Holocaust Survivor on Forgiveness

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Holocaust survivor Eva Kor was subjected to life-threatening and invasive experimental tests at the hands of Nazis when she was 10 years old.

She was taken to Auschwitz in May 1944, along with her father, mother, two older sisters and her identical twin sister, Miriam.

She and Miriam were “guinea pigs” for SS doctor Josef Mengele’s experiments on twins, Kor said in a phone call from her Holocaust museum in Indiana. Mengele viewed twins as genetic control groups.

After 10 months in Auschwitz, only Miriam and Eva — then Eva Mozes — walked out of the camp when they were liberated Jan. 27, 1945. The rest of her family was murdered.

Despite enduring severe illness, starvation and humiliation, Kor said she has forgiven all of the Nazis. The author of “Surviving the Angel of Death: The True Story of a Mengele Twin in Auschwitz,” she travels the world promoting her message of forgiveness and sharing her story of survival.

Eva Kor

Wise words from Holocaust survivor Eva Kor. Kor founded the CANDLES Holocaust Museum and Education Center museum.

“By the time I was born, my destiny was decided, as were the destinies of so many Jewish children. The Nazis had no use for Jew-ish children.”

“Everybody always says when we talk about tragic human events such as genocide, never again. That’s an important idea, never again. If I want to help prevent genocide from happening, I’d better understand it. What made it possible for a guy like Adolf Hitler to rise to power? If we can understand that, maybe we can use that to prevent other terrorists from rising to power.”

Hitler, she said, took advantage of the poor economy that followed the Great Depression. “Hitler told them he could make their lives much better and many people believed him. Instead of solving the crisis, he blamed the Jews. So that is another thing to remember: anytime a ruler or president starts blaming people, looking for scapegoats instead of taking responsibility, that’s a dangerous sign.”

Hitler was a terrorist who rose to power because good people said nothing, she said.

“The key word here is terrorist. Terrorists have no respect for human life,” she said. “In Germany, not all Germans were Nazis. There were many good Germans — but nobody spoke up.”

Never again: Holocaust victim forgives, not forgets, October 06, 2013 12:00 am

One Response to “Holocaust Survivor on Forgiveness”

  1. deaconmike51907 Says:

    Reblogged this on News With a Catholic View and commented:
    We sometimes have trouble forgiving even the smallest slights. Then we read a story like this and we are shamed.

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