Archive for the American Eugenics Society Category

Eugenics influenced both abortion and Nazi holocaust

Posted in American Eugenics Society, Black Eugenics Victim, Black Genocide, Eugen Fischer, Eugenics, Eugenics Review, Guttmacher, Henry Fairchild, Hitler, holocaust, John D Rockefeller, Maafa21, Madison Grant, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger and AES, Margaret Sanger and Nazis, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Nazi, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Rockefeller with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 30, 2019 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood remembers Holocaust, ignores founder’s own eugenic views

Holocaust, remember, Planned Parenthood

This weekend as we remembered the horrific human cost suffered under the Nazi Holocaust, the hashtags #NeverAgain and #HolocaustMemorialDay were trending on Twitter. It is estimated that at least six million Jews (and millions of others) were slaughtered during the Holocaust. One post from Planned Parenthood drew some interesting comments, including this one, pictured below:

Image via Twitter

Image via Twitter

Hitler’s ‘bible’ and Margaret Sanger’s connection

Planned Parenthood may claim to remember the Holocaust and mourn bigotry, but the organization’s founder, Margaret Sanger, was a member of the American Eugenics Society (AES) — headed by Madison Grant, whose book, The Passing of the Great Race, was revered by Adolf Hitler himself. According to the eugenics archive, Grant’s book “argued for the preservation of America as a ‘civilization preserve’ for the Nordic race, advocating for immigration only from the founding stock of Anglo-Saxons and other Nordics from north-western Europe…. After becoming Führer, Hitler wrote to Grant; thanking him for his momentous work, stating that the book was ‘his Bible.’” (emphasis added)

The AES was founded in 1926 by Harry Crampton, Harry H. Laughlin, Madison Grant, and Henry Fairfield Osborn “with the express purpose of spearheading the eugenical movement,” according to the American Philosophical Society. The Nazi means of procuring the “perfect race” included eugenic sterilization, which many believe were inspired by American eugenicists. Historian Stefan Kuhl details in his book, The Nazi Connection, that “Hitler’s personal correspondence with American eugenicists reveals both the influence that American eugenicists had on the highest figures of the Nazi regime and the crucial importance that National Socialists placed on garnering support for their policies on foreign scientists.”

The documentary film Maafa21 even notes the possibility that Hitler got the idea for concentration camps while studying the American eugenics movement:

In 1919, the state of Indiana had allocated $300,000 to create a work colony in the city of Butlerville where those who were labeled feebleminded would be incarcerated. Then, in 1932, Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger called for the U.S. government to set aside farms and “open spaces” where certain groups of people would be segregated from the rest of society.

Image: Margaret Sanger advocates shipping people to farms and open spaces (Image: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger advocates shipping people to farms and open spaces (Image: Maafa21)

Margaret Sanger associated with men who praised (and inspired) Hitler

Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger herself spoke to members of the Ku Klux Klan and promoted eugenics and forced sterilizations. Although there is no indication that Sanger directly supported Hitler, she did not discriminate against those who did.

Leon Whitney – published by Sanger, praised by Hitler for his book on sterilization

Sanger published writings by Leon F. Whitney, former executive secretary of the American Eugenics Society, in her Birth Control Review. In 1934, Adolf Hitler sent a letter to Whitney complimenting him for a book he authored on sterilization — and Whitney praised Hitler as “one of the greatest statesmen and social planners in the world.”

Eugen Fischer – worked with Sanger at World Population Conference

And in 1927, Nazi sympathizer Eugen Fischer worked with Sanger on her World Population Conference in Geneva, Switzerland. According to a library of eugenics records at Cold Spring Harbor, Hitler read Eugen Fischer’s textbook Principles of Human Heredity and Race Hygiene, and used “eugenical notions to support the ideal of a pure Aryan society in his manifesto, Mein Kampf.” Fischer served on committees that planned the sterilization of Afro-German Blacks and was in charge of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute where racist Nazi programs were developed. In an August 28,1935 New York Times article, Fischer praised Hitler, asking the World Population Congress at that time to “Hail Fuehrer and Reich Chancellor Adolf Hitler.”

Image: Eugen Fischer (Image Credit: Archive zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin-Dahlem)

Eugen Fischer (Image Credit: Archive zur Geschichte der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin-Dahlem)

According to the DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor, the Rockefeller Foundation, which has long been funding eugenics and abortion organizations including the Population Council, provided funds to construct the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute. Author Edwin Black noted, “The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

Harry Laughlin – published in Sanger’s Birth Control Review

AES founder Harry Laughlin was published by Sanger’s Birth Control Review and signed the Citizen’s Committee on Planned Parenthood. In 1936, according to researcher Paul A. Lombardo, “Laughlin received an honorary degree from the Nazi-controlled University of Heidelberg as “a pioneer in the science of race cleansing.”

Lothrop Stoddard – sat on Sanger’s Birth Control League Board of Directors

Another Sanger cohortLothrop Stoddard, traveled to Germany to observe a Nazi eugenics court. Stoddard, a journalist and author, served on Sanger’s National Council, her ABCL Board of Directors, and the conference committee of the First American Birth Control Conference. Stoddard described this meeting in his book: Into the Darkness: A Sympathetic Report from Hitler’s Wartime Reich.

Image: Image: American Eugenics Society document

Image: American Eugenics Society document

Ernst Rudin – called for racial purity in Sanger’s Birth Control Review, wrote Germany’s eugenic laws

In 1933, Sanger associate Ernst Rudin of Germany published a call for racial purity in Sanger’s Birth Control Review. Later, according to the documentary film, Maafa21, “Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws and, at one point, he personally helped the Gestapo round-up and sterilize several hundred Blacks who they referred to as ‘Rhineland bastards.’ After the war, Rudin would be identified as one of the architects of the barbaric medical experiments that the Nazis carried out in their concentration camps.”

It is documented that Planned Parenthood’s ties to eugenics ran deep and extended into the late 1960’s. Sanger’s American Birth Control League, and later Planned Parenthood, stacked their boards and events with eugenics leaders. Planned Parenthood’s first physician president, Alan F. Guttmacher, was vice president of the American Eugenics Society. Guttmacher, credited with leading Planned Parenthood to commit abortions, went on to found Planned Parenthood’s former “special affiliate,” the well-known Guttmacher Institute.

Tragically, eugenics philosophy paved the way for genocide under Nazi control of Germany. Today, that same philosophy has led to millions of preborn humans being massacred in the womb through abortion. As we remember what took place in Germany, the words of Rabbi Benjamin Blech ring true today: “We had no idea what was happening needs to be clearly identified as the great lie of the years of Nazi power. The harsh truth is that almost everyone had to know. The numbers negate the possibility for collective ignorance. And still the killings did not stop, the torture did not cease, the concentration camps were not closed, the crematoria continued their barbaric task. The decent people were somehow able to rationalize their silence.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Posted in Abortion Funding, Abortion History, Abortion legalization by state, Abortion prior to Roe, Abortion Racism, abortion used as birth control, Abortion Welfare, American Eugenics Society, American Law Institute, Bernard Nathanson, Bush, Bush Family, Cosmo Magazine, Faye Wattleton, Feminism, Guttmacher, Lader, Men and Abortion, Men For Choice, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood President, Population Control, Population Council, Roe V Wade History, Subverted, Supreme Court, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion

The media seems to always equate abortion with “women’s rights” — but many people may be unaware that legalizing abortion in America was actually an idea originally pushed by pro-abortion men, many of whom were concerned about the growth of certain people groups. But beyond this, predatory men have benefited significantly from legalized abortion, which has removed male responsibility from unplanned pregnancy situations, and which is used to cover up sexual abuse. And male abortionists continue to be protected by the abortion industry even when they rapeinjure or kill female patients.

Below are eight things everyone should know about the large role certain men played in liberalizing abortion laws in the U.S.:

1. Pro-eugenics men were the primary people discouraging reproduction among “undesirable” groups

Image: Image: American Eugenics Society document

Image: American Eugenics Society document

2. A pro-population control man led the push for abortion at Planned Parenthood 

Image: PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

Image: Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

3. A misogynistic man influenced the sexual revolution, which primarily benefited predatory males 

  • The sexual revolution of the 1960s pushed by Cosmopolitan Magazine (under direction of Helen Gurley Brown) was inspired by Hugh Hefner, creator of Playboy.
  • Hefner told Hollywood Reporter that Brown approached him for job before joining Cosmo: “She wanted to do a female version of Playboy.
  • The theme of free sex without consequences and no kids, with abortion as a safety net, benefited men.

Cosmo Magazine 1967

Cosmo Magazine 1967

4. Two pro-abortion men hijacked the 1960’s “women’s movement” to legalize abortion 

Image: Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

  • Most outspoken abortion enthusiasts in the 1960s were men, like Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson.
  • Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” dubbed “mother of the women’s movement,” called Lader “the father of the abortion rights movement.”
  • Friedan founded the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966 and in 1967, Lader and Nathanson convinced her to add abortion to NOW’s plank, causing a loss in female NOW membership.
  • Lader admitted in his book that “Abortion never became a feminist plank in the United States among the suffragettes or depression radicals. It was ignored, even boycotted by Planned Parenthood women in those days.”
  • 1969: NARAL was established by Lader, Nathanson, and Friedan, who admitted few women attended. (Nathanson later renounced his pro-abortion stance and worked to expose the lies they told.)
  • 1989: Friedan acknowledged it was certain men who pushed to legalize abortion: “I remember that there were some men… that had been trying to reform these criminal abortion laws. And they got a sense somehow that the women’s movement might make everything different…. They kept nagging at me… to try and do something…. ‘We need some organization to take up… abortion rights.’”
Image: Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

5. Pro-eugenics men founded the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s former research arm 

  • Alan Guttmacher, former Planned Parenthood president and Eugenics Society VP, founded the Center for Family Planning Program Development in 1968, which became the Guttmacher Institute, a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.
  • In 1969, Guttmacher acknowledged funding came from “Kellogg, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations.”

6. Men in favor of population control pushed for taxpayer-funded “family planning,” which aids America’s largest abortion business

  • The Title X federal family planning program allocates tens of millions of tax dollars to Planned Parenthood.
  • 1965: President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) supported taxpayer funded “family planning” and was awarded Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award the following year.
  • 1966: Alan Guttmacher proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to fund birth control for poor.
  • 1968: George N. Lindsay, chairman of Planned Parenthood-World Population, urged President Richard Nixon to federally fund poor people’s “family planning.”
  • 1969: Nixon spoke in favor of “family planning” and the same year, the Senate approved tax funding for it, with the help of Democrat Senator Joseph D. Tydings, a Planned Parenthood supporter granted PPFA’s Margaret Sanger award.
Image: Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

  • 1970: The U.S. House of Representatives authorized federal dollars to pay for family planning services.
  • The chief co-sponsor of the Title X statute was Rep. George H.W. Bush, who later became president. Bush was recruited because his grandfather, Prescott Bush, once sat on a Planned Parenthood board.
  • 1972: Nixon recommended Congress create the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future to study abortion. It was chaired by John D. Rockefeller III, a longtime advocate of population control. The Executive Director was Charles Westoff, a member of the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood’s National Advisory Council.

7. An all-male Supreme Court legalized abortion

  • 1973: U.S. Supreme Court justices, all men, ruled 7 to 2 to vote in the Roe v. Wade case in favor of legalizing abortion on demand.
Image: Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

8. Men pushing eugenics and population control brought the abortion pill to the U.S.

  • The Population Council, founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller III, was led by men concerned about population issues and is credited with bringing abortion pill RU-486 to the U.S.
  • Population Council leaders were connected to the eugenics movement (read more here).
Image: RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

  • 1994: President Bill Clinton’s administration encouraged French pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf to assign US rights of marketing and distribution of RU-486 to the Population Council.
  • Right to distribute handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.
  • 2000: Larry Lader bragged in a press conference he “plotted” to break the law and smuggle the pills into the U.S.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Group that brought abortion pill to US has eugenics history

Posted in Abortion pill, American Eugenics Society, Bernard Berelson, Eugenics, Every Child a Wanted Child, Frank Notestein, Frederick OSborn, Guttmacher, Population Council, RU-486 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2017 by saynsumthn

The Population Council has a shocking 65-year history, and it’s nothing to celebrate

(From Live Action News)

John D Rockefeller-founded Population-Council

The Population Council, the eugenics organization credited with bringing the abortion pill RU-486 to the United States, turns 65 this month — but it is nothing to celebrate.

In 1952, John D. Rockefeller III founded the Population Council and served as the organization’s first president.  According to the Rockefeller Foundation, the Population Council, Inc., was incorporated following Rockefeller’s Conference on Population Problems, “…to stimulate, encourage, promote, conduct and support significant activities in the broad field of population.”

Like its founder, the Population Council’s other members were concerned about population issues — and, like other population organizations such as Planned Parenthood, high ranking Population Council leaders were well connected to the eugenics movement.

Frederick Osborn

 

Frederic Osborn followed Rockefeller as Population Council president in 1957. Osborn was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society who signed Margaret Sanger’s “Citizens Committee for Planned Parenthood,” published in April of 1938. Osborn once wrote, “Eugenic goals are most likely attained under a name other than eugenics.” Some speculate that Planned Parenthood’s infamous slogan, “Every Child a Wanted Child,” may have originated with Osborn. It is no wonder that Osborn also said that “Birth Control and abortion are turning out to be the great eugenic advances of our time.”

Frank W Notestein

Frank W. Notestein followed Osborn as president in 1959. Like Osborn, he was member of the American Eugenics Society and as the American Philosophical Society, according to a biography published by Princeton University. He was also one of the organization’s original four trustees, according to the Population Council’s 1957 Annual Report.

In 1939, Notestein and Osborn served together on the Medical Advisory Board for Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Federation. By 1967, under Notestein’s leadership, the Population Council released a controversial film, entitled “Family Planning,” which featured Disney’s iconic cartoon figure Donald Duck. It was one of many efforts in the 1960s and ’70s to indoctrinate the culture on the use of birth control.

By 1970, Notestein was serving on the Board of Directors of Planned Parenthood-World Population.

Bernard Berelson

Bernard Berelson took the helm of Population Council in 1968, as its fourth president. A year later, in 1969, Berelson published an article which suggested that if voluntary methods of birth control were not successful, it may become necessary for the government to put a “fertility control agent” in the water supplies of “urban” neighborhoods. The article was published in the journal, “Studies in Family Planning,” published by the Population Council. Berelson was also featured in the Population Council’s first issue of “Population and Development Review.”

 

Alan F. Guttmacher, M.D. sat on the Population Council’s first Medical Advisory Board. Guttmacher, a former Planned Parenthood president, was also vice president of the American Eugenics Society. His ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger, who made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics. Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute, would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.

Alan Guttmacher, president of past Planned Parenthood (screenshot: CBS news)

Thomas Parran, Jr. was on the original Population Council’s board of trustees. On paper, he has a very distinguished career, having been named the nation’s sixth U.S. Surgeon General, building support for the passage of Social Security as well as the establishment of the World Health Organization. His name even appeared on the public health building of the University of Pittsburgh as “one of the giants of 20th-century medicine.”

Thomas Parran (Photo: NIH/NLM)

But according to USA Today, “Parran’s legacy was tainted in 2010, when the U.S. government apologized to Guatemala for the syphilis experiments that exposed 1,308 men, women and children to syphilis without consent from 1946 to 1948. Parran approved of the experiments, conducted by U.S. Public Health Service physician John Cutler.” (Cutler and his wife Eleise contributed to the Population Council and Cutler’s wife admitted that she served on the board of Planned Parenthood.)

Earlier this year, Philly.com reported that Parran was suspected of being the “intellectual inspiration of the infamous Tuskegee Syphilis Study”:

Regrettably, Parran’s great work, impressive resume, and proud legacy are besmirched by his ethical violations. The truth of his association with horrendous experiments using impoverished Alabama sharecroppers, federal prison inmates, and an array of vulnerable subjects in Guatemala who were purposefully infected with syphilis were already known. But newly discovered evidence disclosing his role as the architect of the Tuskegee study may have caused his already troubling case to reach the tipping point…

Pitt trustees now must confront evidence showing Parran was more than a distant bureaucrat during the Tuskegee study. New documents disclose that Parran believed the African American population of Macon County, Ala., was perfect for a nontreatment exercise. “If one wished to study the natural history of syphilis in the Negro race uninfluenced by treatment,” Parran wrote in January 1932, “this county would be an ideal location for such a study.”

Eugenics founded Guttmacher praises Eugenics founded Population Council which turned 65

The Rockefeller family has long been connected to eugenics. According to author Rebecca Messall, “Rockefeller money funded eugenic scientists decades before Hitler put eugenic theories into practice.”

Rockefeller eugenics (image: New York Times)

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

According to author Edwin Black (emphasis added), “Eugenics would have been so much bizarre parlor talk had it not been for extensive financing by corporate philanthropies, specifically the Carnegie Institution, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Harriman railroad fortune. They were all in league with some of America’s most respected scientists hailing from such prestigious universities as Stamford, Yale, Harvard, and Princeton. These academicians espoused race theory and race science, and then faked and twisted data to serve eugenics’ racist aims… The Rockefeller Foundation helped found the German eugenics program and even funded the program that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.”

Black added, “In May 1926, Rockefeller awarded $250,000 to the German Psychiatric Institute of the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute, later to become the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Psychiatry. Among the leading psychiatrists at the German Psychiatric Institute was Ernst Rüdin, who became director and eventually an architect of Hitler’s systematic medical repression.” (NOTE: In 1933, Rüdin’s call for racial purity was published in Margaret Sanger’s Birth Control Review. According to the documentary film, Maafa21, Rudin would be chosen by Hitler to write Germany’s eugenics laws.)

Rockefeller III once claimed that birth control was “directly related to the matter of meaningful peace.”

In her review of the book, “Fatal Misconception: The Struggle to Control World Population,” written by Columbia University historian Matthew Connelly, C-Fam author Susan Yoshihara, Ph.D, discovered what led up to Rockefeller’s founding of the Population Council:

John D Rockefeller III (Image: Rockefeller Foundation)

In 1952, at a secret, invitation-only gathering in Colonial Williamsburg, John D. Rockefeller III brought together what would become the modern population control establishment. Setting the agenda for the following decades were the heads of the United States Atomic Energy Commission, National Academy of Sciences, and top scientists “from embryology to economics,” including past and present Nobel Prize winners.

From verbatim transcripts of the “Conference on Population Problems,” just one of the countless number of such meetings the book exposes, Connelly found that what drove them were the questions of how many people the world could hold along with “whether ‘industrial development should be withheld’ from poor, agrarian countries like India.” By decreasing mortality and encouraging “breeding,” development would increase inferior populations and further degrade “the genetic quality of the human race.” They decided radical measures to reduce birthrates were justified in order to save “Western Civilization” from being dragged down by the growing humanitarian demands of Third World countries.

Thus was born the Population Council, which would in turn become the nexus of the entire population control movement, going on to coordinate the work of the United Nations, the Ford and Rockefeller foundations, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) – founded three weeks later – as well as major pharmaceutical firms.

In 1994, with the encouragement of the Clinton administration, french pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf assigned the US rights of marketing and distribution of abortion pill RU-486 to the Population Council. The right to distribute the harmful drugs were later handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.

In 2015, a Government Accountability Office (GAO) report found that from fiscal year 2010 through 2012, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) reported sending about $236 million to six organizations and their affiliates and member associations: Advocates for Youth, Guttmacher Institute, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA), the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States (SIECUS), and the Population Council.

Today, abortion remains among the Population Council’s strategic priorities, according to its latest annual report.

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Former Planned Parenthood president: forced birth control would be ‘desirable’

Posted in American Eugenics Society, Eugenics, forced abortion, Forced Population Control, Forced Sterilization, Guttmacher, Margaret Sanger, Margaret Sanger License to Breed, Margaret Sanger on Segregation and sterilization, Planned Parenthood History, Planned Parenthood President, Population Control with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on October 3, 2017 by saynsumthn

A former Planned Parenthood president and vice president of the American Eugenics Society once advocated that if families did not limit births to just two children, then compulsory methods of population control could be necessary.  The idea, proposed by Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, a well-known eugenicist and one-time president of Planned Parenthood who established the Guttmacher Institute, came on the heels of radical proposals by Planned Parenthood board members and others that immediate compulsory means should be used to curtail population growth.

In 1970, Guttmacher addressed a group concerned about the so-called “population explosion.” Lee McCall, a reporter for the Sarasota Herald Tribune, attended the conference and noted that Guttmacher, as president of Planned Parenthood World Population “for the past eight years,” was invited to speak under the sponsorship of Planned Parenthood of Sarasota County, Inc.

McCall spoke with Guttmacher about “discussions” that had been floating around to limit children within families to “2 or 3.”

McCall wrote:

There has been discussion of limiting families to 2.2 children.

Dr. Guttmacher feels it inadvisable for Planned Parenthood to boldly vocalize such a plan.

‘It would be difficult,’ he said, ‘In the first place it would probably split the organization. Also we would have trouble with minority groups accepting this.’

Despite his apparent hesitancy towards coercion, McCall goes on to quote Guttmacher as admitting that such a “plan” of compulsory population control would be “desirable.”

“So even though the plan may be desirable and would make us a stronger nation, a less polluted nation, I feel it would be strategically unwise at this time,” the former Planned Parenthood president told the reporter.

Keep in mind, this is the very organization which allegedly claims it was founded on freedom of choice. And Guttmacher was attempting to dispel the theory that abortion and birth control were racist efforts of genocide aimed to limit the birth rate of the Black community.

Racism seen as denting Birth Control 1966

This admission was profound and came shortly after the New York Times attempted to paint Guttmacher as a wanting “volunteer” birth control measures only.

In its 1969 article entitled, “Dr. Guttmacher is the Evangelist of Birth Control,” the New York Times was forced to acknowledge that many leaders sitting on Planned Parenthood’s board were in favor of coercive measures of population control. While painting the picture of an agency which was pushing birth control on the “ghetto” rather than the “middle-class” who were having more than the optimal amount of children, the paper noted that a “sizable” number of Planned Parenthood’s board was made up of “preponderantly white and well-to-do” people. They then quoted a Planned Parenthood board member who admitted the racist attitude of the organization, when he stated:

What it all comes down to is that we want the poor to stop breeding while we retain our freedom to have large families. It’s strictly a class point of view.

However, despite the majority of Planned Parenthood’s board holding a “class” point of view regarding who should be “encouraged” to use contraception, if Guttmacher was for “voluntary measures” of population control, compulsory measures were never ruled out.  Because, as the Planned Parenthood president saw it, if “voluntary measures” did not work, then force would be necessary.

This point of view can clearly be seen in a 1969 article from Medical World News Reports, in which Guttmacher floated the possibility that coercion could be used. His shocking statement was published by the Sarasota Herald Tribune where it quoted Guttmacher as suggesting that, “Each country will have to decide its own form of coercion, and determine when and how it should be employed.”

Guttmacher Compulsory Birth Control 1970

The following year (1970) Guttmacher told an audience at New Mexico State University that, “[…] if by 1990, the population is still growing at a rate of 2% then we must go to some kind of compulsory birth control.” (emphasis added).

Earlier in 1966, Guttmacher compared the world population with the threat of nuclear war and told the Washington Post that governments may have to act officially to limit families saying, “It may be taken out of the voluntary category.”

In his 1959 book, “Babies by Choice or By Chance”, Guttmacher described the atomic bomb as “more merciless to our generation” and “more kinder to future generations” than “the explosion of the population bomb.” He bemoaned the fact that death rates were lowering, while birth rates were on the rise, writing, “Therefore if we want to decelerate the rate of population growth, it must be done by conception control.”

Babies by Choice or By Chance, by Alan F Guttmacher

This idea of temporary volunteerism was also noted by author Angela Franks, who wrote in her book, “Margaret Sanger’s Eugenic Legacy: The Control of Female Fertility”, that, “in the late 1960’s, Guttmacher put a limit on volunteerism: if we don’t see a population decline by 1980, he said, ‘we’ll have to get tough.’”

The fact is that Guttmacher’s ideas of forced or compulsory population control measures were in lock-step with Planned Parenthood’s founder Margaret Sanger. After all, they were both members of the very racist American Eugenics Society, with Guttmacher serving as the group’s vice-president. As Live Action News has documented in the past, Sanger made sure that Planned Parenthood was knee deep in eugenics.

But, rarely reported by contemporary media is the fact that Sanger once suggested that parents should be required to have a “license” to even be allowed to have children at all.

License to Breed Margaret Sanger

In her “A License for Mothers to Have Babies” with the subtitle, “A code to stop the overproduction of children.” Sanger outlined her plan article by article, which read in part (emphasis mine):

A marriage license shall in itself give husband and wife only the right to a common household and not the right to parenthood.

Article 4. No woman shall have the legal right to bear a child, and no man shall have the right to become a father, without a permit for parenthood.

Article 5. Permits for parenthood shall be issued upon application by city, county, or State authorities to married couples , providing the parents are financially able to support the expected child, have the qualifications needed for proper rearing of the child, have no transmissible diseases, and on the woman’s part, no medical indication that maternity is likely to result in death or permanent injury to health.

Article 6No permit for parenthood shall be valid for more than one birth.

While Sanger’s plan may have been viewed as extreme in her day, and the idea of coercion may have been chided as evoking a potential backlash against Planned Parenthood, my colleague, Kelli wisely observed that the “two-child idea” advocated by Guttmacher was just as eugenic. In a recent Live Action News report, Kelli noted that the, “[…] view of ‘two children and no more’ has its roots in the eugenics movement, and at the heart of the eugenics movement lies Planned Parenthood. Margaret Sanger and her friends advocated population control for the ‘unfit’, while today’s eugenicists tend to couch their beliefs about family size in terms of environmental concerns.

Despite that fact that Guttmacher and Sanger were both (as eugenicists) concerned that the world population was a threat, it was under Guttmacher’s leadership that Planned Parenthood first vocalized abortion as part of the answer to “over-population.”

He noted this approval in the 1970 interview where he stated:

If we could get the abortion law liberalized, most of the 750,000 unwanted pregnancies would not lead to babies – rejected children, battered baby syndrome and illegal abortions.

And, in that same year, Guttmacher admitted to a 1970 Cornell Symposium, (according to an April 7, 1970 article published by the Cedar Rapids Gazette), that although he did not know when life began, he believed that “unlimited abortion” was the only way to reduce population growth saying:

There is no question that the most effective way of reducing population growth is by unlimited abortion.

Today, Alan Guttmacher is painted by some as a hero of “reproductive rights” despite his promotion of coerced population control and abortion.  And, Guttmacher was correct about one thing, and that is that abortion has been an effective tool in the limitation of births. This was recently acknowledged by pro-abortion Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg who said, “I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don’t want to have too many of.”

It is no surprise that Guttmacher’s namesake institution, the Guttmacher Institute would later be referred to as a “research arm” and a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.  After all, on their website, his Institute describes Guttmacher by saying, “No one was better able to unite the Planned Parenthood organization or summon it to carry out its historic mission.”

  • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

Church of Euthanasia – abortion a “religious sacrament” originates from Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League

Posted in American Birth Control League, American Eugenics Society, Euthanasia, Euthanesia, Margaret Sanger Euthanasia with tags , , , , , , , , on October 4, 2013 by saynsumthn

A story published in Life News writer Kristen Hatten reveals that the “Church of Euthanasia” Calls Abortion a Religious “Sacrament”

prolady

Hatten writes, Every once in a while, somebody new – maybe somebody young and impressionable – finds out about the Church of Euthanasia, and thinks it’s a little bit awesome. Or maybe a lot awesome.

Here is what the “church” has to say about abortion:
timchick

It has become politically correct to be “pro-choice”, but the very euphemism itself reveals deep misgivings within the people who call themselves pro-choice. The Church of Euthanasia is not pro-choice. The Church of Euthanasia is pro-abortion.

“Sister Catherine” goes on to say that because people are too irresponsible for birth control, ”[t]he time has come for abortion to be encouraged as birth control.” The “sister” particularly loves RU486, calling surgical abortion “crude.” She adds: Where are all those fetuses going, anyway? Judging by the number of pro-life lunatics that manage to get hold of them, too many are winding up in dumpsters. How typically American! Let’s recycle those fetuses, by combining two of the pillars of the church. Fetus pate, anyone?

kim_and_yellow_cap

Church of Euthanasia

The church’s one commandment is “Thou shalt not procreate.” A lot of people seem to have no trouble following this commandment and upholding the four pillars.
The Church currently has hundreds of card-carrying members who’ve taken the vow, plus clergy, directors, and thousands of “e-members” on the Internet. We have members as far away as Italy and Latvia, though the majority are still in the USA.

Hatten concludes, “How lucky for America. In case you’re thinking these are just a handful of wackos, be advised they link to several other “anti-humanist” organizations from their site, such as the Voluntary Human Extinction Movement and Gaia Liberation Front, whose philosophy is summed up as “the Humans must be completely exterminated, ASAP.”

Abortion a Sacred Right READ CREED HERE

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Margaret_Sanger1

This attitude toward Euthanasia is not surprising given that it was formed by Margaret Sanger Gurus.

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In 1938, just a few years prior to the American Birth Control League (ABCL) changing its name to Planned Parenthood, which today is the largest abortion provider in the nation, a group of American Eugenics Society Members and members of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) formed the National Society for the Legalization of Euthanasia.
ABCL EU

One Source here

Heading this pro-euthanasia panel was a man by the name of Charles F. Potter who, in 1938 was also on the ABCL Committee for Planned Parenthood according to a February 1938, New York Times story.

Also on this board was Sidney Goldstein who sat on the American Birth Control League’s National Council and later was on Planned Parenthood’s Board of Directors.

Old PP

Another member was Frank H. Hankins who was a managing editor for Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger’s newsletter called the Birth Control Review. Hankins was also an American Eugenics Society member.

AES Letterhead

Another more famous name who was sat on the advisory board of this panel was Julian Huxley, who was a recipient of a Planned Parenthood award.

Huxley PP Award

Mrs. F. Robertson Jones was also on this panel, she was an ABCL President, wrote for Sanger’s Birth Control Review, and was an honorary board member of Planned Parenthood-World Population and a Board of Director of Planned Parenthood.

ABCL Citizen’s Committee for Planned Parenthood member, Dr. Foster Kennedy, was also on the panel.

American Eugenics Society Member, Clarence Cook Little was the President of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL), at the same time he was on this pro-euthanasia panel. Clarence Little was the president of the University of Michigan, a founding member of The American Eugenics Society, and a board member of the American Birth Control League which would later be known as Planned Parenthood. (Watch Maafa21)

American Eugenics Society founder and friend to Margaret Sanger, Leon Whitney, also sat on this panel. Whitney advocated forced sterilization, was published in Sanger’s Birth Control Review, and openly praised Adolf Hitler for his Nazi effort.

Read more

Later we see that Margaret Sanger actually signed onto a Euthanasia Society- as evidenced here:

Sangereuthenasia-society-of-america

Margaret Sanger’s ABCL members formed first Euthanasia Death Panel

Posted in American Birth Control League, American Eugenics Society, Death Panels, Euthanasia, Euthanesia, Margaret Sanger Euthanasia with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 6, 2013 by saynsumthn

Written and Researched by Carole Novielli.

Just-Discovered Letter Shows Margaret Sanger Was Part of Euthanasia Society

In 1938, just a few years prior to the American Birth Control League (ABCL) changing its name to Planned Parenthood, which today is the largest abortion provider in the nation, a group of American Eugenics Society Members and members of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL) formed the National Society for the Legalization of Euthanasia.

ABCL EU

One Source here

Heading this pro-euthanasia panel was a man by the name of Charles F. Potter who, in 1938 was also on the ABCL Committee for Planned Parenthood according to a February 1938, New York Times story.

Also on this board was Sidney Goldstein who sat on the American Birth Control League’s National Council and later was on Planned Parenthood’s Board of Directors.

Old PP

Another member was Frank H. Hankins who was a managing editor for Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger’s newsletter called the Birth Control Review. Hankins was also an American Eugenics Society member.

AES Letterhead

Another more famous name who was sat on the advisory board of this panel was Julian Huxley, who was a recipient of a Planned Parenthood award.

Huxley PP Award

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Mrs. F. Robertson Jones was also on this panel, she was an ABCL President, wrote for Sanger’s Birth Control Review, and was an honorary board member of Planned Parenthood-World Population and a Board of Director of Planned Parenthood.

ABCL Citizen’s Committee for Planned Parenthood member, Dr. Foster Kennedy, was also on the panel.

American Eugenics Society Member, Clarence Cook Little was the President of Margaret Sanger’s American Birth Control League (ABCL), at the same time he was on this pro-euthanasia panel.

Clarence Little was the president of the University of Michigan, a founding member of The American Eugenics Society, and a board member of the American Birth Control League which would later be known as Planned Parenthood. (Watch Maafa21)

Leon Whitney Acclaims Hitler

American Eugenics Society founder and friend to Margaret Sanger, Leon Whitney, also sat on this panel. Whitney advocated forced sterilization, was published in Sanger’s Birth Control Review, and openly praised Adolf Hitler for his Nazi effort.

ABCL and Euthenasia

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MARGARET SANGER AND EUTHANASIA

Margaret Sanger Slee Pathes

It is unclear why Planned Parenthood founder, Margaret Sanger was not listed on the above article because Sanger was clearly involved in the Euthanasia Society. Sanger was a member of the American Eugenics Society and many of their members were on this panel. Sanger admitted that she gave a speech to the Klu Klu Klan and in her autobiography, she bragged that she received a dozen invites from the Klan for further speeches.

By 1952, Margaret Sanger was open about her belief in Euthanasia.

ssc62

This 1952 letter from the Euthanasia Society of America clearly shows Margret Sanger on the American Advisory Board of the Euthanasia Society of America

Euthenasia Society of America

In addition to Margaret Sanger who founded Planned Parenthood – the panel also shows Henry P. Fairchild a past president of the American Eugenics Society, a VP of Planned Parenthood;Henry Fairchild Eugenics PP

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See here where Sanger is listed as Honorary Chairman of Planned Parenthood in their early years:
Planned Parenthood letter formerly BCFA

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Also listed is Harry Emerson Fosdick, who was a recipient of the Albert Lasker Awards Given by Planned Parenthood in 1953.

Henry H. Goddard is also listed and he was published in Margaret Sanger’s book, The Case for Birth Control.

Holmes ABCL

Also on the list is Samuel H Holmes. According to the film, Maafa21, in a 1929 speech, American eugenicist Samuel Holmes had proposed that mandatory birth control should be used as a tool to eliminate what he called the menace to the white race that had been created by increases in black population. His solution was to have a quota system in which the right to have a child would be controlled by the government and determined by race. At the time, Holmes was on the National Council of the American Birth Control League which would later become known as Planned Parenthood.

Frank L, Babbott is listed as a Vice President of this Euthanasia Society. Babbott was a founding member of the American Eugenics Society.

Frank H. Hankins – is listed on the Board of Director – his associations are listed above.

ABCL May 1924

Clarence C . Little is also listed on the board of directors. Clarence Little was the president of the University of Michigan, a founding member of The American Eugenics Society, and a board member of the American Birth Control League which would later be known as Planned Parenthood. He was President of the International Fed of Birth Control League, Birth Control Federation President, on the Birth Control review editorial board, A Birth Control Federation of America VP, and on the 1938 Citizen Committee for Planned Parenthood. Among other known Sanger associations.

ABCL Committee on PP

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Charles Francis Potter was founder of the Humanist Society and in 1924 Margaret Sanger wrote an “Introduction for Charles Francis Potter.” Potter was active in the Rhode Island Maternal Health Association, which he served as medical director, as well as Planned Parenthood. He was a member of the American, Rhode Island, and Providence medical societies. In 1967, Dr. Potter was awarded the Margaret Sanger Medal by Planned Parenthood for outstanding service to family planning, after he served 11 years as medical director of its clinic.

President of the Euthanasia Society was Mrs. F Robertson Jones who was also on Margaret Sanger’s ABCL board.

We would later discover that RL Dickinson was President of the Euthanasia Society and Senior VP if Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

RL Dickinson

In 2012 PETER GOODWIN, MD ended his life in accordance with Oregon’s Measure 16 “Death with Dignity Act,” the landmark legislation that he helped craft and champion into law in 1997. . Aside from publicly advocating for Measure 16, he served as chairman of the Oregon Death with Dignity Committee. He was also a member of the Planned Parenthood of Columbia/Willamette board.

In 1964, Evelyn Ames co-founded the Planned Parenthood Association of Nashville. She served as the organization’s southeastern representative for nine southern states, and on the executive committee of the national board of directors of Planned Parenthood-World Population. She was also a founder and member of the board of the Nashville chapter of Concern for Dying, an advocacy group for the right to die. Ames Davis died in 1993.

Esther Instebo delivered donations and filled fundraiser tables for Planned Parenthood and Washington politicians. Instebo pulled her friends into Democratic Party politics. Instebo worked with the euthanasia organization Compassion & Choices to qualify for help in dying under the state’s Death with Dignity law. Knowing that she had that option “greatly improved the quality of the last six months of her life because she knew she wouldn’t have to put up with what she was afraid of.”

According to researcher, Rita Dillar, when Compassion & Choices, formerly The Hemlock Society, convened its June 2012 conference, former Planned Parenthood insider Theresa Connor was a featured speaker. She was public policy director for Planned Parenthood in Washington state for 15 years and instituted the research and strategy behind the 2001 Erickson v. Bartell case “that required employers’ insurance plans to cover prescription birth control under anti-discrimination laws.

Margaret Sanger Planned Parenthood Hero

It is interesting how Margaret Sanger, founded in Eugenics, the American Eugenics Society, and members of the Planned Parenthood all helped establish euthanasia and so-called mercy-killing ideologies in America. The purveyors of death have taken their fanaticism all the way from conception to end of life and no one is outside their bloody grips.

Planned Parenthood founder wanted to merge with Eugenics Society

Posted in American Birth Control League, American Eugenics Society, Margaret Sanger with tags , , , on February 27, 2013 by saynsumthn

Margaret_Sanger1

This letter written by Margaret Sanger was published in her Birth Control Review and details her meeting with American Eugenics Society representative, Leon Whitney, to merge her publication with that of the Eugenics Society. Whitney, the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society was a colleague of Sanger’s and she published his writings in the Birth Control Review. Adolf Hitler was so influenced by Whitney that he sent him letter complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization. SangerMergeABCLwithEugenics

Case for Sterilization

In his book, The Case for Sterilization, Whitney said, “No one can deny that our present trend is toward a planned society planned biologically as well as economically; and no planned social order is attainable without careful consideration of the kind of people we want to ‘have forming the race of the future. Inevitably the question arises, How are we to achieve the desired effect? And the answer is: Cut off the useless classes by preventing their reproduction…”

One example of the American Birth Control League passing resolutions to join forces with the American Eugenics Society.

SangerABCL Eugenics

Acclaims Hitler

In 1934, Adolf Hitler sent a letter to American eugenicist, Leon Whitney, complimenting him for a book he had written on sterilization. Whitney was the former Executive Secretary of the American Eugenics Society and a colleague of Margaret Sanger’s. Sanger also published his writings in the Birth Control Review.

In the book that Hitler was praising, Whitney had written that America could eliminate what he called the “slum elements” of society by sterilizing the lowest 25 percent of its population. He claimed this was necessary because such people are too stupid to comprehend or carry out even simple methods of contraception. Besides, he said, the country would “hardly miss” them. ( Watch Maafa21)

Here is Margaret Sanger in 1925 attempting to merge the two groups:

NYT1925Merge ABCL Eugenics

Planned Parenthood’s founder was an active member of the American Eugenics Society:

Sanger AES