Archive for the Abortion History Category

Abortion Texas History

Posted in Abortion History with tags , , , , on November 7, 2015 by saynsumthn

Texas History:

In March 1970, a suit was filed in Dallas on behalf of plaintiff Jane Roe and all other women “who were or might become pregnant and want to consider all options.”

At the time, in Texas, abortions were prohibited except to save the pregnant woman’s life. But, on June 17, 1970 the three-judge federal panel struck down the Texas abortion statute.

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Henry Wade, a Dallas district attorney who defended the Texas law and the state attorney general appealed, leading, eventually, to the Supreme Court ruling: Roe v. Wade.

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On January 22, 1973 the Supreme Court issued the infamous Roe v. Wade decision which legalized abortion on demand in America.

Planned Parenthood PSA fails to mention eugenics ties

Posted in Abortion History, American Law Institute, North Carolina Eugenics, Planned Parenthood and Eugenics, Planned Parenthood Employee, Wallace Kuralt with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 19, 2014 by saynsumthn

PP Health Systems of Charlotte

A video highlighting a North Carolina Planned Parenthood founder fails to mention that she founded the center with help from a man connected to eugenics.

Sarah Bryant PP

It begins, “Planned Parenthood Health Systems of Charlotte began in 1969 when Sarah Bryant saw an unmet need.”

Now an old woman, Ms. Bryant says that she started the Planned Parenthood center at the urging of well known eugenicist Wallace Kuralt and other business leaders. “then Mr. Art Jones who was a banker and Mr. Wallace Kuralt who was the chairman, head of the county health commission, urged me to start Planned Parenthood. They had been involved and had known about Margaret Sanger when they were in [ Oberlin] college. So, that was the beginning.”

Sarah Bryant PP Charlotte

Planned Parenthood was founded on eugenics. Their founder , Margaret Sanger, was a member of the American Eugenics Society and she placed other like-minded believers on her board. This has been well documented by this blog on several occasions.

Ms. Bryant concludes the recently uploaded Planned Parenthood PSA by admitting that their agenda has not changed, “The face may change but the mission is the same…. ,” she states.

Bryant was the wife of the late funeral director Bob Bryant, and in the early 1960’s she asked many of Charlotte’s most powerful bankers, lawyers, ministers, doctors, teachers and community servants to join her on a Planned Parenthood board.

In 1971, two years before abortions were legalized, the agency opened its first health Planned Parenthood center on Morehead Street.

It began after Wallace Kuralt and banker Art Jones approached Bryant to start the Planned Parenthood health center, “We were like a Third World country in that area at the time,” she once stated.

An ardent proponent of population control, in 1969 Jones predicted that, “Unless something is done, the human race is threatened with extinction within 200 years.” His ultimate solution was: abortion calling it a “very necessary medical tool for population restraint.

Arthur Jones NC abortion

Jones was responsible for North Carolina’s passage of a liberal abortion law in 1967 and blamed the “overpopulation” problem on a growing number of social ills: poverty, ghettos, crime, and mental illness.

Much of the idea for Jone’s abortion bill came from Wallace Kuralt, according to author David Gurrow.

Kuralt proposed that the abortion law’s focus be on the “health of the mother.” Kuralt and a welfare department attorney, Myles Hanes, wrote out a first draft of the abortion reform bill and presented it to Senator Herman Moore who mentioned it to Jones.

Just who was Wallace Kuralt?

Wallace Kuralt father to Charles Kuralt , who anchored CBS Sunday Morning , was a MONSTER – he was rooted in eugenics and not surprisingly in 1983 Planned Parenthood of Greater Charlotte gave him the Margaret Sanger Award – according to a Charlotte Observer Obituary from 1994.

The Charlotte Observer described Wallace Kuralt this way, “as architect of Mecklenburg’s program of eugenic sterilization – state-ordered surgery to stop the poor and disabled from bearing children – Kuralt helped write one of the most shameful chapters of North Carolina history.”

When we stop to reflect upon the thousands of physical, mental and social misfits in our midst,” the Observer quotes Kuralt from a 1964 article, “the thousands of families which are too large for the family to support, the one-tenth of our children born to an unmarried mother, the hoard of children rejected by parents, is there any doubt that health, welfare and education agencies need to redouble their efforts to prevent these conditions which are so costly to society?

The Eugenics Details:

A 1965 article published by the Pittsburgh Post Gazette says that Wallace Kuralt had been involved in a birth control program which saved the tax payers thousands of dollars. There it is plain and simple- that excuse for eugenics that – limiting births saves the taxpayer money.

“We have been just as concerned,” Wallace Kuralt observed,”to see that couples who could not have children were directed to the proper medical sources for help as we were to see that families who should not have more children were directed to the proper sources of information,” Kuralt told the Milwaukee Sentinel in 1965.

So, exactly who are the people who should not have more children? Well, research unearthed recently has revealed that most of them were Black women. In fact, North Carolina is one of the few states which has publicly apologized for the state wide Eugenics program which sterilized thousands of blacks. North Carolina has even made their eugenics documents available to the public and has since offered reparations to the victims of sterilization.

Kuralt PP

Entitled: Wallace Kuralt’s era of sterilization, the Charlotte Observer detailed the acts of monstrosity by this Planned Parenthood Award Winner and true to form- they failed to mention the award !

As the New York Times describes Kuralt’s eugenics connections, “wealthy businessmen, among them James Hanes, the hosiery magnate, and Dr. Clarence Gamble, heir to the Procter & Gamble fortune, drove the eugenics movement. They helped form the Human Betterment League of North Carolina in 1947, and found a sympathetic bureaucrat in Wallace Kuralt, the father of the television journalist Charles Kuralt.

“A proponent of birth control in all forms, Mr. Kuralt used the program extensively when he was director of the Mecklenburg County welfare department from 1945 to 1972. That county had more sterilizations than any other in the state.

“Over all, about 70 percent of the North Carolina operations took place after 1945, and many of them were on poor young women and racial minorities. Nonwhite minorities made up about 40 percent of those sterilized, and girls and women about 85 percent.

“The program, while not specifically devised to target racial minorities, affected black Americans disproportionately because they were more often poor and uneducated and from large rural families.”

Another interesting connection is that the doctor who worked with Kuiralt also had Planned Parenthood ties.

According to the Charlotte Observer, many of the women sterilized in the late 1950s were seen by the Health Department’s Dr. Elizabeth Corkey, an obstetrician.

It is noteworthy to point out that Corkey joined in a lawsuit to overturn North Carolina’s abortion ban in 1970.

Dr. Corkey died Thursday, August 24, 1995, but according to the obituary in the Charlotte Observer, she helped start the Charlotte chapter of Planned Parenthood. Corkey’s connection to the abortion giant is documented on the Planned Parenthood website – here. And in this 1964 article she is a speaker at a Planned Parenthood conference.

Kuralt and Corkey sent dozens of sterilization cases to the Eugenics Board for approval.

According to the Charlotte Observer, in 1960, just under 25 percent of Mecklenburg residents were African-American.

But blacks made up more than 80 percent of the people ordered sterilized at the request of the Welfare Department between 1955 and 1966. In 1957, the peak year for Mecklenburg, the state approved sterilizations of 52 blacks and five whites.

This news comes on the heals of MANY North Carolina Eugenics Victims coming forward to tell their horrors- those responsible for funding the North Carolina Eugenics Society associated with Planned Parenthood and the details are here under the victim name: Elaine Riddick


A great documentary about this Eugenics relationship of Planned Parenthood is the film: Maafa21 – see a clip here http://www.maafa21.com – watch it in full it is a stunning film !

Mary Doe plaintiff in abortion companion case dies

Posted in Abortion History, Abortion in the news, Roe with tags , , , , , , on September 30, 2014 by saynsumthn

Today, Sandra Cano, Mary Doe in the Doe v. Bolton Supreme Court Decision a companion decision to Roe v. Wade has lost her battle with cancer !

According to her friends on Facebook- she passed away September 30, 2014

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The case was called Doe. Vs. Bolton and it was the companion case for Roe V. Wade.

But Cano never wanted nor had an abortion. In fact, like Norma McCorvey – Roe in the Roe v. Wade case, Cano carried the pregnancy to term.

In 1970, she gave birth to a daughter but gave her up for adoption.

The Doe decision allowed for abortion up until the moment of birth if necessary for the health of the mother.

According to Cano, the original case was advanced without her understanding of what was going on.

Cano once spoke with the National Catholic Register’s senior writer Tim Drake about the case.

Cano, who has become pro-life once told the Catholic Register, “It’s a nightmare to be connected to a case that I never wanted to be connected to. Doe v. Bolton allows abortion up to the ninth month. This case takes children’s lives.”

She explained her connection to the abortion case:

“Back in 1970,” Cano begins, “I had a very complicated marriage and had two children in foster care. I was pregnant and wanted to get my babies back from foster care. I was poor, uneducated and ignorant. My life was very unstable. I was in a survival state. I went to Atlanta Legal Aid to get a divorce. Whoever was there to try to help me, I trusted. That’s how I became unknowingly involved with Doe v. Bolton. Never once did I know that we were going to kill babies.

“I can’t understand how a case like this could go to the Supreme Court without anyone knowing or speaking to me to find out if what the attorney was presenting to the court was true. I was so ignorant I didn’t know that there were two cases that legalized abortion.

“I ran away to Oklahoma to keep from having an abortion. They knew I was against abortion. Grady Memorial Hospital said I had gone before a panel of nine doctors and nurses to seek an abortion. I never sought an abortion. The hospital has no records because I never went to the hospital.

“It was only later that I learned that, through Margie Pitt Hames, I had sued Georgia Baptist Hospital to have an abortion.”

The Register asked how she discovered the truth and she replied, “In 1974, I went to Georgia Right to Life to try to find someone to help me. I told them that I was the woman who was involved in the abortion law, but didn’t know what it was about. They sent me to Fayetteville to seek help. On and off over the years, I would come forward, but when you don’t have money or people willing to help, a lot of people think you’re someone off the nut wagon.

“In the 1980s, I talked to an Atlanta Journal and Constitution newspaper reporter. She told me I had to prove who I was. I asked, “How do you do that?” She told me I had to go down to the court to verify that I was the person involved in the case. When I did that, they told me I had to go to the Federal Archives building. When I did that, they gave me this humongous book to look through. I didn’t understand half of it. I was out of my league. There was also a sealed envelope. I wanted to open it, but couldn’t. They told me that I would have to go to the court to have my records unsealed. Someone at the court showed me how to petition the court to unseal the records.

“A week later, Judge Owen Foster called me. He told me, “I don’t normally do this, but think you need a lawyer. We’re going to be hearing your case.” I found an attorney and went down to the court to unseal the records. Margie Pitt Hames didn’t want me to open the records.

After unsealing the records I wrote to the Supreme Court. They said that the statute of limitations had passed.”

“They connected my name to a case that I never knew about in the beginning, never participated in, never believed in. I carried a guilt for many, many years. I was just a pawn,” Cano told The Blaze.

In 1989, Cano was contacted by the daughter she gave up for adoption:

Sandra Cano Daughter

A post written on Cano’s Facebook page after her death reads, “She is more happy than anyone I know to be gracing heaven. If anyone knows how to enjoy it…it’ll be Sandra. WE love you, Sandra!!! Your name lives on as someone fought for the life of a child…not the right to kill it!!! Love you!!”

In 2005 Cano gave this testimony before the United States Senate Committee on the Judiciary

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The Consequences of Roe v. Wade and Doe v. Bolton
June 23, 2005

Testimony of Sandra Cano the Former Doe of Doe v, Bolton, before the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Senate Judiciary Committee June 23, 2005

The Doe v. Bolton Supreme Court decision bears my name. I am Sandra Cano, the former ”Doe” of Doe v. Bolton. Doe v. Bolton is the companion case to Roe v. Wade. Using my name and life, Doe v. Bolton falsely created the health exception that led to abortion on demand and partial birth abortion. How it got there is still pretty much a mystery to me. I only sought legal assistance to get a divorce from my husband and to get my children from foster care. I was very vulnerable: poor and pregnant with my fourth child, but abortion never crossed my mind. Although it apparently was utmost in the mind of the attorney from whom I sought help. At one point during the legal proceedings, it was necessary for me to flee to Oklahoma to avoid the pressure being applied to have the abortion scheduled for me by this same attorney.

Please understand even though I have lived what many would consider an unstable life and overcome many devastating circumstances, at NO TIME did I ever have an abortion. l did not seek an abortion nor do I believe in abortion. Yet my name and life is now forever linked with the slaughter of 40-50 million babies.

I have tried to understand how it all happened. How did my divorce and child custody case become the basis by which bloody murder is done on infants thriving in the wombs of their mothers? How can cunning, wicked lawyers use an uneducated, defenseless pregnant woman to twist the American court system in such a fraudulent way? Doe has been a nightmare.

Over the last 32 years, I have become a prisoner of the case. It took me until 1988 to get my records unsealed in order for me to try and find the answer to those questions and to join in the movement to stop abortion in America. When pro abortion advocates found out about my efforts, my car was vandalized on one occasion and at another time, someone shot at me while I was on my front porch holding my grandbaby.

I am angry. I feel like my name, life, and identity have been stolen and put on this case without my knowledge and against my wishes. How dare they use my name and my life this way!

One of the Justices of the Supreme Court said during oral argument in my case “What does it matter if she is real or not.” Well I am real and it does matter.

R.I.P. Sandra Cano, God knows the truth and to Him it matters as well. Thanks for speaking up for life !!