Archive for the Big Brother Category

Big Brother NSA is spying on you thru your IPhone and computers

Posted in Big Brother, biometrics, NSA, Spying with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on December 31, 2013 by saynsumthn

nsa-iphone-hack-2008-document-1
Almost no communication shared by users of Apple’s iPhone is sacred or hidden from the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), thanks to a spyware program called DROPOUTJEEP that allows the agency to intercept SMS messages, access contacts, locate, and even activate the device’s camera and microphone.

Leaked documents made public by security researcher Jacob Appelbaum and Der Spiegel, a German news magazine, report that iOS devices implanted with DROPOUTJEEP have been successfully breached in 100 percent of the cases, according to a report in The Daily Dot.

“DROPOUTJEEP is a software implant for the Apple iPhone that utilizes modular mission applications to provide specific SIGINT functionality. This functionality includes the ability to remotely push/pull files from the device, SMS retrieval, contact list retrieval, voicemail, geolocation, hot mic, camera capture, cell tower location, etc. Command, control, and data exfiltration can occur over SMS messaging or a GPRS data connection. All communications with the implant will be covert and encrypted,” noted the report.

The National Security Agency (NSA) has apparently able to hack the iPhone since 2008, according to a Der Spiegel interactive report that looks at the NSA’s various tools used for spying purposes. One particularly interesting tool, codenamed “DROPOUTJEEP,” is an implant that was first used to compromise the first-generation iPhone and was able to send various data stored on the phone to the agency, including text messages, address book contacts, geolocation and voicemail. Furthermore, the software could activate the microphone of the iPhone, turn on the camera and take pictures and retrieve cell tower location.

The leaked materials show that the NSA had various other mobile-related spying “products” that worked with other smart devices:

GOPHERSET – an implant for GSM SIM cards to pull phone book, SMS and log files for incoming and outgoing calls
MONKEYCALENDAR – attack software that forces a SIM card to transmit geolocation data via covert SMS messages
TOTECHASER – an implant hidden in a satellite phone running Windows CE that transmits data via hidden SMS messages
TOTEGHOSTLY – an implant that enables full remote control on Windows Mobile phones offering data download and upload capabilities
PICASSO – modified GSM handsets that collect user data, audio data while also tracking the location of the handset

NSA Interception: Spy malware installed on laptops bought online

NSA spying on American citizens deepens to internet traffic

Posted in Big Brother, Internet, NSA with tags , , , , , on August 21, 2013 by saynsumthn

The Wall Street Journal peels back another layer of the NSA surveillance onion with an exclusive report:

The National Security Agency—which possesses only limited legal authority to spy on U.S. citizens—has built a surveillance network that covers more Americans’ Internet communications than officials have publicly disclosed, current and former officials say. The system has the capacity to reach roughly 75% of all U.S. Internet traffic in the hunt for foreign intelligence, including a wide array of communications by foreigners and Americans. In some cases, it retains the written content of emails sent between citizens within the U.S. and also filters domestic phone calls made with Internet technology, these people say.

More details on “filtering” capabilities and processes. Note well the bits about content interception and data storage:

The NSA’s filtering, carried out with telecom companies, is designed to look for communications that either originate or end abroad, or are entirely foreign but happen to be passing through the U.S. But officials say the system’s broad reach makes it more likely that purely domestic communications will be incidentally intercepted and collected in the hunt for foreign ones…This filtering takes place at more than a dozen locations at major Internet junctions in the U.S., officials say. Previously, any NSA filtering of this kind was largely believed to be happening near points where undersea or other foreign cables enter the country….The NSA is focused on collecting foreign intelligence, but the streams of data it monitors include both foreign and domestic communications. Inevitably, officials say, some U.S. Internet communications are scanned and intercepted, including both “metadata” about communications, such as the “to” and “from” lines in an email, and the contents of the communications themselves. Much, but not all, of the data is discarded, meaning some communications between Americans are stored in the NSA’s databases, officials say. Some lawmakers and civil libertarians say that, given the volumes of data NSA is examining, privacy protections are insufficient.

MORE at TownHall

NSA audit proves BIG BROTHER is spying on Americans

Posted in Big Brother, Constitution, NSA with tags , , , on August 16, 2013 by saynsumthn

The National Security Agency has overstepped its authority and broken privacy rules thousands of times every year since being given new surveillance powers by Congress in 2008, The Washington Post reported, citing an internal audit and other secret documents.

The documents, which the Post claims it received earlier this summer from NSA leaker Edward Snowden, detail how the controversial agency has crossed the line many times over in its collection of massive amounts of data from around the world.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2013/08/16/nsa-reportedly-broke-privacy-rules-thousands-times/#ixzz2c9gb6drX

The documents, provided earlier this summer to The Washington Post by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden, include a level of detail and analysis that is not routinely shared with Congress or the special court that oversees surveillance. In one of the documents, agency personnel are instructed to remove details and substitute more generic language in reports to the Justice Department and the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

In one instance, the NSA decided that it need not report the unintended surveillance of Americans. A notable example in 2008 was the interception of a “large number” of calls placed from Washington when a programming error confused the U.S. area code 202 for 20, the international dialing code for Egypt, according to a “quality assurance” review that was not distributed to the NSA’s oversight staff.

In another case, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, which has authority over some NSA operations, did not learn about a new collection method until it had been in operation for many months. The court ruled it unconstitutional.

The NSA audit obtained by The Post, dated May 2012, counted 2,776 incidents in the preceding 12 months of unauthorized collection, storage, access to or distribution of legally protected communications. Most were unintended. Many involved failures of due diligence or violations of standard operating procedure. The most serious incidents included a violation of a court order and unauthorized use of data about more than 3,000 Americans and green-card holders.

Zip codes used by the Retailer Big Brother !

Posted in Big Brother with tags , , , on June 24, 2013 by saynsumthn

Big Brother plan calls for more scanning of private Web traffic, email

Posted in Big Brother, cyber security with tags , , , , , on March 22, 2013 by saynsumthn

The U.S. government is expanding a cybersecurity program that scans Internet traffic headed into and out of defense contractors to include far more of the country’s private, civilian-run infrastructure.

As a result, more private sector employees than ever before, including those at big banks, utilities and key transportation companies, will have their emails and Web surfing scanned as a precaution against cyber attacks.

Under last month’s White House executive order on cybersecurity, the scans will be driven by classified information provided by U.S. intelligence agencies — including data from the National Security Agency (NSA) — on new or especially serious espionage threats and other hacking attempts. U.S. spy chiefs said on March 12 that cyber attacks have supplanted terrorism as the top threat to the country.

The Department of Homeland Security will gather the secret data and pass it to a small group of telecommunication companies and cyber security providers that have employees holding security clearances, government and industry officials said. Those companies will then offer to process email and other Internet transmissions for critical infrastructure customers that choose to participate in the program.

Read more

Big Brother’s U.S. Terrorism Agency to Tap a Vast Database of Citizens

Posted in Big Brother, National Counterterrorism Center, Privacy with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 14, 2012 by saynsumthn

H/T Hot Air

Remember when government needed something called a warrant or even probable cause to look at your records? Good times, good times. I’m nostalgic for the halcyon days of, er, February of this year, before the Attorney General of the United States signed off on an order allowing the government to access pretty much everything it wanted in the name of counterterrorism. The Wall Street Journal found out about the order and got a FOIA request to force its exposure:

Top U.S. intelligence officials gathered in the White House Situation Room in March to debate a controversial proposal. Counterterrorism officials wanted to create a government dragnet, sweeping up millions of records about U.S. citizens—even people suspected of no crime.

Not everyone was on board. “This is a sea change in the way that the government interacts with the general public,” Mary Ellen Callahan, chief privacy officer of the Department of Homeland Security, argued in the meeting, according to people familiar with the discussions.

A week later, the attorney general signed the changes into effect.

Read the WSJ U.S. Terrorism Agency to Tap a Vast Database of Citizens

Through Freedom of Information Act requests and interviews with officials at numerous agencies, The Wall Street Journal has reconstructed the clash over the counterterrorism program within the administration of President Barack Obama. The debate was a confrontation between some who viewed it as a matter of efficiency—how long to keep data, for instance, or where it should be stored—and others who saw it as granting authority for unprecedented government surveillance of U.S. citizens.

The rules now allow the little-known National Counterterrorism Center to examine the government files of U.S. citizens for possible criminal behavior, even if there is no reason to suspect them. That is a departure from past practice, which barred the agency from storing information about ordinary Americans unless a person was a terror suspect or related to an investigation.

Now, NCTC can copy entire government databases—flight records, casino-employee lists, the names of Americans hosting foreign-exchange students and many others. The agency has new authority to keep data about innocent U.S. citizens for up to five years, and to analyze it for suspicious patterns of behavior. Previously, both were prohibited. Data about Americans “reasonably believed to constitute terrorism information” may be permanently retained.

The changes also allow databases of U.S. civilian information to be given to foreign governments for analysis of their own. In effect, U.S. and foreign governments would be using the information to look for clues that people might commit future crimes.

“It’s breathtaking” in its scope, said a former senior administration official familiar with the White House debate.

Counterterrorism officials say they will be circumspect with the data. “The guidelines provide rigorous oversight to protect the information that we have, for authorized and narrow purposes,” said Alexander Joel, Civil Liberties Protection Officer for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the parent agency for the National Counterterrorism Center.

The Fourth Amendment of the Constitution says that searches of “persons, houses, papers and effects” shouldn’t be conducted without “probable cause” that a crime has been committed. But that doesn’t cover records the government creates in the normal course of business with citizens.

Congress specifically sought to prevent government agents from rifling through government files indiscriminately when it passed the Federal Privacy Act in 1974. The act prohibits government agencies from sharing data with each other for purposes that aren’t “compatible” with the reason the data were originally collected.

Read Rest

Big Brother : Mandatory Black Boxes in Cars

Posted in Big Brother, Privacy with tags , , , , on December 14, 2012 by saynsumthn