publicize the “problem”, we may well exacerbate it”

NOTE: In 1968, Jaffe founded the PPFA Center for Family Planning Program Development, which later became the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s research arm.

On January 11, 1966, Lammont Du. P. Copeland sent a letter to Alan Guttmacher which contained the advice of Dupont’s Public Relations Representative, Mr. Glen Perry regarding the attitudes of the Black community toward Planned Parenthood.

Perry sought counsels from a black man who had been active with Planned Parenthood, Mr. Joseph Baker, who Dupont retains as a public relations adviser in the field of race relations.

Perry summarized the suggestions in a memo dated: January 10,1966, “Baker told us that Dr. Guttmacher is correct in feeling that civil rights leaders are beginning to take a hostile position toward population planning on the ground that it is an attempt to halt the growth of the Negro population.”

Baker strongly suggested to Perry that Planned Parenthood immediately open dialogue to the Black leaders, to “get their support and participation.”

Baker chastised a speech that Guttmacher made where he admitted some on the Planned Parenthood Board may be there solely for a racist agenda.

Perry writes, “[ Baker] was especially critical of Dr. Guttmacher’s admission that there might be some members of Planned Parenthood who had the political objective attributed to the organization by civil rights leaders. Such an admission could easily be taken out of context, and used to the detriment of the organization.”

Perry suggested that Guttmacher consider adding blacks to the Planned Parenthood board as well as the staff, he warns, “If this isn’t done, I’m not sure any amount of talk can convince the Negro leaders that this isn’t something being done to them by the whites rather than being done for whites and blacks by whites and blacks working together.”

Perry end by stressing that they need to “move quickly” to involve the black community.

On February 4, 1966 Mrs. Helen P. Stanford passed a copy of an article written in the Philadelphia Independent to Mrs. Naomi T. Gray. The memorandum was written on Planned Parenthood-World Population letterhead.

Stanford called the editorial “interesting” describing the writer as a young Negro lawyer who was a “member of our board here.” Stanford was critical of the writing style, but said that “ Still, there is food for thought here.”

The article written by Robert W. Williams, Jr. Esq., president and publisher of the Philadelphia Independent read in part, “There has been serious question of the motives of the Planned Parenthood Association, some opponents seeing in the organization’s work an aim of “containing” the Negro population or of even decimating it. They point to the concentration of interest,
by the Planned Parenthood Association virtually from the beginning, in the Negro ghettos of the major cities. And, let us admit it, it is not difficult to imagine that some racist might have seen the important of keeping the Negro race in America from becoming a larger minority than it already is…”

Williams goes on to defend Planned Parenthood, “The very people who seem least concerned about “oversized” families are also the ones who too often are least concerned about supporting them.”

Williams calls them “repeaters” and says they are both white as well as black. He then proposes a solution, “why not “limit” them, preferably by planned parenthood education —but, if this doesn’t work, perhaps sterilization is not to drastic for some “repeating” unwed mothers?”

In a 1966 Memorandum from Mrs. Miriam Manisoff to Dr. Alan Guttmacher entitled: Negro Attitudes Toward Family Planning, dated February 11,1966, Mrs. Manisoff mentions that questions were raised during a seminar on Planned Parenthood that showed the concern the Black Community had. One such question that came from a man in the audience asked, “How come you people only have clinics in Negro neighborhoods?”

In February of 1966, Sidney A. Hessel of the Planned Parenthood League of New Haven [CT.] wrote to Alan F. Guttmacher this letter (experts): “ Since the luncheon phase of the last board meeting I have been very much concerned. I do not know if your report was the bombshell to the others that it was to me, but the fact that the Urban League, NAACP, etc. were actively and vocally naming PP*WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] a racist organization shocked me. I remember as long ago as 1935 hearing the then Catholic inspired reaction from the Negro community, “The whites want to keep our numbers down so they can rule us.” However, to hear this view point promulgated in 1966 by the leaders of the Negro group was a shock. More upsetting was the apparent acquiescent nod of the PP*WP spokesperson to the accusation. We can and should admit that our efforts have been geared toward the low socio-economic segment of the population-and probably the Negro population more than others…As to Negro board membership- Should a person be elected to the board because his skin is brown or yellow? Isn’t this also racism? Do the leaders of the Negro community have the time to give to Planned Parenthood over and above their other commitments? Let’s put the burden of cure on them and ask the leadership of the NAACP, CORE, the Urban League, etc. to submit names of qualified people to our nominating committee on the same basis as our affiliates…If we tell our story and stick to our viewpoint often enough we will be believed.

In 1966, Planned Parenthood president, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher praised the advice of Cecil Newman, the publisher of the Minnesota Spokesman and former board member of Planned Parenthood of Minneapolis, concerning Guttmacher’s concern that blacks viewed Planned Parenthood and birth control as genocide.

In a letter dated February 18,1966, from a mutual friend, Daryl Feldmeir managing editor of the Minneapolis Tribune, Newman offered this suggestion, which Guttmacher wholeheartedly approved, “If I were Dr. Guttmacher, I would find some of the top Negro clergymen with large congregations to serve on my board. They really command respect.”

On March 7th of the same year, Guttmacher thanks Newman, “Our mutual friend, Daryle M. Feldmeir, wrote me that he had discussed with you my concern about the racist reaction which seems to be springing up regarding Planned Parenthood. Actually the groups that seem the most vocal do not seem to be connected with the Black Muslim movement, to wit, the group of students at Berkley, calling themselves EROS and the NAACP in Philadelphia under the leadership of Cecil Moore.”

Guttmacher goes on to acknowledge Newman’s suggestion of placing clergymen on the board and asks him to submit three names.

On February 23,1966 while in Berkley California, Wylda B. Cowles met with Walter Thompson, head of EROS an organization that opposed both Planned Parenthood and Birth Control.

EROS stands for Endeavor to Raise our Size.

On March 28, 1966, Cowles reported to Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher, MD that EROS “interprets the underlying motives [of Planned Parenthood] as a means of accomplishing racial genocide.

She described Thompson as a college graduate, articulate, and intelligent and said that she did not believe that Thompson was an “irrational, wild-eyed radical.”

Cowles acknowledged that Thompson’s goals were to “destroy Planned Parenthood” because his wife was insulted at a Planned Parenthood center.

In a letter dated March 7, 1966, Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher wrote to Mr. William Searle, VP of Marketing of the CD Searle Company telling him that he had been picketed by a group of very attractive young men, and noted that this was “just one of several manifestations of increasing racist apprehension in regard to birth control by minority groups, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans.”

Guttmacher had a solution, he continued, “I am seriously considering adding to my staff a minority relations man or women from one of the minority groups, and since the largest is the Negro, probably someone of the Negro race. It would be his task to work not only with the conventional groups like the NAACP, CORE, etc. but actively to confront three militant groups and see whether or not we couldn’t persuade them of the error of their ways.”

Guttmacher then tells Searle that the “only thing holding me back is the lack of money.” Guttmacher than asks is Searle would be interested in supporting “such a unit”.

During a workshop on family planning at the March 21-24th, 1966 Southern Christian Leadership Conference (S.N.C.C.), Planned Parenthood’s field consultant, Mrs. Elsie Jackson reported to Alan Guttmacher that, “ As I had suspected the two S.N.C.C. workers came into the room with homemade picket signs (sheets of papers on their chests and backs). WE OPPOSE BIRTH CONTROL FOR NEGROES.

Elsie Jackson described the response of other blacks who attended the conference as follows, “Immediately after the initial presentation and the short introductory film, the reactions were hostile and volatile:

“God is against abortion and family planning is abortion and killing.”
“ Let the government give us our rights…and we’ll take care of our children.”
“They brought us here to work when they needed us and used us even as studs to produce more and more when they needed us—now they say stop breeding—Hell, no—now we’ll do as we please—we are tired of being run and manipulated.”
“Birth Control is a plot just as segregation was a plot to keep the Negro down.”

She reported that two members of the group described birth control as the white man’s tool to weaken the race.

Jackson observes, “It is apparent that birth control—family planning—population control have been caught up in the mass ball that is looked upon as the power structure that has been planned and implemented against the Negro American by the white American. Where or when this happened no one could say, but birth control—family planning—Planned Parenthood is now viewed by many Negroes as part of the other side—that which represents itself as being against the eventual elevation of the Negro…

“[Birth Control – Planned Parenthood] is viewed as a potential enemy. ..One man who was vehement in his opposition was finally pacified when reassured that abortion was not a method of birth control approved by Planned Parenthood…It became obvious that one role of Planned Parenthood in the community is continued education in the principles and philosophies of our organization and continued contacts with the leaders of the people to reassure them of the integrity of our intentions and of our belief, interest and support of the principles and rights that minorities are interested in.”

In a memo from Naomi T. Gray, Elsie Jackson, Helen Stanford, and Wylda B. Cowles, Community Relations Program for Planned Parenthood-World Population, to Alan F. Guttmacher, PP President dated April 11, 1966 they write, “ there was a consensus at the staff retreat that the tax-savings approach as a rational for providing birth control services has generated mistrust of Planned Parenthood’s motives among some segments of minority group communities—especially the Negro. This approach coupled with the population control message has proved to be explosive. The question now is how to handle the situation in such a way as to improve Planned Parenthood’s image , and if possible, to prevent the generation of further mistrust.”

In 1967, Douglas Stewart, Director of Community Relations with Planned Parenthood World Population, noted in a memorandum to the Executive Directors ,Planned Parenthood Affiliates, and Regional Directors that at the July 21-23 Newark Black Power Conference the conference passed an anti-birth control resolution, “I was in attendance at the Black Power Conference held in Newark, New Jersey as a representative of Planned Parenthood –World Population. It is interesting to note that even though the conference passed an anti-birth control resolution, I was personally well received…” Stewart did make this suggestion, “I would strongly recommend that all “outreach” personnel be instructed to minimize discussions of population control in the minority group…”

That same year, the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP charges that Planned Parenthood clinics, which provide the Pill and other forms of birth control in low income and minority neighborhoods, are devoted to keeping the black birth rate as low as possible. In a public statement the organization declares that birth control is being used as an instrument of racial genocide.

In a December 4, 1967 speech at Harvard University, Planned Parenthood president, Dr. Alan Guttmacher gave his views on abortion, “ I oppose abortion on demand, at least now for the United States, there are several reason. First, the public does not want it… only 20 % of the public favors abortion for single women… Abortion on demand relives the male of all responsibility in the sphere of pregnancy control..he becomes and animal…not far removed from the status of a bull…I favor liberalization of existing [ abortion] statutes…I would abort mothers already carrying three or more children…I would abort women who desire abortion who are drug attitudes or severe alcoholics…I would abort women with sub-normal mentality incapable of providing satisfactory parental care…

In a letter from Helen P. Stanford (ACSW) to Mrs. Anne Huppman, Executive Director Planned Parenthood Association of Maryland dated May 14,1968, Stanford tells Huppman , “The charge of Black Genocide as it relates to PP [Planned Parenthood] is being heard more frequently, and I suspect there will be much more of this kind of feeling. This makes it all the more important for us in PP [Planned Parenthood] to focus a great deal of our attention on ways to reach poor urban whites, to put greater emphasis on fostering maternal and child care facilities and to push toward developing social services for family planning by the community. If our services can move in this direction , we will begin to erase the image of birth control , as a planned way of limiting blacks.”

Dr Jerome H Holland sm

Then the dame year that Planned Parenthood World Population approved unanimously a policy recognizing abortion and sterilization as proper medical procedures, they elect the first Negro as Chairman, Dr. Jerome H. Holland.

Holland pledged his support to the organization and said that those who called birth control a form of “genocide” , “ Are not aware of the real meaning of Family Planning and its uses.”

Planned Parenthood then used this BLACK MAN to introduce abortion into the organization:
First BlackPP Prez

Frederick Osborn

That same years, Eugenics Society Officer Frederick Osborn, for thirty years the most important, wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely to be attained under a name other than eugenics”

The Black Unity Party responded this way: “The Brothers are calling on the Sisters not to take the pill. It is this system’s method of exterminating black people here and abroad. To take the pill means that we are contributing to our own GENOCIDE

BlackUnityPartypoor-p1-72

Later that same year (1968) a family planning center in Cleveland was burned to the ground after militant Negroes had labeled it’s activities “black genocide”. The black publication The Nation reported that, “Organized opposition can be found in cities from California to New York.”

DSC02839

In Pittsburgh, Dr. Charles Greenlee a black physician and William Haden a community Activist forced the closing of a Planned Parenthood clinic in the Homewood-Brushton district and then warned that firebombings and riots would occur if any attempt was made to reopen the clinic. Such threats were taken seriously.

Then in 1969, Alan F. Guttmacher, President: Planned Parenthood-World Population, made this alarming statement, “I would like to give our voluntary means of opoulation control full opportunity in the next 10 to 12 years. Then , if these don’t succeed, we may have to go into some kind of coercion…”

Planned Parenthood shows Black woman celebrating free birth control from ObamaCare

Posted in Birth Control and Eugenics, Black Genocide, Black Population Demographics, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Planned Parenthood and Black Leaders, Planned Parenthood and Black Women, Planned Parenthood and NAACP, Planned Parenthood and ObamaCare, Planned Parenthood Clergy with tags , , , , , , , , on October 18, 2013 by saynsumthn

On the Planned Parenthood Tumblr page, the eugenics and racist founded organization shows a black woman dancer to the idea of free birth control under ObamaCare

PP Free BC Black Woman OCt 2013PP Black wioman dances free BC Oct 2013

For YEARS, Black Americans fought the idea of free birth control in minority communities , in fact many continue to speak out today.

In the 1940’s –50’ Certain segments of the black community mistrusted the underlying intention of both private and government efforts with respect to contraception. Some blacks in particular became skeptical of the increasing push for contraceptive dispersal in poor urban neighborhoods, accusing contraceptive proponents of promoting nothing less than “black genocide.”

In 1942, Dr. Dorothy Boulding Ferebee, a black member of Planned Parenthood herself, noted the fear when she stated, these objections by “Negroes” toward birth control: “The concept that when birth control is proposed to them, it is motivated by a clever bit of machination to persuade them to commit race suicide, the fact that birth control is confused with abortion, and the belief that it is inherently immoral.”

That same year (1942) An American Dilemma; the Negro problem and Modern Democracy by: Gunnar Myrdal, reported that the number of contraceptive clinics rose from 34 in 1930 to 803 in 1942. Later that year, Margaret Sangers American Birth Control League would change it’s name to Planned Parenthood. The reason may have been that blacks they surveyed said they did not like words like “Control”. “Plan” was a more acceptable term to the black community.

In 1958, 1958- State Representative of Mississippi David H Glass sponsored a sterilization bill because he was angered by black women who made it a business to give birth to illegitimate children and collected welfare assistance for them. Glass wanted to “ stop, or slow down, such traffic at its source.” According to Mississippi’s The Delta Democrat-Times, Glass said it was designed to limit the number if illegitimate Negro children. Four times more Black children than Whites were receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children in Mississippi in the early 60’s.

By the 1960’s the birth control pill was introduced at a time when scientists such as Arthur Jensen and William Shockley were promoting genetic explanations of racial differences in intelligence-test scores. During the 1960s and 1970s, thousands of poor black women were coercively sterilized under federally funded programs. Women were threatened with termination of welfare benefits or denial of medical care if they didn’t “consent” to the procedure. Southern blacks claimed that black women were routinely sterilized without their consent and for no valid medical reason—a practice so widespread it was called a “Mississippi appendectomy.” Teaching hospitals in the North also performed unnecessary hysterectomies on poor black women as practice for their medical residents. During this period, state legislators considered a rash of punitive sterilization bills aimed at the growing number of blacks receiving public assistance. .. Black concerns about family planning had arisen decades earlier during Margaret Sanger’s crusade for birth control. As Sanger allied herself with the burgeoning eugenics movement, the call for birth control veered away from its radical, feminist origins to include programs to regulate the poor, immigrants and blacks, based on theories of genetic inferiority and social degeneracy. Some blacks of the period, including the nationalist leader Marcus Garvey, opposed birth control as a form of “race suicide.”

In 1962, the National Urban League rescinded its support of contraception, and so did many local NAACP chapters. Twenty-eight percent of the Blacks surveyed in the late 1960’s agreed that “ encouraging blacks to use birth control is comparable to trying to eliminate this group from society” Whitney Young, leader of the Urban League, revoked his group’s support of contraception in 1962 Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception and argued that black women needed to produce large numbers of babies until the black population comprised 30-35 percent of Americans; only then would blacks be able to affect the power structure.

At a meeting of the Council of Philadelphia Anti-Poverty Action Committee in 1965, Cecil Moore, president of the local NAACP chapter, condemned a Planned Parenthood program for northern Philadelphia because 70 percent of the population was black. Labeling the plan “replete with everything to help the Negroes commit race suicide,” Moore convinced the committee to table the proposal. Around the same time, Donald A. Bogue, a Chicago activist, reported that the birthrate of blacks in Chicago had fallen from 39.4 per thousand births in 1960 to 29.1 per thousand births in 1965.

At the White House Conference on Civil Rights sponsored by Lyndon Johnson, Cecil Moore made this attack on population control, And I have noticed that every time that we talk about population and planned parenthood, the only country I find that wants to limit poverty by limiting the poor- they always want to do it in Africa and South America and Asia , but I never heard them talk about doing it in Paris or England. Then I hope I am not belaboring the point, but don’t take that away from Negroes because we don’t have much else.”

In September 1965 the NAACP opposed a $91,000 federal grant for the dissemination of birth control information in North Philadelphia. The NAACP charged Planned Parenthood, which had applied for the grant, with attempting to “help Negroes commit racial suicide.” Although many blacks believed the pill was a benevolent technological advance, black nationalists tended to regard it as a symbol of genocide. A Planned Parenthood official explained to Ebony magazine: “Many Negro women have told our workers, There are two kinds of pills – one for white women and one for us…and the one for us causes sterilization.” This kind of paranoia frustrated and angered birth control activists.

In a letter dated March 7, 1966, Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher wrote to Mr. William Searle, VP of Marketing of the CD Searle Company telling him that he had been picketed by a group of very attractive young men, and noted that this was “just one of several manifestations of increasing racist apprehension in regard to birth control by minority groups, Mexicans, and Puerto Ricans.” Guttmacher had a solution, he continued, “I am seriously considering adding to my staff a minority relations man or women from one of the minority groups, and since the largest is the Negro, probably someone of the Negro race. It would be his task to work not only with the conventional groups like the NAACP, CORE, etc. but actively to confront three militant groups and see whether or not we couldn’t persuade them of the error of their ways.” Guttmacher then tells Searle that the “only thing holding me back is the lack of money.” Guttmacher than asks is Searle would be interested in supporting “such a unit”. Shortly after this, Planned Parenthood would begin to advance blacks to upper management of the organization.

In a memo from Naomi T. Gray, Elsie Jackson, Helen Stanford, and Wylda B. Cowles, Community Relations Program for Planned Parenthood-World Population, to Alan F. Guttmacher, PP President dated April 11, 1966 they write, “ there was a consensus at the staff retreat that the tax-savings approach as a rational for providing birth control services has generated mistrust of Planned Parenthood’s motives among some segments of minority group communities—especially the Negro. This approach coupled with the population control message has proved to be explosive. The question now is how to handle the situation in such a way as to improve Planned Parenthood’s image , and if possible, to prevent the generation of further mistrust.”

On January 11,1966, Lammont Du. P. Copeland sent a letter to Alan Guttmacher which contained the advice of Dupont’s Public Relations Representative, Mr. Glen Perry regarding the attitudes of the Black community toward Planned Parenthood. Perry sough counsels from a black man who had been active with Planned Parenthood, Mr. Joseph Baker, who Dupont retains as a public relations advisor in the field of race relations. Perry summaraized the suggestions in a memo dated: January 10,1966, “Baker told us that Dr. Guttmacher is correct in feeling that civil rights leaders are beginning to take a hostile position toward population planning on the ground that it is an attempt to halt the growth of the Negro population.” Baker strongly suggested to Perry that Planned Parenthood immediately open dialogue to the Black leaders, to “get their support and participation.” Baker chastised a speech that Guttmacher made where he admitted some on the Planned Parenthood Board may be there solely for a racist agenda, Perry writes, “[ Baker] was especially critical of Dr. Guttmacher’s admission that there might be some members of Planned Parenthood who had the political objective attributed to the organization by civil rights leaders. Such an admission could easily be taken out of context, and used to the detriment of the organization.”

Perry suggested that Guttmacher consider adding blacks to the Planned Parenthood board as well as the staff, he warns, “ If this isn’t done, I’m not sure any amount of talk can convince the Negro leaders that this isn’t something being done to them by the whites rather than being done for whites and blacks by whites and blacks working together.” Perry end by stressing that they need to “move quickly” to involve the black community.

During a workshop on family planning at the March 21-24th, 1966 Southern Christian Leadership Conference , Planned Parenthood’s field consultant, Mrs. Elsie Jackson reported to Alan Guttmacher that, “As I had suspected the two S.N.C.C. workers came into the room with homemade picket signs (sheets of papers on their chests and backs). WE OPPOSE BIRTH CONTROL FOR NEGROES.” Elsie Jackson described the response of other blacks who attended the conference as follows, “Immediately after the initial presentation and the short introductory film, the reactions were hostile and volatile:

“God is against abortion and family planning is abortion and killing.”
“ Let the government give us our rights…and we’ll take care of our children.”
“They brought us here to work when they needed us and used us even as studs to produce more and more when they needed us—now they say stop breeding—Hell, no—now we’ll do as we please—we are tired of being run and manipulated.”
“Birth Control is a plot just as segregation was a plot to keep the Negro down.”

She reported that two members of the group described birth control as the white man’s tool to weaken the race.

On February 23,1966 while in Berkley California, Wylda B. Cowles met with Walter Thompson, head of EROS an organization that opposed both Planned Parenthood and Birth Control. EROS stands for Endeavor to Raise our Size. On March 28, 1966, Cowles reported to Planned Parenthood President, Alan F. Guttmacher, MD that EROS “interprets the underlying motives [of Planned Parenthood] as a means of accomplishing racial genocide.” She described Thompson as a college graduate, articulate, and intelligent and said that she did not believe that Thompson was an “irrational, wild-eyed radical.” Cowles acknowledged that Thompson’s goals were to “destroy Planned Parenthood” because his wife was insulted at a Planned Parenthood center.

In 1966, Planned Parenthood president, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher praised the advice of Cecil Newman, the publisher of the Minnesota Spokesman and former board member of Planned Parenthood of Minneapolis, concerning Guttmacher’s concern that blacks viewed Planned Parenthood and birth control as genocide. In a letter dated February 18,1966, from a mutual friend, Daryl Feldmeir managing editor of the Minneapolis Tribune, Newman offered this suggestion, which Guttmacher wholeheartedly approved, “If I were Dr. Guttmacher, I would find some of the top Negro clergymen with large congregations to serve on my board. They really command respect.” On March 7th of the same year, Guttmacher thanks Newman, “Our mutual friend, Daryle M. Feldmeir, wrote me that he had discussed with you my concern about the racist reaction which seems to be springing up regarding Planned Parenthood. Actually the groups that seem the most vocal do not seem to be connected with the Black Muslim movement, to wit, the group of students at Berkley, calling themselves EROS and the NAACP in Philadelphia under the leadership of Cecil Moore.” Guttmacher goes on to acknowledge Newman’s suggestion of placing clergymen on the board and asks him to submit three names.

On September 10,1967, H. Rap Brown, National Chairman of the Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee urged an audience of 1000 that the Vietnam War and Birth Control programs are part of a genocide against Negroes.

Douglas Stewart, Director of Community Relations with Planned Parenthood World Population, noted in a memorandum to the Executive Directors, Planned Parenthood Affiliates, and Regional Directors that at the July 21-23 Newark Black Power Conference. The conference passed an anti-birth control resolution, ” I was in attendance at the Black Power Conference held in Newark, New Jersey as a representative of Planned Parenthood–World Population. It is interesting to note that even though the conference passed an anti-birth control resolution, I was personally well received…” Stewart did make this suggestion, “I would strongly recommend that all “outreach” personnel be instructed to minimize discussions of population control in the minority group…”

_________________________________________________________________________________

This trend continued…….

In 1983– A study conducted in Waller County , Texas, which had a 52% Black population rate, The study found that a substantial percentage of the respondents indicated agreement with each of the following genocidal statements: 5> Birth control programs are a plot to eliminate Blacks; (45.3% agreed)

Ted Hayes, civil rights and homeless activist, tells people about the millions of black babies lost to abortion

1977 It is strange that they choose to start talking about population control at the same time that Black people in America and people of color around the world are demanding their rightful place as human citizens and their rightful share of the material wealth in the world.” Jesse Jackson, 1977

1976 Jesse Jackson: “I think it is a significant issue, it reflects at one level, the moral decay and ambiguity in society, I think that Whenever Human Life ceases to represent the highest value in the human sphere, the society is in trouble….at this point what the court have ruled in abortion, the legal , it almost takes away from the young man the responsibility, and from the young woman the responsibility, of the act they have engaged in. And when people begin to use the excuses like “this girl is not ready yet” it means that the law of convenience becomes the highest law, and that is a very dangerous precedent morally, even before it becomes political!” (Jesse Jackson, Press Conference USA, February 2,1976)

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1971 Contraceptives will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation.” Jesse Jackson, 1971

1971Dr. Andrew Billingsley, vice president for academic affairs at Howard University, said that many birth control programs are aimed at “stamping out black children before they get on welfare. . . others have decided the black population is getting out of c o n t r o l and must be curbed.” BirthCurbsCritisized

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1971 A black educator and social scientist has sharply criticized the Planned Parenthood-World Population organization and called population control programs “overt racism with overtones of genocide.” Andrew Billingsley, Vice President for academic affairs of Howard University in Washington , D. C., told 700 delegates at the organization’s annual convention they should focus their attention on curbing the growth of this country’s white middle class. Although blacks constitute only 15 per cent of
this country’s population, Billingsley said “others have decided the black population’s getting out of control, and must be curbed.” He said birth control might not be bad if it were designed to enhance freedom of choice rather than “stamping out black children before they get on welfare.”

1971 Proponents…have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.Iowa State Rep. June Franklin, Democrat 1971.

1971 The abortion law, hides behind the guise of helping women, when in reality it will attempt to destroy our people.” Brenda Hyson, New York chapter, Black Panther Party, 1971

1970 A true revolutionary cares about the people–he cares to the point that he is willing to put his life on the line to help the masses of poor and oppressed people. He would never think of killing his unborn child.Detroit chapter, Black Panther Party, 1970

1969 A May 1969 issue of The Liberator , told readers, “ For us to speak in favor of birth control for Afro-Americans would be comparable to speaking in favor of genocide.” In articles and in cartoons in the Black press, the Pill was depicted as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. A poster circulated by the Berkley group: EROS, Endeavor to Raise Our Size- likened the Pill to lynching. Lynching represented “Birth Control Then…the crude way.” Under the image of a woman reaching for her oral contraceptives was the caption: ““Now, the Smooth Way.” (SOURCE: Devices and Desires, a History of Contraceptives in America, by By Andrea Tone Published 2002, Hill and Wang; PP.254-256, google books online)

1968The idea is to make less niggers so they won’t have to build houses for them.” , Dr. Charles E. Greenlee, a Negro physician and a chairman of the Health Committee of the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP. ( SOURCE: The Problem of Black Birth Control THE TITUSVILLE HERALD, TITUSVILLE, PENNA, PAGE SEVEN: OCTOBER 7,1968)

1968 Negro doctors Association with the Black Congress attacked some aspects of the government’s birth control program as being genocidal. In Intent for Black People, Walt Bremond, chairman of the Black Congress, said the highly diversified group felt that , “ if we don’t band together in our struggle, we’ll all perish as a people.” ( New York Times: Negroes see riots giving way to Black Activism and drive for Community Control: 10/21/1968)

1967 Newark, Black Power Conference resolution, “rejection of all birth control programs”
( Source; The cry of the ghetto, Saturday Evening Post : 8/26/1967, Vol. 240 Issue 17, P80-80, 1P, Editorial)

1967 On September 10,1967, H. Rap Brown, National Chairman of the Students Nonviolent Coordinating Committee urged an audience of 1000 that the Vietnam War and Birth Control programs are part of a genocide against Negroes. ( SOURCE: The New York Times: Rap Brown Calls Nation on ‘Eve’ of a Negro Revolt: 9/11/1967)

1962 Whitney Young, leader of the Urban League, revoked his group’s support of contraception in 1962 Marvin Davies, head of the Florida NAACP, rejected contraception and argued that black women needed to produce large numbers of babies until the black population comprised 30-35 percent of Americans; only then would blacks be able to affect the power structure. (SOURCE: Journal of Social History, Birth control and the black community in the 1960s: genocide or power politics?, by Simone M. Caron, (Spring 1998)

Some of these quotes are from a new film on Eugenics and Population Control called: Maafa21. It is a MUST SEE film- the best ever made on this issue. The early civil rights leaders, Black Panthers and others saw through the Planned Parenthood mirage. They saw it for what it really was: BLACK GENOCIDE.

In fact, civil rights icon, Fannie Lou Hammer saw clearly that abortion and birth control were being used as Genocide first hand.
Below are exerts of an eye opening incident Ms. Hamer experienced in the realm of Black Genocide written by Black journalist Samuel Yette. Yette was the first Black Washington Correspondent for Newsweek who was later fired after he himself authored a book exposing how birth control and abortion would be used as black Genocide, more on that later. Here Yette writes about Hamar’s experience in the Afro-American:

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer was Tough Fighter The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977 By Samuel Yette

” It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense…For these and other reasons the recent death of Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer …was noted here and across the nation not only with personal sadness, but also with stern political reflection.

When the charades of Richard Nixon included a White House Conference on hunger in 1969, Mrs. Hamer was among the hundreds of authentic grass-roots persons brought here to confir with the highly paid experts.

But the conference (whose name was changed from a conference on hunger to a conference on “Food and Nutrition”) was in reality, one great fraud against the poor.

Instead of seeking ways to feed the hungry, the back stage plan was to get the poor unwittingly to endorse a plan to eliminate from the society those who were hungry.

For example, a panel of medical experts pretended to be studying was to insure proper nourishment for babies and pregnant women. Instead it adopted-in the name of the poor at the conference- a resolution providing for:

– Birth Control devices for young girls, free, and with or without parental approval;

– Required abortions of unmarried girls discovered during the first three months of pregnancy; and

– Forced sterilization of any such girl giving birth out of wedlock a second time.

Only one black person-a nurse-was a member of that panel.

Yette continues, In my reportorial role, I found Mrs. Hamer for a reaction to the newly passed resolution.

She responded with shock and outrage at the deception, “I didn’t come to talk about birth control, ” she protested, ” I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people, Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

Hearing the location of the panel, she gamely pulled herself up on a cane, and made her way to the panel’s meeting room. Along the way she beckoned several black men, who followed seriously intent on doing her will.

She went straight to the front of the room and demanded to be heard.

With the power and conviction of personal tragedy, she told how she, herself, had once been sterilized under the guise of an unrelated surgical procedure. She told how such tools as their resolution in the hands of racist medical personnel would mean tragedy for the black and poor.

Finally, with several large black men at her side, Mrs. Hamer demanded that the resolution be reconsidered. It was, and voted down. But she could not stand and watch forever.

Though she saw the deception and illuminated the society’s most immoral contradictions , she, like the hope and moral vigor of he 1960’s ran out…

The author of the tribute above, Mr. Samuel Yette also suffered persecution for exposing the sinister plot to exterminate blacks with population control methods.

Samuel Yette authored a stunning book called: My Book, “The Choice” and it exposed high level eugenics efforts against the black community

Samuel Yette was also one of the first and very distinguished Black journalists to work for Newsweek. After he published his book, The Choice” which exposed high level attempts of Black Genocide through birth control , abortion, and additional means , he was fired by Newsweek. Yette claims his superiors told him that the “Nixon Whitehouse” wanted him out of Washington.

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In One chapter on Birth Control

Yette exposes President Nixon’s White House Conference on Food and Nutrition of December 2-4, 1969. In Mr. Yette’s words it, “was worse than a farce.” President Nixon opened the conference with 3 recommendations designed to reduce the number of hungry people! He suggested no measures for the relief of hunger in America.

1. He wanted everyone to have a guaranteed minimum income of $1,600 a year. (This is less than welfare was paying at that time.)
2. A supposed expansion of the food stamp program that would be tied into and compliment the welfare reform package in #1. (His plan would have actually reduced the amount of food stamps. Less money + less food =more hunger.)
3. Provide family planning services to at minimum 5 million women in low-income families.

This last proposal was part of a plan formulated by Dr. Charles Lowe of the National Institute of Health. The plan recommended Congress pass a law that:

1. Made birth control information and devices available to any and all girls over the age of 13 with or without parental consent.
2. Allowed mandatory abortions for unmarried girls within the 1st three months of pregnancy.
3. Mandatory sterilization for any unmarried girl giving birth out of wedlock for the 2nd time.

In that book, Yette describes how black activist, Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer was there for the Conference on hunger. When she heard about the birth control proposals she grabbed about a dozen young black men, walked into the room, and demanded to be heard. She spoke about ten minutes on the evil results of this plan and the conference dropped it from consideration.

Today 5 BLACK babies to every 1 White baby will die inside American Abortion Clinics. Is there a targeting going on? Find out: Maafa21:

MAAFA 21 DVD BLACK GENOCIDE IN 21ST CENTURY AMERICA

An incredible documentary that everyone must see.

Introduction:
They were stolen from their homes, locked in chains and brought across an ocean. And for more than 200 years, their blood and sweat would help build the richest and most powerful nation the world has ever known.

But when slavery ended, their welcome was over. America’s wealthy elite had decided it was time for them to disappear and they were not going to be particular about how it might be done.

What you are about to see is that the plan these people set in motion 150 years ago is still being carried out today. So don’t think that this is history. It is not. It is happening right here, right now.

If you think that slavery and racism is over, you will be shocked when you watch this well documented DVD exposing the racism that is still taking place within America. Maafa21 is a high quality documentary with incredible documentation – A MUST SEE for every African American !

MAAFA21 Purchase Here

Maafa21 DVD

Jesse Jackson and other Black Leaders used to speak against abortion- why have they been so silent?

Watch a powerful film called- Maafa21 to find out who has sold out the black race

Clip of Maafa21

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