Archive for the Black pro-life leaders Category

Four Black pro-life women who spoke against abortion as ‘Black genocide

Posted in Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black History Month, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on February 13, 2018 by saynsumthn

By  |  Republished from Live Action News

Image: Mildred Jefferson pro-life leader

Black pro-life leader Mildred Jefferson

In the early 1960s and 70s, organizations seeking to liberalize abortion laws, like the National Organization for Women (NOW), attempted to convince the nation that women wanted legalized abortion on demand. Many women actually opposed liberalized abortion laws, and those women’s voices were silenced by NOW (who was influenced by men seeking to profit from abortion) and NOW’s friends in the (at that time, majority male-led) media.

During that time, many pro-life women spoke out against the liberalization of abortion laws, including many women in the Black community, who saw abortion as “Black genocide.” Four of them are listed below:

Fannie Lou Hamer 

Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped to found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964, she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer pro-life women

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne said Hamer called abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition…. There she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. ‘I didn’t come to talk about birth control,’ she protested. ‘I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?’”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she ‘regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.’”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as saying, “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders. Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Dr. Mildred F. Jefferson

Mildred Jefferson pro-life, women

Mildred Jefferson (Image: Schlesinger Library)

Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and the first woman employed as a general surgeon at Boston University Medical Center. She was ardently pro-life, and was the co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) and Massachusetts Citizens for Life. She served as NRLC president from 1975-1978.

Dr. Jefferson was committed to defending human life from, as she described it, “conception to natural death.”

She first became active in 1970 when, as she recalled to the New York Times, “the American Medical Association first considered bending its founding principles in such a way that a doctor would not be considered unethical” if he or she committed an abortion.

She once described why she became a physician, “I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.”

Dr. Jefferson also warned that abortion would target the Black community, and in 1977, she stated, “Blacks suffer more from abortion because what looks like help is actually striking against them. Blacks are fewer. They will disappear sooner….” She insisted that “[a]bortion is class war against the poor,” and told the Pittsburgh Press in 1977, “Abortionists argue, ‘Let the poor have abortions like the rich can.’ Then abortionists should make a list of the other things rich women have that they’re going to give to poor women.”

Mildred Jefferson abortion Black genocide pro-life women

Mildred Jefferson: Abortion is Black genocide

At a press conference in 1989, Dr. Jefferson noted how the abortion lobby uses the poor to maintain abortion access. At that press conference, Dr. Jefferson joined with other pro-life women to release a declaration supporting life, stating that abortion is “not only genocide” but “national suicide.”

“It implies a fascist solution that now they call ‘liberal,’ to keep down the costs of caring for the poor. They get rid of those who are going to run up the costs,” she stated, adding:

Every women’s organization in this country has got to deal with these issues a little more forthrightly than has been possible in the past.  Because, for most of the organizations, of the general women’s organizations that support that point of view [abortion] there has never been any kind of real in depth discussion of such issues…

We have an idea that N.O.W., the National Organization of Some Women, in alliance with the other alphabet organizations — ACLU, PP, NARAL — are in deadly collusion to obtain the private right to kill all having the direct objective of establishing a socialist order, to replace our Democratic Republic.”

In a 1976 article with the New York Times, Dr. Jefferson summarized efforts of the pro-life movement as “dedication.” She went on to say, “It’s a simple matter that our people believe if they fail, other people will die. Today the unborn, tomorrow the elderly.”

READ: Bishops and pastors gather at Missouri Planned Parenthood to condemn Black genocide

Iowa Rep. June Franklin

Rep. June Franklin was one of many Black women who opposed abortion.

Rep. June Franklin (Image: Maafa21)

In 1971, one of the most convincing arguments against legalizing abortion in Iowa came from a Black female representative in the State’s legislature: June Franklin. According to a report published by the Burlington Hawk Eye, Rep. A. June Franklin, a Democrat from Des Moines, was joined in her opposition to abortion by another female Congresswoman, Hallie Sargisson, (D-Salix).

Rep. Franklin was the only African-American representative in the Iowa legislature, and saw liberalized abortion as a way to target the Black community. “Proponents… have argued this bill is for Blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all,” Franklin said. “Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of Blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either Blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

In July of 1972, she defended her vote to the Des Moines Register, saying, “Most of the people I’ve heard from are strongly opposed to legalizing abortion, and most of these people are not Catholics.”

The Des Moines Register later quoted the female lawmaker as being proud that her vote overturned the measure. “It would have led to genocide and euthanasia. God gave us life and only God can take it away,” Franklin said.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Clardy Craven was one of several Black women who opposed abortion.

Erma Clardy Craven

Erma Craven served on the board of the National Right to Life Committee and NRLC’s state affiliate, Minnesota Citizens Concerned for Life. She was also a social human rights activist and chairman of the Minnesota Human Rights Commission and African-Americans Against Abortion.

In 1972, just prior to the Roe v. Wade decision, Craven wrote a piece titled “Abortion, Poverty and Black Genocide– Gifts to the poor?” and called abortion Black genocide:

Throughout the course of American history, the quality of human life has always been improved at the expense of the weak and oppressed…. It takes little imagination to see that the unborn Black baby is the real object of many abortionists….

The quality of life for the poor, the Black and the oppressed will not be served by destroying their children….

[T]he womb of the poor Black woman is seen as the latest battleground for oppression. In times past the Blacks couldn’t grow kids fast enough for their “masters” to harvest; now that power is near, the “masters” want us to call a moratorium on having babies. When looked at in context, this whole mess adds up to blatant genocide….

Government family planning programs designed for poor Blacks will emphasize birth control and abortion with the intent of limiting the Black population is genocide. The deliberate killing of Black babies in abortion is genocide- perhaps the most overt form of all…. The prevalent Black attitude toward birth control and abortion is distinctly in opposition!

Craven pointed to two studies showing that Blacks — and specifically, Black women — opposed abortion:

In a study conducted by the Bowman Gray Medical School on poverty-level Blacks, 79% of 776 poverty-level Black females, 86% of 500 of their sex partners, and 70% of 215 low-middle-income Black females were found to be “not in favor of abortions under any circumstances.”  Similarly, when 990 urban Black females were studied, 77% were found to be opposed to abortion under any circumstances, and this opposition was found to be manifest in their actions of carrying their children to term…”

In 1975, Craven told a Pennsylvania federal panel that abortion amounted to a “wholesale marketing of human flesh.”

In 1985, Craven described why she opposed abortion. “Having served women on welfare, I feel that the pro-choice movement is a male cop out,” she said. “I vowed on my dear grandmother’s grave that as long as there is breath in my body I shall fight for the right of the Black child to exist.”

Hamer, Jefferson, Franklin, and Craven were adamant in their belief that abortion was being used by those in power to cull the Black population. Planned Parenthood’s own founder, Margaret Sanger, was a eugenicist whose “Negro Project” had the goal of reducing population growth in the Black community. Even today, Planned Parenthood has been caught in controversy, as an undercover Live Action investigation found the organization willing to accept donations to abort specifically Black babies:

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News

Black Church Leaders from COGIC pray outside Planned Parenthood

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Adoption, Black Babies, Black Church, Black Conservative, Black Genocide, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks protest abortionn with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 28, 2017 by saynsumthn

Bishops and pastors gather at Missouri Planned Parenthood to condemn Black genocide

On November 11, 2017, a large group of Church of God in Christ (COGIC) bishops and pastors gathered outside Planned Parenthood of St. Louis to pray and decry Black genocide in their community as part of the COGIC’s Family Life Campaign, a partnership with Human Coalition. Catherine Davis, founder of the Restoration Project, called the event “historic,” adding, “Many who were out there were bishops. The significance of this was remarkable because of the level of influence each bishop and pastor has within the church and their various communities.”

Catherine Davis

Davis told Live Action News that the pastors and ministry leaders participating in the prayer vigil were attending the COGIC’s annual convocation in St Louis. Although many Black pastors have stood outside Planned Parenthood and abortion facilities around the nation, Davis said she was unaware of a group of clerical leaders of this size participating at one time.

The St. Louis facility commits abortions up to almost 22 weeks and is known for its high number of 911 calls; it has sent at least 65 women to hospital emergency rooms since 2009.

“This location is located between two colleges, where they are targeting Black women,” Davis said in her live Facebook video. “We will not allow Planned Parenthood to target our women and we are taking a stand.”

The attendees from across the nation recognized how abortion was decimating the Black community, Davis said, and the group wanted women entering Planned Parenthood to know that help was available through the COGIC.

Black women pray outside Planned Parenthood

“We’re out here… to encourage women who come here for abortions to chose life instead of death for their unborn babies,” one of the attendees stated.

Another said the group was “prayerfully and peacefully serving women and encouraging them to make a healthy choice for themselves and their children.”

“Not only does abortion affect the woman but it affects everyone around her,” said another member, “And so we just want to make it clear that we stand against abortion today. And, we’re going to continue to be a part of the movement within our lives, within our church, and the community. ”

Others noted that they chose to participate to “pray against genocide” and “pray against population control” and against what Planned Parenthood is doing in the Black community by “aborting our babies.”

Black Bishops denounce Planned Parenthood

 

Bishop Vincent Matthews, president of the International Missions Department for COGIC, estimated the crowd at approximately 150 and described Planned Parenthood as a “lynching spot in St. Louis” where, “they lynch people, mainly Black folks but all kinds of people. Black people, white people, Latinos, Asians….”

Bishop Vincent Matthews prays outside Planned Parenthood

“This is the same city [St. Louis] that Dred Scott came to, to be free and they told him ‘go back and be a slave….’ — that he was not a real person. And they want us to go back to being slaves,” Matthews said.

Bishop Mathews regularly encourages members to adopt children from the foster care system as well as babies in danger of being aborted. “It’s about going home, rolling up your sleeves, and taking care of a child,” he noted.

According to Davis, Bishop Matthews also told the crowd that the “Church of God in Christ will not be a Negro Project denomination.” Matthews was referring to eugenicist Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger’s “Negro Project,” pushing birth control on the Black community.

In a letter that Sanger penned to her financier Clarence Gamble, the Planned Parenthood founder schemed to use Black ministers to introduce their congregants to the “Negro Project” agenda because, she said, “We do not want word to go out that we want to exterminate the Negro population,” and if it did, these ministers could “straighten out that idea if it ever occurs to any of their more rebellious members.”

Pastor Dean Nelson, National Outreach Director at Human Coalition, attended the prayer vigil. Human Coalition has partneredwith the COGIC’s Family Life Campaign to “advance their common mission of making abortion unthinkable and unavailable in America.” Nelson called the Church of God in Christ “one of the most Christ centered, socially conscience Black denominations in the country,” and explained to rally participants how abortion disproportionately impacts the Black community. He also pointed out that in New York, where Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger opened her first facility, more Black babies are aborted than are born.

Dean Nelson of Human Coalition prays outside Planned Parenthood

“And, her [Margaret Sanger’s] words to Clarence Gamble, head of Proctor and Gamble at the time, was ‘we don’t want word to get out that we want to exterminate the Negro population. And she used ministers in her diabolical plot.”

Nelson said the COGIC ministers were taking a stand against this eugenic, racist agenda: “We’re engaging with men and women of God in this country who happen to be African American that are saying we’re standing up and saying ‘NO MORE,’ not on our watch.”

Planned Parenthood and the media usually describe Sanger as a “birth control pioneer,” but she also met with members of the Klan, advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit” (which, in her mind, heavily included minority populations). Sanger wrote of her meeting with the Klan in her autobiography:

I accepted an invitation to talk to the women’s branch of the Ku Klux Klan…. I saw through the door dim figures parading with banners and illuminated crosses…. I was escorted to the platform, was introduced, and began to speak…. In the end, through simple illustrations I believed I had accomplished my purpose. A dozen invitations to speak to similar groups were proffered.

But Planned Parenthood‘s ties to eugenics go well beyond their founder Margaret Sanger — and its diabolical agenda of targeting the Black community for abortion has had staggering results.

For years, pro-lifers have contended that abortion disproportionately affects the African American community. They point to US Census Bureau data estimates, which show that in 2014, while Blacks made up approximately 13 percent of the US population, CDC figures for 2014 reveal that non-Hispanic Black women accounted for 36 percent of reported abortions for “race/ethnicity.” And, according to abortion numbers reported by Planned Parenthood‘s former “special affiliate,” The Guttmacher Institute (founded by a leader of the American Eugenics Society), 28 percent of abortions reported to them in 2014 were committed on Black women.

A recent survey published by Guttmacher (which is funded in part by taxpayers) revealed that Black women had a higher rate of prior abortions, because the availability of taxpayer-funded abortions were a contributing factor for women who had at least one prior abortion.

Guttmacher Prior Abortion Survey

 

The report found that Black women had a higher rate of prior abortions: “Slightly more than half of Black abortion patients had a prior abortion (54%), higher than any other racial and ethnic group.”

Members of the COGIC denounced the genocidal effects of abortion, holding signs that read, “COGIC DENOUNCES BLACK GENOCIDE…. ABORTION IS THE #1 KILLER OF AFRICAN AMERICANS IN THE NATION.”

COGIC calls abortion Black Genocide as Black ministers pray outside Planned Parenthood

Bishop Vincent Matthews and COGIC prays outside Planned Parenthood

COGIC Bishops pray outside Planned Parenthood

Blacks protest Planned Parenthood

Black ministers from Church of God in Christ oppose Planned Parenthood

Bishop Patrick Wooden also spoke in a Live Facebook feed while outside Planned Parenthood, announcing, “We are here to say that all lives matter, especially the lives of the unborn.”

Bishop Patrick Wooden COGIC pray outside Planned Parenthood

“We’re here to say that they matter…We are here and we are going to fight.”

As the members walked the sidewalk in front of the abortion facility you could hear them lovingly crying out to offer the women going to Planned Parenthood assistance. You could also hear them crying out to Jesus and praying that He would end the genocide. Many in the group also prayed for the doctors and nurses that worked inside the Planned Parenthood facility.

“We had to be here… we’ve joined the fight,” said Pastor Michael Gantz from Las Vegas. “We feel very moved to stand up against this genocide…. We can’t just talk about it – we’ve got to be about it.”

Bishop Matthews added, “We want women who come here to know we don’t condemn you…. If you don’t have options, we will adopt your baby…. just don’t have an abortion.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here  at Live Action News.

Being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Posted in Black Abortion Stats, Black Conservative, Black leaders on abortion, Black Neighborhood, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Victims, Black Women, Blacks oppose Birth Control, Blacks protest abortionn, Media Bias with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

These 15 women prove that being Black and pro-life is neither ‘rare’ nor ‘ignorant’

Michael Harriot, commentator for The Root,recently claimed that being a Black pro-life woman and seeking the protection of innocent Black babies in the womb is “rare.” But is it?

Harriott was writing in response to an interaction between Rep. Steve Cohen (D – Tenn.) and Star Parker, a pro-life Black woman, in which Cohen called Parker “ignorant” after she pointed out the devastation that abortion has wrought in the Black community.

Dem Congressman calls Black women Star Parker “ignorant”

“Since Roe v. Wade was legalized 20 million humans have been killed inside the womb of Black women. And then, on Halloween, Planned Parenthood tweets out that Black women are safest if they abort their child rather than bring it to term,” Parker said during a hearing on the Heartbeat Bill.

Planned Parenthood tweet tells Black women abortion is safer than birth

Parker also exposed the eugenic beliefs of Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, a known eugenicist who once gave a speech before the Ku Klux Klan. She also compared the Dred Scott decision, in which the U.S. Supreme Court declared that Black slaves in America were not citizens, to that of Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion in the entire country (essentially declaring that preborn humans are not persons and have no standing as such under the law).

Watch the interaction below:

Shockingly, Michael Harriot, who is also Black, chose to criticize Parker for her comments rather than research her claims about Planned Parenthood’s eugenicist beginnings. Instead, Harriot discounted Parker and other Black pro-life women, claiming that they are “rare”:

Star Parker, founder of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and a community activist, was asked to testify before the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice.

Hold up, I think I made a mistake in that previous paragraph. What I meant to type was: Star Parker was asked to testify before the House subcommittee because she is one of the rare black female Republican anti-abortion-rights activists. (No, I will not use the GOP marketing phrase “pro-life.” Who’s not for people living?)

Harriot then echoed Rep. Cohen’s derogatory remarks, saying, “People were shocked to hear him go after a black woman publicly like this, but here is the thing: She is kinda ignorant, though.” (Side note: Imagine for one moment what would happen if Parker were pro-choice and… oh, I don’t know… a white Republican male had called her “ignorant.” Media and social media — and likely Harriot himself — would explode with outrage.)

But Harriot’s claim about the rarity of pro-life Black females is simply wrong. The following Black pro-life women (in both the past and the present) are worth noting (and they weren’t all Republicans, Mr. Harriot):

1) Dr. Mildred Jefferson was the first Black woman to graduate from Harvard Medical School and was co-founder of the National Right to Life Committee. She once stated:

I became a physician in order to help save lives. I am at once a physician, a citizen, and a woman, and I am not willing to stand aside and allow the concept of expendable human lives to turn this great land of ours into just another exclusive reservation where only the perfect, the privileged, and the planned have the right to live.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nxefrRccsbI

2) Fannie Lou Hamer was a civil rights activist who helped found the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. In 1964 she ran for Congress. Hamer was also a victim of eugenic sterilization, a program which Planned Parenthood’s founder (as well as those on her board) advocated.

Fannie Lou Hamer

Ethyl Payne quoted Hamer as calling abortion “black genocide,” writing in The Afro-American, “She was a delegate to the White House Conference on Food and Nutrition… there she spoke out strongly of abortion as a means  of genocide of blacks….”

Journalist Samuel Yette also noted Mrs. Hamer’s views in The Afro American – Apr 2, 1977, quoting her as saying, “It is still a society in which an injured man must show his ability to pay before getting hospital services, but his daughter or wife can be aborted or fed birth control pills, at public expense….” Yette then recounted how Hamer blasted conference organizers: “She responded with shock and outrage at the deception. “I didn’t come to talk about birth control,” she protested. “I came here to get some food to feed poor, hungry people. Where are they carrying on that kind of talk?”

A 1969 article published by the Free-Lance Star quotes Hamer as denouncing voluntary abortion as “legalized murder,” saying she “made it clear that she “regards it part of a comprehensive white man’s plot to exterminate the black population of the United States.”

Author Kay Mills quoted Hamer in her book as being vehemently against abortion. “Once Black women were bought as slaves because they were good breeders,” Hamer said. “Now they talk about birth control and abortion for blacks. If they’d been talking that way when my mother was bearing children, I wouldn’t be here now.”

Elaine Riddick

3) Elaine Riddick is a staunch pro-life advocate and vocal critic of Planned Parenthood. She was a victim of eugenic sterilization who led a successful crusade in North Carolina to gain reparations for the men and women (mostly Black) who were forcefully sterilized.

That NC eugenics program was supported by Margaret Sanger’s financier, Clarence Gamble, a director of Sanger’s American Birth Control League (which later changed its name to Planned Parenthood).

In 1947, Gamble called for the expansion of North Carolina’s state sterilization program, saying that for every feeble minded person sterilized, 40 more were polluting and degrading the bloodlines of future generation with their defective genes.

Research from North Carolina’s Winston-Salem Journal reveals a long history of abuses in that state’s sterilization program — abuses that Gamble consistently glossed over. According to the Journal, “Gamble wanted sterilizations to increase rather than decrease, and increase they did.”

Riddick testified before the North Carolina State Legislature about her experience, tearfully saying, “They cut me open like I was a hog.” She told lawmakers that her only crime was being poor, Black, and from a bad home environment. Riddick’s horrific story was recounted in the documentary Maafa21, which chronicles the history of eugenics and the founding of Planned Parenthood:

4) Dr. Alveda King is the niece of civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr., and Director of Civil Rights for the Unborn for Priests for Life:

5) LaVern Tolbert is a former Board member of Planned Parenthood who now opposes their agenda:

7) Day Gardner is president of the National Black Pro-Life Union:

8) Judge Cheryl Allen is a Superior Court judge for the state of Pennsylvania. She has said, “Most people tend to believe that Planned Parenthood is in the African American Community to help, but they are not there to help, they are there to make abortion more accessible to black people….” (Source: Interview on His Place TV)

Judge Cheryl Lynn Allen

9) Rep. Mia Love is the first Black Republican female elected to the U.S. Congress from the state of Utah:

10)Barbara Howard is the Florida State chairwoman for the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). She has stated,.  “Recently, some black preachers finally came out not against abortion per se, but merely against the location of Planned Parenthood centers in black communities. It seems the murder of blacks is only a consideration for black preachers or other leaders when they are killed by white or Hispanic cops…. So who will stop the cold-blooded murder of millions of unborn black children?”

Barbara Howard

11) Rep. June Franklin (D-Iowa) is the only African American representative in the Iowa legislature, and said in 1971, “Proponents… have argued this bill is for blacks and the poor who want abortions and can’t afford one. This is the phoniest and most preposterous argument of all. Because I represent the inner-city where the majority of blacks and poor live and I challenge anyone here to show me a waiting line of either blacks or poor whites who are wanting an abortion.”

Rep. June Franklin (image Maafa21)

12) Dr Ashley Harrell of Black People Against Abortion:

13) Catherine Davis is a founding member of the National Black Prolife Coalition:

14) Dr. Freda M. Bush is an OBGYN and president of the Medical Institute for Sexual Health:

15) Obianuju Ekeocha, founder and president of Culture of Life Africa:

All the Black pro-life women from both political parties would make an exceedingly long list — and the truth is that the pro-abortion media makes little effort to highlight them.

Tragically, the real “ignorance” here is not found in those who denounce abortion’s impact on the Black community. It is found among members of the media who imply that Black pro-life women are “rare.” It just simply is not true.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Civil rights activist Dick Gregory: Abortion is Black ‘genocide’

Posted in Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Neighborhood, Black pro-life leaders, Civil Rights, Dick Gregory with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 12, 2017 by saynsumthn

|  (From Live Action News)

via flickr

Comedian and civil rights activist Dick Gregory died August 19, 2017, and although he is best known for his humor, the satirist once called out government-funded abortion and birth control as a genocide effort targeting the Black community.

Gregory was the father of eleven children but tragically, one of his children died as an infant. He often used his humor to touch on the social ills of the day, and as a result, many white people attended his comedy events. He became a strong voice in the Black community during the tumultuous times of the 1960’s and 70’s during the African American civil rights struggle.

In 1967, Gregory joined more than 1,100 Black delegates for the First National Conference on Black Power where he along with others in the group adopted a black power manifesto that called for the “refusal to accept birth control programs on the basis that they seek to exterminate Negroes,” among other demands, according to a July 24, 1967, New York Times report obtained by Live Action News.

In the Journal of Social History, researcher Simone M. Caron described the view just after that conference saying, “The following year, the Third Annual National Conference on Black Power in Philadelphia called on all blacks to ‘resist the increasing genocidal tendencies of American society.’ Resistance ranged from a small California group called Efforts to Increase Our Size (EROS) to groups in Pittsburgh and Cleveland that protested Planned Parenthood programs to the ultramilitant group in New York known as the Five Percenters. These organizations asked two main questions: ‘Is birth control just a “white man’s plot” to “contain” the black population?’ and ‘Is it just another scheme to cut back on welfare aid or still another method of “keeping the black man down”?’ An editorial in The Thrust questioned why blacks could not get a free aspirin for a headache ‘yet when you’re a Black woman old enough to look sexy you can get a truck loaded down with control pills free. . . . The whole plot makes Hitler look like a Boy Scout.’”

The following year (1968) Gregory ran for president of the United States on the “peace and freedom” ticket calling the two-party system “corrupt and immoral.”

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine: Abortion is Genocide

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion is Genocide

Then, in 1971, Gregory penned a controversial Op-ed piece entitled, My Answer to Genocide, which was published in Ebony Magazine.

Gregory, like many other Black leaders of his day, believed that large families were important to the Black power struggle of their time. And, the civil rights activist perceived that the government might be attempting to limit the Black population through their funding of abortion and birth control.

This idea that abortion and birth control were plots to exterminate African Americans was not new.

In fact, there were many prominent African American leaders, including Jesse Jackson, Samuel Yette, Fannie Lou Hamer, Whitney Young and more who were suspicious of government programs that pushed “family planning”, especially those that were placed within Black communities.

That suspicion appears to have had merit.

Research shows that family planning centers and abortion facilities often set up their locations in or near minority communities. In addition, the largest provider of abortions, Planned Parenthood, was founded by a radical advocate of racist eugenics who spoke with the Klu Klux Klan. And, Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics go well beyond their founder Margaret Sanger, as Live Action has reported previously.

Today, with Planned Parenthood receiving half a billion in government dollars every year to promote their agenda, not only is the abortion corporation’s market share of abortions increasing, but nationally Black abortions are at frighteningly high levels as well.

In the Ebony article, Gregory begins by criticizing “planned parenthood groups” that call for people to only have 2.5 children.

He dismissed the terminology that claimed a preborn person was merely a fraction of a human to the way Blacks were described during slavery as “three-fifths” human:

My answer to genocide, quite simply is eight Black kids – and a another baby on the way […]

Now planned parenthood groups are saying that a couple should have a maximum of 2 1/2 children. I’m still trying to figure out that half a kid. I know my American history well enough to know what ‘three-fifths’ of a man is, but half-a-kid?

 

Dick Gregory Ebony Magazine Abortion Genocide article

Gregory, who was born into a poor family, denounces birth control as something that “goes against Nature,” writing:

Can you believe that human beings are the only creatures who would ever consider developing birth control pills? You mention contraception to a gorilla and he will tear your head off.

Although Gregory’s humor is weaved throughout his piece, he is clear about the seriousness of genocide or as he also called it “subtle forms of genocide.” He said:

Genocide has come to mean, acts committed with the intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial, or religious group as such; by killing members of the group […] imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group […]

Like many Black leaders today, Gregory pointed to a host of ills facing the Black community including police brutality, segregation, the KKK, poverty, and war. But of genocidal measures to “prevent births” within a group, Gregory wrote in Ebony:

There is ample evidence that government programs designed for poor black folks emphasize birth control and abortion availability, both measures obviously designed to limit black population.

In November of 1971, following the birth of Gregory’s ninth child, Jet Magazine pointed again to the civil rights leaders opposition to planned parenthood groups:

Dick Gregory opposed planned parenthood. Jet Magazine November 1971

At the time, Gregory’s colleague Jesse Jackson shared his views and decried abortion.

In 1971, during public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future, the Rev. Jesse Jackson warned that, “Birth Control as a National policy will simply marshal sophisticated methods to remove ( and control when not remove) the weak, the poor – quite likely the black and other minorities whose relative increase in population threatens the white caste in this nation. Contraceptives, will become a form of drug warfare against the helpless in this nation[…]”

(Source: Statements at public hearings of the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future as quoted in: Genocide? Birth Control and the Black American by Robert G. Weisbord, Greenwoor Press, 1972; P. 165)

In 1973, Jesse Jackson stated, “Abortion is genocide,in a Jet Magazine interview.

In that Jet Magazine, Mar 22, 1973, article Jackson added:

“Anything growing is living…If you got the thrill to set the baby in motion and you don’t have the will to protect it, you’re dishonest…You try to avoid reproducing sickness. You try to avoid reproducing deformities. But you don’t try to stop reproducing and procreating human life at its best. For who knows the cure for cancer won’t come out of some mind of some Black child?”

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

Jesse Jackson Dick Gregory oppose abortion Winnipeg Free Press 1975

In 1975, at an event sponsored by the National Youth Pro-Life Coalition, Gregory joined Jackson in speaking against abortion.

The Winnipeg Free Press described the group as, “a non-sectarian, non-partisan group working for ‘positive alternatives’ to abortion, war, capital punishment, euthanasia, compulsory sterilization and ‘other forms of violence.’”

According to the media outlet, the Black activists told the group that, “that the nation’s pro-abortion mentality undermines the value and dignity of every human life and that ‘killing babies’ is symptomatic of a civilization
and culture which operates without sacred absolutes.”

Upon news of Gregory’s death, CNN described his first-hand experience with injustice:

In a 1963 protest in which Gregory participated in Birmingham, Alabama, he was arrested and beaten by the police for championing the right of blacks to vote. After that incident, Gregory wrote, ‘It was just body pain, though. The Negro has a callus growing on his soul, and it’s getting harder and harder to hurt him there.’

Like a majority of dishonest media which support abortion, CNN failed to mention Gregory’s opposition to the horrific taking of human life in the womb.

But, stats do not lie, and sadly, reported abortion numbers in the Black and minority communities ring of a certain confirmation about the concerns Gregory and Jackson had.

As a result, the numbers of abortions performed on minorities and specifically Black women remain disproportionately high. As Live Action News has previously documented, in 2011, the CDC revealed that almost 56% of all abortions reported for race were committed on minority women.

 

The CDC’s 2012 report (dated November 27, 2015) reveals that 55% of abortions reported for race/ethnicity were performed on Black or Hispanic women.

The latest numbers for 2013 (published in 2016) show those numbers remained relatively the same (54.6%).

While Dick Gregory is rightly remembered for his many accomplishments, it is doubtful the news media will discuss how his suspicions about birth control and abortion proved to be true.

After all, if government-funded abortion and birth control are, in fact, genocide against Black community, then why does the media remain supportive of forced taxpayer dollars to such agendas?

And, more importantly, why does Congress continue to fund Planned Parenthood?

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

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Black pastors decry Bust of racist Planned Parenthood founder at Smithsonian

Posted in Black Panthers, Black pro-life leaders, Margaret Sanger with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 11, 2015 by saynsumthn

A group of Black pastors has sent a letter to the Smithsonian asking that they remove the bust of controversial racist Margaret Sanger.

Margaret Sanger Bust National Portrait GalleryMargaret Sanger Bust

Ministers Taking a Stand addressed their concerns to Ms. Kim Sajet, Director The National Portrait Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution.

Writing:

    We are writing to ask that Margaret Sanger’s likeness be removed from all National Portrait Gallery exhibits. Her bust should not be part of the Gallery’s “Struggle for Justice” exhibit, which honors “great achievements…striking down long-standing segregationist practices and discrimination in American society.”

    Ministers Take a STand

    Ms. Sanger may have been a lot of things, but a “champion of justice” she definitely was not.

    Perhaps the Gallery is unaware that Ms. Sanger supported black eugenics, a racist attitude toward black and other minority babies; an elitist attitude toward those she regarded as “the feeble minded;” speaking at rallies of Ku Klux Klan women; and communications with Hitler sympathizers.

    Also, the notorious “Negro Project” which sought to limit, if not eliminate, black births, was her brainchild.

Sanger Autobiography Klan Speech

The letter also mentions the recent baby parts videos exposing Planned Parenthood’s gruesome organ harvesting operation.

    “Until now the national spotlight has not fallen on Sanger’s background. However, the recent revelations about aborted babies’ organs and body parts being sold, have not only brought Planned Parenthood under intense scrutiny, but also raised questions about its founder, Margaret Sanger. If the revelations were not consistent with her character and ideas, one might argue that Planned Parenthood has ‘gone rogue’ and abandoned Sanger. The fact is that the behavior of these abortionists, their callous and cavalier attitude toward these babies, is completely in keeping with Sanger’s perverse vision for America.”

Margaret Sanger from her autobiography

The Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery catalogs more than 100,000 portrait records from the Catalog of American Portraits (CAP), a survey of American portraits in public and private collections across the United States and abroad.

The CAP encompasses portraits of American subjects or by American artists, generally limited to one-of-a-kind likenesses such as paintings, sculpture, drawings, miniatures, silhouettes, and daguerreotypes.

The Margaret Sanger Bust was made in 1964 a few years before the Planned Parenthood founder died.

The bronze sculpture was created by artist Joy Buba in 1972 and cast after a 1964 original and owned by the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

2009 audio of NPG director Martin Sullivan who explained the portrait to a group visiting the museum said the Bust is located in the “Search for Justice” room which includes César Chávez and heroes of the Mexican revolution among others.

Sanger KKK

Sanger, who praised by the Klan, was also admired by 2016 presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton.

The Black group said this letter is the first among many efforts to expose the racist Planned Parenthood founder.

Stand PP Margaret Sanger

Ironically, Sanger’s bust is featured in the NPG’s “Struggle for Justice” exhibit, alongside two of America’s most celebrated and authentic champions of equal rights. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and Rosa Parks. If Sanger had her way, MLK and Rosa Parks would not have been born ,” the pastors write.

Black Pastors oppose Margaret Sanger Bust Smithsonian

How can a person like Sanger, who found common cause with the racial agenda of the Ku Klux Klan (“KKK”), be ranked among true champions of “justice?” She was a purveyor of grave injustice against the most vulnerable,” they continued.

Ministers Take a STand Smithsonian Margaret Sanger 1Ministers Take a STand Smithsonian Margaret Sanger 2

Read the full letter here.

The Smithsonian has refused to remove the Bust.

Bishop EW Jackson has suggested ( to Fox) that the Margaret Sanger Bust be placed in exhibits of the Klan or in a “hall of shame.”

It is equivalent to a Black genocide and she should not be honored at the Smithsonian Gallery,” he said.

A documentary I did the research for that was produced in 2009, called Maafa21, details the racist views of Sanger and is worth viewing.

#BlackLivesMatter protests missed Planned Parenthood says African American lawmaker! And more!

Posted in Black Caucus, Black Conservative, Black Dems, Black leaders on abortion, Black Lives Matter, Black Pastor, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks protest abortionn with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 29, 2015 by saynsumthn

H/T Breitbart:

Rep Bill Patmon Black Lives Matter Planned Parenthood

“You hear a lot of demonstrations across the country now about ‘Black Lives Matter. Well they skipped one place. They should be in front of Planned Parenthood.” ~ Democrat Rep. Bill Patmon, who is African-American.

It is my business, especially when 17 million of them are black women, 17 million – more than any other population – 17 million that look and act and talk …similar to myself, but even more than that, they’re Americans, and they’re human beings,” Patmon said.

Watch the film Maafa21 for more information about the racist agenda of abortion and Planned Parenthood!

Read what other African American Leaders have to say http://wp.me/ptUz8-12K.

Dr. Ben Carson Jake Tapper

2016 GOP Presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson told Jake Tapper on CNN that Planned Parenthood was an organization founded in eugenics that did not protect the sanctity of life.

(H/T TruthRevolt) )

Carson said that Planned Parenthood is “an organization whose founder believed in eugenics,” a reference to Margaret Sanger, and added, “even today, the plurality of their clinics are in minority communities.

Asked by Tapper if Planned Parenthood’s were needed in low income ares he responded, “I thought that they were supposed to be able to get all those things based on Obamacare. Why do we need Planned Parenthood?”

alvedamaafaquote

This week, Dr. Alveda King called out the Congressional Black Caucus for remaining silent on the Planned Parenthood debate.

Well, CBC, you cannot serve both Planned Parenthood and your constituents. By serving Planned Parenthood you are not only hating the other or despising the other but your position is helping to kill our people.

“It’s not too late to put your constituents first, where they belong. Get behind; no take the lead in the investigations of Planned Parenthood. Take the lead in calling for the defunding of Planned Parenthood. It time to stand up for truth,’ the niece of Dr. Martin Luther King said.

King is featured in the powerful film, Maafa21.

She recently told Charisma, “We need to repent for all the innocent blood that has been shed [thru ‪#‎abortion‬] ; the babies who have been killed while too many stood by silently as abortionists across America took the babies’ lives; the injured and dying mothers; the broken families. We need to ask God for forgiveness; collectively and individually. We need to ask God to heal our land. We need to pray for America, before it’s too late.

GuestClenard Childress Black abortion NAACP COnfederate Flag

Also this month, Black leaders protested outside the NAACP conference in Philadelphia decrying the group’s refusal to speak out against abortion which kills a majority of Blacks.

Rev. Clenard Childress, Jr. director of the largest Black pro-life organization the country, LEARN, visited the NAACP convention for days with a team of African Americans holding signs relating to Black Genocide from abortion.

He said that the group’s basic message at the NAACP event was that, “ALL Black Life Matters.”

It is a gross injustice of the NAACP board and members to ignore the genocide of the African American community and the health ramifications that are resulting from abortions upon African American women,” he said.

ken_blackwell2

“Planned Parenthood pays no taxes. Under President Obama, they’ve made more than $500 million in profits, but they claim to be a “non-profit” organization. They kill more 800 children every day. And they have from the earliest days targeted minority women. They once had a “Negro Ministers” project designed to recruit black pastors to push first birth control and then abortion in minority neighborhoods.” ~ Ken Blackwell, Senior Fellow for Family Empowerment at the Family Research Council, and the Ronald Reagan Distinguished Fellow for Public Policy at the Buckeye Institute in Columbus, Ohio.

Christina Bennett prolife Black abortion

We are dying we’re killing our own people. We came out of slavery, we fought for the civil rights movement but now the greatest civil right, the right to life – we’re not fighting for it,” Christina Marie Bennett.

More from Black leaders on Planned Parenthood:

Pro-life Star Parker: If Black Lives Matter then Black Babies Matter

Posted in Black Conservative, Black pro-life leaders, Black Women, Blacks protest abortionn with tags , , , , , , , on June 22, 2015 by saynsumthn

Star Parker attended a rally in Selma, Alabama this weekend of Juneteenth calling for stricter regulations of abortion clinics in the state and nationwide.

Star Parker Alveda King 86535689445_n

Parker is the founder and president of (CURE) the Center for Urban Renewal and Education, a public policy think tank that promotes market-based solutions to fight poverty.

meme-1

In her speech, she told the crowd, “If Black Lives Matter then Black Women Matter. If Black Lives Matter then Black children matter. If Black Lives Matter then Black children matter.”

Hands up – don’t vacuum – hands up- don’t abort – hands up- you’re under arrest,” Parker said of Dr. Samuel Lett who performs abortion in the civil rights town.

If Black Lives Matter then we need to shut down Samuel Lett and all of the other Gosnell-like abortionists across this country,” she stated.

More on the protest here and here.