Timing of Planned Parenthood Sanger award to MLK suspicious

The timing of when Planned Parenthood gave civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. their infamous Margaret Sanger award is suspicious in my view. As America celebrates the life of MLK, Planned Parenthood which takes lives will parade MLK around as a trophy. In 1966, Planned Parenthood gave MLK the Margaret Sanger Award and they knew exactly what they were doing when they did so.

MLK March 1147593_617588721624798_1700102717_o

A look at records from Planned Parenthood reveal that for many years, the organization which at the time promoted forced sterilizations of those they deemed unfit, had been discussing how they could win over the “Negro community.” Under a eugenics system, blacks and others deemed to be “Feebleminded or unfit” were sterilized by the state. Research has shown that Planned Parenthood was used by state sterilization boards to perform these surgeries.

Webber Iowa EUgenics Planned Parenthood

Webber Iowa EUgenics Planned Parenthood

A problem arose when the idea of state sponsored sterilization began to be challenged in court. If you put these events on a timeline, as I have, you see clearly that this was the time frame that Planned Parenthood began calling for legalized abortion. The problem they faced was that the Black community saw birth control and abortion as genocide. But, they also had a solution. To use what their founder Margaret Sanger had been successful with for years – they would use BLACKS themselves to introduce and promote abortion.

Internal memos within their organization, which I have read, indicate that Planned Parenthood was discussing a solution to this ever growing problem of Blacks being suspicious of them. A snap shot of how this plan to bring the Black community on board is broken down in a small way below.

malcolmxIn 1962, Wylda B. Clowes, a Black field consultant for Planned Parenthood and Mrs. Marian Hernandez director of the Hannah Stone Center, met with radical Black activist Malcolm X to “discuss with him his group’s philosophy concerning family planning”. They described the Malcolm X group as one that recruits mainly “low income Negroes”.

A June 19, 1962 memo from Eugenics Society Vice President and one time Planned Parenthood president, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, describes the meeting, “[ Malcolm X] responded in a positive way to the name [ Planned Parenthood] by saying that Black Muslims are interested in anything having to do with planning. He asked if Planned Parenthood has anything to do with birth control and offered the suggestion that we would probably be more successful if we used the term family planning instead of birth control. His reason for this was that people, particularly Negroes, would be more willing to plan than to be controlled…The mention of overpopulation reasons evoked questions on why major efforts to control population are directed toward colored nations , therefore this aspect was played down.

Malcolm X PP

Then in 1965, a letter was sent to Rev. Andrew J. Young of the Southern Christian Leadership Council, to engage his support in the birth control / planned parenthood movement. The letter is written on the University of Wisconsin Letterhead by an associate professor who begins by telling Young that his father was a sociologist in India aiding in population planning as a consultant with the Ford Foundation. The professor also admits to Young that his mother and mother-in-law are “ardent workers for Planned Parenthood.” He expressed to Young a, “fond hope for a marriage between the experts in birth control and the experts in the civil rights movement,” and sells it as, “one program that the civil rights movement would not have to finance.”

He explains how the Black community was a hurdle to Mr. Young, “many Negroes will be justifiably suspicious of white organizations, white physicians, and white social workers that seek to “limit the Negro population.” It smacks of racism and can offend people who are understandably sensitive on the matter. Planned Parenthood is itself reluctant to take any initiative for fear of the reaction from the Negro population as a whole as well as from civil rights leaders in particular,” the correspondence states. He ends by suggesting that, “ it is crucial that Negro leaders in the movement introduce the project to their Negro followers so that whites are not in the misperceived position of racist aggression.”


Then, in 1966, Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation told a symposium at the University of California Medical Center that a sensitive area in the field of birth control was, “the belief that the white middle class was coercing their own poor and people with black and yellow skins to reduce family size because the middle-class whites are frightened of being outnumbered.

He solution comes in what was said next:

The only way the mounting feeling that birth control is a tool of racism can be handled, is to involve knowledgeable leaders from the minority groups who understand and are favorable to the philosophy of birth control. They, in turn, must translate their appreciation of the contribution which birth control can make toward family stability to their own people.”

A January 28, 1966 internal memo from Alan Guttmacher and Fred Jaffe, outlines the plan for winning over the Black Community. The memo begins by calling the new plan, a “Community Relations Program.” The “program” is to, “form a liaison between Planned Parenthood and minority organizations.” The plan, according to Planned Parenthood, will emphasize that “all people have the opportunity to make their own choices,” rather than, as the memo states, “exhortation telling them how many children they should have.”

One way to get the message is out is to “ get assistance from black organizations like The Urban League and the AME church,” and according to the memo they need to employ, “ more Negro staff members on PP-WP [Planned Parenthood-World Population] and Affiliate’s staff, as well as recruit more Negro members for the National Board- at least 5.”

Along with this Guttmacher suggests that they initiate cooperation with the National Medical Association [NMA], a Black medical association, and encourage them to establish a committee on reproduction and family planning. Guttmacher also hoped to secure at least three Negro physicians for membership on the PP-WP Medical Committee, and he planned to invite NMA leaders to address their convention. Also on the radar was a comprehensive plan to address the Black media by, “specially developed news and feature articles for Negro newspapers.”

Guttmacher ends by stating that the above suggestions are “long overdue” but stresses, “we do not need to panic. In fact, if we panic and continue to publicize the “problem”, we may well exacerbate it.

NOTE: In 1968, Jaffe founded the PPFA Center for Family Planning Program Development, which later became the Guttmacher Institute, Planned Parenthood’s research arm.

On January 11, 1966, Lammont Du. P. Copeland sent a letter to Alan Guttmacher which contained the advice of Dupont’s Public Relations Representative, Mr. Glen Perry regarding the attitudes of the Black community toward Planned Parenthood. Perry sought counsel from a black man who had been active with Planned Parenthood, Mr. Joseph Baker, who Dupont retained as a public relations adviser in the field of race relations.

Perry summarized the suggestions in a memo dated: January 10,1966, “Baker told us that Dr. Guttmacher is correct in feeling that civil rights leaders are beginning to take a hostile position toward population planning on the ground that it is an attempt to halt the growth of the Negro population.”

Baker strongly suggested to Perry that Planned Parenthood immediately open dialogue to the Black leaders, to “get their support and participation.

Martin Luther King Planned Parenthood

And he did, within a few months, Planned Parenthood gave their most infamous award to civil rights leader, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Planned Parenthood’s Margaret Sanger award was received by Mrs. Martin Luther King rather than MLK himself.


Interestingly, on the day after the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, a memorial service was held at Howard University in Washington, DC. As mourners left the auditorium, they encountered about 600 people attending a rally outside. Several speakers were heard warning the crowd that population control was being used as a weapon of black genocide. Among the speakers who gave this warning was noted civil-rights activist Stokely Carmichael.

It is doubtful that Martin Luther King understood Planned Parenthood’s eugenics past and he certainly had no idea that seven years after he accepted the Margaret Sanger Award, the United States would legalize abortion on demand. He had no way of knowing how Planned Parenthood would grab abortion and use it to target the Black community. Alveda King, the niece of Martin Luther King, Jr. explains this:

Planned Parenthood is now the number one provider of abortions in the nation. Today, research shows that family planning centers and abortion facilities often set up their locations in or near minority communities. In addition, the largest provider of abortions, Planned Parenthood was founded by a radical advocate of racist eugenics. As a result, the numbers of abortions performed on minorities and specifically Black women remain disproportionately high.

In 2011, the CDC revealed that almost 56% of all abortions reported for race were done on minority women. According to the latest report dated November 27,2015, in 2012, over 55% of abortions reported for race/ethnicity were performed on Black or Hispanic women.

CDC Abortions black hispanic

Among the 27 areas that reported abortions by race/ethnicity , non-Hispanic white women and non-Hispanic black women accounted for the largest percentages of abortions. According to the 2012 stats, Black women had the highest abortion rate (27.8 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–44 years) and accounted for 36.7% of abortions reported for race/ethnicity while 18.7% of abortions were reported for Hispanic women. White women accounted for a slightly higher abortion percentage, 37.6% of reported abortions, but had the lowest abortion rate (7.7 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15–44 years).

In several states, Black Abortions reported for race broke down as follows:

Abortions on Black women 2012

Mississippi 63.6%
Georgia 59.5%
Tennessee 51.1%
Alabama 48.8%
North Carolina 47.6%
Delaware 43.4%
Michigan 48.2%
Virginia 43.9%
Missouri 41.1%
South Carolina 40.6%
Arkansas 39.7%
New York 39.7% (44.1% in New York City alone)
Ohio 39%
New Jersey 30.2%
Kentucky 25.8%
Texas 25.2%
Minnesota 23.6%
Kansas 22.5%
Indiana 27.6%
West Virginia 9.5%
South Dakota 9.3%
Colorado 7.2%
Oregon 5.9%
Utah 3.2%
Idaho 1.5%
Montana .8%

Martin Luther King Jr’s dream is dead for 56 million babies:

My friend Ryan Bomberger over at Too Many Aborted laments the fact that today, with abortion, MLK’s dream is dead:

In 1963 when Martin Luther King Jr. shared his dream with the nation, he never envisioned an America where ”reproductive justice” would end 56 million innocent human lives. His dream never pictured a nation where black boys and black girls would never be able to join hands with white boys and white girls, as sisters and brothers, because “freedom of choice” determined some humans are simply not equal. His dream never imagined that in the state where millions have been welcomed into a harbor that serves as a shining beacon of Liberty, millions would be violently deprived of their own life, liberty and pursuit of happiness.” Read more here


Let Freedom Ring from Studio 25 Productions on Vimeo.

2 Responses to “Timing of Planned Parenthood Sanger award to MLK suspicious”

  1. […] memos within their organization, which I have read and detailed further on my blog, indicate that Planned Parenthood was discussing a solution to this ever growing […]

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