Archive for the abortion used as birth control Category

8 ways pro-abortion men pushed legalized abortion on America

Posted in Abortion Funding, Abortion History, Abortion legalization by state, Abortion prior to Roe, Abortion Racism, abortion used as birth control, Abortion Welfare, American Eugenics Society, American Law Institute, Bernard Nathanson, Bush, Bush Family, Cosmo Magazine, Faye Wattleton, Feminism, Guttmacher, Lader, Men and Abortion, Men For Choice, Planned Parenthood, Planned Parenthood President, Population Control, Population Council, Roe V Wade History, Subverted, Supreme Court, Title X with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 22, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion

The media seems to always equate abortion with “women’s rights” — but many people may be unaware that legalizing abortion in America was actually an idea originally pushed by pro-abortion men, many of whom were concerned about the growth of certain people groups. But beyond this, predatory men have benefited significantly from legalized abortion, which has removed male responsibility from unplanned pregnancy situations, and which is used to cover up sexual abuse. And male abortionists continue to be protected by the abortion industry even when they rapeinjure or kill female patients.

Below are eight things everyone should know about the large role certain men played in liberalizing abortion laws in the U.S.:

1. Pro-eugenics men were the primary people discouraging reproduction among “undesirable” groups

Image: Image: American Eugenics Society document

Image: American Eugenics Society document

2. A pro-population control man led the push for abortion at Planned Parenthood 

Image: PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

PPFA president Alan F Guttmacher speaks about abortion, 1965

Image: Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

Faye Wattleton first female Planned Parenthood president (Image: New York Times)

3. A misogynistic man influenced the sexual revolution, which primarily benefited predatory males 

  • The sexual revolution of the 1960s pushed by Cosmopolitan Magazine (under direction of Helen Gurley Brown) was inspired by Hugh Hefner, creator of Playboy.
  • Hefner told Hollywood Reporter that Brown approached him for job before joining Cosmo: “She wanted to do a female version of Playboy.
  • The theme of free sex without consequences and no kids, with abortion as a safety net, benefited men.

Cosmo Magazine 1967

Cosmo Magazine 1967

4. Two pro-abortion men hijacked the 1960’s “women’s movement” to legalize abortion 

Image: Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson

  • Most outspoken abortion enthusiasts in the 1960s were men, like Larry Lader and Bernard Nathanson.
  • Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” dubbed “mother of the women’s movement,” called Lader “the father of the abortion rights movement.”
  • Friedan founded the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966 and in 1967, Lader and Nathanson convinced her to add abortion to NOW’s plank, causing a loss in female NOW membership.
  • Lader admitted in his book that “Abortion never became a feminist plank in the United States among the suffragettes or depression radicals. It was ignored, even boycotted by Planned Parenthood women in those days.”
  • 1969: NARAL was established by Lader, Nathanson, and Friedan, who admitted few women attended. (Nathanson later renounced his pro-abortion stance and worked to expose the lies they told.)
  • 1989: Friedan acknowledged it was certain men who pushed to legalize abortion: “I remember that there were some men… that had been trying to reform these criminal abortion laws. And they got a sense somehow that the women’s movement might make everything different…. They kept nagging at me… to try and do something…. ‘We need some organization to take up… abortion rights.’”
Image: Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

Betty Friedan speaks to NARAL history of NOW

5. Pro-eugenics men founded the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s former research arm 

  • Alan Guttmacher, former Planned Parenthood president and Eugenics Society VP, founded the Center for Family Planning Program Development in 1968, which became the Guttmacher Institute, a “special affiliate” of Planned Parenthood.
  • In 1969, Guttmacher acknowledged funding came from “Kellogg, Rockefeller, and Ford Foundations.”

6. Men in favor of population control pushed for taxpayer-funded “family planning,” which aids America’s largest abortion business

  • The Title X federal family planning program allocates tens of millions of tax dollars to Planned Parenthood.
  • 1965: President Lyndon Johnson (LBJ) supported taxpayer funded “family planning” and was awarded Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger Award the following year.
  • 1966: Alan Guttmacher proposed a blueprint to force taxpayers to fund birth control for poor.
  • 1968: George N. Lindsay, chairman of Planned Parenthood-World Population, urged President Richard Nixon to federally fund poor people’s “family planning.”
  • 1969: Nixon spoke in favor of “family planning” and the same year, the Senate approved tax funding for it, with the help of Democrat Senator Joseph D. Tydings, a Planned Parenthood supporter granted PPFA’s Margaret Sanger award.
Image: Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

Prescott Bush with his son, George Bush (Image Credit: George Bush Presidential Library and Museum)

  • 1970: The U.S. House of Representatives authorized federal dollars to pay for family planning services.
  • The chief co-sponsor of the Title X statute was Rep. George H.W. Bush, who later became president. Bush was recruited because his grandfather, Prescott Bush, once sat on a Planned Parenthood board.
  • 1972: Nixon recommended Congress create the Commission on Population Growth and the American Future to study abortion. It was chaired by John D. Rockefeller III, a longtime advocate of population control. The Executive Director was Charles Westoff, a member of the American Eugenics Society and Planned Parenthood’s National Advisory Council.

7. An all-male Supreme Court legalized abortion

  • 1973: U.S. Supreme Court justices, all men, ruled 7 to 2 to vote in the Roe v. Wade case in favor of legalizing abortion on demand.
Image: Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

Supreme Court at time Roe v Wade legalized abortion (Image credit: Oyez)

8. Men pushing eugenics and population control brought the abortion pill to the U.S.

  • The Population Council, founded in 1952 by John D. Rockefeller III, was led by men concerned about population issues and is credited with bringing abortion pill RU-486 to the U.S.
  • Population Council leaders were connected to the eugenics movement (read more here).
Image: RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

RU486 abortion pill Mifeprex (Image credit: Danco)

  • 1994: President Bill Clinton’s administration encouraged French pharmaceutical manufacturer Roussel-Uclaf to assign US rights of marketing and distribution of RU-486 to the Population Council.
  • Right to distribute handed over to Danco Laboratories, a sub-licensee of the Population Council.
  • 2000: Larry Lader bragged in a press conference he “plotted” to break the law and smuggle the pills into the U.S.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

‘Father of abortion rights’ called self a ‘disciple’ of Planned Parenthood founder and eugenicist Margaret Sanger

Posted in abortion used as birth control, Betty Friedan, Lader, Margaret Sanger, Men and Abortion, NARAL, National Organization for (Some) Women, Planned Parenthood History, Subverted, Women's Movement with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2019 by saynsumthn

Planned Parenthood founder

Larry Lader, rightly dubbed the “father of the abortion rights movement,” influenced the women’s movement of the 1960s to push abortion. Lader was a writer by trade and became the biographer for Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger, even referring to himself as her “disciple.” The two eventually parted ways over abortion. Watch to learn more:

In his biography, Lader said Sanger’s obsession with eugenics (an ideology the two shared) originated with her introduction to Henry Havelock Ellis in 1914, a psychologist and author of several books on sex, with whom Sanger was rumored to have had an affair. At the time Lader’s biography was published, it received some favorable reviews with Sanger herself arranging book signings. It was also reportedly distributed through Planned Parenthood offices.

 

Image: Lawrence (Larry) Lader

Lawrence (Larry) Lader

But, in co-authoring his second book on Sanger, Lader can be credited for remaking her from a eugenic fanatic into, as Planned Parenthood describes her, a heroine. Thanks to Lader, Sanger “the eugenicist” became known instead as Sanger “the birth control pioneer.”

Lader’s books barely mention the word eugenics and certainly fail to connect the evil philosophy to Sanger. But the Planned Parenthood founder admitted to meeting with members of the Ku Klux Klan, openly advocated eugenics, and supported the use of sterilization to rid the planet of the “unfit.”

Forced sterilization as a permanent solution was, in Sanger’s mind, a preferred solution to procreation of the so-called “unfit” over abortion.

Image: Margaret Sanger Story by Lawrence Lader

Margaret Sanger Story by Lawrence Lader

In his push for legalizing the abortion pill RU486, Lader recounted that Sanger had “skimpy” knowledge about abortion and claimed the topic caused a split between the two. “Ironically, I would eventually split with Margaret over abortion – only in a theoretical sense since, by 1963, she was too ill to carry on our old discussions,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II.”

“Margaret had always opposed abortion…. Naturally, she was right in the context of her time,” he continued.

According to the LA Times, Lader had observed Sanger’s strong opposition to abortion, “seeing the horrors of the women on the Lower East Side, with $5 in their hands, submitting themselves to butchers.” To Sanger, “birth control was a solution to abortion,” Lader realized.

Lader’s abortion activism birthed with Sanger 

Nonetheless, Lader’s time with the Planned Parenthood founder seems to have been the catalyst for Lader’s own abortion obsession. “I hesitated to deal with the subject after writing my biography of Margaret Sanger,” Lader wrote in “Abortion II.” “In 1955, I evaded it again…. By 1962, I made the first step, soliciting dozens of editors to write a magazine article on abortion, but being rejected by all. A year later, still concerned that I could be damaged as a writer by this connection, I started work on a book that was published under the blunt title, ‘Abortion,’ in early 1966.”

Image: Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

Abortion written by Lawrence (Larry) Lader 1966

On April 14, 1966, during a discussion about abortion recorded by WNYC in New York, Lader was asked about his feelings on abortion. He said:

I did a biography of Margaret Sanger of the birth control movement ten or twelve years ago and from that point on I’ve been extremely interested in anything that denies to women — and to men also, but basically to women — what I consider their basic right to decide whether they should or should not become a mother.

I think this is summed up very well by a great phrase of Margaret Sanger’s which she stated, ‘No woman can call herself free who does not own and control her own body. No woman can call herself free until she can choose consciously whether she will or will not be a mother.’

Image: Margaret Sanger quote

Margaret Sanger quote

And then I add in my book, I state my own statement, the laws that force a woman to bear a child against her will are the sickly heritage of a feminine degradation and male supremacy. In brief, I believe that the right of a woman to bear or not to bear a child is one of the basic human rights and that this cannot be taken away from her….

Lader reiterated the Planned Parenthood founder’s influence in his book, “RU486.” He wrote (emphasis added), “My first book on Margaret Sanger indicated I had a feminist bent. Three crowded years of talking and working with Sanger had completely convinced me that a woman’s freedom in education, jobs, marriage, her whole life, could only be achieved when she gained control of her childbearing. I came gradually to understand that birth control required abortion as a backup measure when contraception failed or wasn’t used at all.”

Prior to the Roe decision, Lader took part in an illegal underground abortion referral service called the “Clergyman’s Consultation Service on Abortion,” founded by the Reverend Howard Moody. Lader made more than 2,000 referrals for women seeking illegal abortions while participating in this “service.”

Then, in 1967, Lader, along with former abortionist Bernard Nathanson (who later became pro-life) hijacked Betty Friedan’s 1960’s women’s movement and influenced the so-called feminist icon to add a pro-abortion plank to the National Organization for Women (NOW), which she founded. Soon after, in 1969, Lader helped Nathanson to found NARAL, originally called the National Association for the Repeal of Abortion Laws, and remained active until 1976, when Lader left NARAL for reasons “no one chooses to discuss,” as the LA Times noted.

This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.

_________________________________

Part of series on Larry Lader.

  • ( Part one) ‘Father of abortion rights’ called minority children in America ‘unwanted’
  • Larry Lader and Margaret Sanger (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader on Planned Parenthood (here). (here) (here)
  • Larry Lader, Bernard Nathanson and NOW, Betty Friedan and NARAL – Here and here.
  • Men like Larry Lader who pushed abortion and helped Roe (here)
  • Lies about illegal abortion (here)

Abortionist says using abortion as birth control ‘might be the best method’

Posted in Abortion clinic, abortion used as birth control, Abortionist, repeat abortion with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on January 20, 2019 by saynsumthn

abortion

The abortion industry pushes the idea that women need abortion for hard cases, that abortions are not being used as birth control and that repeat abortions rarely happen. A glimpse at the Twitter feed of one longtime abortionist reveals that the truth is very different from the propaganda being brought forth: abortions are being used as birth control, and repeat abortions are not frowned upon by the abortion industry.

Abortionist Diane Horvath-Cosper comments frequently on Twitter and commits abortions at Whole Woman’s Health in Baltimore, Maryland. A blog post at WWH’s website reveals that Horvath-Cosper has also worked for a dozen other facilities, including Planned Parenthood, according to the website AbortionDocs.org — so when she reveals why women obtain abortions, she holds a level of credibility.

This week, Horvath-Cosper published a series of posts on her Twitter page that claim two things:

  • Women use abortion as birth control.
  • Abortionists do not care if women have multiple abortions.

“One of the dumbest ‘arguments’ about #abortion: is it or is it not birth control? OF COURSE it’s #birthcontrol, because it prevents a birth. It’s definitionally not #contraception because conception has already occurred,” she wrote. “#ABORTION IS #BIRTHCONTROL, no matter how you personally feel about it. Let’s stop shaming and stigmatizing people for knowing what’s best for their own lives.”

READ: Abortionist claims pro-abortion hospital is discriminating by keeping her off TV

Live Action News previously reported that the use of birth control does not necessarily prevent abortions:

study published by the Guttmacher Institute, along with a study by the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, found that more than half of the women who seek abortion reported using birth control during the same month they got pregnant. The Guttmacher findings, published on January 8, 2018, state that in 2014, 51 percent of the women who sought abortion were using birth control. Of that 51 percent, 24 percent were using condoms, 13 percent were using the pill and one percent were using a long-acting reversible birth control such as an IUD.

In another tweet, Horvath-Cosper says abortion is actually “the best method of birth control,” writing, “When we stop and listen – *really* listen – to people’s lived experiences, we discover that #abortion might actually be the BEST method of #birthcontrol sometimes.”

In another tweet, she added, “If people want to use #abortion as birth control, THAT’S 100% OKAY.”

Image: Dr Diane Horvath abortion is birth control repeat abortions ok (Image: Twitter)

Dr Diane Horvath abortion is birth control repeat abortions ok (Image: Twitter)

Horvath-Cosper then reveals a truth rarely mentioned to the public: the abortion industry doesn’t care how many repeat abortions (even as many as twelve) a woman has. She writes, “And I don’t much care if someone has one #abortion or three or twelve. That person deserves compassionate care EVERY. SINGLE. TIME. No matter how many times. No matter what other people think about their decision-making.”

Live Action News previously documented that half of women who have an abortion have had at least one prior abortion already. The information came from a report published by the TARA Health Foundation. TARA’S philanthropy was recently used to prop up Whole Woman’s Health (WWH), where Horvath-Cosper works.

Repeat abortions are also believed to be a direct result of taxpayer funding.

Live Action News reported about another survey, which asked “a national sample of 8,380 women how many prior abortions they had.” The report found that slightly less than half of post-abortive women (44.8%) had not undergone just one procedure. They also found that taxpayer funding played a significant role in repeat abortions, as “[p]atients who paid for their abortion procedure with their own funds were less likely to have had a prior abortion than those who used health insurance or received financial assistance.”

Live Action News also noted that more than half of abortions in Medicaid-coverage states are taxpayer funded.

READ: Writer says she used ‘several abortions’ as birth control because contraception made her sick

There have been numerous attempts to convince the American public that women only use abortion for “safety net” purposes. Data reviewed by Live Action News revealed only a tiny fraction of the so-called “hard cases” are the reasons given for why women abort. In 2014, the last year abortion data was published by Planned Parenthood’s former research arm, the Guttmacher Institute, half of women admitted they “did not want to be a single parent or were having problems with their husband or partner.” Other reasons women gave included “the inability to afford raising a child” and the “belief that having a baby would interfere with work, school or the ability to care for dependents.”

May 2018 Gallup poll found that 50 percent of Americans would want abortion to remain legal only under “certain circumstances.” It would then be difficult to believe that using abortion as birth control or having multiple abortions falls under that category, despite what aborionist Horvath-Cosper says.

The question is, will the media or polling agencies ever ask?

    • This article is reprinted with permission. The original appeared here at Live Action News.